CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Generate Key Pair Ethereum

Bitcoin Private Keys: Everything You Need To Know

Bitcoin Private Keys: Everything You Need To Know

Bitcoin Private Keys: Everything You Need To Know By: Sudhir Khatwani In: Bitcoin , Wallets Last Updated: What if you lost all of your bitcoins tomorrow? What would you do? If you dont own your private key, you dont own your bitcoins. Even the most knowledgeable man on Bitcoin says: The private key must remain secret at all times because revealing it to third parties is equivalent to giving them control over the bitcoins secured by that key. The private key must also be backed up and protected from accidental loss, because if its lost it cannot be recovered and the funds secured by it are forever lost, too. In my earlier guide on Bitcoin wallets , I have used two terms extensively-Private Address (or key) and Public Address (or key).These keys are what make Bitcoin the safest and most widely used cryptocurrency . Tounderstand private keys and public keys, let us look at an example. Consider a mailbox where you receive your physical mail. It has a unique and specific number (an address). If someone has to deliver you a letter, he/she must know your house/flat number to deliver it. And as the receiver, you have a private address (or key)to unlock the mailbox and collect your belongings. In real life, do you give your keys to someone unknown? You always keep track of your key and dont jeopardize the contents inside of your mailbox. Similarly, just like your house/flat number, anyone in the Bitcoin world can know your public address(Bitcoin address) to send you bitcoins. And to unlock (spend/send) those bitcoins, you would requireyour private address (or key)for which you need to take full responsibility, just like the keys of the mailbox. I feel that understanding the underlying technical aspect of keys is important so that your remain better informed and educated enough Continue reading >>

Create Full Ethereum Wallet, Keypair And Address

Create Full Ethereum Wallet, Keypair And Address

Create full Ethereum wallet, keypair and address Generating a usable Ethereum wallet and its corresponding keys This article is a guide on how to generate an ECDSA private key and derive its Ethereum address. Using OpenSSL and keccak-256sum from a terminal. You can find a working implementation of keccak-256sum here . Cool thing, it exists as a package in the Arch User Repository as well . If youre feeling lazy, you can find statically linked pre-compiled versions for both i386 and x86-64 on my repo . Warning SHA3 != keccak. Ethereum is using the keccak-256 algorithm and not the standard sha3. More info at Stackoverflow . I have a repository with complete scripts in both bash and python if youd like. First of all we use OpenSSL ecparam command to generate an elliptic curve private key. Ethereum standard is to use the secp256k1 curve. The same curve is used by Bitcoin. This command will print the private key in PEM format (using the wonderful ASN.1 key structure) on stdout. If you want more OpenSSL info on elliptic curves, please feel free to dig further . > openssl ecparam -name secp256k1 -genkey -noout-----BEGIN EC PRIVATE KEY-----MHQCAQEEIFDLYO9KuwsC4ej2UsdA4SYk7s3lb8aZuW+B8rjugrMmoAcGBSuBBAAKoUQDQgAEsNjwhFoLKLXGBxfpMv3ILhzg2FeySRlFhtjfi3s8YFZzJtmckVR3N/YLJLnUV7w3orZUyAz77k0ebug0ILd1lQ==-----END EC PRIVATE KEY----- On its own this command is not very useful for us, but if you pipe it with the ec command it will display both private and public part in hexadecimal format, and this is what we want! Lets do it: > openssl ecparam -name secp256k1 -genkey -noout | openssl ec -text -nooutread EC keyPrivate-Key: (256 bit)priv: 20:80:65:a2:47:ed:be:5d:f4:d8:6f:bd:c0:17:13: 03:f2:3a:76:96:1b:e9:f6:01:38:50:dd:2b:dc:75: 9b:bbpub: 04:83:6b:35:a0:26:74:3e:82:3a:90:a0:ee:3b:91: bf: Continue reading >>

Eth-lightwallet

Eth-lightwallet

LightWallet is a HD wallet that can store your private keys encrypted in the browser to allow you to run Ethereum dapps even if you're not running a local Ethereum node. It uses BIP32 and BIP39 to generate an HD tree of addresses from a randomly generated 12-word seed. LightWallet is primarily intended to be a signing provider for the Hooked Web3 provider through the keystore module. This allows you to have full control over your private keys while still connecting to a remote node to relay signed transactions. Moreover, the txutils functions can be used to construct transactions when offline, for use in e.g. air-gapped coldwallet implementations. The default BIP32 HD derivation path has been m/0'/0'/0'/i, but any HD path can be chosen. Please note that LightWallet has not been through a comprehensive security review at this point. It is still experimental software, intended for small amounts of Ether to be used for interacting with smart contracts on the Ethereum blockchain. Do not rely on it to store larger amounts of Ether yet. The eth-lightwallet package contains dist/lightwallet.min.js that can be included in an HTML page: //Nowsetksastransaction_signerinthehookedweb3provider //andyoucanstartusingweb3usingthekeys/addressesinks! These are the interface functions for the keystore object. The keystore object holds a 12-word seed according to BIP39 spec. From this seed you can generate addresses and private keys, and use the private keys to sign transactions. Note: Addresses and RLP encoded data are in the form of hex-strings. Hex-strings start with 0x. This is the interface to create a new lightwallet keystore. password: (mandatory) A string used to encrypt the vault when serialized. seedPhrase: (mandatory) A twelve-word mnemonic used to generate all accounts. salt: Continue reading >>

Php - Generate Ethereum Address From A Private Key - Stack Overflow

Php - Generate Ethereum Address From A Private Key - Stack Overflow

Generate Ethereum address from a private key I am trying to generate an Ethereum address based on a given private key following this " How are ethereum addresses generated? " and using this Keccak-256 Ethereum implementation. But it show this error: Warning: openssl_pkey_get_details() expects parameter 1 to be resource, boolean given in /localweb/getethaddress.php on line 15 // Format the private key as PEM $header_private_key = "-----BEGIN EC PRIVATE KEY-----\n"; $footer_private_key = "\n-----END EC PRIVATE KEY-----"; $eth_private_key = $header_private_key . "1a63b5c735d66d827f40f7d3a257da777cd7997d48bd5d319c36683c0ad3b1de" . $footer_private_key; // Load private key from a string $private_key = openssl_pkey_get_private($eth_private_key); var_dump($private_key); while ($msg = openssl_error_string()) echo "openssl_pkey_get_private " . $msg . "\n"; // Get the Public key $_public_key = openssl_pkey_get_details($private_key)['key']; $eth_public_key = openssl_pkey_get_public($_public_key); // hash the public key $hash_public_key = Keccak256\Keccak256::hash($eth_public_key, 256);; $eth_address = '0x' . substr($hash_public_key, -40); // compare the output echo 'Your generated address: ' . $eth_address . ''; echo 'Myetherwallet address: 0x47180b59dd8c81f46186900bbd29cbf675b3fbd9'; /* ad 40: 47180b59dd8c81f46186900bbd29cbf675b3fbd9 pk 64: 1a63b5c735d66d827f40f7d3a257da777cd7997d48bd5d319c36683c0ad3b1de */?> openssl_pkey_get_private error:0D07207B:asn1 encoding routines:ASN1_get_object:header too longopenssl_pkey_get_private error:0D068066:asn1 encoding routines:ASN1_CHECK_TLEN:bad object headeropenssl_pkey_get_private error:0D07803A:asn1 encoding routines:ASN1_ITEM_EX_D2I:nested asn1 erroropenssl_pkey_get_private error:10092010:elliptic curve routines:d2i_ECPrivateKey:EC libope Continue reading >>

Understanding Private Key, Public Key & Address In Ethereum Blockchain

Understanding Private Key, Public Key & Address In Ethereum Blockchain

Public key is described as follows in yellow paper . Where pu is the public key, assumed to be a byte array of size 64 (formed from the concatenation of two positive integers each < 2256) and pr is the private key, a byte array of size 32 (or a single positive integer in the aforementioned range). This is done using group operation of EC cryptography. To derive public key, private key is multiplied by G.Multiplication used to derive public is EC multiplication which is entirely different from normal multiplication for which I am going to use JS library . G is called generator point which is one of the domain parameters of EC cryptography. G has fixed value for ecp256k1, which is recommended by experts. you can read more here . var EC = require('elliptic').ec;var BN = require('bn.js');var ec = new EC('secp256k1');var G = ec.g; // Generator pointvar pk = new BN('1'); // private key as big numbervar pubPoint=G.mul(pk); // EC multiplication to determine public point var x = pubPoint.getX().toBuffer(); //32 bit x co-ordinate of public point var y = pubPoint.getY().toBuffer(); //32 bit y co-ordinate of public point var publicKey =Buffer.concat([x,y])console.log("pub key::"+publicKey.toString('hex')) Ethereum address is described as follows in yellow paper For a given private key, pr, the Ethereum address A(pr) (a 160-bit value) to which it corresponds is defined as the right most 160-bits of the Keccak hash of the corresponding ECDSA public key. To generate Ethereum address, take Keccak-256 hash of public key. Right most 20 bytes is your Ethereum address. var EC = require('elliptic').ec;var BN = require('bn.js');var ec = new EC('secp256k1');const keccak256 = require('js-sha3').keccak256;var privateKey=Buffer.alloc(32, 0);privateKey[31]=1;console.log("PK::"+privateKey.toStrin Continue reading >>

Why Do I Need A Public And Private Key On The Blockchain?

Why Do I Need A Public And Private Key On The Blockchain?

Why Do I Need a Public and Private Key on the Blockchain? When someone sends you cryptocoins over the Blockchain, they are actually sending them to a hashed version of whats known as the Public Key. There is another key which is hidden from them, that is known as the Private Key. This Private Key is used to derive the Public Key. You can know your own Private Key, and everyone else on the Blockchain knows their own Private Key, but the Private Key should not be shared with outsiders (that is, unless you want your cryptocurrencies to be stolen!). Both the Private Key and the Public Key are large integer numbers, but since these numbers are so large, they are usually represented using a separate Wallet Import Format (WIF) consisting of letters and numbers. The Private Key is the longer of the two, and is used to generate a signature for each blockchain transaction a user sends out. This signature is used to confirm that the transaction has come from the user, and also prevents the transaction from being altered by anyone once it has been issued. In short, you sign the cryptocurrencies you send to others using a Private Key. If someone were to obtain your private key, they would be able to send your cryptocurrencies to themselves, verifying that transaction with the Private Key in effect stealing from you! The Private Key is used to mathematically derive the Public Key, which (along with information about the network and a checksum)is then transformed with a hash function to produce the address that other people can see. You receive cryptocurrencies that others send to your address (which is a result of the hash of your public key and some additional information). At this point, you may be asking yourself, if a Public Key is derived from a Private Key, couldnt someone cre Continue reading >>

Securely Generating And Storing An Ethereumwallet

Securely Generating And Storing An Ethereumwallet

Securely Generating and Storing an EthereumWallet With the rise of Ethereum and Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs), especially ERC20 tokens , people unfamiliar with Ethereum or other cryptocurrencies like BitCoin are becoming interested in the technology. Unfortunately, getting started with Ethereum and participating in ICOs is not simple. The central component in Ethereum is the wallet. An Ethereum wallet is what holds your Ether and other Ethereum-based tokens, and conceptually can be thought of like a real wallet. Like a real wallet, an Ethereum wallet can be stolen. You shouldnt leave it out, or stored on a device that is often connected to the internet, or it risks being hacked. There is no recovery for a stolen wallet the courts cannot help you recover it, and you cant reverse what happens. This guide will explain how to safely generate and store an Ethereum wallet. MyEtherWallet is an open source project to make it simple to create an Ethereum wallet and interact with the Ethereum platform. It is hosted at myetherwallet.com , but its just a static web page. The safe, recommended way of using MyEtherWallet is to download the website yourself, so that there is no risk you go to the wrong website. This also allows you to use MyEtherWallet without being connected to the internet. You can download the latest version of the MyEtherWallet website as a zip file at this link . Download the etherwallet-v, not the chrome extension. When you unzip the file, you get a list of files containing a website. Unzipped MyEtherWallet. Double click index.html to openit. Open index.html to launch MyEtherWallet. Through the magic of mathematics, you can easily create a password-protected Ethereum wallet that no one will ever be able to duplicate accidentally. There are many more available E Continue reading >>

Create Ethereum Wallet Address

Create Ethereum Wallet Address

Can anyone here tell me how to generate a legitimate ethereum wallet address without using a wallet of any kind? One that I could eventually import into a wallet to spend funds? What are the steps to creating one, so I can make a program to simply generate addresses? Nobody knows how to generate ethereum addresses? I'm talking about a step-by-step process like for bitcoin. This website lays out how to generate bitcoin addresses: . Isn't there something similar for eth? Quote from: Lillian89 on August 25, 2017, 08:52:18 AM You can create ETH a wallet at this site I think this is the best answer to your question, I strongly agree to make eth wallet via the best... Myetherwallet is only one i know you can generate and migrate the wallet to your device wallet. Just generate a wallet there and download it. Then you can now load the wallet and store funds. It's the easiest and the fastest way to have wallet that can be imported to your device wallet. Me, im using etherwallet. Just load the generated wallet to myetherwallet and there you go... You have created your wallet. So they cannot access accounts, recover keys, reset passwords, nor reverse transactions. Protect your keys & always check that you are on correct URL. In my journey in cryptocurrency I haven't encountered generating a ethereum address without singing to create a ethereum wallet. Well if you change your mind, try to make a wallet here-> This is the best option for ethereum wallet, so far. ...........ICO Dec 1st Dec 30th............ ............Open Dec 1st- Dec 30th............ I always use myetherwallet when I want to make etherium addres because how to use it is very simple I think Myetherwallet is only one and is already commonly used by all bitcoin users. this is Myetherwallet's official address: So they Continue reading >>

Can I Have A Single Private Key For Multiple Public Address Wth Different Passphrase Is It Possible

Can I Have A Single Private Key For Multiple Public Address Wth Different Passphrase Is It Possible

First thing is you misunderstand what private keys, public keys and addresses are. So let's clear that up first. Private keys are 256bit random numbers. Private keys are never made public. They remain secret. Public keys are derived from private keys and are mathematically related to them. You can't derive a private key from a public key. Each private key has just one public key. They are called a key pair. The public key is revealed to the world and the world uses it to verify transaction signatures generated by your secret private key without you having to expose said private key to the world. Bitcoin public keys are also 256bits. Hash functions - Hash functions take arbitrary sized data and output numbers of a fixed size. They are one way functions. You can't take the output of a hash function and determine the input. Hash functions are used to create "fingerprints" of data. If even a single bit in the data changes the output of the hash function will change. Bitcoin addresses are public keys run through hash functions. The hash functions used result in 160bit addresses. Because 256bits is greater than 160bits all addresses can be unlocked by more than one public/private key pair. That's where the 296 comes from. But this refers to key pairs behind bitcoin addresses not private keys behind public keys. An address is not the same as a public key. It is the public key run through hash functions. There is such a thing as a deterministic wallet and that uses a single random number to generate a whole tree of addresses. We don't call that random number a private key though. We call it a seed. Each address there has its own private key and they are indistinguishable from randomly generated keys to anyone who doesn't have the seed. Continue reading >>

How Do I Create An Ethereum Wallet In Pure Python?

How Do I Create An Ethereum Wallet In Pure Python?

I am building an application that would create a wallet for a user. One option is the web3.personal API in web3.py, which has a newAccount('passphrase') method. The method only returns the address of created account. What I'm looking for is a function similar to the eth.accounts API in web3.js, which has a create([entropy]) method. It returns an account object with 'address', 'privatekey' and other details. I am very new to the idea of ethereum and such kind of development practice, so would be glad to get some help from you. Thank you in advance. Is it important to you that your node ends up with a copy of the key, or are you satisfied if everything happens in pure python? carver Sep 1 '17 at 16:30 @carver I was actually looking for something that would happen completely in python Saujanya Acharya Sep 1 '17 at 17:05 If you'd like to generate all these pieces locally in python, you can use pyethereum. The private key is just a random series of 32 bytes. Generate a big random byte-string and take the sha3. from ethereum import utilsimport osprivate_key = utils.sha3(os.urandom(4096)) Note: please read about the security limitations of os.urandom , which depends on your version of Python, and your operating system. Convert the private key to the public address. raw_address = utils.privtoaddr(private_key)account_address = utils.checksum_encode(raw_address) Thank you very much for the detailed instructions. However, I wanted to know if this key pair can be used to perform actual transactions (sorry, I'm very new to this field). Also, I wanted to store a WalletID, Private Key, and Password (for the private key, similar to password used in myetherwallet) in my database. Is that possible? Saujanya Acharya Sep 1 '17 at 18:01 This is a broad extension from the focused one you as Continue reading >>

How Are Ethereum Addresses Generated?

How Are Ethereum Addresses Generated?

What criteria does a valid ethereum address need to fulfil? Is it just a random number in hexadecimal? Or does it need to be derived in a specific way, according to some cryptographic algorithm? What algorithms and standards are used to generate the keypair? I don't agree about the duplicate. Question is not about verifying if the address is valid but rather how the address is built and if it follows a format or is just random. Indeed it's not random but the result of some processes. The fact that the word "valid" is in the question is not a criteria, you won't mark all questions with the "valid" word as duplicates ! Nicolas Massart May 3 '16 at 15:38 @tayvano I'm not the one who asked this question Nicolas Massart May 4 '16 at 5:55 It's totally fine that questions get edited/improved and voted for reopening. Here we go. 5chdn May 4 '16 at 11:51 There are three main steps to get from private -> address: Create a random private key (64 (hex) characters / 256 bits / 32 bytes) Derive the public key from this private key (128 (hex) characters / 512 bits / 64 bytes) Derive the address from this public key. (40 (hex) characters / 160 bits / 20 bytes) Even though a lot of people call the address the public key, it's actually not the case in Ethereum. There is a separate public key that acts as a middleman that you won't ever see, unless you go poking around a pre-sale wallet JSON file. The private key is 64 hexadecimal characters. Every single string of 64 hex are, hypothetically, an Ethereum private key (see link at top for why this isn't totally accurate) that will access an account. If you plan on generating a new account, you should be sure these are seeded with a proper RNG. Once you have that string.. This is hard and beyond me. There is something with Elliptic Curve Di Continue reading >>

Ensuring Myetherwallet Doesn't Give Different People The Same Private Key

Ensuring Myetherwallet Doesn't Give Different People The Same Private Key

First of all, the wallet private key is not given, it is randomly generated, then the public key is derived from it, and finally the address is derived from the public key. Potentially someone else could randomly generate the same private key, but the chances of that happening are unbelievably tiny - Let's take things into perspective. Since every Ethereum address starts with '0x' and is followed by 40 hexadecimal characters, and hexadecimal characters have 16 options (a-f and 0-9), there are 16^40 possible Ethereum addresses. 16^40 = 2^2^2^40 = 2^160 possible addresses. That's 1,461,501,637,330,902,918,203,684,832,716,283,019,655,932,542,976. That means you can actually pick a private key yourself. Just pick a number between 0 and 1461501637330902918203684832716283019655932542976. Go ahead, just pick one. Don't tell anyone! There, that's your private key. That number gives you access to all the funds in that account. If you happened to pick one that someone else is using, you now have access to all of their funds. If someone else happens to pick the one that you just picked, now they have access to all of your funds. That's why it's important that the one you picked is really really random and that you never let anyone see it. It's that simple. Pick a number, that's your account. Cross your fingers that nobody else picks it! The mind blowing part is that this is actually secure. That number up there is so large that if you truly did a good job picking your number randomly, then the odds that anyone else picks it is infintesimal. (1/that number). Don't believe me? Go ahead, there are billions of dollars worth of value in the blockchain. You should set up a computer program to generate tons of these numbers and check each one to see whether they have any money in them. Continue reading >>

How To: Run An Ethereum Node Onaws

How To: Run An Ethereum Node Onaws

High volume rewards handling uses an AWS SQS queue to retry any reward that fails Upgraded to Web3J 3.1 to make use of the new status flag from the Byzantium fork of Ethereum (currently in QA) Researching ways to reduce or eliminate Ethereum gas costs including Brave, Raiden, 0x, and IOTA Youve figured out how to run Geth (go-ethereum) to start interacting with the blockchain from your computer, but what happens if you want to run Geth on your server so that all of your clients can connect to it as well? In our case, we wanted all of our Android, iOS, and Web clients to be able to interact with Ethereum without having to run an entire node themselves, and we wanted to leverage the security benefits of running our own node on a cloud service like AWS. This guide will walk you through firing up a Geth node on an AWS EC2 instance from a Mac, and assumes some knowledge of AWS and Ethereum . Make sure you have Homebrew installed, then install AWS Command Line Interface by entering the following in a terminal window. Youll need to create a key pair , security group , and access key before you start. Make sure to download the keypair file that is generated on creation. Before creating the keypair, ensure the region in the upper right corner matches the region you specify in the configure step below. Weve selected Ohio (us-east-1) to keep costs down. Weve selected json as the default output format, but you can output in whatever format fits your project best. AWS Access Key ID [None]: AWS Secret Access Key [None]: For more information, consult the AWS Documentation . Now, lets create the EC2 instance where our node will run. Well use the most recent stable Ubuntu AMI with hardware virtualization and SSD volumes for performance. The Continue reading >>

How Ethereum Wallets Work And How To Back Them Up

How Ethereum Wallets Work And How To Back Them Up

How Ethereum wallets work and how to back them up If you've used bitcoin wallets and backed them up yourself, they work in the same way, so if you're coming from that background, you probably don't need to read this article. This is for people that are learning about Ethereum as their first cryptocurrency and want to understand a little more about how to properly store their coins with as little technical detail to get lost in as possible. As someone completely new to blockchains, you might not know how your ether is actually stored. I myself as someone that didn't know anything about bitcoin before I started learning about Ethereum know how this feels. You might think you have actual digital coins stored on your computer. You may have heard that you need to back up your wallet - does that mean I'm duplicating coins? You might think that your password is enough to get back your coins. That's not how it works. To understand how your coins are stored and accessed, you need to understand a little bit about public/private key encryption. If you've ever used SSH keys before, it's similar. You have a pair of keys that are randomly generated (usually by your wallet application). The public key in ethereum is the address you give to other people to send money to your account. The private key is hidden away behind password encryption, and is the key that proves to the network you are who you say you are. The 'wallet' that you are storing is actually just the private key and as long as you have that, you can access your coins. The reason why it is password protected is so if someone manages to get access to your private key, they still need to crack your password to get access to your account. The way that Ethereum stores coins, is on the blockchain, it has a record of how much Continue reading >>

Myetherwallet.com

Myetherwallet.com

Ledger / TREZOR / Digital Bitbox : Use your hardware wallet . Your device * is * your wallet. MetaMask Connect via your MetaMask Extension . So easy! Keys stay in MetaMask, not on a phishing site! Try it today. Jaxx / imToken Use your Mnemonic Phrase to access your account. Mist / Geth / Parity: Use your Keystore File (UTC / JSON) to access your account. **Do not lose it!** It cannot be recovered if you lose it. **Do not share it!** Your funds will be stolen if you use this file on a malicious/phishing site. **Make a backup!** Secure it like the millions of dollars it may one day be worth. **If you do not reveal your bid, you will not be refunded.** You will unlock your account, enter the Bid Amount, and the Secret Phrase. In the event that two parties bid exactly the same amount, the first bid revealed will win. Once the auction has ended (after 5 days / 120 hours), the winner needs to finalize the auction in order to claim their new name. The winner will be refunded the difference between their bid and the next-highest bid. If you are the only bidder, you will refunded all but 0.01 ETH. The auction for this registrar is a blind auction, and is described in EIP162 . Basically, no one can see *anything* during the auction. Be safe & secure: We highly recommend that you read our guide on How to Prevent Loss & Theft for some recommendations on how to be proactive about your security. Always backup your keys: MyEtherWallet.com & MyEtherWallet CX are not "web wallets". You do not create an account or give us your funds to hold onto. No data leaves your computer / your browser. We make it easy for you to create, save, and access your information and interact with the blockchain. We are not responsible for any loss: Ethereum, MyEtherWallet.com & MyEtherWallet CX, and some of Continue reading >>

More in ethereum