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Bitcoinj Wallet Format

How To Claim Bitcoin Cash (bcc) Using The Electron Cash Wallet

How To Claim Bitcoin Cash (bcc) Using The Electron Cash Wallet

How to claim Bitcoin Cash (BCC) using the Electron Cash wallet How to claim Bitcoin Cash (BCC) using the Electron Cash wallet On August 1 2017, around 20% of Bitcoin Miners made the decision to "fork" the Bitcoin (BTC) Blockchain to create a new cryptocurrency named "Bitcoin Cash" (BCC). This isn't the first time that members of the community have created a new cryptocurrency based on the Bitcoin Blockchain and it remains to be seen whether BCC will be a big hit or fall by the wayside. You can read a little about Bitcoin Cash and the advantages its supporters feel it offers over regular Bitcoins on the Bitcoin Cash website . For now, it's enough to know that if you possessed any Bitcoins at the time the Blockchain forked, you're entitled to claim an equal amount of Bitcoin Cash. As the value of the Bitcoin is determined by supply and demand you can't be sure that Bitcoin Cash will have the same USD/EUR/GBP exchange rate but you have nothing to lose by claiming your BCC. In this guide we will explore firstly how to move your existing Bitcoins to a safe place using the excellent, lightweight 'Electrum' wallet software. You will then learn how to install the 'Electron Cash' wallet. This software is based on Electrum but designed for users who want to hold and spend BCC specifically. We have compiled a list of the best bitcoin exchanges Continue reading >>

Wallet - Bitcoin Wiki

Wallet - Bitcoin Wiki

A Bitcoin wallet is a collection of private keys but may also refer to client software used to manage those keys and to make transactions on the Bitcoin network. This page covers various wallet formats in use. The original Bitcoin client stores private key information in a file named wallet.dat following the so called "bitkeys" format. The wallet.dat file is located in the Bitcoin data directory and may be encrypted with a password . It is intended that a wallet file be used on only one installation of Bitcoin at a time. Attempting to clone a wallet file for use on multiple computers will result in "weird behavior" [1] . The format of this file is Berkeley DB. Tools that can manipulate wallet files include pywallet . Continue reading >>

Exporting Private Key From Bitcoin Clients

Exporting Private Key From Bitcoin Clients

Exporting Private Key from Bitcoin Clients Exporting Private Key from Bitcoin Clients The private keys required are in the so called wallet import format (wif),they usually start with a 5. Her is, how you export your private keys in the most common bitcoinclients/wallets: For Bitcoin-qt, we first need to access the console via the menu bar: After that we can unlock the wallet with the passphrase and extract the privatekey with: walletpassphrase 9999dumpprivatekey The advanced settings of blockchain.info offer to export an unencrypted versionof the private key: In Electrum we need to go through the menu: For armory users, the private key can be located by double-clicking your walletin the Armory main window, click Backup this wallet, select Export Key Listsand click the button of the same name. After having supplied your password,youll be presented with your private key in different encodings. You can removeall checkboxes, except Private Key (Plain Base58). Check the Omit spaces inkey data box. Now select the key string and copy it to the clipboard. Continue reading >>

Working With The Wallet

Working With The Wallet

Learn how to use the wallet class and craft custom transactions with it. The Wallet class is one of the most important classes in bitcoinj. It stores keys and the transactions that assign value to/from those keys. It lets you create new transactions which spend the previously stored transactions outputs, and it notifies you when the contents of the wallet have changed. Youll need to learn how to use the Wallet to build many kinds of apps. This article assumes youve read Satoshis white paper and the WorkingWithTransactions article. For optimal operation the wallet needs to be connected to a BlockChain and a Peer or PeerGroup. The block chain can be passed a Wallet in its constructor. It will send the wallet blocks as they are received so the wallet can find and extract relevant transactions, that is, transactions which send or receive coins to keys stored within it. The Peer/Group will send the wallet transactions which are broadcast across the network before they appear in a block. A Wallet starts out its life with no transactions in it, and thus a balance of zero, regardless of what the block chain contains. To use it you need to download the block chain, which will load the wallet up with transactions that can be analyzed and spent. Wallet wallet = new Wallet(params);BlockChain chain = new BlockChain(params, wallet, ...);PeerGroup peerGroup = new PeerGroup(params, chain);peerGroup.addWallet(wallet);peerGroup.startAndWait(); Of course, the snippet of code is fairly useless because theres no way to get money into it. You can obtain keys and addresses from the wallet with the following API calls: Address a = wallet.currentReceiveAddress();ECKey b = wallet.currentReceiveKey();Address c = wallet.freshReceiveAddress();assert b.toAddress(wallet.getParams()).equals(a);assert Continue reading >>

Found An Old Bitcoin Wallet Backup

Found An Old Bitcoin Wallet Backup

Short time lurker here I recently decided to look through my old harddrives and came across something pretty interesting I have a file called Bitcoin wallet backup. Judging by the dates, this was from back when I was buying stuff from darkweb. Because of the size of the file (33kb) and the lack of file extension Im guessing I encrypted the file somehow? Ive tried changing the extension to .dat and open with electrum but it didnt read the file. Doubt Ill be able to recover it but I thought Id see if you guys had any ideas on how I could open this. This is what a portion the file looks like in notepad: do you have any idea as to what software created the file? or was it just a notepad file you saved? Yes, it looks like an encrypted file. You could try decrypting it using openssl. I would try the following: openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -a -in "Bitcoin Wallet backup" Used openSSL and didnt get an error Ended up with a strange filetype that started with The rest of the file however, is just gibberish and looks like this: It looks like there are two different type files. One is KeePass which is software that allows you to create and store encrypted passwords: The other which says Bitcoin Wallet Backup I cant see the extension so I am not sure what type file that is. I would say use KeePass first with the .kdb files to get your old password as it is a database file that stores and encrypts multiple passwords. You still have to remember the password to unlock the database of stored passwords: Use this command from the command prompt to open KeePass database: KeePass.exe C:\My Documents\MyDatabase.kdb -preselect:C:\pwsafe.key This is separate then the encrypted Bitcoin Wallet Backup file. KeePass.exe C:\My Documents\MyDatabase.kdb -preselect:C:\pwsafe.key The MyDatabase.kdb is t Continue reading >>

Dump Keys From Protobuf Format [solved]

Dump Keys From Protobuf Format [solved]

I've got a backup from my Bitcoin Wallet for Android (Andreas S.) and I've decrypted it using openssl. So, because of some changes to how Bitcoin Wallet works, I was surprised not to find a plain text file, but instead I have a protobuf file. What I want to do is export the private keys. I understand that if I dig around in bitcoinj I can apprantly "write a small app" do to do this (Continue reading >>

Understanding Bip-38 Password Encrypted Paper Wallets

Understanding Bip-38 Password Encrypted Paper Wallets

About BIP38 password-encrypted paper wallets The advantage to encrypting your paper wallet's private key with a password is that if your paper wallet is stolen or otherwise exposed, the balance on the wallet is safe unless the passphrase used to encrypt the wallet is guessed. However, if you encrypt your private key with BIP38 and you lose your passphrase, it will be impossible for you to recover the funds you have sent to this wallet. Also, note that not many bitcoin wallet applications or web services are able to import BIP38 private keys. In this case, you will have to use the "Validate" feature on the generator to extract the unencrypted Wallet Import Format (WIF) key as an intermediate step before sweeping the balance. WARNING: Before sending any funds to a BIP38-encrypted wallet, first do a test make sure you are able to decrypt the printed private key back to ordinary WIF format. In short, if you do not have a strong understanding of the BIP38 encryption and decryption workflow, do not BIP38-encrypt your paper wallet. Just print your paper wallet out without encryption, and keep it safe the same way you would jewels or cash. How do I convert a non-encrypted wallet to use BIP38? If you have a regular paper wallet that displays the unencrypted WIF key, you can duplicate it and print out a new BIP38-protected version of the same wallet in just a few steps: Launch the generator , preferably using your own copy downloaded from GitHub . You may skip the random mouse movement step since you are not generating any new keys. Click on the Validate tab, and either type in your private key, or scan its QR code. (Firefox works best for camera scanning.) Click the validate button. Click Use these details to print a paper wallet Click the checkbox for BIP38 Encrypt?, supply yo Continue reading >>

Aaron Voisine - Mobile Bitcoin Wallet

Aaron Voisine - Mobile Bitcoin Wallet

Aaron is the CEO and Founder of Breadwallet . He was a senior iOS consultant at Banjo, Co-Founder of Lightt and iOS development lead at Yammer. He is very familiar with Objective-C, Python, software development, C++, Linux and iOS. He holds a degree in computer science from Purdue University. Trace Mayer: So before we get straight into the interview just a quick disclaimer. I actually hadnt used Breadwallet (the mobile bitcoin wallet) before. There are tons of mobile bitcoin wallets out there. I just hadnt had time to and I actually after the interview downloaded a copy of Breadwallet, a mobile bitcoin wallet; began to use it and I really like it. Its super simple. Its probably going to replace my blockchain.info. Nick Cary, CEO of blockchain.info, is in our next interview. I love that mobile bitcoin wallet too. Its just they have different uses and functions. One thing I dont necessarily like in Breadwallet (the mobile bitcoin wallet), theres no coin control, but I can take care of that on Blockchain.info or Armory so. Anyways, on to the interview. Welcome back to the Bitcoin Knowledge Podcast . We have Aaron Voisine, founder and CEO. of Breadwallet (the mobile bitcoin wallet). Welcome to podcast. Trace Mayer: So Breadwallet (the mobile bitcoin wallet)s the first hierarchical deterministic SPV wallet, right? Trace Mayer: Can you explain a little bit to our audience, like, what does that even mean. Its all Iike Dolphin-speak to me. Aaron Voisine: All right. Yes, so we had the first one to have, but BitcoinJ which is a java bitcoin wallet, they have it now too as well. But we had it first. What hierarchical deterministic means is that all your bitcoin addresses are generated from a single seed value. So if you just back up that one seed value you can encode it in an Eng Continue reading >>

Need Help Importing From Encrypted Android Wallet Backup [solved]

Need Help Importing From Encrypted Android Wallet Backup [solved]

Need help importing from encrypted Android wallet backup [SOLVED] Author Topic: Need help importing from encrypted Android wallet backup [SOLVED] (Read 3308 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. This has been quite the challenge to claim my stakes, I wish I sent my AGS donation through a desktop wallet. I sent my AGS donation through the "official" Android wallet (the one by Andreas S.) When I back up the bitcoin wallet, I had to enter a password. From this point I'm not sure what to do to claim my AGS shares in the BitsharesX wallet. Second question: when I create an account in the BitsharesX wallet, do I need to register the account before I import the bitcoin wallet, or can I safely import the bitcoin wallet to claim my shares with the account unregistered? Last Edit: September 25, 2014, 01:02:16 am by bsxnewb Reply #1 on: September 11, 2014, 03:23:51 am I've managed to decrypt my android wallet backup file, but it doesn't seem to import anything into bitshares-x. Anyone have any ideas? Quote from: bsxnewb on September 11, 2014, 03:23:51 am I've managed to decrypt my android wallet backup file, but it doesn't seem to import anything into bitshares-x. Anyone have any ideas? What do you mean by ' it doesn't seem to import anything into bitshares-x.'? If you clarify this someone might be able to help. (this is above my pay grade, but there are a lot of knowledgably people here ready to help) Reply #3 on: September 11, 2014, 03:58:09 am UPDATE: More useful: The private key you're looking for is in WIF format. You can import your private keys exported from your Android bitcoin wallet. If they associate with BTSX from your AGS donation you're all set. Never the less post up your BTSX public key and we can send you enough to register an account. The Android Continue reading >>

Greenaddress Bitcoin Wallet

Greenaddress Bitcoin Wallet

We don't make you choose between security and convenience. And we don't compromise your privacy. Our per-transaction two factor authentication, multi-signature and deterministic wallet allow you unprecedented control over your transactions. And, we never store your private keys, not even encrypted. At the same time we make it trivial to view and transfer your funds. Take control of your future now, at GreenAddress. Better privacy with your funds and safer login with watch-only Safely check your balance and transactions from public Wi-Fi, Starbucks and on the go. With our unique watch-only mode you can quickly check your balance or receive funds without full access to your wallet. Your keys are not loaded so no transactions are possible and settings can't be modified. More features that allow convenient and secure access to your wallet Enable quick PIN login to your wallet from any of your devices without having to use your passphrase. Should our system be taken down or disappear, sleep safe with our automatic presigned transaction (nLockTime) allowing you to simply wait for your selected expiry to get your funds! All transfers to your wallet (including change) will use a newly generated address each time making it harder for people you transact with to read your past and future transactions. 1) Hot wallets can be emptied and cold wallets may have delays, bugs or be lost 2) If the service is compromised brute force attacks may be tried on your encrypted wallet, requires strong password. 3) Access to user wallets requires that both the user and the service are compromised at the same time which reduces risks. We use hierarchical deterministic wallets (or BIP0032 HD Wallet) which means we use new addresses for each incoming transaction (including change), which, together Continue reading >>

Why A 12 Word Mnemonic Is An Insecure Bitcoin Walletbackup

Why A 12 Word Mnemonic Is An Insecure Bitcoin Walletbackup

Tech entrepreneur, avid rock climber, all natural environmentalist, and bitcoin evangelist. CEO & Founder of Edge (formerly Airbitz) Why a 12 Word Mnemonic is an Insecure Bitcoin WalletBackup Rewind back to 2010 and the way Bitcoin wallets worked. Users had a wallet.dat file on their computer with their private keys on it. They could optionally add a password to encrypt it. They SHOULD back up the file in case they lost their computer, like this guy . Life at the time was tedious! Some mobile wallets worked the same way. Users were given full responsibility for keys but without good tools to take responsibility. Fast forward to today. Now the defacto standard is to backup your wallet by writing down a 12 to 24 word passphrase which IS your master private key. In some ways this is easier than saving a file to a thumb drive and putting it in a safe. Especially on mobile. But have we just opened up ourselves to possibly the biggest attack vector on our devices? I recently sat down with John McAfee, life long hacker and former founder of popular anti virus software, and we discussed securing Bitcoin. Being buried in the hacker community, he sees the biggest threat to our devices as two things, and I would agree: Both Android and iOS now allow custom keyboards and its entirely possible one of those is snooping your keys and sending them to a malicious party. With a 1224 word seed backup, weve guaranteed that weve given attackers our private key on a silver platter. Show the words on screen and boom, a screen capture virus has it. Have the user enter it to verify the backup (many wallets do this) and bam, a key logger has you pwned! Some wallets talk about being uber secure because they use the Secure Element to store keys in hardware on the phone. But show the keys on scree Continue reading >>

Wallet File Extension - What Is A .wallet File And How Do I Open It?

Wallet File Extension - What Is A .wallet File And How Do I Open It?

Home : File Types : WALLET File (2 File Associations) File format categories include Binary, Text, XML, and Zip. The format of this file type has not been determined. A WALLET file is a file created by Multibit, an international Bitcoin wallet used to perform Bitcoin transactions. It contains private keys and transactions referenced in the transactions of the BitCoin currency. To create a WALLET file, select File New Wallet, name your file, choose a save location, select "MultiBit (*.wallet)" from the "File Format" drop down menu, and click Save. To open a WALLET, simply double-click the file or select File Open Wallet, navigate to and select your WALLET file, and click Open. saving.wallet - The main wallet used for containing any transactions and private keys you have. Stored with the WALLET files you create. File format categories include Binary, Text, XML, and Zip. The format of this file type has not been determined. A WALLET file is a file encrypted by the CryptoMix, or CrypMix, virus, which is ransomware utilized by cybercriminals. It contains a user's file, such as a .PDF or .DOCX file, encrypted with AES encryption by the virus. WALLET files are similar to .LOCKY files but became prevalent in 2017. The CryptoMix virus may also be referred to as a CrypMix, CryptFile2, or Dharma virus. It is dangerous malware that is commonly known as ransomware, where the purpose of the virus is to take your files hostage and force you to pay the perpetrator (by way of bitcoin) to unlock your files. Once the virus infiltrates your computer it begins scrambling your files, renaming them, and encrypting them. The virus then generates a .TXT ransom note (#_RESTORING_FILES_#.TXT) informing you of the takeover and what you need to do to recover your files. The virus appends the [emai Continue reading >>

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know About Private Keys

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know About Private Keys

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know about Private Keys Private keys have been an integral component of Bitcoin since its first description in 2008. Wallet software often attempts to shield users from the need to understand what private keys are and how they work. Even so, most users eventually come face to face with private keys, too often with unpleasant results. A basic understanding of private keys can help prevent loss of funds and other mishaps, but it can also offer useful insights into how Bitcoin works. This guide outlines the most important private key concepts for using Bitcoin effectively. Although Bitcoin is best known as an electronic cash system , underneath it all runs a secure messaging system built on the Internet. Instead of relaying emails, texts, or web pages, the Bitcoin network processes value-transfer messages called transactions. Private keys play a central role in authenticating these messages and allowing users to identify each other. An example helps illustrate the problems that private keys solve. Imagine Alice wants to pay Bob using a coin with a face value of 1. Her plan is to create a transaction identifying Bob as the payee. After doing so, Alice plans to publish the transaction to the Bitcoin network. In using this system, Alice faces two fundamental problems: Alice needs a way to identify both herself and Bob in the transaction. She cant employ a trusted authority such as a government registry or email provider because that would create a central point of control and failure the very thing Bitcoin was created to eliminate. Alice needs a way to prevent others from changing her transaction and forging transactions in her name. Bitcoin solves both problems through a system called public key cryptography . This system uses two pieces of i Continue reading >>

Wallet (bitcoinj 0.13-snapshot Api)

Wallet (bitcoinj 0.13-snapshot Api)

publicWallet( NetworkParameters params) Creates a new, empty wallet with a randomly chosen seed and no transactions. Make sure to provide for sufficient backup! Any keys will be derived from the seed. If you want to restore a wallet from disk instead, see loadFromFile(java.io.File, org.bitcoinj.core.WalletExtension...) . Creates a new, empty wallet with a randomly chosen seed and no transactions. Make sure to provide for sufficient backup! Any keys will be derived from the seed. If you want to restore a wallet from disk instead, see loadFromFile(java.io.File, org.bitcoinj.core.WalletExtension...) . publicWallet( NetworkParameters params, KeyChainGroup keyChainGroup) publicWallet( Context context, KeyChainGroup keyChainGroup) public static Wallet fromSeed( NetworkParameters params, DeterministicSeed seed) public static Wallet fromWatchingKey( NetworkParameters params, DeterministicKey watchKey, longcreationTimeSeconds) Creates a wallet that tracks payments to and from the HD key hierarchy rooted by the given watching key. A watching key corresponds to account zero in the recommended BIP32 key hierarchy. public static Wallet fromWatchingKey( NetworkParameters params, DeterministicKey watchKey) Creates a wallet that tracks payments to and from the HD key hierarchy rooted by the given watching key. A watching key corresponds to account zero in the recommended BIP32 key hierarchy. public static Wallet fromKeys( NetworkParameters params, List < ECKey >keys) Creates a wallet containing a given set of keys. All further keys will be derived from the oldest key. public DeterministicKey currentKey( KeyChain.KeyPurpose purpose) Returns a key that hasn't been seen in a transaction yet, and which is suitable for displaying in a wallet user interface as "a convenient key to receive f Continue reading >>

How To Recover Your Corrupt Or Deleted Bitcoin Core Wallet

How To Recover Your Corrupt Or Deleted Bitcoin Core Wallet

How to recover your corrupt or deleted Bitcoin Core wallet This post discusses the methods for recovering a deleted or corrupt Bitcoin Core Wallet. Many other currencies, such as Bitcoin Cash, Litecoin, Dogecoins and more share Bitcoin Cores wallet format and can be recovered using the same techniques and tools. I assume that you have the wallet password, or there is no password. (Ill post later on what to do if you forget your password.) This information is based on helping dozens of people in similar situations with my Bitcoin wallet recovery service . The information below is just an outline. I hope to add detailed instructions soon. Your wallet could have been deleted in several ways: If you removed the Bitcoin Core software, your wallet is still on your computer. Just go to your Bitcoin Core Data Directory : If you deleted the wallet file, you should first check for any backups you made. If you dont have any backups, you can try two things: Until the file is overwritten by new data, deleted files stay on your hard drive. You can get them back with data recovery software: Android smartphones: Turn onUSB Debugging and connect to PC. Now run Smartphone-enabled data recovery software . iPhone: I do not believe deleted application data (unlike photos, messages, etc) can currently be recovered. Previous versions are copies of files and folders that Windows automatically saves as part of a restore point. Previous versions are sometimes referred to asshadow copies. Follow Microsofts instructions to see if there is an older copy of your wallet. If you did a quick format, all your data are probably still on the hard drive. Use the tools above. If you did a full format on Windows or Mac, your hard drive sectors have been completely zeroed out, and your data is lost. If you w Continue reading >>

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