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Want To Learn Programming? This Startup Pays You Cryptocurrency To Study Python

Want To Learn Programming? This Startup Pays You Cryptocurrency To Study Python

Want to learn programming? This startup pays you cryptocurrency to study Python Blockchain-based skills platform BitDegree has unconventional plans for connecting tech talent and recruiters. Lithuania-based startup BitDegree has an education platform that it hopes will change the face of technology training and skills. Its idea is that companies looking for certain skills will put up financial incentives to developers and other would-be techies willing to participate in relevant training courses. In return for studying, students receive tokens based on their results and can spend them to develop their skills further. The company has created its own token, the BitDegree (BDG), with BDG10,000 currently valued at one ethereum. The BitDegree platform is based on blockchain. The company received ETH32,500 ($31m) from contributors during a token crowdsale in December. It aims to open up technology courses to everyone, regardless of their income, to address skills shortages, Andrius Putna, co-founder and CEO, tells ZDNet. Electronic Arts co-founder Jeff Burton and former Coursera senior manager Roberto Santana are on the BitDegree advisory board. Tokens act as an incentive for people to continue their education, Putna says: "Students can also earn them by mentoring others. Or they can pay for mentorship using the tokens they have." Download now: Special report: IT Jobs in 2020: A leader's guide (free PDF) Companies interested in hiring techies can design courses and award scholarships. The platform already lists seminars on Solidity, a programming language used for writing smart contracts on the ethereum blockchain. This year, it plans to host various other courses, including bitcoin and cryptocurrency, Python, data structures and algorithms, robotics, building Android apps, Continue reading >>

Blockchain For Dummies: A Beginner's Guide | Python For Dummies

Blockchain For Dummies: A Beginner's Guide | Python For Dummies

Blockchain: the single most confusing term since Bitcoin. Everyone has a vague idea of what it does. Its either the ultimate evolution of financial technologies, or a silly fad that can be summed up in the disconcerting phrase: dogechain. In reality, major companies around the world have already shown favor to the burgeoning money exchange system and it may become harder and harder to stay away from the financial dark art.In reality, it is all relatively easy to understand. The Blockchain is a public ledger where transactions are recorded and confirmed anonymously. Its a record of events that is shared between many parties. More importantly, once information is entered, it cannot be altered. So, if the blockchain is the public record, what is being recorded? What are all of these transactions? Cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin, are currencies that exist solely in digital. There are no physical golden coins with a big B on them. Moreover, owning these non-real coins entails a new idea of ownership. You dont literally have it in your hands, or even in your bank account, but you have the ability to transfer ownership to someone else simply by creating a record in the blockchain. Rather than using bills, your transfer is pure data. Where exactly is this chain located? Due to the open nature of cryptocurrencies, and the importance of the public having access to other blocks, the blockchain isnt located on just one guys large computer. For example, the bitcoin blockchain is actually managed by distributed nodes. These nodes all have a copy of the entire blockchain. Nodes will forever come and go, synchronizing their own copies of the chain with those of other users. By distributing copies and access, the chain cant simply go down, or disappear. Its a decentralized system that i Continue reading >>

Blockchain A-z: Learn How To Build Your Own Blockchain

Blockchain A-z: Learn How To Build Your Own Blockchain

Did you ever hear of something long before it exploded into everyday life but didnt do anything about it? Maybe it was 20 years ago, when you saw the internet revolution coming.Maybe you kicked yourself for not paying attention to Google or Amazon. Or maybe it was more recently, when disruptive technologies like mobile apps or streaming video transformed our lives forever? Most people will soon be adding another thing to this what if list one that could be just as transformative as any of those. Right now, the closest many get to knowing this technology is through Bitcoin. But in industries, economies and technologies, the focus is on Blockchain - and how those organizations position, adapt or evolve themselves to take advantage of this revolutionary break-through. The majority of people dont know about Blockchain yet. But soon, everything will change... You may not realize it yet, but were at the beginning of another frontier era. Just like the Internet did at the start of this century, Blockchain is creating a new Wild West. Its an untamed land, where opportunity and success wait for those brave enough to discover it. Right now, pioneers are moving to stake their claim in this barely discovered territory.And as they push towards that rich country, their carts (and minds) are filled with the one thing needed to make the journey a success. With education, these Blockchain pioneers will shape society and leave their mark. For those who learn, harness and use this new technology, the opportunities are endless: Joining companies like IBM or Microsoft, desperately looking for the skills you possess to drive the next generation of innovative ideas Utilizing the technology for yourself as a digital entrepreneur, creating disruptors that cut out middlemen and topple outdated Continue reading >>

A Blockchain In 200 Lines Ofcode

A Blockchain In 200 Lines Ofcode

I like programming and Careless Whisper. The basic concept of blockchain is quite simple: a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of ordered records. However, it is easy to get mixed up as usually when we talk about blockchains we also talk about the problems we are trying to solve with them. This is the case in the popular blockchain-based projects such as Bitcoin and Ethereum . The term blockchain is usually strongly tied to concepts like transactions , smart contracts or cryptocurrencies . This makes understanding blockchains a necessarily harder task, than it must be. Especially source-code-wisely. Here I will go through a super-simple blockchain I implemented in 200 lines of Javascript called NaiveChain . The first logical step is to decide the block structure. To keep things as simple as possible we include only the most necessary: index, timestamp, data, hash and previous hash. The hash of the previous block must be found in the block to preserve the chain integrity The block needs to be hashed to keep the integrity of the data. A SHA-256 is taken over the content of the block. It should be noted that this hash has nothing to do with mining , since there is no Proof Of Work problem to solve. To generate a block we must know the hash of the previous block and create the rest of the required content (= index, hash, data and timestamp). Block data is something that is provided by the end-user. A in-memory Javascript array is used to store the blockchain. The first block of the blockchain is always a so-called genesis-block, which is hard coded. At any given time we must be able to validate if a block or a chain of blocks are valid in terms of integrity. This is true especially when we receive new blocks from other nodes and must decide whe Continue reading >>

Introduction Tendermint Documentation

Introduction Tendermint Documentation

Welcome to the Tendermint guide! This is the best place to start if you are newto Tendermint. Tendermint is software for securely and consistently replicating an application on many machines.By securely, we mean that Tendermint works even if up to 1/3 of machines fail in arbitrary ways.By consistently, we mean that every non-faulty machine sees the same transaction log and computes the same state.Secure and consistent replication is a fundamental problem in distributed systems;it plays a critical role in the fault tolerance of a broad range of applications,from currencies, to elections, to infrastructure orchestration, and beyond. The ability to tolerate machines failing in arbitrary ways, including becoming malicious, is known as Byzantine fault tolerance (BFT).The theory of BFT is decades old, but software implementations have only became popular recently,due largely to the success of blockchain technology like Bitcoin and Ethereum.Blockchain technology is just a reformalization of BFT in a more modern setting,with emphasis on peer-to-peer networking and cryptographic authentication.The name derives from the way transactions are batched in blocks,where each block contains a cryptographic hash of the previous one, forming a chain.In practice, the blockchain data structure actually optimizes BFT design. Tendermint consists of two chief technical components: a blockchain consensus engine and a generic application interface.The consensus engine, called Tendermint Core, ensures that the same transactions are recorded on every machine in the same order.The application interface, called the Application BlockChain Interface (ABCI), enables the transactions to be processed in any programming language.Unlike other blockchain and consensus solutions, which come pre-packaged wit Continue reading >>

An Introduction To Ethereum And Smart Contracts: A Programmable Blockchain

An Introduction To Ethereum And Smart Contracts: A Programmable Blockchain

An Introduction to Ethereum and Smart Contracts: a Programmable Blockchain Bitcoin took the world by surprise in the year 2009 and popularized the idea of decentralized secure monetary transactions. The concepts behind it, however, can be extended to much more than just digital currencies. Ethereum attempts to do that, marrying the power of decentralized transactions with a Turing-complete contract system. In this post we will take a closer look at how Ethereum works and what makes it different from Bitcoin and other blockchains. Read on! In our previous post , we took a closer look at what blockchains are and how they help in making distributed, verifiable transactions a possibility. Our main example was Bitcoin: the world's most popular cryptocurrency. Millions of dollars, in the form of bitcoins, are traded each day, making Bitcoin one of the most prominent examples of the viability of the blockchain concept. Have you ever found yourself asking this question: "what would happen if the provider of this service or application disappeared?" If you have, then learning about Ethereum can make a big difference for you. Ethereum is a platform to run decentralized applications: applications that do not rely on any central server. In this post we will explore how Ethereum works and build a simple PoC application related to authentication. A blockchain is a distributed, verifiable datastore. It works by marrying public-key cryptography with the nobel concept of the proof-of-work. Each transaction in the blockchain is signed by the rightful owner of the resource being traded in the transaction. When new coins (resources) are created they are assigned to an owner. This owner, in turn, can prepare new transactions that send those coins to others by simply embedding the new owner Continue reading >>

A General Framework For Blockchain Analytics

A General Framework For Blockchain Analytics

same features are developed several times A general framework could reduce the implementation effort General-purpose blockchain analytics frameworks External data: no built-in support, a source code extension Tool Blockchain Database Schema Ext. Data Updated blockparser BTC RAM-only Custom Custom 2015-12 rusty-blockparser BTC SQL, CSV Fixed Custom 2017-09 BlockSci BTC RAM-only Custom Custom 2017-09 python-parser BTC None None Custom 2017-05 3. Support for non Bitcoin-based blockchains (e.g. 4. Abstraction from the blockchain client (e.g. Bitcoin Core) 1. Get a local copy of the blockchain (e.g. Bitcoin Core) 2. Model blockchain objects (e.g. by using BitcoinJ) a. construct a view with both internal and external data; b. analyse it by using the query language of the DBMS. build the view once, use it for different analyses new views can be created without source modifications A general framework for blockchain analytics Bitcoin (via Bitcoin Core and BitcoinJ) Built-in support for external data (e.g. exchange rates, A MongoDB document for each Bitcoin transactions Average value of outputs (in BTC) of the transactions in We split exchange rates in 7 intervals of the same size. Basic view 9 h 2860 s 300 GB 9 h 3.5 h 266 GB Metadata 2 h 0.5 s 0.5 GB 1.4 h 2.5 s 0.5 GB Exchange rates 5 h 477 s 34 GB 4.5 h 243 s 27 GB Transaction fees 9 h 448 s 51 GB 8.5 h 614 s 43.5 GB Address tags 4 h 1.8 s 0.8 GB 2.3 h 2.7 s 0.6 GB No particular performance differences between MongoDB Basic view 9 h 2860 s 300 GB 9 h 3.5 h 266 GB Metadata 2 h 0.5 s 0.5 GB 1.4 h 2.5 s 0.5 GB Exchange rates 5 h 477 s 34 GB 4.5 h 243 s 27 GB Transaction fees 9 h 448 s 51 GB 8.5 h 614 s 43.5 GB Address tags 4 h 1.8 s 0.8 GB 2.3 h 2.7 s 0.6 GB I/O bound: Create time usually increases proportionally to Basic view Continue reading >>

The Authoritative Guide To Blockchain Development

The Authoritative Guide To Blockchain Development

Entrepreneur. @Airbnb, @earndotcom alum. Instructor @Outco. Writer. Effective Altruist. Blockchainist. Former poker pro. The authoritative guide to blockchain development Cryptocurrencies, ICOs, magic internet money its all so damn exciting, and you, the eager developer, want to get in on the madness. Where do you start? Im glad youre excited about this space. I am too. But youll probably find its unclear where to begin. Blockchain is moving at breakneck speed, but theres no clear onramp to learning this stuff. Since I left Airbnb to work full-time on blockchain, many people have reached out to me asking how to get into the blockchain space full-time. Consider this my authoritative (and inevitably incomplete) guide on how to get into blockchain engineering. Why should you learn blockchain development? Why should you learn blockchain development? Before I answer that question, let me first note: blockchain is a massively overvalued space right now. These prices are unsustainable, and a crash is definitely coming. This has all happened before, and will probably happen again. But if you work long-term in this space, youll learn to shrug off prices. In the words of Emin Gun Sirer prices are the least interesting part of cryptocurrencies. These are massively important technologies, and they are going to irrevocably change the world. If youre unsure, I cant tell you whether or not you should jump in. But I can tell you five reasons that convinced me to take the leap: Bitcoin was invented 10 years ago, but the rate of innovation has only reached a fever pitch in the last couple of years, especially with the launch of Ethereum in 2015. Most of the new companies and ideas in this space have been built on top of Ethereum, which is still very immature. Even if you start now, you Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Open Source Projects To Study Blockchain Technology In Terms Of Simplicity?

What Are The Best Open Source Projects To Study Blockchain Technology In Terms Of Simplicity?

What are the best open source projects to study blockchain technology in terms of simplicity? The best source I've found to study the blockchain technology and get a nice view of the whole thing right now is using the white papers from the most important infrastructure startups in the blockchain ecosystem. If you are starting, you must know that there is a lot of buzz about blockchain technology. There tons of alternatives conceptually different each one from another. I would say the best way to start is understanding how Bitcoin works. Being a beginner, you could make the mistake of thinking that blockchain technology and Bitcoin can be studied by separate. The reallity is that you must understand Bitcoin, and after you will be able to understand what the Blockchain Technology is. As the concept of the private blockchains has grown, I have added some links to the most important projects and white-papers on this field. Anyway, in order to understand this concept, first you should have understood public blockchains. So, here is a list of the most important papers I have found: Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System (Satoshi Nakamoto, Bitcoins inventor) The first step to start with blockchain technology should be understand where does Blockchain Technology come from. This paper started the whole crypto revolution. It can be complex, but will give you a good understanding what has happened since the paper was published in 2008. Ethereum: A Next Generation Smart Contract & Decentralized Application Platform (Vitalik Buterin, Ethereums creator) I would say this is the second most important white paper in the blockchain/bitcoin history. If you are thinking about starting with Ethereum, you truly must read this paper, as it will give you a nice comprehension of what E Continue reading >>

Blocks - Storing Document/file In Blockchain - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Blocks - Storing Document/file In Blockchain - Ethereum Stack Exchange

The 1 MB size limit per Block is for the Bitcoin's blockchain. In Ethereum, there is theoretically no limit for the block size. However, blockchain is not meant for data storage and storing large documents will be very expensive. Here are some instances where people hacked into the Bitcoin Blockchain and stored some unexpected data. You would have to compress and store the doc/pdf/audio in Hexadecimal format. That said, many blockchain-like solutions designed just to store data were developed recently. STORJ seems to be famous and well developed. Filecoin is another such solution which is yet to materialize. Enigma is one more initiative which is being developed in the MIT Media Lab. Like you mentioned, blockchain might be used to maintain a Distributed Hash Table(DHT) which contains hashes of the data files stored off-chain. This is to ensure integrity of data. These are the costs for storing data on Ethereum public blockchain as of June 7th, 2016: This is Solidity code for creating a contract with 1 Kilo Byte of data. contract Storage { byte[1024] data; function Storage() { for (uint i = 0; i < 1024; i++) { data[i] = 'A';}}} If we run this code in the online compiler , we get an estimated transaction cost of 5925085 gas. The gas price today is 23731285772 Wei (10^18 Wei = 1 Ether = $15).So, storing 1 Kilo Byte of data in the public blockchain, as per conversion rates on June 7th is approximately $2.11. Similarly, reading 1 Kilo Byte of data costs 284396 gas, which is approximately $0.1. This price might increase if there is an increase in the Gas value or Ether value. More information about gas prices can be found at Appendix G. Fee Schedule of the Ethereum yellow paper . Continue reading >>

Developer Guide - Bitcoin

Developer Guide - Bitcoin

BETA: This documentation has not been extensively reviewed by Bitcoin experts and so likely contains numerous errors. Please use the Issue and Edit links on the bottom left menu to help us improve. Click here to close this disclaimer. X The Developer Guide aims to provide the information you need to understandBitcoin and start building Bitcoin-based applications, but it is not aspecification . To make the best use ofthis documentation, you may want to install the current version of BitcoinCore, either from source or from a pre-compiled executable . Questions about Bitcoin development are best asked in one of the Bitcoin development communities .Errors or suggestions related todocumentation on Bitcoin.org can be submitted as an issue or posted to the bitcoin-documentation mailing list . In the following documentation, some strings have been shortened or wrapped: []indicates extra data was removed, and lines ending in a single backslash \are continued below. If you hover your mouse over a paragraph, cross-referencelinks will be shown in blue. If you hover over a cross-reference link, a briefdefinition of the term will be displayed in a tooltip. The block chain provides Bitcoins public ledger, an ordered and timestamped recordof transactions. This system is used to protect against double spending and modification of previous transaction records. Each full node in the Bitcoin network independently stores a block chain containing only blocks validated by that node . When several nodes allhave the same blocks in their block chain , they are considered to be in consensus . The validation rules these nodes follow to maintain consensus are called consensusrules . This section describes many ofthe consensus rules used by Bitcoin Core. The illustration above shows a simplified ve Continue reading >>

Building Your Own Blockchain In R

Building Your Own Blockchain In R

Everybody is freaking out about the rise of the Bitcoin and the potential of the Blockchain technologies. The advent of cryptocurrencies, game changing use cases, disruption of established business models by disintermediation, etc.. By the time Im writing this article, there are more than 1300 crypto-currencies listed in coinmarketcap .. And a lot more coming with the next ICOs (Internet Coin Offering). Most certainly, the main enabler of Bitcoin and of many other currencies (although not all of them) is the Blockchain technology. Although the original paper from Satoshi explains very well the ground idea behind this technology, nothing like creating your own blockchain to fully understand how it works, its limitations and potential improvements (aka If you can code it, you certainly understand it). In this post Id like to share a gentle coding exercise in R (#rstats). Why R? Just because its my favorite language I wouldnt choose R for a productive, full-fledge block chain implementation, but again, this is not the purpose of this post. This is just a learning exercise hacked quite quickly without any aspiration of ever running this code in a productive environment, and should be understood as such. For convenience, I stored the code in a git repository , for others to improve, re-use, try, etc. First things first: what is what in a Blockchain A blockchain is an immutable chain of sequential records or blocks that are chained together using hashes. Blocks can be understood as containers, typically of transactions, but it can be extended to documents, etc. We can think of a blockchain as a database where new data is stored in blocks, that are added to an immutable chain based on all other existing blocks. Blockchain is often referred as a digital ledger of transactions Continue reading >>

Github - Bellaj/blockchain: Useful Documents And Scientific Papers About Blockchain & Cryptocurrencies. I've Read Them All, Now It's Your Turn ;)

Github - Bellaj/blockchain: Useful Documents And Scientific Papers About Blockchain & Cryptocurrencies. I've Read Them All, Now It's Your Turn ;)

useful documents and scientific papers about Blockchain & cryptocurrencies. I've read them all, now it's your turn ;) If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download Xcode and try again. If nothing happens, download the GitHub extension for Visual Studio and try again. Blockchain and cryptocurrency Document Library: Collection of useful documents about Bitcoin, Ethereum, blockchain technologies and distributed system. Contribution are always welcome and recommended! Here is how: Clone to your machine git clone Principles of Distributed Computing (lecture collection) Analyzing Cryptocurrency Markets Using Python Gekko Define your own trading strategy and Gekko will take care of everything else.* OSTIA : Ostia is a cryptocurrency trading platform that allows you to run algorithmic trading strategies across all major exchanges* Prediction: Bitcoin Price Variation Predicting Bitcoin Price Variations using Bayesian Regression Cryptocurrency Analysis with Python Blackbird Bitcoin Arbitrage: a C++ trading system* Cuckoo Cycle the first graph-theoretic proof-of-work DeOS Decentralized Operating System Tribeca A high frequency, market making cryptocurrency trading platform in node.js Continue reading >>

A Simple And Secure Blockchain Database Api Written Inpython

A Simple And Secure Blockchain Database Api Written Inpython

A simple and secure Blockchain Database API written inPython When we talk about Blockchain, we always relate it to peer-to-peer network and think that data must be distributed across the network. It will raise concern from people and think that Blockchain would breach the confidentiality of the data. Actually, the data architecture of Blockchain itself already provides a good solution for securing the data from unauthorized manipulation, given that the server is protected by sufficient controls, such as access control, network and system security control, and better to be in an internal network. Therefore, I try to build an database based on the data architecture of Blockchain by using Python, Sqlite and RESTful API framework. Blockchains Data Architecture and its Integrity Abstracted from Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System by Satoshi Nakamoto From the diagram above, each block of the data is consisted of previous hash, nonce and transactions. If you are not sure what is hash, you can read this article first. To simplify, hash value is an unique ID for the previous block. If we use this unique ID to verify the previous block, we will know whether the previous block has been modified or not. What is the implication? This mechanism allows us to ensure that no one is allowed to change the previously created data. If you need to modify the data, you have to create another records to modify or delete it. From the above example, Alice wrongly enter the journal entries for 123.4, but it should be 432.1. Alice has to create another records delete to reverse the previous entries. It seems that it is the basic function for most of the accounting system, but we cannot know whether it is simply controlled in the application level, creating a possibility that the data c Continue reading >>

Cryptography And Cryptocurrencies

Cryptography And Cryptocurrencies

Learn cryptography with a series of hands-on projects in a fun, CTF-style environment. Covers the main cryptosystems in use today: AES, RSA, ECC, SHA, Bitcoin, and Ethereum. The first challenges are easy enough for beginners (Binary, XOR, Cryptokitties), and the later ones get difficult enough to interest intermediate security professionals (Padding Oracle, Smart Contracts). My assistants and I will demonstrate the challenges and help participants get through them as needed. Technical requirements: some challenges require only a Web browser, but to do them all you will need a computer that can host virtual machines. Some projects require Windows, and some require 64-bit Ubuntu Linux. Thumbdrives with appropriate virtual machines will be available. All materials and challenges are freely available at samsclass.info, including slide decks, video lectures, and hands-on project instructions. They will remain available after the workshop ends. Lectures will be streamed live at They will also be recorded and published onYouTube for later viewing. Continue reading >>

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