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Ethereum Eip Process

Ethereum Developers In Heated Debate Concerning Fund Recovery Proposal

Ethereum Developers In Heated Debate Concerning Fund Recovery Proposal

Ethereum Developers in Heated Debate Concerning Fund Recovery Proposal Therehave been countless cases of crypto wallet hacks that have often led to the loss of enormous amounts of funds. At current, Ethereum developers are at crossroads concerning the fund recovery proposal EIP 867. This improvement could enable stolen funds to be returned to their rightful owners after being taken. Some Ethereum senior programmers are calling for an open debate to come up with the best steps to take in improving the network to make it possible to return funds lost in notorious hacks and other crypto pitfalls. on February 9, 2018, at their routine bi-weekly meeting, some programmers endorsed the controversial Ethereum improvement proposal EIP 867 , which provides a standardized format for recovery of certain classes of lost funds. However, the proposal has attracted a lot of criticism as other senior members like Yoichi Hirai do not support making changes to the Ethereum protocol just because some investors ether was stolen by hackers or lost due to ignorance on the part of the owner. Yoichi Hirai wrote in a blog post that he is not going to move a finger for such changes, adding that: The choice comes from my personal belief that each user of Ethereum is responsible for their use of Ethereum. I also believe that, if others pay for a users mistake, the payment should be voluntary donations (as opposed to freeing stuck tokens). And, originally, I just wanted a simple, deterministic virtual machine that doesnt change frequently. While both the supporters and critics of the EIP 867 proposal are still trying to reach a consensus, Ethereum developer Vlad Zamfir told stakeholders present at the meeting that: These proposals, especially proposals that do set important precedents, that impact Continue reading >>

Ethereum: Ethereum Improvement Proposals (eips)

Ethereum: Ethereum Improvement Proposals (eips)

Ethereum Improvement Proposals (EIPs) describe standards for the Ethereum platform, including core protocol specifications, client APIs, and contract standards. an EIP that is open for consideration and is undergoing rapid iteration and changes. an EIP that is done with its initial iteration and ready for review by a wide audience. a core EIP that has been in Last Call for at least 2 weeks and any technical changes that were requested have been addressed by the author. The process for Core Devs to decide whether to encode an EIP into their clients as part of a hard fork is not part of the EIP process. If such a decision is made, the EIP will move to final. an EIP that has been in Last Call for at least 2 weeks and any technical changes that were requested have been addressed by the author. an EIP that the Core Devs have decided to implement and release in a future hard fork or has already been released in a hard fork. an EIP that is not being considered for immediate adoption. May be reconsidered in the future for a subsequent hard fork. EIPs are separated into a number of types, and each has its own list of EIPs. Describes any change that affects most or all Ethereum implementations, such as a change to the the network protocol, a change in block or transaction validity rules, proposed application standards/conventions, or any change or addition that affects the interoperability of applications using Ethereum. Furthermore Standard EIPs can be broken down into the following categories. Improvements requiring a consensus fork (e.g. EIP5, EIP101), as well as changes that are not necessarily consensus critical but may be relevant to core dev discussions (for example, the miner/node strategy changes 2, 3, and 4 of EIP86). Includes improvements around devp2p (EIP8) and Ligh Continue reading >>

Ethereum Gas Fees Made Easy With Eip-1559

Ethereum Gas Fees Made Easy With Eip-1559

Ethereum Gas Fees Made Easy with EIP-1559 Ethereum Gas Fees Made Easy with EIP-1559 The Ethereum gas fees youre familiar with may be changing thanks to EIP-1559 . This proposal seeks to do away with the old and sometimes frustrating gas fee auction system. As an alternative, EIP-1559 proposes a BASEFEE, which would make the experience of paying for transaction fees so much smoother. EIP-1559 simplifies how you pay for Ethereum gas fees We can all agree that the current auction-style fee system can be frustrating. Ever wanted to just send a transaction without worrying about how busy the network is? Youll be happy to hear that EIP-1559 automates the auction process by creating a BASEFEE that automatically adjusts in a predictable way based on network congestion. When the network is at >50% capacity, the BASEFEE goes up. And when capacity is at <50%, the BASEFEE goes down slightly. You can predict the maximum amount the BASEFEE could change from block to block. Therefore, your wallet can be set to pay the BASEFEE along with a tip for the miner (you can choose the tip amount). Say goodbye to Insufficient funds for gas messages I think weve all encountered this phrase. You probably hate seeing that message as much as I do. But with EIP-1559s simple BASEFEE, you can forget all about it. We reached out toEric Conner, founder of EthHub and co-author of EIP-1559, for his thoughts on the matter. He shared his thoughts on the impact of EIP-1559: The biggest impact for a day to day user is twofold. First, the cost for a transaction to get into the next block will be very predictable. This means that wallets will be able to guide users much easier to the cost they need to pay to get into the next block. Today, there is only very basic retroactive guidance so the user really has no Continue reading >>

Ethereum/eips - Gitter

Ethereum/eips - Gitter

hello everyone. I've been brainstorming on a means of introducing two-factor auth transactions into a cryptocurrency in an effort to store coins more securely. I've come up with a means of doing so and documented the concept on my github ( ). This implementation is more bitcoin focused, but is it worthwhile for me to think of an ETH implementation and open a EIP? Or is my idea completely stupid nevermind, the more i think about it, the more i realize this isn't possible on ETH. Apologies @CBarraford You know, you can have other factors using multisigs (or by combining keys with ECDSA) A passphrase can be converted to a key, or a tweak to a key. And a hardware wallet is "something you have" Hi! I have been looking for documentation on how abstracted accounts will be able to 'sign data', similar to how you can do with EOAs now with web3.eth.sign(...). Have been looking through Casper FFG code but can't figure out what is doing. For a project, I have been thinking about how to make 'regular contracts' sign data in a similar way that EOA accounts can, that can later be 'recovered' by contracts. Thinking about making it an EIP if it does make sense with how this will work after abstraction. A draft of the idea can be found here: Contracts can't have private keys, and so can't sign data. They can make calls, though, so a better approach is to have a contract that records assertions made by accounts, instead of signatures. forgot to quote 'sign data'. My proposal would be to have a standard deployed contract that could be trusted with assertions made by accounts, instead of having each app implement their own mechanism for contract assertion. An initial interface is outlined in my comment on the issue linked above Have there been any EIPs related to including signature aggreg Continue reading >>

Make Ethereum Future Proof (one Proposal At A Time)

Make Ethereum Future Proof (one Proposal At A Time)

Make Ethereum Future Proof (one proposal at a time) tl;dr : EIP Editor Criteria to EIP-1 , EIP-1 addition to EIP Editor Responsibilities , very early stages random editor assignment . Ethereums history started in November 2013, when Vitalik Buterin made the Ethereum whitepaper public. This was 5 years after Bitcoin was born, in October 2008, when Satoshi Nakamoto published Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. It took 5 years to come up with a better blockchain design, with a Turing-complete EVM. Ethereum could do what Bitcoin did and more. However, a big part of Bitcoins developer community shuns Ethereum and they forget the technical merits, preferring to bring forth various reasons for why they stick with Bitcoin from Bitcoins anonymous beginnings, Ethereums ICO and DAO fork, to various collaboration issues and differences between the two communities. It is also hard to let go of something when a lot of money is involved, and easy to find reasons for staying. But when human incentives and efforts align, research and development happen faster. We are now 5 years into Ethereums timeline. There have been a number of projects claiming that they are better than Ethereum. Still, up until this point, none have surpassed it in terms of the number of users and developers. If Ethereum remains technically superior, there will be little chance for other technologies to do so. Ethereums big test is recognizing and overcoming its own bad habits, as Bitcoin did when Ethereum appeared. The community of developers should look at Ethereums competitors and find the technical features that would make them better. And, of course, integrate those features into Ethereum. With its Turing complete expressiveness, Ethereum has high chances to do that successfully. The test itself i Continue reading >>

Protocol - How Do Upgrades At Ethereum Work? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Protocol - How Do Upgrades At Ethereum Work? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

You have to program the code to that will upgrade the client software. This code will start from some block number, say 6,000,000 . Everybody gets ready for this date and buys some champagne to celebrate. When this block is created the fork happens, and the clients of the entire network start working a little bit differently, this difference is described in EIP (Ethereum Improvement Proposal). If you want to change something, create an EIP and submit it, if it is good enough, Vitalik may accept it. Thank you for your answer. What happen if somebody does not "update" the software and continue with the old one? Bruce Wayne Nov 21 '17 at 19:11 @BruceWayne it depends. if it is a soft fork, he won't be benefiting from the new changes. If it is a hard fork he won't be able to download the full blockchain. If he is a miner this means he will not be able to mine and will lose money. This will be show as "bad block" error during the download process. Nulik Nov 21 '17 at 20:36 @BruceWayne, what idea of improvement do you have? I have my own private network, maybe we can develop the changes you want to incorporate to Ethereum, on our own network and you will be able to use it Nulik Nov 21 '17 at 20:41 I understand perfectly, thank you also for this answer. I don't have any particular improvement: i'm just studying every details of this technology, for the moment. :) Bruce Wayne Nov 23 '17 at 9:38 Continue reading >>

Ethereum - Wikipedia

Ethereum - Wikipedia

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . This article relies too much on references to primary sources . Please improve this by adding secondary or tertiary sources . Some of this article's listed sources may not be reliable . Please help this article by looking for better, more reliable sources. Unreliable citations may be challenged or deleted. The Ethereum Project's logo, first used in 2014 Ethereum is an open-source , public, blockchain -based distributed computing platform featuring smart contract (scripting) functionality. [2] It provides a decentralized Turing-complete virtual machine , the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM), which can execute scripts using an international network of public nodes. Ethereum also provides a cryptocurrency token called "ether", which can be transferred between accounts and used to compensate participant nodes for computations performed. [3] "Gas", an internal transaction pricing mechanism, is used to mitigate spam and allocate resources on the network. [2] [4] Ethereum was proposed in late 2013 by Vitalik Buterin , a cryptocurrency researcher and programmer. Development was funded by an online crowdsale between July and August 2014. [5] The system went live on 30 July 2015, with 11.9 million coins "premined" for the crowdsale. [6] This accounts for approximately 13 percent of the total circulating supply. In 2016, as a result of the collapse of The DAO project, Ethereum was forked into two separate blockchains - the new forked version became Ethereum (ETH), and the original continued as Ethereum Classic (ETC). [7] [8] [9] Ethereum was initially described in a white paper by Vitalik Buterin , [10] a programmer involved with Bitcoin Magazine , in late 2013 with a goal of buildin Continue reading >>

Ethereum Developers May Implement Eip-2025 In The Next Hard Fork

Ethereum Developers May Implement Eip-2025 In The Next Hard Fork

Ethereum Developers May Implement EIP-2025 in The Next Hard Fork The Ethereum team is reportedly considering EIP-2025 as an enhancement during Istanbul. This move has already cause considerable controversy among developers because of the corresponding increase in inflation rate. Accordingly, the proposal has sparked both debate and backlash from a contingent of developers. 4/ The EIP process is supposed to be a purely technical process. Consider it a technical review of the proposed standard for soundness and viability. There is no capacity or capability for handling things like politics or measuring social contention. The information from the Ethereum core notes for the Ethereum Improvement Proposals (EIP) shows the same. An EIP provides information to the Ethereum community. Needless to say, blockchain platforms like Ethereum are open-source and community participation is a core part of the platform. In such a scenario, the criterion for rewards allocation is certainly a bone of contention. This is why the proposal has caught the attention of many developers. The document for plans outlined proposals to create more ether per block for a period of 18 months. As a result, this will increase flow to a funding organization. The end result is fueling development of the Ethereum ecosystem. Essentially, EIP-2025 proposes 0.0055 ETH` per block for 18 months as a developer block reward reserved for funding Ethereum1.X development. This move will increase the block rewards within the stipulated time frame. To the core developers, the increasedliquidity in the form of block reward can be a good thing for spurring moreinnovation. Needless to say, not everyone shares this opinion. Developers were quick to jump on thisinformation. Unsurprisingly, most of them had a negativereactio Continue reading >>

Ethereum Dev Yoichi Hirai Steps Away From Role As Eip Editor, Raises Questions About Process

Ethereum Dev Yoichi Hirai Steps Away From Role As Eip Editor, Raises Questions About Process

Click here to view original web page at www.ethnews.com Yoichi Hirai, an Ethereum developer who had been acting in the capacity of Ethereum Improvement Proposal (EIP) editor, stepped away from this role on February 14 following a contentious debate surrounding EIP867 . The proposal seeks to establish a procedure for the recovery of lost or frozen Ether tokens that is significantly more streamlined than the process currently in place, which is, generally speaking, ill-defined. The purpose of EIP867, according to language contained in the proposal itself, is to "provide a standardized format for Ethereum Recovery Proposals (ERPs), which relate to recovery of certain classes of lost funds. This EIP does not advocate for or against the acceptance of any particular recovery proposals," but aims to facilitate the return of funds to users in cases "where there is no disagreement about the right outcome between directly affected parties." Hirai challenged a number of aspects of the proposal and even questioned the integrity of the system that tasked him with approving it. But the issue that ultimately kept him from reversing his decision to block EIP867, he said, was his concern that in doing so, he would violate a Japanese law . The law in question states that a "person who, with the intent to bring about improper administration of the matters of another person, unlawfully creates without due authorization an electromagnetic record which is for use in such improper administration and is related to rights, duties or certification of facts, shall be punished." Hirai explained , "Aiding a crime by not acting is also a crime, and I suspect this applies if I dismiss my blocking review, or recuse myself," though he admitted, some 13 days into the debate, that he wanted "to unblock Continue reading >>

Improving Ethereum With Eips

Improving Ethereum With Eips

With an entire community working together to advance the Ethereum blockchain, ETHNews examines the formal process for vetting and implementing suggestions on the platform. As a complex multifaceted platform, the Ethereum blockchain represents the cumulative efforts of numerous individuals. To coordinate this crowdsourced project, developers of Ethereum have come up with a process by which proposals can be workshopped, discussed, and possibly integrated into the Ethereum blockchain. Many of the novel and sometimes groundbreaking developments of Ethereum promulgate from members of the community. Anyone with a GitHub account can submit suggestions in the form of what are called Ethereum Improvement Proposals (EIPs). EIPs are designed to provide a format for presenting ideas that is simple and digestible to newcomers. Others can then comment on ways to help drive the proposals forward, or pick them apart to see if they have any merit. EIPs are useful for evolving protocols, processes, or responses to environmental changes. EIPs can be broken down into three types. The first, a Standard Track EIP, covers any change that will affect all or most implementations of the Ethereum blockchain. Standard Track EIPs can be thought of as broad layer changes and might cover alterations to network protocols, application standards, or interoperability among Ethereum applications. In addition, Standard Track EIPs can be further delineated into subcategories: core, networking, interface, and Ethereum request for comment (ERC). Core improvements are often changes that require a consensus fork, relative to discussions of "core" developers. Networking focuses on light client improvements or general network protocol alterations. Interface submissions are aimed at client API/RPC protocols. ERCs Continue reading >>

Ethereum Developer Resigns As Code Editor Citing Legal Concerns

Ethereum Developer Resigns As Code Editor Citing Legal Concerns

Ethereum Developer Resigns as Code Editor Citing Legal Concerns Feb 15, 2018 at 11:00 UTC|UpdatedFeb 15, 2018 at 11:03 UTC Ethereum developer Yoichi Hirai has resigned as one of the platform's code editors, citing concerns that a contentious proposal may be in violation of penal law. Named EIP 867 , the proposal defines a method to better facilitate the return of lost funds on the platform. Speaking on GitHub, the developer wrote : "Some EIP editors look nonchalant about legal consequences of this draft, but I have warned them, and I have no capacities to do anything more than warn them ... I resign from the post of an EIP editor." Writing his comments yesterday , Hirai said that the EIP may be in violation of a Japanese law named the "Unauthorized Creation of Electromagnetic Records," stating "I have a doubt that, if the proposal is followed in practice, the process might constitute a crime." The law in question deals with cases of computer-based fraud, in particular the unlawful creation of data "with the intent to bring about improper administration of the matters of another person," a legal document states . Last week, Hirai blocked the proposal due to its failure to align with the "ethereum philosophy," a requirement based on the code acceptance process, as detailed in EIP-1 . The developer has since retracted those statements, writing : "I was able to ignore my interpretation of 'the ethereum philosophy' but I cannot ignore the penal code." As previously detailed by CoinDesk , the proposal is led by developer Dan Philferfrom Musiconomi, an ICO issuer that saw 16,475 ether lost in the Parity fund freeze last year . Philfer's proposal has sparked controversy among developers, with some urging the public to get involved with the debate. The proposal is also said to Continue reading >>

Ethereum Client Forgets Eip Inclusion, Asks Users For Another Upgrade

Ethereum Client Forgets Eip Inclusion, Asks Users For Another Upgrade

Ethereum Client Forgets EIP Inclusion, Asks Users for Another Upgrade Ethereum client Parity released an urgent announcement, admitting that they forgot to include an EIP in the latest upgrade. Ethereums Biggest Client Forgets EIP Inclusion A recent announcement posted by one of Ethereums biggest clients, Parity, came as a surprise. The service admitted that it forgot to include an EIP (Ethereum Improvement Proposal) into their recent upgrade. Parity stated that their version V2.5.11-stable serves as an emergency patch that they prepared soon after realizing their mistake. The patch will add a missing component known as eip1344_transition for the main net. The biggest problem lies in the fact that the error was made so close to the Istanbul update, and anyone who fails to add the patch might suffer issues when the hard fork arrives. As for the EIP what it does, is that it basically proposes to add an opcode for retrieving the chain ID of the chain on which the block was mined. That way, smart contracts will have the ability to validate signatures that use replay protection. The problem with this is that the only way to achieve it is hardcoding the chain ID into the smart contract. Obviously, that is a problem when it comes to a hard fork . Even so, it remains unclear how Parity managed to forget to include an entire EIP. Another thing that Parity failed to explain is how the error remained undiscovered until only a few hours before the major Ethereum network upgrade . Of course, another valid question is why would anyone even use this Ethereum client at this point. There are plenty of others that are not under the payroll of another project, while they still provide pretty much the same capabilities as ETH. One explanation is that the fact that the clients team started Continue reading >>

Yoichi Hirai, Ethereum Code Editor Resigns Over Legal Concerns

Yoichi Hirai, Ethereum Code Editor Resigns Over Legal Concerns

Yoichi Hirai, Ethereum Code Editor Resigns Over Legal Concerns Yoichi Hirai, Ethereum Code Editor Resigns Over Legal Concerns Ethereum Code Editor Has Resigned Over Ethereum Improvement Proposal (EIP) Issue Japan: Code Editor for Ethereum, Yoichi Hirai, quits his office following his concerns that the Japanese law would be potentially violated by an Ethereum Improvement Proposal (EIP) over a standardized format for lost fund recovery. Aside tweeting his resignation, Yoichi also posted a more dramatic explanation of the motives behind his resigning on Github: My blood pressure is higher since I found this draft. I dont sleep well. My family accuses me of mental absence. I believe these are signs that my abilities are not ready for the task of the EIP editorship. I resign from the post of an EIP editor. The proposal which seeks to proffer a simpler method to the amendment of the Ethereum blockchain that would allow to redistribute address balances in the case of lost funds was introduced by Dan Phifer, a Musiconomi developer and two developers from startup TapTrust . A cyber-attack on the Parity Ethereum client last June caused Musiconomi to lose their Ether raised though by crowdfunding when Parity froze their multi-sig wallet. However, this proposal by Dan would allow such lost funds on the Ethereum platform to be returned in the case of a similar future hack. Yoichi reported that he sees the proposal as a conflict with the Japanese penal code on the Unauthorized Creation of Electromagnetic Records. According to what he wrote on Github, Yoichi stated he doesnt think that anybody has the authority to make an irregular state change, because he doesnt believe that Ethereum users know about or authorize the EIP process, and thus doesnt want the non-democratically chosen EI Continue reading >>

Block Rewards Threaten Ethereum's Entire Economic Model: Eric Conner

Block Rewards Threaten Ethereum's Entire Economic Model: Eric Conner

Happy Friday defiers! Im introducing occasional outside columnist on The Defiant as a way to offer you different perspectives on decentralized finance, Ethereum, and smart contracts platforms, and today is the first one. My idea is to have guests that can help us go deeper into the weeks most interesting developments. This weeks discussion around raising block rewards in Ethereum to fund specific groups is worth further thought. EthHub co-founder Eric Conner helped spark the debate by strongly opposing EIP 2025, which proposed that change to the protocol. In the following column he explains why he thinks the proposal is a slippery slope and threatens Ethereums economic model. He also proposes a way to improve the Ethereum Improvement Proposal process itself. 999, 1890 and now 2025. These numbers are meaningless when an author submits an EIP but they become symbolic for the ideas and debates they raise in the Ethereum community afterwards. In this article, I discuss the EIP workflow and observe some of its potential weakness, particularly in the wake of the recent case of 2025. Its first important to begin by taking a step back and explaining what exactly an EIP is. According to EIP-1, which lays out the rules for the process, EIP stands for Ethereum Improvement Proposal. An EIP is a design document providing information to the Ethereum community, or describing a new feature for Ethereum or its processes or environment. James Hancock helps us visualize the overall workflow: Because Ethereum is decentralized, anyone can go to the Ethereum Github repository and submit an EIP. To be clear, this is a good thing! At the same time, however, this openness raises a number of important questions: If anyone can submit an EIP, how do we make sure that threat vectors outside of tec Continue reading >>

Proposal To Restore A Destroyed Ethereum Contract | Hacker News

Proposal To Restore A Destroyed Ethereum Contract | Hacker News

If they want to change history to help a privileged group of people, they should have a generalized mechanism and process for doing so. If I can prove I accidentally lost 1 ETH, let alone millions, I should be able to retrieve it via that same process. I love Lord Vitalik as much as any ETH nerd, but the more he dictates to help his friends, the more it will hurt the ecosystem. The "generalized mechanism for doing so", in this case, would be the EIP process itself, no? It's a bit like those clients that say of their software, in its requirements, "I want my software to be customizable after-the-fact with any new logic I desire, up-to-and-including the power to completely rewrite the application." Some people try to solve this problem as stated, resulting in the . Other people recognize what's happening, and just respond with "the customization mechanism is the source code. You can customize it at any time by contracting a programmer to do so for you." The FDIC of the Ethereum blockchain seems to beas this example, and the earlier example of the DAO, would suggestthe Ethereum maintainers themselves. The way the Ethereum maintainers propose changes to the consensus protocol to fix problems is through EIPs. So, if there's an Ethereum "natural disaster", the natural thing to expect in response would be an EIP. (as opposed to the Ethereum Classic blockchain, which has no such entity, which is rather the point of the fork.) You could create another layer atop the EIP process, formalizing specifically the recovery process from a "loss of money" event... but it's really going to boil down to a consensus-algorithm change in the end, so an EIP is going to have to be involved. (Unless you're suggesting that there should be some way, within the Ethereum VM itself, to aribtrate dis Continue reading >>

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