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Blockchain - What Are The Ethereum Disk Space Needs? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Blockchain - What Are The Ethereum Disk Space Needs? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

How fast is Ethereum blockchain growing and how big is it likely to get in the future? Is it still about 1 GB per month? Are there any data pruning or compression algorithms in place? Latest Update: Nov 29th, 2017. I have written a blog post about this, esp. parity pruning modes: The Ethereum-blockchain size will not exceed 1TB anytime soon . Last Update: June 1st, 2017 / Block ~ 3800000 *) I wasn't able to synchronize any of the 5 clients below in unpruned node on a Quadcore-CPU VPS with 16 GB RAM on a HDD within a reasonable time. **) This is the default enabled mode of operation / pruning / synchronization. Go only offers database pruning on initial sync. The default --syncmode fast prunes old chain states and results initially in a database with around 20 GB in size. It is, however, expected to grow over time as the fast sync is only available once. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------| Sync-Mode | Database | Comment |===========================================================================| Light | 0.175 GB | --- |---------------------------------------------------------------------------| Fast** | 20.367 GB | Will grow consistently after initial sync. |---------------------------------------------------------------------------| Full | N/A | Wasn't able to sync this within 14 days*. |--------------------------------------------------------------------------- Parity offers continuous state trie pruning. The default --pruning fast will keep only the latest 64 states by default. It's expected to grow at a rate of a few GB per year. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------| Pruning | Database | Comment |===========================================================================| Fast** | 9.911 Continue reading >>

Ethereum And Stellar? Kik's Kin Token To Use Two Chains

Ethereum And Stellar? Kik's Kin Token To Use Two Chains

Ethereum and Stellar? Kik's Kin Token to Use Two Chains Mar 21, 2018 at 14:00 UTC|UpdatedMar 22, 2018 at 08:10 UTC One crypto token on two different blockchains? While it might sound unlikely, social messaging app Kik has announced it'll be doing just that with its "kin" token, which allowed the company to raise $98 million in an initial coin offering (ICO) in September. After some back and forth about which blockchain the company wanted to host its crypto token on, Kik has decided to use ethereum (on which the tokens were first launched) for liquidity and stellar for transactions. The decision comes only a few months after CoinDesk reported that Kik was thinking about moving its crypto token fully off ethereum and onto stellar due to high transaction fees and slow confirmation times plaguing the ethereum network. At the time,Kik CEO Ted Livingston referred to the ethereum as "the dial-up era of blockchain," but today the company has pulled back a bit from its complaints about the second largest blockchain by market capitalization. As such, users can imagine their kin token being split into two equal parts - one that runs on stellar and one that runs on ethereum. Using atomic swaps , an in-progress technology that allows cryptocurrencies to be traded across blockchains, the company will lock up a kin token's stellar half when its ERC-20 (the ethereum standard for crypto tokens) half leaves the app, and vice versa. "Creating a bi-directional blockchain with stellar will drive mass adoption of kin by providing faster confirmation times, low transaction fees and scalability," Livingston said in a press release. Stellar founder Jed McCaleb seconded that, telling CoinDesk: "Kik will be one of the first mainstream projects that uses cryptocurrencies in a meaningful way. It w Continue reading >>

How To: Create Your Own Private Ethereum Blockchain

How To: Create Your Own Private Ethereum Blockchain

How To: Create Your Own Private Ethereum Blockchain Releasing a Dust Server update today to include client local time zone based login rewards Android and iOS client updates are currently in QA and will release next week including promoted blasts now marked as promoted, legacy Dusters will now get rewards, and other performance enhancements and bug fixes. Designing analytics of rewards in preparation for switching to mainnet Developing method of paying Ethereum gas costs with an ERC-20 token Researching different mechanisms for storing content on the blockchain This post marks the first in a new How To series were starting in an effort to provide some easy to read instructions covering topics our developers found particularly ill-documented online. As we move beyond the token sale, our focus now is helping other developer teams interested in integrating GMT into their apps. To that end, were ramping up our technical content production to make it easier to onboard new developers looking to try their hand with blockchain technology. If you have a particular topic youd like to see detailed in a How To post, wed love to hear from you at [email protected] This is a guide for starting your own custom Ethereum blockchain on Mac, not to be confused with starting a node on the main Ethereum blockchain. Here we are starting an entirely new and separate blockchain that cannot interact with Ethereum mainnet. Starting your own Ethereum blockchain is useful, educational, and safer than the public testnet. Learning to set up a private testnet provides tangibility to otherwise abstract concepts such as mining, network peers, and even the geth datadir. ruby -e $(curl -fsSL chainId this is your chains identifier, and is used in replay protection. homesteadBlock, eip155Block, eip Continue reading >>

Using Ethereum Core And Classic Chains Simultaneously

Using Ethereum Core And Classic Chains Simultaneously

Using Ethereum Core and Classic chains simultaneously On July 20th 2016, in block #1920000 , a change was introduced to the Ethereum protocol to fix the issue related to the DAO hack. To the surprise of many, the old chain kept being mined. The fork resulted in 2 chains: Ethereum Core (ETH) and Ethereum Classic (ETC). By now, most of the Ethereum users know which chain they want to support but there is still a benefit for being able to handle transactions on both chains. An example of this, is calling the Whitehat Withdraw contract on the Classic chain in order to retrieve ETC. Calling a contract on the ETC chain requires users to either use an online service or do it themselves, which is less complicated than it sounds. As a reminder, it is highly recommended to every users, prior doing anything else, to use the Split contract to avoid potential transaction replay attacks . Transaction replays are not really an issue as long as they are understood. The safest option remaining for the users to Split between addresses dedicated to one or the other chain to avoid confusion and have less to worry about. A first ReplaySafeSplit smart contract has been deployed, followed by an improved version : ReplaySafeSplit v2 . These contracts are deployed on both chains and use the transaction replay attacks to run transactions on both chains. This contract can be called only on one chain or the other (at the moment). Calling the Split method of these contracts only makes sense when sending the funds to split. ReplaySafeSplit v2 enforces this, preventing users from losing useless transaction fees. When a user calls the Split method, he has to provide 2 distinct addresses (also enforced by ReplaySafeSplit v2 ), a Target Fork address and a Target NoFork address. When the Split transacti Continue reading >>

Ethereum's Two Ethereums Explained - Coindesk

Ethereum's Two Ethereums Explained - Coindesk

What started as an attempt to rescue investor funds in a high-profile project has resulted in a schism that has effectively split the community on the second-largest public blockchain. The split is not only psychological. Thanks to the design of public blockchain systems, it is also technical, with competing visions manifesting in two very real blockchains, or versions of the projects transaction history. As of this weekend, there are now two groups working on two competing versions of a project called ethereum , a blockchain-based platform designed to enable decentralized application development. If bitcoin envisioned how a distributed group of users could create and manage a currency, ethereum sought to allow a distributed group of users to create and manage a decentralized, uncensorable app store. (You can learn more in our latest CoinDesk Research report). However, there are now two slightly different versions of this platform available to users ethereum, the 'official' version of the blockchain maintained by its original developers, and ethereum classic, an 'alternative' blockchain maintained by a wholly new team . Both offer the same technology platforms, and according to developers, they're in agreement on a formal roadmap for steps forward. But, the small differences have created two markets, both with a combined value of roughly $1.2bn . Long the most notable ethereum project, The DAO, short for distributed autonomous organization, raised $150m in ether the cryptocurrency of the ethereum network earlier this year during a public crowdsale. Held online, anyone who had ether could participate. The idea was simple, in theory. Investors would send money to The DAO and receive voting tokens, and then those who invested (and voted) would decide democratically how Th Continue reading >>

What Is Ethereum Classic? Ethereum Vs Ethereum Classic

What Is Ethereum Classic? Ethereum Vs Ethereum Classic

What is Ethereum Classic? Ethereum vs Ethereum Classic Angel Investors, Startups & Blockchain developers... If you have been involved with cryptocurrency , then there is no way that you dont have an opinion on this. The battle between Ethereum and Ethereum Classic is both an ethical and ideological one. Before we start explaining the basic difference between the two and drawing our own conclusions, it is important for us to know a little bit of history. A lot of things needed to happen for us to arrive in this conjecture. So, lets dial back the clocks and check out some of the most critical points in not just Ethereum history, but cryptocurrency in general. The entire ecosystem of Ethereum works on the basis of smart contracts. For the uninitiated, smart contracts are basically how things get done in the Ethereum eco-system. To put it in layman terms, smart contracts are automated contracts that enforce and facilitate the terms of the contract itself. The DAO aka the Decentralized Autonomous Organization was a complex smart contract which was going to revolutionize Ethereum forever. It was basically going to be a decentralized venture capital fund which was going to fund all future DAPPS made in the eco-system. The way it worked was pretty straightforward. If you wanted to have any say in the direction DAPPS that would get funded, then you would have to buy DAO Tokens for a certain amount of Ether. The DAO tokens were indicators that you are now officially part of the DAO system. So, how were DAPPS going to get approved and built? Well, firstly they need to get whitelisted by the curators, who have basically known figureheads in the Ethereum world. After getting their stamp of approval, they will get voted on by the DAO token holders. If the proposal gets a 20% approva Continue reading >>

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