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Ethereum Swarm Vs Ipfs

What Is The Difference Between Swarm And Ipfs?

What Is The Difference Between Swarm And Ipfs?

Data sharing network in which files are addressed by the hash of their content (Content-addressable) Can be used to store the HTML, CSS and JavaScript that implement an application on top of the other decentralized systems. Can be used to store (arbitrary) static files. Some imply that Swarm may be better for small chunks / low latency. Because BitTorrent is good at delivering large chunks of data with high throughput and high latency. Swarm is ALSO good at delivering small chunks of data with low latency, which is necessary for some anticipated applications - Dr. Daniel Nagy, Lead Developer on the Swarm team. One "advantage" of Swarm is built-in incentives (within Ethereum). Some feel that Swarm is "reinventing the wheel" and ipfs & filecoin should just be used instead. Filecoin being the incentive. IPFS is a peer-to-peer distributed file system that seeks to connect all computing devices with the same system of files. In some ways, IPFS is similar to the Web, but IPFS could be seen as a single BitTorrent swarm, exchanging objects within one Git repository. In other words, IPFS provides a high throughput content-addressed block storage model, with content-addressed hyperlinks. This forms a generalized Merkle DAG, a data structure upon which one can build versioned file systems, blockchains, and even a Permanent Web. IPFS combines a distributed hashtable, an incentivized block exchange, and a self-certifying namespace. IPFS has no single point of failure, and nodes do not need to trust each other. source: HTTP is obsolete. It's time for the distributed, permanent web Swarm - Decentralised data storage and distribution: Swarm is a peer to peer data sharing network in which files are addressed by the hash of their content. Similar to Bittorrent, it is possible to fetch t Continue reading >>

The Next Phase Of The Internet: Joining The Dots

The Next Phase Of The Internet: Joining The Dots

The Next Phase Of The Internet: Joining The Dots Every day, new solutions are making Ethereum stronger and easier to use for developers and a growing user base. ETHNews explores some of the upcoming projects that are ensuring the platform will play a dominant role in the internet of tomorrow. Since its initial release in July 2015, the rate of development seen by Ethereum has been nothing short of incredible. The Ethereum value exchange network outperforms Bitcoin in terms of speed, cost, reliability, and energy efficiency and its smart contract platform for programming is gaining traction as the de facto platform for building distributed applications. Very soon, all of the dots for the next phase of the internet will be in place for Dapp developers and users to join together. The internet of tomorrow will bean internet of valueand those who participate in it will be able to seamlessly make exchanges using programmable digital currencies, such as Ethereum. The history of the internet began with a basic, yet highly functional, closed academic and military network, which soon found widespread use in homes and businesses all over the world. From there we saw the rise of high-speed connections, advanced search engines, and mobile cloud computing. But while the rate of progress has been staggering, there have also been challenges ranging from centralization and fraud to establishing convenience of use. While Ethereum may not be the cure-all solution, it has the benefit of being able to stand on the shoulders of giants and develop solutions in a first principles way. From a primitive point of view, Ethereum's technology can be thought of as a way to manage value in a manner that is cheap, efficient, and secure. However, the most valuable aspect of Ethereum is the potential f Continue reading >>

Advanced Workshop: From Contract To Dapp (web3.js / Whisper / Swarm / Ipfs)

Advanced Workshop: From Contract To Dapp (web3.js / Whisper / Swarm / Ipfs)

Advanced Workshop: From Contract to DApp (web3.js / Whisper / Swarm / IPFS) Neubaugasse 64-66/ III / 4 (Stiege 3, Hochparterre) Vienna Technologies like Ethereum enable an entire new class of applications to be developed: DApps. Those are fully decentralized applications that use Ethereum and other technologies to completely remove the need for a central trusted 3rd party. In this workshop we will focus on building the non-contract parts of a DApp. During this workshop you will choose an existing contract (for example the one built in the "From Idea to Contract" workshop) and build a simple frontend for it, which interacts with the blockchain and can be deployed onto IPFS (or SWARM if ready). Interfacing with the blockchain using web3.js At least basic familiarity with solidity (at the level of our first workshop). This is so you can read the contract you work with, there will be no contract development in this workshop. You should already know how to build regular web apps (HTML/JS) or at the very least be familiar with JS Having some experience with JS modules and bundlers like webpack is also recommended. A suitable boilerplate, that sets everything up, will be provided. ipfs (see ) working installation of node.js (recommended) If you have problems with setting up geth, you can come 15 minutes earlier and we can help you out. Continue reading >>

Interplanetary File System

Interplanetary File System

This article may be too technical for most readers to understand. Please help improve it to make it understandable to non-experts , without removing the technical details. Protocol implementations: Go (reference implementation), JavaScript , C [1] , Python Client libraries: Go, Java , JavaScript, Python, Scala, Haskell, Swift, CommonLisp, Rust, Ruby, PHP, C#, Erlang InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) is a protocol and network designed to create a content-addressable , peer-to-peer method of storing and sharing hypermedia in a distributed file system . [2] IPFS was initially designed by Juan Benet, and is now an open-source project developed with help from the community. [3] [4] In 2014, the IPFS protocol took advantage of the Bitcoin blockchain protocol and network infrastructure in order to store unalterable data, remove duplicated files across the network, and obtain address information for accessing storage nodes to search for files in the network. [5] [2] IPFS is a peer-to-peer distributed file system that seeks to connect all computing devices with the same system of files. In some ways, IPFS is similar to the World Wide Web , but IPFS could be seen as a single BitTorrent swarm, exchanging objects within one Git repository. In other words, IPFS provides a high-throughput, content-addressed block storage model, with content-addressed hyperlinks . [11] This forms a generalized Merkle directed acyclic graph (DAG). IPFS combines a distributed hash table , an incentivized block exchange, and a self-certifying namespace. IPFS has no single point of failure, and nodes do not need to trust each other, except for every node they are connected to. [12] Distributed Content Delivery saves bandwidth and prevents DDoS attacks , which HTTP struggles with. [5] The filesystem can b Continue reading >>

Difference Between Bluzelle And Ipfs/filecoin: Data Vsfiles

Difference Between Bluzelle And Ipfs/filecoin: Data Vsfiles

Difference between Bluzelle and IPFS/Filecoin: data vsfiles Database Service is Missing Piece in Decentralized Internet The new decentralized internet is missing a major component a database service. Theres rapid innovation in blockchain and frenetic activity in the decentralized storage space, in particular, thanks to IPFS/Filecoin, Storj, Sia, and Ethereums Swarm. But these solutions can only progress the decentralized so far. Bluzelle fills a key gap in decentralised infrastructure. Whenever we are asked what is Bluzelles differentiator and we get the question a lot the answer is simple: Bluzelle is a database service while the rest of these are file services. Bluzelle is a quick, cheap and scalable decentralized database service ready for the worlds dApps. In the internet world before decentralization, there were two primary data storage services file storage and database storage. File storage was achieved by the likes of DropBox, GoogleDrive, and web-based HTTP. Database storage was achieved with relational database management services like Oracle, SQL Server or Mongo, and so on. Now, the introduction of blockchain technology demands a new database service and heres why: Software generally deals with two types of data: files and data fields. Files are relatively large (> 10KB), of arbitrary size, and their contents are not searchable or structured in any agnostic way. File storage services are optimized to deliver whole files, and lack the granularity required to do search and retrieval within files efficiently. This is exacerbated by the fact that in new decentralized file storage services, files are broken up into chunks at arbitrary locations, with no regard or interest for the data in the file. Trying to access data when the underlying storage mechanism does n Continue reading >>

Picking A Decentralized Storage System

Picking A Decentralized Storage System

Wed 02 August 2017 | by Mark Pors | in blockchain train journal This article is part 2 of the Blockchain train journal, start reading here: Catching the Blockchain Train . A couple of articles that I found useful when learning about decentralized storage: What is the difference between Swarm and IPFS? Our decentralized blog pages are in need of some sort of decentralized hosting. To build that from scratch seems like a lot of work and will probably result in a blockchain train crash. So let's see what is already out there we could use for our project. did I forget a serious contender? Please let me know . Im not yet qualified to compare these technologies (still trying to catch the train!), but Ill add some observations for each: Blockchain-based, end-to-end encrypted, distributed object storage, where only you have access to your data. That doesn't sound like something that is handy for a blog, where we want content to be public. Storj looks like a great product though, it is a bit like Resilio Sync , but with a blockchain added to create a marketplace for buying or renting out disk space on the network. SIA is another Dropbox killer, more or less the same as Storj. Where Storj and SIA pitch their service as a faster and cheaper way to store your data, Maidsafe promotes their SAFE network by scaring you. Cloud providers, government, and hackers can not be trusted is the message in their video. Apart from the funny name, it is very similar to the two services above. Now, this is a different beast. The first three services are incentive platforms, which means they have their own cryptocurrency to support their marketplace. IPFS also has such a thing, FileCoin , but it is neatly split from IPFS which is more like a decentralized storage protocol. IPFS stands for interpla Continue reading >>

The State Of Decentralized Storage

The State Of Decentralized Storage

Society is transitioning from the industrial age to the information age, and data is becoming the worlds most valuable resource. As humans continue to generate countless petabytes of data, the question of where and how to store it becomes increasingly important. Migration from on-premise storage to cloud storage has been the major theme of the past decade, and the trend is accelerating . The tech giants currently dominate this market. Amazon, Google, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft each control a huge share of the worlds data. But this existing system leaves much to be desired. Its insecure, expensive, centralized, and involves putting a lot of trust in these large corporations. Centralized servers containing valuable or sensitive information are targets for hackers, as we saw in the iCloud hack of 2014 and the Dropbox hack of 2012. These systems are only as secure as the measures put in place by the companies running them. Even the worlds best and most funded tech teams cannot protect themselves: see Equifax , Verizon , Target , etc. The fact that each of these companies actually takes custody of customer data means that there is always risk of theft. These companies also have broad jurisdiction to censor individuals or data, to provide users data to governments or other law enforcement agencies, or even to sell customer data to advertisers. They are central points of failure that are targets for nefarious actors and are inherently fragile. Earlier this year, for example, a human error by an Amazon S3 employee caused several prominent websites to temporarily go offline. Blockchain technology has created the first opportunity to rethink cloud storage on a technical level and as an economic system by solving these major problems. Blockchain-based decentralized storage is Continue reading >>

An Introduction To Ipfs Consensys Medium

An Introduction To Ipfs Consensys Medium

When you have IPFS , you can start looking at everything else in one specific way and you realize that you can replace it all Juan Benet This section will attempt to provide a high level insight as a prelude to my colleague, Dr. Christian Lundkvists, deep dive technical summary below. IPFS began as an effort by Juan Benet to build a system that is very fast at moving around versioned scientific data. Versioning gives you the ability to track how states of software change over time ( think Git ). IPFS has since become thought of as the The Distributed, Permanent Web ; IPFS is a distributed file system that seeks to connect all computing devices with the same system of files. In some ways, this is similar to the original aims of the Web, but IPFS is actually more similar to a single bittorrent swarm exchanging git objects. IPFS could become a new major subsystem of the internet. If built right, it could complement or replace HTTP. It could complement or replace even more. It sounds crazy. It is crazy.[ 1 ] At its core, IPFS is a versioned file system that can take files and manage them and also store them somewhere and then tracks versions over time. IPFS also accounts for how those files move across the network so it is also a distributed file system. IPFS has rules as to how data and content move around on the network that are similar in nature to bittorrent. This file system layer offers very interesting properties such as: - websites that are completely distributed - websites that can run entirely on client side browsers - websites that do not have any servers to talk to Instead of referring to objects (pics, articles, videos) by which server they are stored on, IPFS refers to everything by the hash on the file. The idea is that if in your browser you want to access Continue reading >>

System Architecture Newsflash

System Architecture Newsflash

Getting a product market fit and ready for adoption is now vital for our projects future. As such, speed of development and user experience have been prioritized. From the community and how it is organized (or self-organized) to the way our dev team works some parts are still centralized, or at least have the risk of becoming centralized. The path to full decentralization is the one we are creating ourselves. Creating a blockchain based app thats fast and responsive as a bee is hard. Thats why the Swarm City architecture consists of several layers that interoperate, to create an experience that enables a decentralized peer to peer sharing economy. The protocol is the most important part; making sure layers can communicate by speaking the same language using the same grammatical rules. These layers are isolated so they can be changed without disabling the app. One of these layers enables the communication between devices, the blockchain, and IPFS. Before data is stored on IPFS or the Ethereum blockchain, it needs to be available on every users device so it can interact with it. In the current live version, this part is played by Whisper. With the development and release of Boardwalk (June 2017) the dev team reached and pushed the limits of what you can use Whisper for today. To create an awesome user experience, Boardwalk 2.0 will use Firebase to enable the communication layer. In the meantime our dev and lab teams keep working on optimizing the Whisper solution, and when ready, will swap out the components on this layer. Firebase knows whats going to be on IPFS before its there. But it needs to have the hash later on, so everyone can verify what is true. There is a unique IPFS bridge constructed within Firebase, and its function is to listen to changes made to the Fire Continue reading >>

How Ipfs Is Reimagining The Internet

How Ipfs Is Reimagining The Internet

Hard disks inside a server room at a company in Bangkok, Thailand, April 5. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters This article was originally published by International Business Times . Since it first appeared, the distributed file system IPFS (InterPlanetary File System) has generated a ton of interest and momentum. A year-and-a-half later, IPFS creator Juan Benet is ready to add a blockchain-based currency layer called Filecoin (a coin sale is coming) to incentivize data storage on the IPFS network. The goal of IPFS is to add decentralized permanence to data on the web, and to take advantage of many efficiencies lost via the de facto file retrieval system, HTTP, making the latter work more like a peer-to-peer system. The mechanics of IPFS can be illustrated with an analogy. Imagine if people actually said: "Hey, I just finished this amazing book, you have to read it tooit's at the NYC public library, section nine, bookcase three, top shelf, first from the left." This is ridiculous. In the real world you would just tell someone the title of the book and they would get it at the nearest convenient place, which is what IPFS does with data. Being able to ask to be connected to whoever is closest that can provide a particular file is a much more resilient and useful way to propagate content on the network. If a file has been retrieved by your browser, why can't you simply move it from your computer to your phone for example? In Pictures: Every U.S. President Ranked From Best to Worst One would think this is simple, but today, most content moves first to the cloud, and only after to your other devices, which makes it very inefficient, reliant on centralized third parties, and impossible to do when offline. Instead, we should switch our internet architecture so that content flows nat Continue reading >>

Blockchain Infrastructure Landscape: A First Principles Framing

Blockchain Infrastructure Landscape: A First Principles Framing

Blockchain Infrastructure Landscape: A First Principles Framing Manifesting Storage, Computation, and Communications How are Ethereum, IPFS/Filecoin, and BigchainDB complementary? What about Golem, Polkadot, or Interledger? I often get questions like this. So, I decided to write about how I answer those questions, via a first-principles framing. The quick answer: theres no one magic system called blockchain that magically does everything. Rather, there are really good building blocks of computing that can be used together to create effective decentralized applications. Ethereum can play a role, BigchainDB can play a role, and many more as well. Lets explore The elements of computing are storage, compute, and communications. Mainframes, PCs, mobile, and cloud all manifest these elements in their own unique ways. Specialized building blocks emerge to reconcile tradeoffs within a given element. For example, in the storage element we have both file systems and databases, where file systems are for storing blobs like mp3s with a hierarchy of directories and files, and databases are for storing structured metadata with a query interface like SQL [1]. In the centralized cloud, we might use Amazon S3 for blob storage, MongoDB Atlas for databases, and Amazon EC2 for processing. This article focuses on the blockchain landscape: the blocks for each element of computing, and some examples of systems manifesting each block. For each block, I will focus on being illustrative over thorough. Here is each element of computing, with related decentralized building blocks: Storage: token storage, database, file system / blobs Processing: stateful business logic, stateless business logic, high performance compute Communications: connect networks of data, of value, and of state Blockchain t Continue reading >>

The Missing Piece Of The Decentralized Internet? A Database Service

The Missing Piece Of The Decentralized Internet? A Database Service

The missing piece of the decentralized internet? A database service Pavel is an entrepreneur, futurist, designer and investor in exponential technologies. He is the CEO of Bluzelle Networks, which builds... They say that history repeats itself and in the case of the decentralized internet at the moment, that might well be the case. For while there has been rapid blockchain innovation and frenetic activity in the area of decentralized storage, a problem that earlier digital pioneers encountered seems to blocking progress once again. Even before the decentralized internet, there were two primary data storage services file system storage for files and database storage for data fields. Files are usually over 10KB in size so relatively large and arbitrarily fixed, while data fields are typically small and of fixed size. Files are also not generally structured in a way that makes them searchable, while data fields are organized into groups and collections for easy searching. These different characteristics made the storage solutions for each type of data quite different too. While data fields could be quickly stored and retrieved to achieve the best security, performance and scalability, file systems were optimized to deliver the entire file but lacked the granularity to search and retrieve data within them. Were now totally familiar with the major players in these fields, from Dropbox and Google Drive on the file storage side to Oracle and Mongo on the database side. To a greater or lesser extent, these solutions solved the problems surrounding access to data in the internet world. What is the apparent now is that the same problems they faced then are occurring again in a decentralized internet. For while solutions such as IPFS/Filecoin, Storj, Sia and Ethereums Swarm have Continue reading >>

Off-chain Data Storage: Ethereum &ipfs

Off-chain Data Storage: Ethereum &ipfs

function read() public view returns (bytes) { Ive deployed this contract on Rinkeby test net and generated 1024 of random bytes using then stored 1kB of data using the write function. The resulting transaction can be seen here: The Gas used amounted to 754,365 @ 20Gwei Gas price = 0.0150873 Ether. At the time of writing this post (Oct 17, 2017) the Ether price is currently 328.79 USD/ETH. So storing 1kB of data would have cost $4.96 to run on the Ethereum Main Net. That means ~ 5 Million USD / GB! Saving a few bytes to the EVM is ok but for larger chunks of data the costs are probably too high for most projects. One solution is to modify our data storage strategy and save the data off-chain (as opposed to the on-chain approach we took above). There are multiple off-chain storage options: IPFS and Swarm are 2 popular ones. Ill use IPFS in this post but Swarm works equally well. Looking at the wikipedia article on IPFS: InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) is a protocol designed to create a permanent and decentralized method of storing and sharing files IPFS allows p2p storage and we can use it as a distributed file system to store data. Saving data on IPFS provides a unique hash. Instead of storing the data on the contract, well only store the hash on the contract and then we can use the hash to retrieve the data. In production wed need to create our own IPFS node, but INFURA provides a node for developers which we can use for free. Here is a js snippet you can try out on to save data to IPFS: const ipfs = new IPFS({host: ipfs.infura.io, port: 5001, protocol: https}); const randomData = 8803cf48b8805198dbf85b2e0d514320; // random bytes for testing and this should return our data: 8803cf48b8805198dbf85b2e0d514320 One remark is that the hash string size is independent of the Continue reading >>

An Introduction To Ipfs | Hacker News

An Introduction To Ipfs | Hacker News

So, the same question and point of criticism that I've brought up in past discussions about IPFS, and that so far has not yet been sufficiently answered by anybody: The claim is that IPFS could replace HTTP, the web, and so on. The only thing I see, however, is a distributed filesystem, which is only one part of the puzzle. Real-world applications require backend systems with access control, mutable data, certain information being kept secret, and so on - something that seems fundamentally at odds with the design of IPFS. How would IPFS cover all of these cases? As it stands, it essentially looks to me like a Tahoe-LAFS variant that's more tailored towards large networks - but for it to "replace HTTP", it will have to not only cover every existing HTTP usecase, but also do so without introducing significant complexity for developers. Seriously, I'd like to see an answer to this, regardless of whether it's a practical solution or a remark along the lines of "this isn't possible". I'm getting fairly tired of the hype around IPFS, with seemingly none of its users understanding the limitations or how it fits (or doesn't fit) into existing workflows. I can't really take it seriously until I see technical arguments. Let's separate the use cases: we want a permanent, public web, and we want applications that don't die when servers get shut down. IPFS clearly solves the first use case, so let's talk about the second. In this context, IPFS is part of the toolkit for building decentralized applications. The architecture of these applications is fundamentally different from today's apps. Users control the data, not the application developer. Private data can live on the user's machine or some cloud service they trust to hold the data for them. IPFS probably isn't a good fit for p Continue reading >>

How Will Maidsafe Compete With Swarm?

How Will Maidsafe Compete With Swarm?

Eventually they will focus their attention on developing Swarm and Whisper, with the news and network effect Ethereum is already getting wont it be difficult for MaidSafe to compete? Edit: Apologies if my questions came off as overly critical of MaidSafe. Just trying to find out more about the technology and maybe make a few bucks in the long run while Im at it. Theyre both trying to reach the same goals, but are different at the same time. Ethereum as being a decentralized computer that runs scripts on which all nodes agree on the outcome. Maidsafe more focused on storage and decentralized storage like websites etc. If theres an App on Ethereum to store data, great. If Safenet is providing datastorage and security great as well. Both have the opportunity to run Apps. So we can even expect some bridges when Devs jump on it. Ethereum has a strong network effect but for the average user the software can still be complicated to use. They said themselves that first releases are for the more technical people. So we have to wait for all of them (Maidsafe, StorJ, Ethereum, IPFS) to see whats in store. And I think all people interested have their own attraction to one of them. SAFE is the only one that promised to be an internet replacement. Really a hijacker in its first phase. It does to the sponsored bs portion of the net what solar with batteries does to oil. One thing that people tend to get hung up on when thinking of Safe is that it is an app or a company like dropbox or Storj. I like to think of Safe more as a protocol. I try to explain to people that Maidsafe the company created a new internet protocol/network called the SAFE network. I dont think the network is focused just on file storage and/or privacy, those are just features it happens to provide. The Safe Networ Continue reading >>

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