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What Is Private Blockchain

What Are The Use Cases For Private Blockchains? The Experts Weigh In

What Are The Use Cases For Private Blockchains? The Experts Weigh In

What Are the Use Cases for Private Blockchains? The Experts Weigh In Many people argue that private blockchains, run by private firms, are useless, since they make users dependent upon a third party the firm managing the blockchain. Many believe that private blockchains currently being considered are not blockchains, but rather, distributed ledger technology which has already existed. Others believe private blockchains could provide solutions to many financial enterprise problems that Bitcoin does not, such as abiding by regulations such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), anti-money laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) laws. The Hyperledger project from the Linux Foundation, R3CEVs Corda , and the Gem Health network are just several of the different private blockchain projects under development. Bitcoin Magazine spoke with some well-known blockchain thinkers on their opinions of what the uses for a private blockchain might be. In general, Bloq feels it is important to build and support software that works on both public and private blockchains. This connects the private blockchain customer with public blockchain innovation, developers and new applications. I'll preface my comments with the fact that OpenBazaar is a public blockchain Bitcoin-only project, so I don't have tons of experience with private blockchains. I personally don't believe that private blockchains provide much added value above a privileged database and have yet to really see a necessary use case for them. "Private blockchains provide interesting opportunities for businesses to leverage [their] trustless and transparent foundation for internal and business-to-business use cases. With the advent of smart contracts, this technology could eventually replace many Continue reading >>

Public And Private Blockchain

Public And Private Blockchain

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video If you're a software developer and new to blockchain, this is the course for you. Several experienced IBM blockchain developer advocates will lead you through a series of videos that describe high-level concepts, components, and strategies on building blockchain business networks. You'll also get hands-on experience modeling and building blockchain networks as well as create your first blockchain application. The first part of this course covers basic concepts of blockchain, and no programming skills are required. However, to complete three of the four labs, you must understand basic software object-oriented programming and how to use the command line. It's also helpful, but not required, that you can write code in JavaScript. When you complete the course, you should understand what a blockchain business network is, how to build and model a simple blockchain solution, and the role of the developer in creating blockchain applications. If you successfully complete the course, you'll receive a certificate of completion. You'll need to pass several end-of-section quizzes and a final exam that include multiple choice, true and false, and fill in the blank questions. This course does not cover Bitcoin or cryptocurrency in detail. Blockchain fabric development and architecture In this module, you'll learn more about the components of a blockchain solution and about the roles of people who model, build, and maintain that blockchain solution. You'll also learn to use command-line tools to build a simple application in JavaScript that queries and updates a prepopulated blockchain network ledger. You'll also learn more about the architecture of a blockchain network and a Continue reading >>

Public Vs Private Blockchain In A Wide World Of Unique Applications

Public Vs Private Blockchain In A Wide World Of Unique Applications

Public vs Private Blockchain In A Wide World Of Unique Applications Recently we explored the fundamental concept of blockchain and how its revolutionizing record keeping in a wide swath of industries. We focused on the public blockchain, an incorruptible record keeping system; transparent by being public and un-hackable due to its distributed nature. However, there is more to this globally distributed ledger system than being public and transparent. The advantages of blockchain technology transcend these characteristics, which have been made famous by applications like bitcoin. There are also private and permissioned blockchains that prioritize different elements of the technology in order to serve a variety of other applications. Public, permissioned and private blockchains are defined by who can use the system and who hosts the blockchain in order to validate transactions. Anyone can be a user or a node (host) on a public blockchain, while permissioned blockchains are operated by a wide but defined group, such as the primary stakeholders of a specific industry. A private blockchain, as the name suggests, is run and used by one organization. Each form of blockchain places a different level of importance on anonymity, immutability, efficiency, and transparency. The public blockchain, that has been made famous by bitcoin for example, prioritizes anonymity, immutability, and transparency over efficiency. Whereas permissioned blockchains value immutability and efficiency over anonymity and transparency. The private blockchain can be confusing for those just getting to grips with complex systems like bitcoin. By prioritizing efficiency over the anonymity, immutability and transparency it foregoes the characteristics normally associated with the technology. The range of app Continue reading >>

Private Blockchain Vs Public Blockchain

Private Blockchain Vs Public Blockchain

You cannot be a crypto investor or entrepreneur without having a real understanding of the differences between these types of blockchains as well as their implications. Even if they are based on similar principles, their operation is, in fact, different to all levels. So the tokens issued by these blockchains will not be assessed in the same manner. A blockchain is so-called public (or open) when anyone can become a member of the network without conditions of admission. In other words, anyone wishing to use the service proposed by the network can download the protocol locally without having to reveal his or her identity or meet predetermined criteria. A protocol is a computer program that could be compared to a Charter in that it defines the rules of operation of a network based on a blockchain. For example, the members of the bitcoin network download the Bitcoin protocol (through the intermediary of their wallet) to be able to join the network and exchange bitcoins, but the only condition is to have an Internet connection. It is different with a private blockchain (or closed) since the members of the network are selected before being able to download the protocol and therefore use the proposed service by the network. The mining capabilities and the system of consensus as a whole are centralized within the hands of the same entity. A network based on a private blockchain is therefore not decentralized in itself. Finally, consortium blockchains provide many of the benefits of private blockchains without focus the mechanism of the consensus between the hands of the same entity. In this article, we will mostly focus on the diffrence between public and private blockchain. The differences between these types of blockchains are based on the levels of trust existing among the Continue reading >>

Heres How I Built A Private Blockchain Network, And You Cantoo

Heres How I Built A Private Blockchain Network, And You Cantoo

Heres how I built a private blockchain network, and you cantoo Nothing helps understand blockchains better than building oneyourself This is PART-4 of The Product Managers guide to the Blockchain series! If you somehow landed on my publication for the first time, Welcome! I recommend you start from part 1 , and then read part 2 and part3 before reading this post. However If you are the explorer type, read on! (Update: Heres the latest part 5 of the blockchain series ) In Part 3 of this series, we looked at the mechanics of Ethereum and also talked about the concept of Ethereum Accounts, Smart Contracts and Gas the fuel that helps all these pieces to work together. Its been a lot of reading so far, but while you can read all the blockchain content available on the internet, nothing helps understand blockchains better than building one yourself. So thats what I did. You can simply follow this post and build a little prototype to see how everything weve talked about so far comes together. Here is what we will accomplish in this post, Weve seen this before , but basically the Ethereum blockchain network is simply lots of EVM (Ethereum Virtual Machines) or nodes connected to every other node to create a mesh. Each node runs a copy of the entire blockchain and competes to mine the next block or validate a transaction. Whenever a new block is added, the blockchain updates and is propagated to the entire network, such that each node is in sync. To become a node in the Ethereum network, your computer will have to download and update a copy of the entire Ethereum blockchain. To achieve this Ethereum provides tools that you can download, connect to the Ethereum network with and then interact with it. These are: Geth if you have experience with web development and are interested i Continue reading >>

Public Vs Private Blockchains: Challenges And Gaps

Public Vs Private Blockchains: Challenges And Gaps

Public vs Private Blockchains: Challenges and Gaps By Joe Liebkind | March 3, 2018 6:00 AM EST Why Cardano Could Beat Ethereum and Bitcoin Since its introduction, blockchain has undergone several iterations as the general public and private corporations sought to take advantage of its valuable infrastructure. While its spectacular design has long played second fiddle to the speculative sentiment driving valuations in cryptocurrencies, blockchains actual technological rewards should not be discounted. If anything, the attention fixated on the rampant rally in cryptocurrency valuations has brought increased attention to the entire ecosystem, accelerating adoption and even raising a greater likelihood of institutional participation. Already, countless name brand global multinationals have entered the space in a drive to revolutionize their offerings. IBM, for example, is one of the companies at the vanguard of blockchain technology applications for business, especially amid the growing drive to migrate more services to cloud-based infrastructure. Even so, it is just one example of the growing corporate embrace of blockchain, though it highlights the shift towards the deployment of private blockchains that eschew many of the properties and principles popularized by the earliest chains. At its core, blockchain can be viewed as a decentralized store of information, or a database that is updated in real-time and distributed across its user-base for validated record-keeping. Distilling the concept even further, it can be a trustless means to exchange value, both informational and asset-based. Above all, public chains are especially valuable due to the transparency inherent in the technology, with anyone able to view and verify all the data recorded on each block. One of the re Continue reading >>

5 Answers - What Is The Difference Between Private Blockchains And Public Blockchains Like Bitcoin? - Quora

5 Answers - What Is The Difference Between Private Blockchains And Public Blockchains Like Bitcoin? - Quora

What is the difference between private blockchains and public blockchains like bitcoin? A private blockchain is just like a public one when it comes to the distribute aspect of the data,multiple computers (nodes) are comneceted through a protocol and they exchange transactions and help mentain a common ledger. Unlike a public one the private blockchain is behind a firewall and can only be mined by computers that are on that network. It is also generally used just within a company, behind their firewall and is only available to the emplyees and systems on that company. You can say a public blockchain is a democracy where all the computers and organizations decide together where they are going and what changes to implement. In a private one, there is generally a dictatorship because everything is owned by one company. Have a look at . The private blockchain that NASDAQ is using. If you want to find out more about how the blockchain works have a look at I think that there's misunderstanding of what "private blockchain" means. If the blockchain would be totally private - like belongs to a few parties that totally trust each other - then it will defeat the whole added value of blockchain as a "trust machine". Such organization would be better of with adopting some existing database to serve as a ledger - like Oracle SQL where only trusted parties get read/write access. Private blockchain - is one where there are some parties - that somewhat trust each other, but not entirely. Like companies that compete with each other in some things, but want collaborate in other. Such companies can decide to expose the blockchain to everybody, but restrict those who can be miners. Or they just can decide that block considered to be "confirmed" whenever n out of m participants sign the blo Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Public And Private Blockchain

The Difference Between Public And Private Blockchain

Blockchain Unleashed: IBM Blockchain Blog The difference between public and private blockchain May 31, 2017 | Written by: Praveen Jayachandran Categorized: Blockchain Developers | Blockchain Explained | Blockchain Identity There are a number of explanations on what blockchain is and what exactly is the difference between Bitcoin and blockchain , but another area where I get many questions, is the difference between public and private blockchain. The similarities of public and private blockchain Many flavors of blockchain have evolved over the years and the terminology is often misconstrued. This is easy to do because public and private blockchain have many similarities: Both are decentralized peer-to-peer networks, where each participant maintains a replica of a shared append-only ledger of digitally signed transactions. Both maintain the replicas in sync through a protocol referred to as consensus. Both provide certain guarantees on the immutability of the ledger, even when some participants are faulty or malicious. The sole distinction between public and private blockchain is related to who is allowed to participate in the network, execute the consensus protocol and maintain the shared ledger. A public blockchain network is completely open and anyone can join and participate in the network. The network typically has an incentivizing mechanism to encourage more participants to join the network. Bitcoin is one of the largest public blockchain networks in production today. One of the drawbacks of a public blockchain is the substantial amount of computational power that is necessary to maintain a distributed ledger at a large scale. More specifically, to achieve consensus, each node in a network must solve a complex, resource-intensive cryptographic problem called a proo Continue reading >>

What Are Private Blockchains And What Purposes Do They Serve?

What Are Private Blockchains And What Purposes Do They Serve?

These days, the market is filled with both public and private blockchains, yet due to their similarities, many people tend to confuse the two. In this article, we will attempt to eliminate the confusionsurroundingprivate blockchains and their purposes. Both public and private blockchain networks are decentralized and distributed P2P ledgers that safely record and store information through transactions. Additionally, both provide immutability guarantees and are kept in sync via consensus protocols. The main dissimilarity between the two relates to who can participate in the network, make transactions, maintain the ledger and see the records. Public blockchain networks are open to anyone and even have mechanisms meant to encourage more people to join the network, similar to bitcoin and other digital currencies. On the other hand, private blockchains offer limited access to authorized members only. When it comes to using the blockchain network for business purposes, the openness associated with public networks is detrimental to the privacy of the companies involved. Not only this, but public blockchains also require huge amounts of computing power to maintain. Most private blockchain networks are permissioned and have varying sets of rules. Consequently, the network restricts who can participate and who cannot, with access only provided via invitation. Once a new party joins a private/permissioned blockchain,it will instantly start playing a role in maintaining the network and its decentralized status, according to the initial rules put in place by the networks developers. Currently, there are numerous use cases for private blockchains. For instance, businesses have the opportunity to base their operations on a transparent and trustless foundation which can actively keep Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between A Public And Private Blockchain?

What Is The Difference Between A Public And Private Blockchain?

Join our resident expert, Taylor Gerring, as he explores the differences between public and private blockchains . He dives into the differences between public and private blockchains, compares them, and ultimately answers which type of blockchain he expects to see in the future. While public blockchains provide great transparency, private companies allow independent organizations to implement blockchain technology without giving up any privacy. Check out this video for all the similarities and differences between the types of chains! Or you can read through the discussion below! Be sure to check out our What is a Blockchain guide if you want more information, and our other episodes of Ask an Expert for all those questions you need answered!And if you ever have any questions you want to ask an expert, contact us here! Whats the difference between public and private blockchains? The blockchains we are more familiar with today, such as Bitcoin , Ethereum , and Dash , are public blockchains in the sense that access is open to anyone. By contrast, private blockchains intend to restrict either participant or validator access. Many private companies, including Disney and JP Morgan, have shown an interest in the potential of blockchain technology, but require greater control than that provided by public blockchains. Companies are looking to incorporate blockchain technology into the way they conduct business, ranging from accounting to record keeping. Obviously, private entities dont want this information to be shared publicly, but they also see the advantages of moving towards blockchain technology. The middle ground that they have desired has led to the creation of private blockchains, allowing companies the benefit from the technology without giving up their autonomy. The r Continue reading >>

Private And Permissioned Ledgers

Private And Permissioned Ledgers

In the 4th part of this series, Ill take a deeper look at a different approach to maintaining data privacy private blockchains. So far, this series has focused on solutions to improving privacy on public blockchains. As weve seen, its not easy to maintain financial and data privacy in the face of systems whose strengths are rooted in their public nature. Through cryptography and diligent engineering, the community have found a number of solutions to common privacy issues. As Ill explain, private blockchains are not one of those solutions. Instead, I believe they serve best as a restatement of the issues facing public blockchains today, especially acute for the enterprise privacy and scalability. In the second half of 2015, the industry took a turn. The price of Bitcoin was stagnant . The Ethereum Genesis block had been mined , but Ethereum wasnt yet on many peoples radar. After the excitement of 2013 and maintained interest of 2014, VC funding was getting harder to come by. Having just graduated a Bitcoin-focused accelerator , our team saw this effect first-hand. Fellow graduates struggled to raise traditional venture capital, opting instead to join other accelerators or forgo funding altogether. Others, however, pivoted to serve enterprise clients, and went on to raise significant rounds. In fact, the trend was mirrored in the greater space, with high-profile Bitcoin infrastructure companies like Gem and Chain pivoting to work on private blockchains and permissioned ledgers. Businesses were sold on the idea of a blockchain. Some were convinced that it could lessen coordination costs between disparate parties. Fair enough. Others heard that blockchains were an existential threat, and were looking to get out in front of the whole thing historically, a difficult proposit Continue reading >>

Private Blockchain Or Database?

Private Blockchain Or Database?

A private blockchain is a blockchain that has an access control layer built into the protocol [ 1 ]. This means the network participants have control over who can join the network, and who can participate in the consensus process of the blockchain. This is in contrast to a public blockchain, which is open for all to participate in as a user, as an entity that determines the validity of transactions, and the consensus process. Private blockchains, therefore have a very different level of security than public blockchains like Bitcoin [ 2 ]. Private blockchains are a class of distributed ledgers that use transactions and blocks, first described in Bitcoin. Distributed ledgers are shared databases with access protection rights, with defined rules on what types of changes can be performed by what entities. The value of distributed ledgers at the enterprise level arises from the ability to do away with reconciliation of data among participating entities [ 3 ]. This is especially the case with financial institutions that trade with one another. A lot of effort on the back-office today is spent in reconciliation of records among different institutions [ 4 ]. Instead, distributed ledgers allow financial institutions to maintain a structurally consistent shared database of transactions. This allows each participating institution to read data from the distributed ledger and be guaranteed that it is valid and reconciled against the data held by the other participating institutes. Difference between a Public and Private Blockchain Distributed ledgers are inspired from Bitcoin and other public blockchains. However, they differ in their fundamental characteristics of access and security promises. The security of a public blockchain like Bitcoin comes from its proof of work, which mak Continue reading >>

What Usecases Do Private Blockchains Have?

What Usecases Do Private Blockchains Have?

Are private blockchains intended to serve as testnets only or are there other applications? What use cases can private blockchains be applied to? In order to differentiate this question from this one , I'm going to assume this is looking specifically at use cases for private networks, not for a comparison between private and public ones. Jeff Coleman Jan 25 '16 at 1:59 There are numerous use cases for private blockchains. Some of the many ones that are being currently considered in industry include: As an access-restricted inter-bank settlement layer for currencies and securities As an inter-departmental "balance sheet" within a large enterprise tracking private data such as security authorisations, finances, etc. without any one department being in authoritative control of the records As an access-restricted platform for the issuance of loyalty points, gift cards, etc. by a major commercial entity As a private tracking tool for private equity, debt, and other liquid agreements. For a discussion of the contrasting features and other reasons that motivate these types of use cases to consider private blockchains over public blockchains, see this question . There is an Ethereum blog post that addresses this question. In a nutshell: Private blockchains are not necessarily just testnets There are two aspects of "privacy": (i) read permissions, (ii) block generation permissions. You may want to restrict (i) because your use-case may require privacy. You may want to restrict (ii) because your use-case does not require globally distributed trust, but rather trust spread across a pre-determined set of participants. that isn't an answer... eth Jan 22 '16 at 11:55 Indeed. Its a question rather. And for a reason: the article above covers your question and you did not state what ef Continue reading >>

On Public And Private Blockchains

On Public And Private Blockchains

Over the last year the concept of private blockchains has become very popular in the broader blockchain technology discussion. Essentially, instead of having a fully public and uncontrolled network and state machine secured by cryptoeconomics (eg. proof of work, proof of stake), it is also possible to create a system where access permissions are more tightly controlled, with rights to modify or even read the blockchain state restricted to a few users, while still maintaining many kinds of partial guarantees of authenticity and decentralization that blockchains provide. Such systems have been a primary focus of interest from financial institutions, and have in part led to a backlash from those who see such developments as either compromising the whole point of decentralization or being a desperate act of dinosaurish middlemen trying to stay relevant (or simply committing the crime of using a blockchain other than Bitcoin ). However, for those who are in this fight simply because they want to figure out how to best serve humanity, or even pursue the more modest goal of serving their customers, what are the practical differences between the two styles? First, what exactly are the options at hand? To summarize, there are generally three categories of blockchain-like database applications: Public blockchains: a public blockchain is a blockchain that anyone in the world can read, anyone in the world can send transactions to and expect to see them included if they are valid, and anyone in the world can participate in the consensus process the process for determining what blocks get added to the chain and what the current state is. As a substitute for centralized or quasi-centralized trust, public blockchains are secured by cryptoeconomics the combination of economic incentive Continue reading >>

What Are Private Blockchains & How Are They Different From Public Blockchains?

What Are Private Blockchains & How Are They Different From Public Blockchains?

What Are Private Blockchains & How Are They Different From Public Blockchains? By: Sudhir Khatwani In: Blockchain Last Updated: Was it Bitcoin that introduced Blockchain to the world or was it the other way round? Well, this fact is as debatable as the chicken vs egg. But nonetheless,both Bitcoin and Blockchain have done remarkably well this year. Bitcoin reached an all-time high of well above $7000. Blockchain attractedmore than $2 billion investment. A handful of IT and banking pundits say that Blockchain is the real invention of Satoshi Nakamoto and not Bitcoin. It is so because the blockchain technology can be leveraged to solve many fundamental problems that our world faces in many areas. Since its invention, the blockchain that Bitcoin introduced to us has mutated into several other types of the blockchain. I have discussed some of the types of blockchain here on CoinSutra . But out of these aforementioned mentioned types of blockchain, I am interested in two types i.e. Public Blockchain and Private Blockchain, because I feel they have a lot of potential. Anyone can participate in a public blockchain because it is open-source and public to all where no one is in charge. There is no access or rights managementdone for a public blockchain and anyone can be the part of the consensus. ( Know more about consensus here ) Because of this, anyone at any given point of time can join or leave/read/write/audit the public blockchain ecosystem and the network will still be trustless. Trustless here means you need not set-up a trusted party or entity to overlook the operations on this type of blockchain and yet it will be censorship resistance. The catch is that this type of self-governed, decentralized yet trustless autonomy is ensured on the system by its method of decision Continue reading >>

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