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Ethereum Wallet Syncing Problems

Ethereum Wallet Syncing Problems

One of the most common problems with the Ethereum Wallet application is keeping the blockchain in sync with the Ethereum network. This page describes some of the common issues users may encounter while trying to sync the blockchain and potential methods to work around the problems. Note that Ethereum Wallet will not display your account balance correctly when it is not synced fully or correctly. Check that your the clock on your computer is close to real time. Change your system settings so that your system clock is synced to an NTP (Network Time Protocol) server. Slow Syncing Between Blocks 2,283,397 And 2,717,576 You may be encountering some problems syncing Ethereum Wallet (or Mist) to the Mainnet blockchain. A common problem when syncing Ethereum Wallet's blockchain data is that the syncing slows down between blocks 2,283,397 and 2,620,384 due to the attack on the Ethereum network (reference Why is my node synchronization stuck/extremely slow at block 2,306,843? ). The syncing also slows down between blocks 2,675,055 and 2,717,576 due to the state clearing process to remove the 20 million empty accounts created by the network attack. If you have a problem with slow syncing, the easiest way to recover from this slowdown is to remove your blockchain data and restart Ethereum Wallet. Ethereum Wallet will then perform a fast sync which skips over these attack blocks. WARNING: Make sure you back up your keystore directory so you don't accidentally delete your account information. Depending on your operating system, you will find the chaindata subdirectory in: Alternatively, you can run geth removedb to remove the blockchain data. Start Ethereum Wallet. It should now start fast syncing the blockchain data. Alternatively, run geth --syncmode "fast" --cache 1024 console an Continue reading >>

Greg Wright: Relocating The Ethereum (block)chain Data To An External Drive For Linux / Mac Systems

Greg Wright: Relocating The Ethereum (block)chain Data To An External Drive For Linux / Mac Systems

Relocating the ethereum (block)chain data to an external drive for Linux / Mac systems With the ethereum blockchain now over 110GB, locating the chain data to a separate external drive has become necessary for me so just posting the steps taken as well as referencing to the original helpful post for other options that may be more appropriate for others: Soft Linking - chaindata Subdirectory Only Copy your ~/Library/Ethereum/chaindata subdirectory into your new location /Volumes/Drive2/Ethereum/chaindata using the following commands: A copy of your Ethereum chaindata subdirectory will now be located in /Volumes/Drive2/Ethereum/chaindata. Rename your default Ethereum chaindata subdirectory for testing: mv ~/Library/Ethereum/chaindata ~/Library/Ethereum/OldChaindata_to_delete_when_tested Soft link your new chaindata subdirectory back to the default location: ln -s /Volumes/Drive2/Ethereum/chaindata ~/Library/Ethereum/chaindata Test out your Mist browser and delete your old chaindata directory ONLY AFTER your testing is successful: rm -rf ~/Library/Ethereum/OldChaindata_to_delete_when_tested I'm a total novice at using Terminal. I have an external harddrive that I would like to move my Ethereum chain data to instead of having it stored on my mac's local harddrive. How do I do this? Is it possible to do without using Terminal or how do I set up new folder on the external harddrive using Terminal. What should the mkdir command look like? Please help! Continue reading >>

Backup & Restore | Ethereum Frontier Guide

Backup & Restore | Ethereum Frontier Guide

DO NOT FORGET YOUR PASSWORD and BACKUP YOUR KEYSTORE Everything geth persists gets written inside its data directory (except for the PoW Ethash DAG, see note below).The default data directory locations are platform specific: Accounts are stored in the keystore subdirectory. The contents of this directories should be transportable between nodes, platforms, implementations (C++, Go, Python). To configure the location of the data directory, the --datadir parameter can be specified. See CLI Options for more details. Note: The Ethash DAG is stored at ~/.ethash (Mac/Linux) or ~/AppData/Ethash (Windows) so that it can be reused by all clients. You can store this in a different location by using a symbolic link. Sometimes the internal database formats need updating (for example, when upgrade from before 0.9.20). This can be run with the following command (geth should not be otherwise running): Geth's blockchain and state databases can be removed with: This is useful for deleting an old chain and sync'ing to a new one. It only affects data directories that can be re-created on synchronisation and does not touch the keystore. Export the blockchain in binary format with: Or if you want to back up portions of the chain over time, a first and last block can be specified. For example, to back up the first epoch: Note that when backing up a partial chain, the file will be appended rather than truncated. Import binary-format blockchain exports with: See for more info And finally: DO NOT FORGET YOUR PASSWORD and BACKUP YOUR KEYSTORE Continue reading >>

Talk Crypto Blog Symlink Mist Data Directory To Save 52gb

Talk Crypto Blog Symlink Mist Data Directory To Save 52gb

When you download Mist and try to sync the Ethereum blockchain, your Ethereum folder will be in the following location: To save space, you can put your chaindata folder in another location such as a removable USB drive. Above you can see my chaindata folder is actually a symbolic link. To create a symbolic link run this command: > ln -s /Volumes/myUSBdrive/Ethereum/chaindata ~/Library/Ethereum/chaindata What Ive done is Ive put my 39Gb chaindata folder on a thumb drive and Im linking to it. The reason why its 8.43Gb is because I havent removed test net yet. Testnet is 8.24Gb. Once this is removed, even more space will be saved. The other option is to create a symbolic link to the entire Ethereum folder but this results in an error where Mist is looking for a geth.ipc file which is created upon startup but it cant because of the symbolic link. This is the easiest and quickest way to have the data directory located in a non default location. This is different to bitcoin-qt where the location can be specified in the configuration file. Continue reading >>

Is It Possible, In Theory, To Create A Block-chain Where Data Can Be Deleted?

Is It Possible, In Theory, To Create A Block-chain Where Data Can Be Deleted?

Couldn't we say that after, say, 10,000 confirmations we accept all balances as true and delete the old data? You would lose the information of where the coins came from of course. You wouldn't be able to point to their generation block. And what if some coins were in addresses that existed on the earlier blocks in the chain, deleting those blocks would delete those coins. But could you remove dead addresses and transactions that were fully spent? It turns out it is possible, and was actually written by Satoshi himself in the original bitcoin whitepaper where he described a process known as "blockchain pruning" which deletes unnecessary data from fully validating nodes. The official version of bitcoin core does not implement blockchain pruning. Of course, you'd still have to have some nodes with the full blockchain to sync up new nodes. Another way to decrease the hard disk space requirements of a node would be to chop the block chain up and distribute it to multiple nodes, then have good communication between nodes for transaction propagation and validation. I don't think this is being seriously considered. A final way that Satoshi also wrote about is called an SPV wallet. You might have used ones like the android bitcoin wallet, or MultiBit on the desktop. These wallets only download block headers, not all the transactions and rely on fully validating nodes for information on your addresses. All of these options lead to a more centralized network. Continue reading >>

Defeating The Ethereum Ddosattacks

Defeating The Ethereum Ddosattacks

Blockchain Enthusiast, Founder QuickBlocks.io and Philadelphia Ethereum Meetup, MS Computer Science UPenn I spend a lot of time looking at historical Ethereum transactional data. I do this by scanning the chain using QuickBlocks . If youve ever done this, you will be familiar with a certain set of transactions that take a very long time to process. These transactions happened between blocks 2,286,910 and 2,717,576. They are a pain in my a$$. See here . In a surprisingly effective attack, some evil genius took advantage of an underpriced opcode to create millions of dead Ethereum accounts. This had the effect of significantly bloating the state database, but more importantly for our purposes it created tons of transaction traces. Until recently, if we were scanning the Ethereum database (especially if we were scanning this section and looking at traces which QuickBlocks does all the time), we had to wait many hours (perhaps even days) while Parity delivered the traces. We could have cached these traces, but our goal has always been to create a minimal impact on the target machine (this helps us stay decentralized), and we never write data without thinking about it careful. With the solution we present below, we can now effectively choose whether to scan, skip or cache these transactions. This post discusses how we did that and how we now routinely scan very quickly through this difficult portion of the data. The morning of DevCon 2, there was a hack against the Geth client. The Ethereum developers responded quickly, and fixed that hack, but a few days later another attack occurred. This second attack went on for more than a month and is described here . In response, the Ethereum devs conducted two hard forks: Tangerine Dream ( EIP150 ) and Spurious Dragon ( EIP 161 ). A Continue reading >>

How To Properly Uninstall Ethereum Wallet

How To Properly Uninstall Ethereum Wallet

I hope you guys can help me on an issue I'm having with the ethereum wallet. I downloaded the wallet from the ethereum homepage and quickly noticed that it was slow as hell syncing the blockchain a problem many of you probably know. Because of that I deleted the chaindata folder as suggested in many threads. I still had the problem of a slow sync so I decided to start all over againg, to uninstall the wallet, install it and delete the chaindata folder again. To my surprise after uninstalling the wallet and installing it again I couldn't find the chaindata folder and other folders anymore. The folder structure seems to have changed. There is a chaindata folder, but it is now in the geth folder which wasn't the case at the beginning My folder structure looks like this since then: I think to remember that before my whole uninstall & reinstall chaos the Ethereum folder had more subdirectories in it Or am I just wrong? Nevertheless I would like to know how I can COMPLETELY uninstall the Ethereum wallet and everything connected to it, so that I can atempt to install it properly again (without it missing certain folders). Continue reading >>

How To Delete Your Local Copy Of The Blockchain

How To Delete Your Local Copy Of The Blockchain

How to Delete Your Local Copy of the Blockchain If you want to delete your local copy of the NEM blockchain, it is strongly recommended to shutdown the NEM software (NCC and NIS) first. The blockchain is a database file located at: Windows Vista/7/8: C:\Users\[YOUR-USERNAME]\nem\nis\data\ Mac: /Users/[YOUR-USERNAME]/nem/nis/data/ Linux: /home/[YOUR-USERNAME]/nem/nis/data/ After you deleted the blockchain, restart the NEM client and it will begin to download and synchronize the blockchain from scratch. If you don't want to wait for the blockchain to download, you can follow this guide to import the developer uploaded database. 1. Open the Windows file explorer and go to (C:) and then to Users. 6. Delete the "nis5.h2" file (this is the blockchain database): Continue reading >>

Ethereum/mist - Gitter

Ethereum/mist - Gitter

I opened mist wallet on May 3, i can't recall if a entered with Testnet. I did the back up and have the Keystore file with the files. I transferred ETH from Kraken but they never arrived, did not see them in my mist wallet. The transaction is visible on etherscan.io How can i restore the old account using the backup files? I opened myetherwallet and the backup file does not open there? Anyone know how to transfer funds from Mist to coinbase without syncing? Thread below: @Heleri Balances do not show until you have synced to the block your Kraken tx was sent to Mist. Were you fully synced before you sent the deposit from Kraken? @RiotAkt Your other option is to import your keys to Parity, but I would ask in their channels on the specifics. Hi , Someone could tell me how heavy the folder chaindata of mist, since it takes 60 gb and still I can not see my balance @PabDuart If you are doing fast sync, the chaindata folder should be less than 20GB. But you can only do fast sync in one complete sync, once you stop sync, fast sync is disabled if chaindata folder is not empty. You are looking at something around ~160GB for slow sync you are on. Delete your chaindata folder, start fresh sync and do not interrupt fast sync. Continue reading >>

The Ethereum-blockchain Size Will Not Exceed 1tb Anytime Soon.

The Ethereum-blockchain Size Will Not Exceed 1tb Anytime Soon.

The Ethereum-blockchain size will not exceed 1TB anytime soon. Before diving into this article, please read the two disclosures about my involvement (1,2) and the one on data accuracy (3) at the bottom of the article. At least once a month someone posts a chart on r/ethereum predicting the blockchain size of Ethereum will soon exceed 1 TB. I want to take that chance to clean up with some stories around the Ethereum-blockchain size in this article and try to explain why this chart is technically correct, but not the full picture. Let's have a look at this chart first. It shows the complete data directory size of an Ethereum node (red), Geth in this case, and a Bitcoin node (blue), probably Bitcoin-Core , plotted over time. While the Bitcoin graph is moving slightly upwards in a seemingly linear inclination, the Ethereum graph reminds the reader of an exponential growing slope. On Blocks, Block-History, States, and State-History Users accusing Ethereum of blockchain-bloat are not far off with their assumptions. But actually, not the chain is bloated but the Ethereum state. I want to examine some terminology from the Whitepaper before proceeding. Block. A bundle of transactions which, after proper execution, update the state. Each transaction-bundling block gets a number, has some difficulty, and contains the most recent state. State. The state is made up of all initialized Ethereum accounts. At the time of writing, there are around 12 million known accounts and contracts growing at a rate of roughly 100k new accounts per day . Block-History. A chain of all historical blocks, starting at the genesis block up to the latest best block, also known as the blockchain. State-History. The state of each historical block makes up the state history. I will get into the details on t Continue reading >>

Heres How I Built A Private Blockchain Network, And You Cantoo

Heres How I Built A Private Blockchain Network, And You Cantoo

Heres how I built a private blockchain network, and you cantoo Nothing helps understand blockchains better than building oneyourself This is PART-4 of The Product Managers guide to the Blockchain series! If you somehow landed on my publication for the first time, Welcome! I recommend you start from part 1 , and then read part 2 and part3 before reading this post. However If you are the explorer type, read on! (Update: Heres the latest part 5 of the blockchain series ) In Part 3 of this series, we looked at the mechanics of Ethereum and also talked about the concept of Ethereum Accounts, Smart Contracts and Gas the fuel that helps all these pieces to work together. Its been a lot of reading so far, but while you can read all the blockchain content available on the internet, nothing helps understand blockchains better than building one yourself. So thats what I did. You can simply follow this post and build a little prototype to see how everything weve talked about so far comes together. Here is what we will accomplish in this post, Weve seen this before , but basically the Ethereum blockchain network is simply lots of EVM (Ethereum Virtual Machines) or nodes connected to every other node to create a mesh. Each node runs a copy of the entire blockchain and competes to mine the next block or validate a transaction. Whenever a new block is added, the blockchain updates and is propagated to the entire network, such that each node is in sync. To become a node in the Ethereum network, your computer will have to download and update a copy of the entire Ethereum blockchain. To achieve this Ethereum provides tools that you can download, connect to the Ethereum network with and then interact with it. These are: Geth if you have experience with web development and are interested i Continue reading >>

The Blockchain Immutability Myth

The Blockchain Immutability Myth

Where flexible thinking is preferable to dogmatism The highest good, than which there is no higher, is the blockchain, and consequently it is immutably good, hence truly eternal and truly immortal. Saint Augustine, De natura boni, i, 405 C.E. (with minor edits) If you ask someone well-informed about the characteristics of blockchains, the word immutable will invariably appear in the response. In plain English, this word is used to denote something which can never be modified or changed. In a blockchain, it refers to the global log of transactions, which is created by consensus between the chains participants. The basic notion is this: once a blockchain transaction has received a sufficient level of validation, some cryptography ensures that it can never be replaced or reversed. This marks blockchains as different from regular files or databases, in which information can be edited and deleted at will. Or so the theory goes. In the raucous arena of blockchain debate, immutability has become a quasi-religious doctrine a core belief that must not be shaken or questioned. And just like the doctrines in mainstream religions, members of opposing camps use immutability as a weapon of derision and ridicule. The past year has witnessed two prominent examples: Cryptocurrency advocates claiming that immutability can only be achieved through decentralized economic mechanisms such as proof-of-work. From this perspective, private blockchains are laughable because they depend on the collective good behavior of a known group of validators, who clearly cannot be trusted. Scorn poured on the idea of an editable (or mutable) blockchain, in which retroactive modifications can be made to the transaction history under certain conditions. Mockers posed the question: What could possibly be the Continue reading >>

Exceptionally Large Ethereum Blockchain Size

Exceptionally Large Ethereum Blockchain Size

Exceptionally Large Ethereum Blockchain Size I came to notice that my hard drive which is dedicated to blockchains reached maximum capacity and after a little investigation, I discovered that my "blocks" folder in my Ethereum directory weighs 74.5 GB (80,050,787,860 bytes) for 840,984 Files which seems extremely odd. There's also an "extra" & "state" folder which additionally weigh ~3.5 GB and ~13GB respectively. Cryptominingblog created a post a few hours ago stating that Ethereum's directory is about 16 GB so this only adds to my confusion. I invoke the following command to launch eth via a batfile [start eth -d Q:\the.MlNE\Ethereum] within Mist's subdirectories followed by Mist a few seconds later which is of the latest build. Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here. My Ethereum folder (C:\Users\\AppData\Roaming\Ethereum) is 10.4 GB, using the Mist wallet in win7. Almost all of it comes from the chaindata folder from inside. Wow, that's already messed up in itself. But it's even crazier when you consider Ethereum's launch wasn't even 10 months ago . Dash was released over 2 years ago and its blockchain is only 1.8 GB as of this writing. Just sayin'. Guess distributing a glorified calculator all over the world is taking its toll. Nonetheless ETH is gonna have a future on one datacenter or the other... Quote from: ICOcountdown.com on May 10, 2016, 09:48:56 PM It is because all smart contracts are stored in the blockchain. I did recently create a wallet which to my knowledge is a contract of very basic form. I do however remain a little reluctant to believe that my wallet accounts for over 70 GB of data. damn i need to download the wallet but if ur saying its so Continue reading >>

How To Delete Geth Chaindata & Resync

How To Delete Geth Chaindata & Resync

Home Guides Clients How To Delete Geth Chaindata & Resync Go-Ethereum (Geth)is one of the many Ethereum clients . It is developed by developers from the Ethereum Foundation . The core features of Ethereum web 3.0 stack are expected to arrive at Geth first. In this guide, the procedure for re-syncing Gethon Windows will be shown. I am usingGeth 1.5.4 (latest stable version as of 30 Nov) on my Windows 10 machine. Note: If you have not installed Geth, please install Geth using the instructions here: How To Install Geth In Windows . Resync of the blockchain has the benefit of reducing the amount of disk space used by Geth. The deletion of chaindata folder and resyncing of the blockchain will not be needed once Geth has employed state-tree pruning which will automatically archive old blocks to reduce disk usage. Until Geth has included this functionality, the regular deletion of chaindata folder and resyncing of blockchain is recommended to keep the disk usage at minimum. The chaindata folder is located atC:\Users\\AppData\Roaming\Ethereum\geth\. Yes, delete the whole folder. Do not worry. Your Ethereum account will NOT be deleted (they are stored in another location). Step 3: Run Geth with the -fast -cache=1024 flags If you do not know how to set the flags, please usethe instructions here (Under Step 4): How To Install Geth In Windows . Step 4: Wait for Geth to complete the fast sync Fast sync is completed when Geth starts to import 1 block at a time. Continue reading >>

Speeding Up Ethereum-wallet Initial Sync On Macos X

Speeding Up Ethereum-wallet Initial Sync On Macos X

Speeding up Ethereum-Wallet initial sync on MacOS X After experimenting with the Ethereum Wallet client on a linux machine I decided to install on my MacPro with OS X 10.11.5. I installed the latest Ethereum-Wallet 0.8.1 app from github and launched the app. I soon noticed that the sync would appear to freeze at various points and never achieved a full sync. This despite multiple force quits and restarts. After some poking around I found a nice summary of the problem and a workaround I wanted to share. StackEchange is my goto source when I have any problem and it paid off again today. Under the topic Help with slow mist sync I found several good answers and things to try. Caveat: what Im about the describe worked for me, but I am hardly a knowledgable expert and this may be wrong from a technical perspective. It turns out that, using the command line interface Ethereum client called geth, you can initiatea fast sync by setting certain flags when the program is run. Details are here . This will only work, however, if its the first attempt at a sync. I had made dozens of attempts, so I needed to delete all these files. The first thing I tried worked: I went to my user Library folder (Finder>Go>Go To Folder, then type ~/Library and select Go). Once there, locate the Ethereum folder and open it. Delete the folder called chaindata. (Dont worry. This folder will be recreated when you do the faster sync.) To be able to initiate a fast sync using the command line interface tool, we need to know where the geth program is located. What follows is the description for how to do this by user tayvano at the Ethereum StackExchange: Right click on the ethereum-wallet.app and select show package contents Open contents, then frameworks, then node, then geth Then you should right click o Continue reading >>

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