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Ethereum Mining Guide For All Operating Systems

Ethereum Mining Guide For All Operating Systems

BestVPN Guides Ethereum Mining Guide for all Operating Systems Ethereum Mining Guide for all Operating Systems Ethereum mining can be difficult, I know! In this guide, Ive covered everything from the bottom up so whether youre a beginner or a pro you should be able to glean some useful insight and learn something new. It doesnt matter if youre planning to do mining using Linux, ethOS or Windows. Ive made sure to cover the steps for each. You will also find some great tips, tricks, optimizations, and solutions to common troubleshooting issues. If you dont have time to read all of it today, then bookmark this page, or sign up to our email list and receive it as a free ebook! Ethereum is an open blockchain platform similar to Bitcoin but with additional in-built flexibilities. With Ethereum, the blockchain can be considered to be intelligent thanks to the Ethereum Virtual Machine and Smart Contracts. Whereas with Bitcoin its a glorified ledger. With Ethereum you can execute code on the blockchain in a distributed way. These are called Smart Contracts. These allow you to set up a system, whereby a person will only receive payment under certain conditions. As Ethereum grows, the scale and complexities of these contracts are expected to increase. Smart Contracts is what has given Ethereum such a solid footing, as like with the blockchain has a functional use. If youre interested in about how Ethereum came about and wanted to find out more about it, then watch this YouTube video by COO, Stephan Tual . Before you determine if you should go on your Ethereum mining adventure; youll need to decide whether its going to be profitable or not. While, on the surface, this is incredibly easy, as Ill show below, you must be aware that mining is very much like trading. Cryptocurrency pri Continue reading >>

7,218 Ethers Stolen From Miner With Rpc Port Open

7,218 Ethers Stolen From Miner With Rpc Port Open

User Patrick reported on the TheDAO forum that 7,218 ethers was hacked from his account, shortly after he used the Ethereum Wallet to send a small test transaction to purchase some TheDAO tokens. Using the blockchain explorer view of Patricks account, the rogue transaction occurred 17 seconds after Patrick sent his small test transaction. This was probably due to his geth (The Ethereum node software) account being unlocked. Looking at the source code for the Ethereum Wallet that handles the password, I found at the source code: web3.personal.unlockAccount(Session.get('data').from, pw || '', 2, function(e, res){ And the 2 seconds is consistent with the 17 seconds interval between the test transaction and the rogue transaction. 2 + 15 second average block time = 17 seconds. I suggested that this 2 second unlocking would be a possible attack vector, and it turns out that a hacker has been posting the rogue transaction on the open RPC communications port on Patricks Ethereum node. When Patrick unlocked his account for 2 seconds, the hackers transaction went through. Patrick left his RPC ports open on the Internet as he was running a solo mining pool with some of his miners connecting to his internal network via the Internet. He knew not to unlock his accounts in geth, but did not realise (and this was unexpected) that using the Ethereum Wallet would allow this hack to occur. Ive reproduced this problem and sent a report to [email protected] . Patrick later reproduced the problem and this is documented the steps on his original post. The Ethereum Wallet should unlock the account ONLY for its session connection to geth, and this connection should be encrypted as the password would otherwise pass through in plaintext via the IPC connection, but the currently implementation ha Continue reading >>

Two-node Setup Of A Private Ethereum On Aws With Contract Deployment (part 1)

Two-node Setup Of A Private Ethereum On Aws With Contract Deployment (part 1)

From time to time I plan to emulate an Ethereum environment. The idea behind is to observe how Ethereum nodes work to each other, and how different accounts interact in transaction and contract deployment. For testing, most contract deployment example nowadays is mainly on testrpc or testnet, but how the contract works among nodes is still new to me. I deploy this two-node setup on AWS. As I do not use any special features on AWS, it should be applicable to another cloud environment. My setup is inspired by the work from JJs World ( link ), and after testing this for several times with modification, I document the whole process I have done, and share some experience here about the whole process. I also use the Voting contract developed by Mahesh Murthy ( link ). This is a simple contract that best illustrates how a contract works in the chain. This by no means is a detailed step-by-step guide. I omit certain steps and make reference to some work done by others. For example, the detailed operation of AWS EC2, including launching a new instance with a setup like access key, security group, etc. can be found here ( link ). Part 1: Create a 2-node Ethereum network with private blockchain, and accounts on the two nodes can send ether to each other. Part 2: Deploy a contract from one node, and both accounts can access and execute functions on this contract. Use t2.medium (2 vCPU, 4 GB RAM) with default 8G SSD. Pick Ubuntu OS. Make sure that the two nodes are with the same security group, which allows TCP 30303 (or 30000-30999 as I may use more ports on this range). Port 30303 by default is for peering among nodes. I first tried t2.micro as it is the free-tier offer. However, mining was not successful (DAG loop without ether reward). I next tried t2.small and mining worked. H Continue reading >>

Ethereum: Using The Wallet With A Private Geth Node

Ethereum: Using The Wallet With A Private Geth Node

Ethereum: Deploying to a Private Blockchain This step may be optional depending on your situation. If youve had geth running in a dev environment for a while then its worth checking if a newer version is available. Check your current geth version by opening a terminal and typing: GethVersion: 1.5.9-stableGit Commit: a07539fb88db7231d18db918ed7a6a4e32f97450Protocol Versions: [63 62]Network Id: 1Go Version: go1.7.3OS: linuxGOPATH=GOROOT=/usr/lib/go-1.7 The stable version available at time of writing is 1.6.7. StackExchange has a nice answer on updating Mist on Ubuntu which helped me with the next part: sudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereumsudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade Lastly, validate that geth was updated successfully: You should see output similar to below confirming the version installed as 1.6.7-stable GethVersion: 1.6.7-stableGit Commit: ab5646c532292b51e319f290afccf6a44f874372Architecture: amd64Protocol Versions: [63 62]Network Id: 1Go Version: go1.8.1Operating System: linuxGOPATH=GOROOT=/usr/lib/go-1.8 Next youll need to download the Ethereum Wallet if its not already installed on your machine. wget Wait until the download is complete and youll see something like this: .HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OKLength: 57229019 (55M) [application/octet-stream]Saving to: 'Ethereum-Wallet-linux64-0-9-0.zipEthereum-Wallet-lin 100%[===================>] 54.58M 794KB/s in 2m 12s 2017-08-18 23:12:42 (425 KB/s) - 'Ethereum-Wallet-linux64-0-9-0.zip saved [57229019/57229019] Unzip the downloaded file and cd into the newly created directory: unzip Ethereum-Wallet-linux64-0-9-0.zipcd linux-unpacked The new directory named /linux-unpacked should contain several files, including the ethereumwallet exec Continue reading >>

Nanopool | Ethereum Classic | Help

Nanopool | Ethereum Classic | Help

The following is a quick start guide of mining Ethereum Classic on Windows 7 or greater x64. To mine Ethereum Classic you need a GPU, 4+GB RAM, Ethereum Classic account and GPU miner. The GPU must have at least 4GB memory. Recomended AMD GPU driver 15.12. Account can be obtained in several ways. The simplest way to register on one of exchanges . Miner can be downloaded from the link below. Copy the downloaded files to the folder where you previously extracted the archive with the miner. Share difficulty is static and equal to 5 billion. Recommended minimum hashrate is 5 Mh/s You can mine directly to your Ethereum Classic wallet on any exchange Do NOT use CONTRACT addresses for mining if it consumes more than 40000 gas. PPLNS payout scheme where N is defined as all submitted shares during the last 20 minutes. Remember: using the pool is at your own risk and we can`t compensate any losses. A lot of useful information can be found on cryptocompare.com More information about NiceHash: Getting Started with NiceHash To create buy order on NiceHash you must use these settings: Algorithm: DaggerHashimotoStratum hostname or IP: etc-eu1.nanopool.org (or any other pool's server)Port: 19999Username: YOUR_WALLET.YOUR_WORKER/YOUR_EMAIL (example: 0x9eab4b0fc468a7f5d46228bf5a76cb52370d068d.NH/ [emailprotected] )Password: x We recommend to use Genoil or Claymore clients as they have build-in stratum support, better DAG-files handling and higher hashrate with most of GPUs. Make sure start.bat file looks like this: EthDcrMiner64.exe -epool etc-eu1.nanopool.org:19999 -ewal YOUR_ETC_ADDRESS/YOUR_WORKER_NAME/YOUR_EMAIL -mode 1 YOUR_ETH/ETC_ADDRESS - your valid etc address YOUR_WORKER - simple short worker name (like worker01). Optional. YOUR_EMAIL - your email address for notifications. Opt Continue reading >>

Command Line Interface And Options | Ethereum Frontier Guide

Command Line Interface And Options | Ethereum Frontier Guide

geth [global options] command [command options] [arguments...]VERSION: 1.0.0COMMANDS: recover attempts to recover a corrupted database by setting a new block by number or hash. See help recover. blocktest loads a block test file import import a blockchain file export export blockchain into file upgradedb upgrade chainblock database removedb Remove blockchain and state databases dump dump a specific block from storage monitor Geth Monitor: node metrics monitoring and visualization makedag generate ethash dag (for testing) version print ethereum version numbers wallet ethereum presale wallet account manage accounts console Geth Console: interactive JavaScript environment attach Geth Console: interactive JavaScript environment (connect to node) js executes the given JavaScript files in the Geth JavaScript VM help Shows a list of commands or help for one commandGLOBAL OPTIONS: --identity Custom node name --unlock Unlock the account given until this program exits (prompts for password). '--unlock n' unlocks the n-th account in order or creation. --password Path to password file to use with options and subcommands needing a password --genesis Inserts/Overwrites the genesis block (json format) --bootnodes Space-separated enode URLs for p2p discovery bootstrap --datadir "/Users/tron/Library/Ethereum" Data directory to be used --blockchainversion "3" Blockchain version (integer) --jspath "." JS library path to be used with console and js subcommands --port "30303" Network listening port --maxpeers "25" Maximum number of network peers (network disabled if set to 0) --maxpendpeers "0" Maximum number of pending connection attempts (defaults used if set to 0) --etherbase "0" Public address for block mining rewards. By default the address first created is used --gasprice "1000000000 Continue reading >>

Network Ports, Files And Directories

Network Ports, Files And Directories

This page contains the default location of the files and directories commonly used by the Ethereum software: The default port Ethereum clients use to listen for incoming connections is 30303. In the listing below, the first two connections are the outgoing connections from my local Ethereum client to Ethereum clients over the Internet. The next two ports are the TCP and UDP 30303 ports the local Ethereum client is listening on: $ netstat -an | grep 30303tcp4 0 0 172.20.10.4.54871 47.90.2.48.30303 ESTABLISHEDtcp4 0 0 172.20.10.4.54854 198.27.65.15.30303 ESTABLISHEDtcp46 0 0 *.30303 *.* LISTEN udp46 0 0 *.30303 *.* Some application communicate with the Ethereum client through the RPC (Remote Procedure Call) port 8545. In the listing below, the first two connections are communications with Remix (Browser Solidity) from my web browser. The third line is the local Ethereum client listening for RPC connections from locally running applications. $ netstat -an | grep 8545tcp4 0 0 127.0.0.1.8545 127.0.0.1.55313 ESTABLISHEDtcp4 0 0 127.0.0.1.55313 127.0.0.1.8545 ESTABLISHEDtcp4 0 0 127.0.0.1.8545 *.* LISTEN The IPC (Interprocess Communication) file is created when geth is running, and is located in the directory shown below. Ethereum Wallet / Mist communicates with geth through this pipe: $ ls -al $HOME/Library/Ethereum/geth.ipc srw------- 1 bok staff 0 17 Mar 11:44 /Users/bok/Library/Ethereum/geth.ipc If installed using Homebrew, the location of your geth executable is: If installed using a downloaded package, the location of your geth executable is in the subdirectory where you unpacked the downloaded package. geth Executable - Automatic Download By Ethereum Wallet / Mist If installed automatically by Ethereum Wallet / Mist, the location of your geth executable is: $HOME/Libra Continue reading >>

Is Port Forwarding A Hard Requirement? - Ethereum

Is Port Forwarding A Hard Requirement? - Ethereum

All guides tell you to open port 30303 or whatever you pipe in your geth using --port (30303 by default). But is this a hard requirement? Reading the documentation at it only sais: "Geth continuously attempts to connect to other nodes on the network until it has peers. If you have UPnP enabled on your router or run ethereum on an Internet-facing server, it will also accept connections from other nodes. Geth finds peers through something called the discovery protocol. In the discovery protocol, nodes are gossipping with each other to find out about other nodes on the network. In order to get going initially, geth uses a set of bootstrap nodes whose endpoints are recorded in the source code." So, reading this as I understand it:1. geth will start talking to some bootstrap nodes, as most p2p networks do2. those will tell geth about other nodes and then geth will try to connect to them. 3. all nodes "talk" with each other (gossip is the term used in the documentation) telling about other nodes. 4. so once we're connected to atleast 1 peer / node, it's just a matter of time till that node tells us about other nodes and we end up beeing connected with 2 peers / nodes and so on The documentation further tells us how to check if we're connected: I tested connection with both: port forwarding active and port forwading disabled. Results are that even though the network builds slightly slower when port forwarding is closed, I still get connected and mineing works fine. So, why even bother with port forwarding? Continue reading >>

Connecting To The Network

Connecting To The Network

Geth continuously attempts to connect to other nodes on the networkuntil it has peers. If you have UPnP enabled on your router or runethereum on an Internet-facing server, it will also accept connectionsfrom other nodes. Geth finds peers through something called the discovery protocol. Inthe discovery protocol, nodes are gossipping with each other to findout about other nodes on the network. In order to get going initially,geth uses a set of bootstrap nodes whose endpoints are recorded in thesource code. To change the bootnodes on startup, use the --bootnodes option andseparate the nodes by commas. For example: geth --bootnodes enode://[email protected]:port1,enode://[email protected]:port2,enode://[email protected]:port3 Sometimes you just can't get connected. The most common reasons areas follows: Your local time might be incorrect. An accurate clock is requiredto participate in the Ethereum network. Check your OS for how to resyncyour clock (example sudo ntpdate -s time.nist.gov) because even 12seconds too fast can lead to 0 peers. Some firewall configurations can prevent UDP traffic from flowing.You can use the static nodes feature or admin.addPeer() on the consoleto configure connections by hand. To start geth without the discovery protocol, you can use the --nodiscover parameter. You only want this is you are running a test node or an experimental test network with fixed nodes. To check how many peers the client is connected to in the interactive console, the net module has two attributes give you info about the number of peers and whether you are a listening node. To get more information about the connected peers, such as IP address and port number, supported protocols, use the peers() function of the admin object. admin.peers() returns the list of currently connected peers. > ad Continue reading >>

Ethereum Mining Pool (eth)

Ethereum Mining Pool (eth)

Note: Using the setup generator is highly recommended if you are new to crypto mining Login using your wallet address as username. An optional workername can be appended to your address separated by a dot character. Leave the password blank. Claymore Miner: Add the -esm 3 command line switch Ethminer/Genoil: Add the -SP 2 command line switch SSL/TLS: To connect using SSL/TLS please add 2 to the respective port number. For ccminer, claymore and sgminer change the protocol from stratum+tcp:// to stratum+ssl://. For dstm's Miner change the protocol from stratum+tcp:// to ssl://. XMRig does not currently support SSL. If already have a miner you need to add or modify a command line switch to make the miner communicate using the correct stratum protocol with our pool: Claymore Miner: Add the -esm 3 command line switch Genoil's Miner: Add the -SP 2 command line switch Extract the archive and create start.bat in a text-editor of your choice in the same directory you extracted ethminer @echo OFFethminer.exe -U -SP 2 -S eth.coinfoundry.org:3072 -O YOUR_WALLET_ADDRESS Replace YOUR_WALLET_ADDRESS with your Ethereum address. If you don't know your address, read this section first. If you are mining on multiple machines/rigs, you can append an identifier of your choice to your wallet address seperated by a dot to make it easier to distinguish between your rigs when evaluating your results. Example: . Extract the archive and create start.bat in a text-editor of your choice in the same directory you extracted ethminer @echo OFF./ethminer -G -SP 2 -S eth.coinfoundry.org:3072 -O YOUR_WALLET_ADDRESS Replace YOUR_WALLET_ADDRESS with your Ethereum address. If you don't know your address, read this section first. If you are mining on multiple machines/rigs, you c Continue reading >>

How To Set Up And Run Claymores Ethereum Miner On Windows

How To Set Up And Run Claymores Ethereum Miner On Windows

If youre new to mining, youve probably encountered at one point or another a mention of Claymores Ethereum miner. Its one of the most popular, if not the most popular, software for quickly and easily getting your mining rig up and running. It offers extensive control features, runs smoothly, and even allows on-the-fly tweaking of certain parameters without a restart. But for those who are just now getting into this mining thing, it might be a bit confusing to get running. Whats a config file? What are parameters? How do I get this thing to make me money? First of all, I assume youve found this guide after already purchasing your mining rig. If thats the case, then feel free to read on. But if youre still trying to decide whether or not its worth it to get into Ethereum mining or mining for any cryptocurrency, for that matter Id encourage you to check out our Is it worth it? series. In that series, we focus on the most popular coins and give you the latest information on whether or not its even worth mining that coin in the first place. So youve already purchased all the hardware you need for your Ethereum mining rig? Now youre just trying to figure out the software side of things and get things running smoothly so that your electricity-to-crypto conversion machine is running smoothly? If thats the case, and this should go without saying if youre reading this, Claymores is one of your best options. The first thing you need to do is download Claymores. For anyone with any technical background, this should be the most straightforward part of the process. Head over to the Claymores thread on BitcoinTalk and download the latest version. Youre going to have to unzip this file to somewhere friendly on your PC. I chose my desktop, because I basically put everything on my minin Continue reading >>

Why Am I Getting An Error Message 'cannot Connect To P2p Network'?

Why Am I Getting An Error Message 'cannot Connect To P2p Network'?

Why am I getting an error message 'cannot connect to p2p network'? If you use Exodus in a network with a firewall or tightened network security you may see an error message "Exodus cannot connect to p2p networks." Typically this happens when Exodus is used in an environment that has network restrictions - many times these P2P connections are blocked outside of your computer. Exodus connects to individual digital asset networks via P2P (peer-to-peer) and many shared networks block these types of connections. The following ports are what Exodus uses on each P2P network: There are a few things you can try to fix this: 1) Use Exodus on a home network or a network you have full control over. This easy fix seems to solve the problem for most users. 2) If you are running Exodus on a computer with VPN try connecting to the VPN over TCP rather than UDP. Also try to relaunch Exodus with the VPN turned off - some VPN providers block the P2P ports above. 3) If you have a firewall or network restrictions on your computer or router, remove the restrictions on the services and ports above. (for both UDP and TCP) 4) Change your DNS settings to use a less restrictive DNS provider. Changing DNS providers is free for anyone and choosing the right DNS provider also typically speeds up your internet! Exodus recommends OpenDNS. OpenDNS uses the following nameservers: You can also view a full step-by-step setup guide for using OpenDNS. 5) Quit and restart Exodus. When Exodus starts up the first time it uses a standard web page internet connection to check outside services for any assets were sent to you. This is a one-time check on startup so it typically catches anything Exodus missed while it was closed. Keep in mind that although this may work to verify deposits quickly it is a one-time s Continue reading >>

Port 30303 (tcp/udp) :: Speedguide

Port 30303 (tcp/udp) :: Speedguide

TCP ports use the Transmission Control Protocol. TCP is the most commonly used protocol on the Internet and any TCP/IP network. Whereas the IP protocol deals only with packets, TCP enables two hosts to establish a connection and exchange streams of data. TCP guarantees delivery of data and that packets will be delivered in the same order in which they were sent. Guaranteed communication/delivery is the key difference between TCP and UDP. UDP ports use the Datagram Protocol, a communications protocol for the Internet network, transport, and session layers. Like TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), UDP is used with IP (the Internet Protocol) and makes possible the transmission of datagrams from one computer to applications on another computer, but unlike TCP, UDP is connectionless and does not guarantee reliable communication; it's up to the application that received the message to process any errors and verify correct delivery. UDP is often used with time-sensitive applications, such as audio/video streaming, where dropping some packets is preferable to waiting for delayed data. When troubleshooting unknown open ports, it is useful to find exactly what services/processes are listening to them. This can be accomplished in both Windows command prompt and Linux variants using the "netstat -aon" command. We also recommend runnig multiple anti-virus/anti-malware scans to rule out the possibility of active malicious software. For more detailed and personalized help please use our forums. Please use the "Add Comment" button below to provide additional information or comments about port 30303. Continue reading >>

Home Ethereum/mist Wiki Github

Home Ethereum/mist Wiki Github

Mist is an electron application, means it's a desktop hybrid application with a web interface. This allows faster development and changes of the Mist interface and helps with the browser part of Mist. Therefore some problems can come from electron itself. Ethereum Wallet is just a Mist implementation that can only access a single Dapp the wallet dapp , this is due to missing features in Mist itself and so that we are able to release earlier. Please note that Mist is still in beta and problems can be expected. This guide will help you troubleshoot some of the most common problems. Some steps require the use of the command line or the developer console that Mist offers. If you need assistance you can ask for help on . The first step is to make sure you have the latest version of Mist. Mist is under active development and new versions contain bugfixes. You can download the latest version here: . If it's not a common problem you can look at log files to see if there are errors. It is important to know that the wallet consists of two applications. Mist, which runs the wallet and an ethereum node which connects to the network. Communication between the two is done over IPC. A quick scan can be done to determine if the problem is within the Wallet or within the node. The last part of the node log file can be viewed from Mist through the top menu bar -> develop -> Show log file. If it contains an error try to search for it on to see if its already been report and if someone offered a solution. If there are no errors the next step is to see if there are problems within Mist. Open the console via the top menu -> develop -> Toggle developer tools -> Wallet UI and look for errors (ignore the "Failed to load resource: net::ERR_FILE_NOT_FOUND" error) and look on the GitHub issue lis Continue reading >>

Building An Ethereum Playground With Docker (part 3ethereumwallet)

Building An Ethereum Playground With Docker (part 3ethereumwallet)

@vertigobr Founder & CTIO, disrupting things for fun. Building an Ethereum playground with Docker (part 3 EthereumWallet) I have updated this article on December/2017. I no longer create a custom Docker image, because Ethereum official image already brings an all-tools version that includes bootnode and other treats. This is the third article in an ongoing series Building an Ethereum Playground with Docker. The articles already published are: We will cover using the official ethereum/go-ethereum Docker image, playing with Ethereum Wallet, provisioning the ethereum nodes on public clouds and deployment of a sample app. All sources and scripts are located in . In this article we will introduce and install the Ethereum Wallet, connect it to our private Ethereum network, create an account and mine into it. Not just an UI to manage your Ethereum accounts and ether, the Wallet is "a gateway to decentralized applications on the Ethereum blockchain". For now we will simply consider the Wallet as a ready-to-use front-end for our playground. When ran with its default arguments the Wallet also becomes a full Ethereum node connected to the public network (main or testnet, you can choose) something we don't need in this case. With some (documented) tinkering we will be able to use it to connect to one of our local mining container nodes. Pick the proper version and download it from Github or from the main Ethereum site . There are installers for many platforms (OSX and Windows, for example) and also a ZIP alternative for manual installation. Since we will not run the Wallet double-clicking an icon (we wil need to supply command line arguments) please take note of where the Wallet executable file is. This is kinda catchy on OSX but straightforward on the other platforms. The reason Continue reading >>

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