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Ethereum Private Key

I Lost My Private Key

I Lost My Private Key

i create new classic eth wallet and record all the information that i need. went back to my eth wallet and try to send eth into classic eth but accidentally create another wallet address with same password because i though that was same address from initial wallet address. i did not record private key for second wallet address where i sent my eth. i see all my eth in second wallet but i cant do anything without private key. If you describe your software and the steps you have done with it more thoroughly, someone might help you. i create wallet address from with password wrote down private key and wallet address on my note. went to my bithumb account and get ready to send. went back to ethereumproject.github/etherwallet/ to copy address on first page put my password again (did not realize that was creating new wallet address) second address was created (didnt know that time) i copy this second wallet address which i did not record private key. sent my eth from bithumb wallet to this second wallet address. i close all the window and went back to ethereumproject.github/etherwallet/ and type first wallet address which has nothing on it. i realized that something wrong went back to bithumb found out that was wrong address. i went back ethereumproject.github/etherwallet/ again and typed second wallet address which my eth is there but i cant move or sell because i dont know private key for it. please help me what do i have to do now. thanks. please Continue reading >>

Exporting The Private Key For Your Ethereum Address

Exporting The Private Key For Your Ethereum Address

Exporting the private key for your Ethereum address Backing up your Blockchain.info wallet is critical and can be done by following this guide . Creating the backup phrase will secure your bitcoin and ethereum balances. You also have the option of exporting the individual private key for your ethereum address. This is useful if you accidentally sent ethereum based tokens (known as ERC20 tokens) to your Blockchain wallet. At this time we do not support sending tokens or showing token balances in the Blockchain wallet, which you can read about in greater detail here . To export yourethereum private key start by clickingETHER in the lefthand menu: You will see the main transaction page for the ethereum section of your wallet. To the top right you can seeExport Private Key: PressExport Private Key and acknowledge the following message: PressContinue and the private key will be displayed. As stated in the warning you shouldnever share this information with anyone. Access to a private key means access to the funds associated with the public address. Continue reading >>

Understanding Private Key, Public Key & Address In Ethereum Blockchain

Understanding Private Key, Public Key & Address In Ethereum Blockchain

Public key is described as follows in yellow paper . Where pu is the public key, assumed to be a byte array of size 64 (formed from the concatenation of two positive integers each < 2256) and pr is the private key, a byte array of size 32 (or a single positive integer in the aforementioned range). This is done using group operation of EC cryptography. To derive public key, private key is multiplied by G.Multiplication used to derive public is EC multiplication which is entirely different from normal multiplication for which I am going to use JS library . G is called generator point which is one of the domain parameters of EC cryptography. G has fixed value for ecp256k1, which is recommended by experts. you can read more here . var EC = require('elliptic').ec;var BN = require('bn.js');var ec = new EC('secp256k1');var G = ec.g; // Generator pointvar pk = new BN('1'); // private key as big numbervar pubPoint=G.mul(pk); // EC multiplication to determine public point var x = pubPoint.getX().toBuffer(); //32 bit x co-ordinate of public point var y = pubPoint.getY().toBuffer(); //32 bit y co-ordinate of public point var publicKey =Buffer.concat([x,y])console.log("pub key::"+publicKey.toString('hex')) Ethereum address is described as follows in yellow paper For a given private key, pr, the Ethereum address A(pr) (a 160-bit value) to which it corresponds is defined as the right most 160-bits of the Keccak hash of the corresponding ECDSA public key. To generate Ethereum address, take Keccak-256 hash of public key. Right most 20 bytes is your Ethereum address. var EC = require('elliptic').ec;var BN = require('bn.js');var ec = new EC('secp256k1');const keccak256 = require('js-sha3').keccak256;var privateKey=Buffer.alloc(32, 0);privateKey[31]=1;console.log("PK::"+privateKey.toStrin Continue reading >>

Public Private Key - Nethereum

Public Private Key - Nethereum

On Ethereum, public and private are used:1. to Sign data (certifying its origin).2. to Encrypt data3. to Decrypt data Cryptographic keys are the backbone of security in Ethereum, they garantee the origin of data and restrict their access to designated owners/users. Each Ethereum account has a private key and a public key. Private keys are generated cryptographically with tools like openssl. The following command:openssl ecparam -name secp256k1 -genkey -noout MHQCAQEEIHg9y3qNQ4kGLNr2aGH4bCah+WHL44Ta2qix0pwSK59IoAcGBSuBBAAKoUQDQgAEqXS+UM4Dyu06ksUWmcgl/0g5EkGNxolCxIz4DYqbLuED5iqu2XI4YCb69vx9xXaiswCbfhcaez6RbD0dDRHKWQ== Private keys shouldn't be shared with anyone, they are the equivalent of the physical key protecting a lock. Public keys are generated using a private key, they are shared with users who need to verify the origin of a file. always come in pairs and offer its owner various capabilities. Those capabilities are based on cryptographic mathematics. As their name suggest, the public key is meant to be distributed to whoever is relevant, while the private key is to be jealously guarded, akin to having your house address public, but keeping the key to your house private. Continue reading >>

What Are Ethereum Private Keys?

What Are Ethereum Private Keys?

Moving Ether around is very easy, but in the background an important part of moving and storing Ether involves something called a private key. The easiest way to understand private keys is to think about an old-fashioned mailbox system: Lets say Maria wants to send mail to Peter. First she needs to know what Peters mailbox address or number is. Lets say Peters mailbox is number 2034. Similarly, if she wants to send Ether to Peter, she needs to know his Ether address, which is a number that uniquely identifies him. This is also sometimes called his wallet address, or public key, which functions similar to your bank account number. Its a long and complicated number because there are so many Ether mailboxes in the world, but thankfully you dont have to remember it, you can find it on the internet. So now Maria deposits the Ethereum in Peters mailbox. She can have a peek inside and see the Ethereum there, in fact anyone who walks by can see that mailbox 2034 is filled with one Ethereum. This is part of the exciting part of Ethereum - that everyone can see all the transactions but without anyone having to share their identity. People can see there is one Ethereum in 2034, but no-one, except for Maria and Peter, will know it belongs to Peter. Now lets see how Peter gets his Ethereum - well he can see its there, so he doesnt have to do anything. But if he wants to move it, he needs to open the box to send it to someone else. To open this he needs a key - and this is his own unique key, also called a private key, that he, and only he can use to open the mailbox. When he opens it he can remove the Ethereum and deposit into someone elses box, lets maybe say he is buying an online game from Microsoft, now he can deposit it into Microsofts box and once they can see the Ethereum re Continue reading >>

Ethereum - Remix Account Get Private Key - Stack Overflow

Ethereum - Remix Account Get Private Key - Stack Overflow

I want to sign message in remix, interacting with ethereum contract. You can't get the private key from the embedded accounts in the "JavaScript VM" environment in Remix. What you need to do is download and run Ganache and switch the environment over to "Web3 Provider". When you start Ganache, you'll see a summary of accounts and private keys like the following: Available Accounts ================== (0) 0x9a6d82ef3912d5ab60473124bccd2f2a640769d7 (1) 0x65463bf6268e5cc409b6501ec846487b935a1446 (2) 0xb98e575977160c29301f8f9444710048c5bb9a1c (3) 0x1655e4b2e19d5934d9336f8b1dd351e14ce466ba (4) 0x40ade79c474c47991fcb1b62308a4e755864e24d (5) 0x4888ba85dd44fd3416a0788ab9bde63290a6c8e2 Private Keys ================== (0) 70f1384b24df3d2cdaca7974552ec28f055812ca5e4da7a0ccd0ac0f8a4a9b00 (1) ad0352cfc09aa0128db4e135fcea276523c400163dcc762a11ecba29d5f0a34a (2) 85fa10d6fc72b1b86e0b876167507297b21aae5f4bcd7d518c11c837c6229b3f (3) c49f807bc5e8d332df558f77fdd48f10b112a8f2c2ce50a32d09def7d7d1ef16 (4) d38e9c788f4c6d09f0da1ff8140bf8600aacca559ba3b82ff7cd76e450f3c5f4 (5) d8acd90819cee0299336324ff56b87524c165e8ad7fd6d150c518f89754059e3 Use one of those private keys to sign your transaction. The list of accounts and private keys change after every restart. If you need to have them persist, start Ganache with the --accounts option ganache-cli --account "0x70f1384b24df3d2cdaca7974552ec28f055812ca5e4da7a0ccd0ac0f8a4a9b00,300000000000000000000" --account "0xad0352cfc09aa0128db4e135fcea276523c400163dcc762a11ecba29d5f0a34a,300000000000000000000" Continue reading >>

How Do You See My Private Key?

How Do You See My Private Key?

I don't think anyone uses the ethereum wallet. its the biggest piece of shit. just save your keystore folder on a USB and delete the whole thing. you want view your private key ? upload the UTC file to myetherwallet and it will present you with everything you need. WAT? And how do you expect them to transact if they only have their keys on a usb? Shitloads of people use the Ethereum Wallet, it's practically the only way to interact with the DAO's for a start. Yes it's a beta heap of shit compared to their final vision for the Mist Browser but the whole platform is still a work in progress. People just don't seem to get that. I too am wondering about my private key in my ethereum wallet - how do I access it? Can anyone else access it? Is the ethereum wallet secure? As a non programmer occasionally executing my first transactions in crypto in recent weeks, there are a myriad of concerns that come to mind - password protection, private key protection, hacking concerns, etc. etc. I start calling friends for help - friends in the know i.e. some are programmers and others are in the crypto business and they also find it difficult to navigate this stuff smoothly - so clearly the industry has a ways to go before its ready for prime time. But we know that, don't we? So my question still is how do I know what my private key is in my ethereum wallet dag nannit? OK, here is the answer to the question 'how do you see my private key' which I got from a trusted source in the crypto space: 'Knowing the password = Owning the private key Nobody will ask you for the private key itself and it is not visible. Finally he also said you must backup your files: To backup the private key and account details. This required to be done once only and not every time you send or receive Ether. 1) In Continue reading >>

Big Trap Of Ethereum Private Key On Web3.js

Big Trap Of Ethereum Private Key On Web3.js

Big trap of ethereum private key on Web3.js Sometimes we want to get account from private key. During those times, we call web3.eth.accounts.privateKeyToAccount but it has very big trap. const Web3 = require('web3');const web3 = new Web3();const account = web3.eth.accounts.privateKeyToAccount('355f246a9fb2c4c4de691fadca5ca21685ba30aa83b3f8b04ca7cf1992e1dd87');console.info(account.address); It shows 0xdD20FD91dD1cDBAA4e303fe1f12018c57D03de8A. But please input that private key to MyEtherWallet . It will shows 0xF124db77bdA4B3166f456fc8a41bE29ec8b0A6a0. const Web3 = require('web3');const web3 = new Web3();const account = web3.eth.accounts.privateKeyToAccount('0x355f246a9fb2c4c4de691fadca5ca21685ba30aa83b3f8b04ca7cf1992e1dd87');console.info(account.address); I added 0x to head of private key and it shows 0xF124db77bdA4B3166f456fc8a41bE29ec8b0A6a0 ! Whatever we must add 0x to head of private key. but MEW, MetaMask and like them shows private key without 0x. It's big trap. I used 1 hour to resolve this problem \_()_/ If you are developing something for users, following code will help you. Please use it as a reference. const Web3 = require('web3');const web3 = new Web3();// get private key from user// const privateKey = ...const account = web3.eth.accounts.privateKeyToAccount(privateKey.indexOf('0x') === 0) ? privateKey : '0x' + privateKey); Did you find this post useful? Show some love! Continue reading >>

Go Ethereum - What Is The Private Key? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Go Ethereum - What Is The Private Key? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

I am trying to understand what is the private key in Ethereum. Help please. Private key = the text seen when we open the file in the keystore folder? Private key = something other than the above? Besides the answers below, here is an answer that will help you understand how the private key is stored in the file in the keystore folder. ethereum.stackexchange.com/questions/15494/ Ajoy Bhatia Jul 4 '17 at 18:43 Note: I've edited the title from "Where...?" to "What...?". The question itself is asking what the private key is, not where it's kept. Richard Horrocks Jul 4 '17 at 21:28 the private key(secret big number) is created by your wallet randomly, then encrypted(with you password) and stored in the UTC file in the keystore folder.the address is calculated from the public key which is derived from the private key. When you say " ... public key which is deactivated from the private key ... ", I think that you mean "derived from the private key". Ajoy Bhatia Jul 4 '17 at 18:39 exactly sorry for the awfull typo Badr Bellaj Jul 4 '17 at 18:44 And when I am asked to type in my private key what exactly do I need to type in? Martin May 17 at 10:46 Why does that matter? I just want my private key decrypted in clear text. Is that to much to ask? But to put your mind at rest: Minds.com which currently runs on the Rinkeby test net. So no real money is at risk. Martin May 17 at 10:52 To get a better understanding of what a private key in Ethereum is, you need to understand what Asymmetric cryptography is. There are two popular asymmetric cryptography algorithms. RSA and ECDSA. Ethereum uses ECDSA (Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm). You can see how ECDSA functions here. To put the above is perspective in simple terms - A private key is a very large random number that is use Continue reading >>

Accounts, Addresses, Public And Private Keys, And Tokens

Accounts, Addresses, Public And Private Keys, And Tokens

Accounts, Addresses, Public And Private Keys, And Tokens The format of your private key is 3a1076bf45ab87712ad64ccb3b10217737f7faacbf2872e88fdd9a537d8fe266. The format of your account (which is generated from your public key) is 0xC2D7CF95645D33006175B78989035C7c9061d3F9. Note that there is a lowercase version 0xc2d7cf95645d33006175b78989035c7c9061d3f9 and a partially uppercase version 0xC2D7CF95645D33006175B78989035C7c9061d3F9. The partially uppercase version has a checksum to verify the address. See EIP55 - Yet another cool checksum address encoding The password encrypted private key is stored in a JSON file with the following format (newlines and indents added for clarity, example on OS/X): $ more ~/Library/Ethereum/keystore/UTC--2017-03-18T05-48-53.504714737Z--c2d7cf95645d33006175b78989035c7c9061d3f9 {"address":"c2d7cf95645d33006175b78989035c7c9061d3f9", "crypto":{ "cipher":"aes-128-ctr", "ciphertext":"0f6d343b2a34fe571639235fc16250823c6fe3bc30525d98c41dfdf21a97aedb", "cipherparams":{ "iv":"cabce7fb34e4881870a2419b93f6c796" }, "kdf":"scrypt", "kdfparams"{ "dklen":32, "n":262144, "p":1, "r":8, "salt":"1af9c4a44cf45fe6fb03dcc126fa56cb0f9e81463683dd6493fb4dc76edddd51" }, "mac":"5cf4012fffd1fbe41b122386122350c3825a709619224961a16e908c2a366aa6" }, "id":"eddd71dd-7ad6-4cd3-bc1a-11022f7db76c", "version":3} How To Create New Accounts (or Addresses) How To Create A New Account In Go Ethereum (geth) You can generate a new Ethereum account by executing geth account new if you already have the geth Ethereum node software installed: $ geth account newYour new account is locked with a password. Please give a password. Do not forget this password.Passphrase: xxxxxxxxRepeat passphrase: xxxxxxxxAddress: {4e6cf0ed2d8bbf1fbbc9f2a100602ceba4bf1319} A UTC--{year}-{month}--{account} enc Continue reading >>

Knowledge-base/ethereum-two-people-same-private-key.md At Master Myetherwallet/knowledge-base Github

Knowledge-base/ethereum-two-people-same-private-key.md At Master Myetherwallet/knowledge-base Github

First of all, the wallet private key is not given, it is randomly generated, then the public key is derived from it, and finally the address is derived from the public key. Potentially someone else could randomly generate the same private key, but the chances of that happening are unbelievably tiny - Let's take things into perspective. Since every Ethereum address starts with '0x' and is followed by 40 hexadecimal characters, and hexadecimal characters have 16 options (a-f and 0-9), there are 16^40 possible Ethereum addresses. 16^40 = 2^2^2^40 = 2^160 possible addresses. That's 1,461,501,637,330,902,918,203,684,832,716,283,019,655,932,542,976. That means you can actually pick a private key yourself. Just pick a number between 0 and 1461501637330902918203684832716283019655932542976. Go ahead, just pick one. Don't tell anyone! There, that's your private key. That number gives you access to all the funds in that account. If you happened to pick one that someone else is using, you now have access to all of their funds. If someone else happens to pick the one that you just picked, now they have access to all of your funds. That's why it's important that the one you picked is really really random and that you never let anyone see it. It's that simple. Pick a number, that's your account. Cross your fingers that nobody else picks it! The mind blowing part is that this is actually secure. That number up there is so large that if you truly did a good job picking your number randomly, then the odds that anyone else picks it is infintesimal. (1/that number). Don't believe me? Go ahead, there are billions of dollars worth of value in the blockchain. You should set up a computer program to generate tons of these numbers and check each one to see whether they have any money in them. Continue reading >>

Why Generate Truly Random Privatekeys?

Why Generate Truly Random Privatekeys?

[spotted] 21 BTC (cumulative) sent to an address whose private key is compromised To develop our applications, we are constantly handling authentication protocols (basic, digest, oauth,). We even use hash functions and in 2016, when Apple required that all connections be in https, we could no longer ignore the main principles of symmetric and asymmetric encryption. And still When I generated accounts every 2 minutes while doing my tests on Ethereum, I had the impression to reserve myself addresses unnecessarily, I realize now that this reasoning is fundamentally wrong for several reasons. First, the probability of a collision when creating an address is infinitely small, orders of magnitude are so huge that it is difficult to represent them. Then, even if two people tried to brute-force keys for 100 years, these addresses would have to be used on the Blockchain transactions for that to be relevant. Conclusion, no reason to feel guilty if you generate thousands of addresses, consider rather that they already exist all but you can not control them. So we have a system without storage / persistence that allows from a private key to generate a public key and an address. This is obviously a one-way system. Do not try to hack it, there is no flaw in this system, it is both ultra secure and very user friendly. Without dependency (third party or hardware) I can sign transactions on the Blockchain with the only constraint, the knowledge of my secret code. On the other hand, if your private key is compromised, a hacker can quietly take away your cryptos and you will not be able to do anything. If you find this shocking, make an analogy with your mailbox. When you send me an email, I know your public address (your email), imagine that your password is your date of birth (private Continue reading >>

Ethereum Private Key - Enow.com - Content Results

Ethereum Private Key - Enow.com - Content Results

In Ethereum, this is unnecessary as it does not operate in a UTXO scheme. With the private key, it is possible to write in the blockchain, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency_wallet A cryptocurrency wallet stores the public and private keys which can be used to receive or spend the cryptocurrency.A wallet can contain multiple public and private key pairs. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography Public-key cryptography, or asymmetric cryptography, is any cryptographic system that uses pairs of keys: public keys which may be disseminated widely, and private keys which are known only to the owner. Ethereum Vs Bitcoin: What's The Main Difference? | HuffPost www.huffingtonpost.com/ameer-rosic-/ethereum-vs-bitcoin... Ethereum Vs Bitcoin: What's The Main Difference? ... Differences Between Ethereum and Bitcoin. ... Another key difference between them is their monetary supply. Rescue Your Ethereum DAO Funds In Two Clicks | HuffPost www.huffingtonpost.com/david-seaman/rescue-your-ethereum... If Ethereum -- the world's sec ... Rescue Your Ethereum DAO Funds In Two Clicks. By David Seaman. Hey, so ... Paste your private key. DONE!!! But I thought Ethereum ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency_and_security In 2016, known as the DAO event, an exploit in the original Ethereum smart contracts resulted in multiple transactions, ... If the private key is stolen, ... Whomever has the private key to the address is considered the owner and can spend the coins that belong to the address. Ordinary Ethereum addresses can be used to ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockchain_(database) A private key is like a password that gives its owner ... "Within a private blockchain there ... most known public blockchains are Bitcoin and Ethereum. Private ... Continue reading >>

Accessing Your Ether Wallets Private Keys On Blockchain.info

Accessing Your Ether Wallets Private Keys On Blockchain.info

Accessing your Ether wallets Private Keys on Blockchain.info Currently, many companies support creation and use of Ether wallets. Its possible to send and receive ETH easily, without being need to download the whole Blockchain for the task. However, many of these wallets havent added support for ERC-20 tokens. These tokens are used often as a trading value in many ICOs, and also given to the users as payment for their contribution. With Chronologics ICO it wasnt different. There are steps to be taken to visualize and use these tokens for some wallets. Now, lets talk about the wallets that really allow users full control over their address. Among them we have Jaxx, MyEtherWallet, Blockchain.info, and others. If youve made your contribution from any of these rest assured that with a few simple steps you can manage and even transfer your DAY tokens. However, if youve sent your contribution from Coinbase, Bittrex, Poloniex, FreeWallet, BTC Markets or Kraken, among others, then you have a problem. In order to check the DAY tokens inside your ETH address, you dont need to unblock/open your wallet, rather only type your wallets address on EtherScan.io or Ethplorer.io. Now, if you really want to move your DAY tokens, or any other ERC-20 asset from those wallets, then youll have to access it using the Private Key, JSON file and password, etc. Today well feature a quick tutorial on how to recover your Private Key from an Ether wallet hosted by Blockchain.info. Step #1: Login into your Blockchain.info account. Step #2: Click on Ether (left side of your screen). Step #3: Select the option Export Private Key, as demonstrated below. Step #4: This warning mentions the implied risks of exposing your Private Key. Basically, never let anyone else see it and always double-check the websi Continue reading >>

Why Do I Need A Public And Private Key On The Blockchain?

Why Do I Need A Public And Private Key On The Blockchain?

Why Do I Need a Public and Private Key on the Blockchain? When someone sends you cryptocoins over the Blockchain, they are actually sending them to a hashed version of whats known as the Public Key. There is another key which is hidden from them, that is known as the Private Key. This Private Key is used to derive the Public Key. You can know your own Private Key, and everyone else on the Blockchain knows their own Private Key, but the Private Key should not be shared with outsiders (that is, unless you want your cryptocurrencies to be stolen!). Both the Private Key and the Public Key are large integer numbers, but since these numbers are so large, they are usually represented using a separate Wallet Import Format (WIF) consisting of letters and numbers. The Private Key is the longer of the two, and is used to generate a signature for each blockchain transaction a user sends out. This signature is used to confirm that the transaction has come from the user, and also prevents the transaction from being altered by anyone once it has been issued. In short, you sign the cryptocurrencies you send to others using a Private Key. If someone were to obtain your private key, they would be able to send your cryptocurrencies to themselves, verifying that transaction with the Private Key in effect stealing from you! The Private Key is used to mathematically derive the Public Key, which (along with information about the network and a checksum)is then transformed with a hash function to produce the address that other people can see. You receive cryptocurrencies that others send to your address (which is a result of the hash of your public key and some additional information). At this point, you may be asking yourself, if a Public Key is derived from a Private Key, couldnt someone cre Continue reading >>

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