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Parsing Bitcoin Blockchain

Deconstructing Bitcoin Transactions Part 1

Deconstructing Bitcoin Transactions Part 1

Deconstructing Bitcoin Transactions Part 1 Example 1. Pay-to-Public-Key-Hash (P2PKH) - One-to-one Transaction The majority of Bitcoin transactions today are of this general type. These types of transactions are used to transfer value, typically from one user to another. They are constructed having the form: scriptSig (or the unlocking script) first, followed by the scriptPubKey (or locking script). This example transfers the complete value from one Unspent Transaction Output (UTXO) into one address. Note: For simplification purposes, this example does not take into account a miners fee, and would most likely take additional time to be incorporated into the block chain. However, we are using the testnet where mining fees are not as strict. UTXO: 219f4b02e6e67dfbb27601449eec399f112fd3d49314aeacf63cbc5cac72c496 Pub Key: 0207c9ece04a9b5ef3ff441f3aad6bb63e323c05047a820ab45ebbe61385aa7446 Total Initial Value: 0 Satoshi (to Begin) Hover over each section of the script to see what they are. 01000000The version in Little-Endian (reversed) format 01The number of input(s)/UTXO(s) 96c472ac5cbc3cf6acae1493d4d32f119f39ec9e440176b2fb7de6e6024b9f21Previous transaction output hash, in Little-Endian. This can be found in the transaction input (txid) from your block explorer such as Chain.so. 01000000Output index output_no of the previous transaction in Little-Endian format. Again, can be found from your block explorer. 6aThe size (bytes) of the scriptSig or Unlocking Script that immediately follows. This value is in HEX as are all similar numbers and need to convert HEX to DEC to be human readable. 47PUSHDATA 47 -Size (in Bytes) to push to stack. This is also in HEX. 3044022034519a85fb5299e180865dda936c5d53edabaaf6d15cd1740aac9878b76238e002207345fcb5a62deeb8d9d80e5b412bd24d09151c2008b7f Continue reading >>

How To Read/parse Blockchain And Get Bitcoin Addresses Having Balance.

How To Read/parse Blockchain And Get Bitcoin Addresses Having Balance.

How to read/parse blockchain and get bitcoin addresses having balance. i am trying to get bitcoin addresses from my blockchain stored on server. my bitcoin is up to date. index mode is not enabled, as i dont want UTXO database. i tried using [[email protected]]# env BLOCKCHAIN_DIR="/home/user2/" ./parser allBalances > allBalances.txt info: loading block chain from directory: /home/user2/.bitcoin info: estimated number of blocks = 1071.27K info: estimated number of transactions = 276.71M info: done initializing hash tables - mem = 0.000 Gigs info: pass 1 -- walk all blocks and build headers ... info: pass 1 -- took 48 secs, 488497 blocks, 136.34 Gigs, 2862.34 Megs/secs , 89430 early link misses, mem=0.000 Gigs info: pass 2 -- done, did 89430 late links info: pass 4 -- full blockchain analysis (with index)... info: computing balance for all addresses info: hit ^C to interrupt and dump current, valid state of ledger info: 1 blocks, 0.000 MegaAddrs , info: 141229 blocks, 1.738 MegaAddrs , info: 166873 blocks, 3.058 MegaAddrs , info: 181587 blocks, 3.939 MegaAddrs , info: 186771 blocks, 4.633 MegaAddrs , but it crashes in the middle., or some times at the end., i tried running it many times., previously i got memory related error., so freed up memory and increased swap on my server. then tried running it again fatal: failed to locate upstream transaction i counted and looks like it aborts when 2000 blocks are remaining. i am not the only one getting this error.. so what you guys are using ? to get data extracted from blockchain files. is there any other tool ? optimized ? or any other fork 152955.81868182 e95dbb25283cc35d4a6aefa76c0382e63ce0fa36 3Nxwenay9Z8Lc9JBiywExpnEFiLp6Afp8v 56 Tue Jul 12 14:11:34 2016 11 Wed Jun 1 15:36:33 2016 121295.29280322 b3b9f5025c397c07e7e37db7e Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Blockchain Parser - Dsinstallez Bitcoin Core Mac

Bitcoin Blockchain Parser - Dsinstallez Bitcoin Core Mac

Bitcoin blockchain parser - Dsinstallez bitcoin core mac Peercoin blockparser Peer4commit The decentralized paradigm of Bitcoin requires each node of the network to retain the blockchaini. Local offerblockchain dat, bitcoin, blkdat, block blk. Matt also built maintains the Bitcoin FIBRE project the latest generation of low latency Bitcoin block. However, the binary data in the block chain can be read. Open logs, FileMode. Module on BlockchainBitcoin blockparser Simple C + bitcoin blockchain parser Join GitHub today. Here is my code, assuming Gocoin is in your GOPATH. Bitcoin blockchain parser GitHub bitcoin blockchain parser. Depending on how deep you want to go here s a fast little blockchain parser that will parse the blockchain into a SQL database text file s) for your viewing pleasure: com znort987 blockparser. Bitcoin Blockchain Parser Meldungen 10 . This is mostly straightforward but one detail to note is that transaction byte sizes are not explicitly included we have to at least minimally parse each. Parsing the unparsable: The case of missing P2SH addresses. The Block Parser reads blocks and transactions from the local. Raw hex value: Decoded as JSON version : 3 prevHash 9185dbc5e60723af6b4cdcdb5ceea505bc1cf7fe85097d,. A pure C# block chain parser library for Bitcoin. Lets Talk Bitcoin btctrackr Finding and Displaying Clusters in Bitcoin. Permalinkparse script txout tx hash tx idx) Object. This example is a minimal approach. First, I hit the Google withparse. Installation, Install the latest version of this package by entering the following at the terminal: pip install blockchain parser. I just wrote a bitcoin blockchain parser in a tiny code snippet. NBitcoin The most complete Bitcoin port been added to yhe bitcoin blockchain with third party among wallets usi Continue reading >>

How To Extract All Used Hash160 Addresses From Bitcoin Blockchain

How To Extract All Used Hash160 Addresses From Bitcoin Blockchain

I have all 150GB Bitcoin blocks now what? How to open them and read them in Python? I need to extract all used hash160 so far I tried to open them with Berkeley DB but no success it seems these files aren't Berkeley DBand what is the difference between blkxxxxx.dat and revxxxxx.dat files anyway? it seems revxxxxx.dat files got some improvement in file size I guess bitcoin uses LevelDB. fzgregor Aug 24 at 17:29 This only partially true. The blocks itself are just memory dumped into the files. However, bitcoin maintains a LevelDB database for open transactions in the chainstate directory. fzgregor Aug 25 at 9:40 This software seems to do just what you want. Its README contains this example: . Compute and print the balance for all keys ever used since the beginning of time: ./parser all >all.txt If I run the previous command, I get the following result: [email protected]:~/blockparser# ls -alh all.txt -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 900M Aug 25 09:33 [email protected]:~/blockparser# head all.txt --------------------------------------------------------------------------- State of the ledger at block 194124 (minted : Thu Aug 16 03:36:13 2012)------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Balance Hash160 Base58 nbIn lastTimeIn nbOut lastTimeOut--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 507335.01317523 8bf24a18a58ab500d30c73bf21dbf4703d31ad2c 1DkyBEKt5S2GDtv7aQw6rQepAvnsRyHoYM 152 Tue Aug 14 18:11:09 2012 17 Tue Jul 17 02:32:38 2012 105555.03133700 582431b9e63d2394c8 Continue reading >>

Parsing The Bitcoin Genesis Block Withj

Parsing The Bitcoin Genesis Block Withj

The genesis block is the first block on the Bitcoin blockchain . Satoshi Nakamoto, themysterious entity that created Bitcoin, mined the genesis block on January 3, 2009. Its been five years since the genesis blocks birthand Satoshi is still unknown , Bitcoin is bigger than ever, and the blockchain is longer than 300,000 blocks and growing. One of the most important features of the blockchain is its immutability. After theBitcoin network accepts a block and adds it to the blockchain it can never be altered. This makes Bitcoin blocks rare durable binary artifacts. Thecryptographic hash algorithms that underpin the Bitcoin protocol enforce block immutability. If someone decides to tinker with a block, say maliciously flip a single bit, the blocks hash will change and the network will reject it. This is what makes it almost impossible to counterfeit Bitcoins. Bitcoins have been lost and stolen but they have never been successfully counterfeited. This sharply contrasts with funny money like the US dollar that is so routinely and brazenly counterfeited that many suspect the US government turns a blind eye. The exceptional durability of Bitcoin blocks, coupled with the mysterious origins of Bitcoin, makes the genesis block one of the most intriguing and important byte runs in the world. This post was inspired by the now defunct post 285 bytes that changed the world. I would love to give you a link but this post has vanished. A secondary, but excellent reference is John Ratcliffs How to Parse the Bitcoin BlockChain . I am adapting Johns nomenclature in what follows. When programmers start exploring Bitcoin they often cut their teeth on parsing the genesis block. If you Google blockchain parsing youll find examples in dozens of programming languages. The most popular are C, C++ Continue reading >>

Hidden Surprises In The Bitcoin Blockchain And How They Are Stored: Nelson Mandela, Wikileaks, Photos, And Python Software

Hidden Surprises In The Bitcoin Blockchain And How They Are Stored: Nelson Mandela, Wikileaks, Photos, And Python Software

Xerox Alto restoration, IC reverse engineering, chargers, and whatever Hidden surprises in the Bitcoin blockchain and how they are stored: Nelson Mandela, Wikileaks, photos, and Python software Every Bitcoin transaction is stored in the distributed database known as the Bitcoin blockchain.However, people have found ways to hack the Bitcoin protocol to store more than just transactions. I've searched through the blockchain and found many strange and interesting things - from images to source code in JavaScript, Python, and Basic. If you're running a Bitcoin client, you probably have all this data stored on your system. [1] The Bitcoin blockchain contains this image of Nelson Mandela and the tribute text. Someone encoded this data into fake addresses in Bitcoin transactions, causing it to be stored in the Bitcoin system. "I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping ones head pointed toward the sun, ones feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death." "I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear." "Difficulties break some men but make others. No axe is sharp enough to cut the soul of a sinner who keeps on trying, one armed with the hope that he will rise even in the end." "It always seems impossible until its done." "When a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace." "Real leaders must be ready to sacrifice all for the freedom of their "Everyone can rise above their circumstances and achieve Continue reading >>

Parsing Bitcoin Blockchain Data In Java

Parsing Bitcoin Blockchain Data In Java

posted at June 27, 2014 with tags bitcoin , java Last week I spent some time on collecting certain statistics (e.g., averagenumber of performed transactions and created blocks per month) over a vast(~20GB) Bitcoin blockchain dataset. The hardest part for me was to pick theright tool to parse the raw blockchain data. First, I hit the Google withparse bitcoin blockchain keywords. Unfortunately, the returned results( bitcointools , blockchain , blockparser , etc.) point to almostundocumented projects, where some appear to not even work. (As a side note,bitcointools require a running BitcoinQt/bitcoind process in the background,which I find pretty amusing.) Next, I checked some papers on Google Scholars tofind out how other people solved the problem. A paper leaded me to BitcoinArmory project, whichrequires a dozen of manual interventions to get installed. (I did not evenattempt to install it.) Suddenly, it occured me to add a java keyword to thesearch phrase, which led me to bitcoinj project.bitcoinj is far most the best Bitcoin blockchain parser library that I haveever met. It has a rich documentation, developer-friendly (and fullydocumented) API and works out of the box. It is composed of a single JAR, noother requirements, stupid hassles, etc. In addition, its IRC channel atFreeNode is packed with real people that provide instant support on any Bitcoinrelated questions. Enough with the talk! Lets get our hands dirty with the code. I first includedthe bitcoinj Maven dependency in my pom.xml as follows: com.google bitcoinj 0.11.3 compile Next, I downloaded a couple of raw blockchain data for test purposes: From the genesis block through a recent height (~17 GB as of this post) Here comes the s Continue reading >>

Reliable, Efficient Way To Parse The Blockchain Into A Sql Database

Reliable, Efficient Way To Parse The Blockchain Into A Sql Database

I need to generate a SQL database (preferably SQLite3) of every transaction that has occurred in the blockchain. Is there an efficient way to do this using open-source software? I'm attempting to do it myself using a Haskell script that makes system calls to bitcoind but I'm having trouble making it sufficiently fast. Does it have to be SQL or can you use LevelDB? Dominic Tancredi Jun 18 '13 at 2:07 I know that bitcoind (if you changed the settings, which I have) creates a LevelDB database for its own use. However, there is very little documentation on LevelDB in general, and even less in my language of choice (Haskell). I want something that I can easily use in a clearly correct way in code that analyzes the data, and SQL seems like the only option for that. Mike Jun 18 '13 at 15:40 I created a fork of blockparser with a 'csvdump' command that will generate a details dump of the blockchain in CSV format. There are also some support scripts in that repository for creation, population and periodic update of a PostgreSQL database. Be aware that the resultant database is pretty large; you might want to consider PostgreSQL over SQLite for this one. I remember blockparser being slow as sin for single transaction and account data when I first tried it, but I'll give the CSV dump a shot and see how long it takes. Do you remember how long it took for you? If so, what were the specs of the machine you ran it on? Mike Jun 18 '13 at 15:44 blockparser is relatively CPU and memory intensive. I just carried out a full csvdump on my machine and it took 9 mins, maxing out at just under 9GB memory used. It will definitely help if you have a decent CPU and SSDs for storage. jgm Jun 18 '13 at 16:38 I'm currently running the SQL dump. It's much faster than Bitcoin-Abe; it looks like it's Continue reading >>

Java - Reading & Parsing Blockchain Dat Files - Stack Overflow

Java - Reading & Parsing Blockchain Dat Files - Stack Overflow

I'm working on some code that reads the DAT files in the Blockchain, and I was trying to use bitcoinj because it seemed fairly straightforward. However, I can't seem to get it to actually read the blocks within the DAT file. I've tried many different versions and have made no significant progress. I'm feeling like this should be fairly straightforward, and I'm just missing something simple here. To be clear, I'm not trying to write to the Blockchain, just read the DAT files. NetworkParameters np = new MainNetParams();Context c = new Context( np );Context.getOrCreate(MainNetParams.get());List blockChainFiles = new ArrayList<>();blockChainFiles.add( new File( "blk00000.dat" ) );BlockFileLoader bfl = new BlockFileLoader(np, blockChainFiles);int blockNum = 0;// Iterate over the blocks in the dataset.for (Block block : bfl) {... Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalStateException: Context does not match implicit network params: [email protected] vs [email protected] org.bitcoinj.core.Context.getOrCreate(Context.java:147)at testBitcoin.main(testBitcoin.java:20) Continue reading >>

Block Parsers: How To Read The Bitcoin Block Chain

Block Parsers: How To Read The Bitcoin Block Chain

Block Parsers: How to Read the Bitcoin Block Chain Join our community of 10 000 traders on Hacked.com for just $39 per month. A Block Parser reads the Bitcoin block chain. There is no encryption of the data stored in the block chain. Bitcoin is a pseudonymous system. Meaning, ECDSA key pairs are used to abstract the identity of users. However, the binary data in the block chain can be read. The block chain is a transaction database. Every full node participating in the Bitcoin network has the same copy. The Bitcoin protocol dictates its structure and is the means through which each node maintains a duplicate copy. Overall, the block chain is just a data structure for storing blocks . The block chain stores blocks in a series, beginning with the genesis block . Also read, What is Bitcoin? Is Googles 4th Most Searched What is? Term of 2014 This example is a minimal approach. In all, 138 lines of Python code are used to build this block parser. In some places, encoding and endianness are unfamiliar or backwards. Despite these minor formatting issues, below is a beginner approach to a Bitcoin block parser. The project began with building the tools required to parse the binary data. The protocol dictates the tools that will be necessary. import structdef uint1(stream):return ord(stream.read(1))def uint2(stream):return struct.unpack('H', stream.read(2))[0]def uint4(stream):return struct.unpack('I', stream.read(4))[0]def uint8(stream):return struct.unpack('Q', stream.read(8))[0]def hash32(stream):return stream.read(32)[::-1]def time(stream):time = uint4(stream)return timedef varint(stream):size = uint1(stream)if size < 0xfd:return sizeif size == 0xfd:return uint2(stream)if size == 0xfe:return uint4(stream)if size == 0xff:return uint8(stream)return -1def hashStr(bytebuffer):re Continue reading >>

Blockchain Intelligence Group

Blockchain Intelligence Group

Public block explorers do not correctly parse and display all transaction data. Some multisig scripts are not decoded properly even by the most used public block explorer. Blockchain Intelligence Group (B.I.G.) takes data integrity seriously, we routinely make sure that even edge-cases are taken care of. B.I.G. parses and displays data that our industry peers deem unparsable. During the course of my work at Blockchain Intelligence Group I routinely run different analyses on the Bitcoin blockchain. In order to minimize errors i frequently compare our data versus that of public blockchain explorers. At one point I was looking into multi-signature transactions, and I discovered something interesting. For those who are not familiar with multisig transactions, I will first present a quick multisig summary here. A multisig transaction is one in which the funds are sent to a special multisig address (also called P2SH Pay to Script Hash). The difference between a simple and a multisig address is the number of signatures it takes to redeem an output. With simple addresses (P2PKH Pay To PubKey Hash), the signature required to redeem an output previously sent to that address is the one of the address itself. Multisig addresses can have a number of signatories required to redeem an output. When creating a multisig address we can specify the number of signatures required (we can look this up in our bitcoin wallet by typing help addmultisigaddress into the console of the debug window). We also specify all the addresses that can sign for outputs sent to this newly created multisig address. So we have n signatures required and m number of addresses eligible to sign, thats why often you see the n out of m phrase associated with multisignature addresses. I have created a vanity address Continue reading >>

Low-level Bitcoin Curiosity Driven

Low-level Bitcoin Curiosity Driven

Simple utility methods to convert bytes into the hex-encoded strings or to and from little-endian numbers. var hex = { decode: function(text) { return text.match(/.{2}/g).map(function(byte) { return parseInt(byte, 16); }); }, encode: function(bytes) { var result = []; for (var i = 0, hex; i < bytes.length; i++) { hex = bytes[i].toString(16); if (hex.length < 2) { hex = '0' + hex; } result.push(hex); } return result.join(''); }};var littleEndian = { decode: function(bytes) { return bytes.reduce(function(previous, current, index) { return previous + current * Math.pow(256, index); }, 0); }, encode: function(number, count) { var rawBytes = []; for (var i = 0; i < count; i++) { rawBytes[i] = number & 0xff; number = Math.floor(number / 256); } return rawBytes; }}; Bitcoin addresses are encoded using the base-58 encoding as it offers human-friendly output . The implementation below uses a big integer library. var base58 = { _codes: '123456789ABCDEFGHJKLMNPQRSTUVWXYZ' + 'abcdefghijkmnopqrstuvwxyz', _58: new BigInteger('58'), encode: function(bytes) { var number = new BigInteger(bytes); var output = []; while (number.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) > 0) { var result = number.divideAndRemainder(this._58); number = result[0]; var remainder = result[1]; output.push(this._codes.charAt(remainder)); } // preserve leading zeros for (var i = 0; i < bytes.length; i++) { if (bytes[i] !== 0) { break; } output.push(this._codes[0]); } return output.reverse().join(''); }, decode: function(string) { var result = BigInteger.ZERO; var output = [], code, power; for (var i = 0; i < string.length; i++) { code = this._codes.indexOf(string.charAt(i)); // preserve leading zeros if (result.equals(BigInteger.ZERO) && code === 0) { output.push(0); } power = this._58.pow(string.length - i - 1); code = new Bi Continue reading >>

Developer Reference - Bitcoin

Developer Reference - Bitcoin

BETA: This documentation has not been extensively reviewed by Bitcoin experts and so likely contains numerous errors. Please use the Issue and Edit links on the bottom left menu to help us improve. Click here to close this disclaimer. X The Developer Reference aims to provide technical details and API informationto help you start building Bitcoin-based applications, but it is not aspecification . To make the best use ofthis documentation, you may want to install the current version of BitcoinCore, either from source or from a pre-compiled executable . Questions about Bitcoin development are best asked in one of the Bitcoin development communities .Errors or suggestions related todocumentation on Bitcoin.org can be submitted as an issue or posted to the bitcoin-documentation mailing list . In the following documentation, some strings have been shortened or wrapped: []indicates extra data was removed, and lines ending in a single backslash \are continued below. If you hover your mouse over a paragraph, cross-referencelinks will be shown in blue. If you hover over a cross-reference link, a briefdefinition of the term will be displayed in a tooltip. The Bitcoin.org Developer Documentation describes how Bitcoin works tohelp educate new Bitcoin developers, but it is not a specificationandit never will be. Bitcoin security depends on consensus . Should your program diverge from consensus , its security is weakened or destroyed. The cause of thedivergence doesnt matter: it could be a bug in your program, it couldbe an error in this documentation which youimplemented as described, or it could be you do everything right butother software on the network behaves unexpectedly . The specific cause will not matter to the users of your softwarewhose wealth is lost. The only correct sp Continue reading >>

A Visual Representation Of How To Parse The Bitcoin Blockchain Raw Data : Bitcoin

A Visual Representation Of How To Parse The Bitcoin Blockchain Raw Data : Bitcoin

Do not use URL shortening services: always submit the real link. Begging/asking for bitcoins is absolutely not allowed, no matter how badly you need the bitcoins. Only requests for donations to large, recognized charities are allowed, and only if there is good reason to believe that the person accepting bitcoins on behalf of the charity is trustworthy. News articles that do not contain the word "Bitcoin" are usually off-topic. This subreddit is not about general financial news. Submissions that are mostly about some other cryptocurrency belong elsewhere. For example, /r/CryptoCurrency is a good place to discuss all cryptocurrencies. Promotion of client software which attempts to alter the Bitcoin protocol without overwhelming consensus is not permitted. Trades should usually not be advertised here. For example, submissions like "Buying 100 BTC" or "Selling my computer for bitcoins" do not belong here. /r/Bitcoin is primarily for news and discussion. Please avoid repetition /r/bitcoin is a subreddit devoted to new information and discussion about Bitcoin and its ecosystem. New merchants are welcome to announce their services for Bitcoin, but after those have been announced they are no longer news and should not be re-posted. Aside from new merchant announcements, those interested in advertising to our audience should consider Reddit's self-serve advertising system . Do not post your Bitcoin address unless someone explicitly asks you to. Be aware that Twitter, etc. is full of impersonation. Continue reading >>

A Bitcoin Blockchain Parser In A Few (thousand) Lines Of C++

A Bitcoin Blockchain Parser In A Few (thousand) Lines Of C++

A bitcoin blockchain parser in a few (thousand) lines of C++ I just wrote a bitcoin blockchain parser in a tiny code snippet. This is implemented as just two source files, one header and one CPP, without any external dependencies. This code snippet does not use any memory allocation, templates, containers, STL, Boost, or anything more complicated than 'fopen, fread, fclose'. I wrote this mostly as a learning tool so I could understand the blockchain format myself. While writing it I ran into a couple of minor issues. One, is that sometimes a blockchain data file will just run out of data, the rest of the file containing zeros. I don't know if this is normal or expected, but I treat it as an end-of-file condition. The other is that some blocks contain less data than is indicated by the block length; meaning that after all of the transactions are read in, the file pointer has not advanced as far as the 'block length' which was indicated. I am going to assume this is normal and expected? This code snippet parses my copy of the blockchain (9.2gb) in roughly 95 seconds; which I figured was pretty good; though I don't know what I have to compare to. At any rate, if anyone finds this code snippet useful or just wants to better understand the data layout of the bitcoin blockchain you can find it here: Feedback, bugfixes, suggestions, all welcome. Feedback, bugfixes, suggestions, all welcome. Being someone who wrote a blockchain parser from scratch (which is what Armory does on every load/rescan), I can tell you that everything about that is normal (except for the second point below). And 95 seconds is pretty good. It depends what else you're doing while you're scanning. In my case, my code scans in about 150-240 seconds depending on HDD caching, but it's also identifying all t Continue reading >>

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