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Ethereum Client Comparison

Blockchain - What Exactly Is An Ethereum Client And What Clients Are There? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Blockchain - What Exactly Is An Ethereum Client And What Clients Are There? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

What exactly is an Ethereum client and what clients are there? Ethereum.org's introductory Command Line Interface tutorial mentions these clients: eth - a C++ client suitable for mining, IoT and contract development geth - a security audited Go client for use with Mist, suitable for Dapp development pyethapp - Python client to help understand and hack Ethereum What exactly is an Ethereum client? Is it a full network node that can post transactions to the blockchain (if that is the correct lingo?) or could it also be a light JS client that connects from a browser to a full node? Could someone please shed some light on what clients there currently are and what roles they fulfil? An 'Ethereum client' is just a term. It refers to any node able to parse and verify the blockchain, its smart contracts and everything related. It also allows you/provides interfaces to create transactions and mine blocks which is the key for any blockchain interaction. There are currently three reference implementations available, as you already highlighted: eth - C++ client of the webthree project. It was formerly known as cpp-ethereum: geth - Golang client of the go-ethereum project: pyethapp - Python client of the pyethereum project: All clients should work the same, from the user's perspective. They provide the same interfaces and so on. For example, if you launch a DApp or the Ethereum Wallet or a DApp browser instance, it should not note any difference in communicating with the client. Graphical clients available by the Ethereum core developers are: mist which works on top of geth or eth and aims to be a DApp browser and currently implements the ethereum-wallet-dapp. alethzero is internally called the hardcore client but it's being deprecated. Non-official clients implementing the yellow p Continue reading >>

5 Best Ethereum Mining Pools To Join 2017 / 2018 (comparison)

5 Best Ethereum Mining Pools To Join 2017 / 2018 (comparison)

Jordan Tuwiner Last updated July 13, 2017 Once you get Ethereum mining hardware , your next step is to decide on which Ethereum mining pool youll join. A mining pool helps you get more frequent payouts rather than only getting paid when you solve an Ether block. Note that mining has a lot of up-front costs, and if you just want Ether than its usually a better idea to just buy Ethereum . Youll also need Ethereum mining software to point your hardware towards your selected pool. And, an Ethereum wallet to receive payouts to . Weve listed the top pools in order of hash rate share according to Etherchain : The pools below are mining pools. This means you need to own mining hardware. If you want another company to mine for you you need cloud mining . Ethpool and Ethermine are two different sites although they appear to be basically the same pool. They are currently the largest Ether mining pool with about 25% of the networks hash rate. F2pool is also a Bitcoin mining pool. Its Ether mining pool appears to only be available in Chinese, so this is not a good option for most of our readers. DwarfPool is the third largest Ethereum mining pool with about 13% of the networks hash rate. In addition to Ether you can mine a bunch of other currencies like Monero and Dash. ethfans is another Chinese pool with about 8.6% of the network hash rate. If you just want ether, mining is NOT the best way to obtain coins. Buying ether is the EASIEST and FASTEST way to get ether. Get $10 worth of free ether when you buy $100 or more at Coinbase . This section will answer common questions about Ethereum pools. All of the pools are pretty good and ideally you will just want to choose one that is reliable, has low fees, and has a server near you. No, Ethereum mining pools and Bitcoin mining pools a Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Best Ethereum Wallets (2018 Edition)

The Top 10 Best Ethereum Wallets (2018 Edition)

The Top 10 Best Ethereum Wallets (2018 Edition) By: Sudhir Khatwani In: Ethereum Last Updated: Ethereum currently has the second largest market cap after Bitcoin . Because of this, many investors are now flocking to Ethereum. Naturally, this has surged demand for more secure Ethereum wallets. And in my opinion, this is what all secure cryptocurrency wallets need to have: Private keys Wallets where you control your private keys. Ease of use Elegant UI for ease of use. Development community Active development community. Backup & security Backup and restore features. Compatibility Compatible with different operating systems. I believe that if a wallet doesnt have any one of these things, your coins could be at risk and you could give yourself a major headache. When looking for wallets, make sure that the above requirements are met before you store your coins there. If you want to get hold of ETH Instantly using Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency, just use the widget below. Here I have listed out the best wallets for Ethereum. They all meet the above requirements. The Ledger Nano S is one of the most inexpensive Ethereum hardware wallets available ($65). Here, Ether is stored offline on the device. Whenever you want to spend Ether, Ledger signs it using the private key stored on the device. You can store both ETH & ETC. Harsh has made few videos guide about Ledger Nano S that you must check out. This will help you to learn everything about Ledger Nano S. The best thing about the Ledger Nano S is that it comes with a small OLED screen which allows you to control your transactions. The security is so robust that you can use your Nano S device even on a hacked computer. Trezor was the first hardware wallet invented for Bitcoin. However,nowTrezor can be used for Ethereum too Continue reading >>

Performance Analysis

Performance Analysis

So with the latest benchmarks (available to see at parity.io), it's clear Parity has head and shoulders the fastest and lightest Ethereum block processing engine amongst the available clients. But aside from the big numbers, it's nice to understand a bit deeper about what's going on underneath. This is a quick dive into the differences between Parity and the currently most popular client on the Ethereum network, Geth. I haven't yet done similar stuff for EthereumJ or Eth, though I expect that might be fun, too. Note that throughout I'm talking about block-processing. In particular, each client processed the same ~1,000,000 blocks in the current "Frontier" Ethereum mainnet. Block processing means checking the proof-of-work and all the transaction signatures, executing EVM code, building and updating tries, managing the death row (in the state-pruning clients) and various verifications. I measured block processing through making the clients do a "full" sync (as opposed to Geth's --fast sync which doesn't do block processing, instead just duplicating the state trie from a remote host) from a pre-synced node running locally. It used to be that block-processing speed was the same as sync speed. With the advent of state-trie-duplicating (aka fast-syncing), this is no longer strictly true: nodes can sync without actually needing to process all those transactions that happened prior (ish - they still tend to process the last 1000 or so). Here we measure block-processing speed - though it's not an especially great proxy for understanding how fast a node can sync, it's still useful for understanding a few other aspects about how fast a node will go. Block processing speed governs how fast a miner will be able to confirm an incoming block and get back to mining on the right chain Continue reading >>

Six Most Popular Ethereum Wallets

Six Most Popular Ethereum Wallets

While until recently Ethereum users could lament that their ecosystem lacked simple and convenient wallets, now the selection has definitely expanded. Still, the more the choice is, the harder it is to find what suits you best. ForkLog has compiled an overview for six most popular Ethereum wallets. Any crypto-project has its own standard implementation and default wallet, and Ethereum is no exception here. Ethereum Foundation that supports the project has created Mist, an Ethereum browser capable of acting like a standard means of storing ETH and interacting with smart contracts. Still, one shouldnt forget that currently Mist isnt quite ready to serve as a full-fledged decentralized app, as its still undergoing beta testing. You will have to install it on your HDD with blockchain syncing that takes a while. Additionally, youll need basic coding skills. The latest recommended version 0.7.6 (Beta 20) with vulnerabilities removed was released June 26. Its available on Ethereums official site and at GitHub . The final release of Mist is expected to coincide with the next version of Ethereum protocol titled Metropolis. Anyways, even though developers issued some warnings, Mist is quite good for storing ETH and other cryptoassets on Ethereum blockchain, as well as for deploying and using smart contracts. Additionally, Mist is integrated with ShapeShift, which enables thefast exchange of ETH for BTC and vice versa. Newbies should pay some attention to the fact that Mist implies thedifference between Account and Wallet. Both the account and the wallet may store coins. Account, however, implies a standard and BTC user-friendly method of storing private and public keys, while Wallet is a smart contract controlled by one or several accounts. Disadvantages of the wallet include th Continue reading >>

The Ethereum-blockchain Size Will Not Exceed 1tb Anytime Soon.

The Ethereum-blockchain Size Will Not Exceed 1tb Anytime Soon.

The Ethereum-blockchain size will not exceed 1TB anytime soon. Before diving into this article, please read the two disclosures about my involvement (1,2) and the one on data accuracy (3) at the bottom of the article. At least once a month someone posts a chart on r/ethereum predicting the blockchain size of Ethereum will soon exceed 1 TB. I want to take that chance to clean up with some stories around the Ethereum-blockchain size in this article and try to explain why this chart is technically correct, but not the full picture. Let's have a look at this chart first. It shows the complete data directory size of an Ethereum node (red), Geth in this case, and a Bitcoin node (blue), probably Bitcoin-Core , plotted over time. While the Bitcoin graph is moving slightly upwards in a seemingly linear inclination, the Ethereum graph reminds the reader of an exponential growing slope. On Blocks, Block-History, States, and State-History Users accusing Ethereum of blockchain-bloat are not far off with their assumptions. But actually, not the chain is bloated but the Ethereum state. I want to examine some terminology from the Whitepaper before proceeding. Block. A bundle of transactions which, after proper execution, update the state. Each transaction-bundling block gets a number, has some difficulty, and contains the most recent state. State. The state is made up of all initialized Ethereum accounts. At the time of writing, there are around 12 million known accounts and contracts growing at a rate of roughly 100k new accounts per day . Block-History. A chain of all historical blocks, starting at the genesis block up to the latest best block, also known as the blockchain. State-History. The state of each historical block makes up the state history. I will get into the details on t Continue reading >>

Releases Ethereum/mist Github

Releases Ethereum/mist Github

Clock sync popup warning fix for macOS High Sierra users Light Client integration (from v0.9.1 onwards) The long-awaited Light Client integration has come, in its own beta version. Syncing time decreased by an order of magnitude, compared to running a full node. Same as for storage requirements. As Geth 1.7.x uses LES protocol v1, you'll notice log retrieval takes more time than usual. The good news is v2 is coming to ease that. We'll keep you posted. In order to enable it, head to Develop > Use Light Client menu. You can join us for further discussion at the Gitter channel . This release contains a security fix. Updating Mist is highly recommended. If you want to keep using an older Mist version, you mustn't visit untrusted websites. Refer to Electron 1.7.8 release notes for more info. Ethereum Wallet users are not affected by the vulnerability. Thanks to Yoonho Kim for reporting via the Ethereum bug bounty program. Introducing Light Client integration (beta) The long-awaited Light Client integration has come, in its own beta version. Syncing time decreased by an order of magnitude, compared to running a full node. As Geth 1.7.x uses LES protocol v1, you'll notice log retrieval takes more time than usual. The good news is v2 is coming to ease that. We'll keep you posted. In order to enable it, head to Develop > Use Light Client menu. You can join us for further discussion at the Gitter channel . This release adds some anticipated features and also addresses important security improvements. IMPORTANT FOR DAPP DEVELOPERS! Read the notes below about changes in Mist's web3 object! It is now possible to navigate through the Swarm decentralized network with the bzz:// protocol. Every request lands on the Swarm node, which will search for the content through the p2p network Continue reading >>

Web3j Vs Geth - Code Comparison

Web3j Vs Geth - Code Comparison

Code snippet comparison between Web3j and Geth integrating Ethereum with Android client. As part of building the Kin open source sdk , we wanted to experiment with several Ethereum mobile client solutions and pick the best fit for our use case. We decided to run the experiment in parallel and test the most promising direction. I was tasked with exploring the web3j library: evaluating its API, integration, ease of use and stability. While eventually (spoiler alert!) we decided to go with go-ethereum , I believe it is valuable to share the differences between the two. In this article, I will present a few code snippets to help you get started and have a broader understanding of each implementation. From now on I will describe the API calls and how it is implemented with the web3j lightweight Java library as well as with the go-ethereum Go implementation of the Ethereum protocol. Setting up build.gradle app configuration: The client library hides the complexity of communicating with the blockchain as well as provides interfaces to create transactions and communicates with the Kin token contract. In order to initialize a client, we must first provide a service provider that enables connecting to the Ethereum network (either testnet or mainnet). For our preliminary investigation we used the Ropsten testnet service provider by Infura . Please note that each network has a unique and specific network id that will be used later on, while sending transactions to the network. In order to use Infura, you need to register to get a valid token. The web3j is a basic object that will be used in my other code snippets. More about working with Infura using Web3j can be found here . The ethereumClient is a basic object that will be used in my other code snippets This Web3 call (as many o Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Vs Ethereum: Driven By Different Purposes

Bitcoin Vs Ethereum: Driven By Different Purposes

Bitcoin Vs Ethereum: Driven by Different Purposes Ethereum has received a lot of attention since its announcement at the North AmericanBitcoinConference in early 2014 byVitalikButerin. The natural consequence of its rising popularity has been its constant comparison toBitcoin, the first virtual currency. It is important for investors to understandthe similarities and differences between BitcoinandEthereum. Bitcoin, the first virtual currency, was born seven years back. It introduced a novel idea set out in a white paper by the mysterious SatoshiNakamoto:Bitcoinoffers the promise of lower transaction fees than traditional online payment mechanisms and is operated by a decentralized authority, unlike government issued currencies . There are no physicalBitcoins , only balances associated with public and private keys. Over these years, the acceptance of the concept of a virtual currency has increased among regulators and government bodies.Althoughit isnt a formally recognized medium of payment or store of value, it has managed a niche for itself and continues to coexist in the financial system despite being regularly scrutinized and debated. The attempts to understandBitcoinmoreclosely resulted in the discovery of blockchain , the technology that powers it. Theblockchainis not just the hottest topic in theFinTechworld but also asought after technology in many industries. Ablockchainis a public ledger of all transactions in a given system that have ever been executed. It is constantly growing as completed blocks are added to it. The blocks are added to theblockchainin linear, chronological order through cryptography, ensuring they remain beyond the power of manipulators. Theblockchainthus stands as a tamper-proof record of all transactions on the network, accessible to all Continue reading >>

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

What should I install on my desktop/laptop? Most users will likely just install Mist / Ethereum Wallet and that will be enough for their needs. The Ethereum Wallet is a single dapp deployment of the Mist Browserwhich will be the centerpiece of the Metropolis phase of development, whichcomes after Homestead. Mist comes with bundled go-ethereum and cpp-ethereum binariesand if you are not running a command-line Ethereum client when Mist startsthen it will start syncing the blockchain using one of the bundled clients(defaulting to geth). If you want to use Parity with Mist, or to run Mist againsta private network, just start your node before Mist, and Mistwill connect to your node rather than starting one itself. Work is underway to add Parity and other clients as first-class entitiesto Mist too. If you want to interact with Ethereum on the command-line, and to takeadvantage of the Javascript console then you will want to install one ofthe client applications directly, as well as Mist. Follow the links inthe table above for further instructions. If you want to do mining then Mist will not be sufficient. Check outthe Mining section. What should I install on my mobile/tablet? We are at the very beginning of our support for mobile devices. The Goteam are publishing experimental iOS and Android libraries, which somedevelopers are using to start bootstrapping mobile applications, but thereare not yet any mobile Ethereum clients available. The main hinderance to the use of Ethereum on mobile devices is that theLight Client support is still incomplete. The work which has been done isoff in a private branch, and is only available for the Go client.doublethinkco will be starting development of Light Client for the C++ clientin the coming months, following grant funding. Check out S Continue reading >>

Ethereum Project

Ethereum Project

You are responsible for your own computer security. If your machine is compromised you will lose your ether, access to any contracts and possibly more. You are responsible for your own actions. If you mess something up or break any laws while using this software, it's your fault, and your fault only. You are responsible for your own karma. Don't be a jerk and respect the rights of others. What goes around comes around. The user expressly knows and agrees that the user is using the Ethereum platform at the users sole risk. The user acknowledges that the user has an adequate understanding of the risks, usage and intricacies of cryptographic tokens and blockchain-based open source software, eth platform and ethereum The user acknowledges and agrees that, to the fullest extent permitted by any applicable law, the disclaimers of liability contained herein apply to any and all damages or injury whatsoever caused by or related to risks of, use of, or inability to use, ethereum or the Ethereum platform under any cause or action whatsoever of any kind in any jurisdiction, including, without limitation, actions for breach of warranty, breach of contract or tort (including negligence) and that neither Stiftung Ethereum (i.e. Ethereum Foundation) nor Ethereum team shall be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, exemplary or consequential damages, including for loss of profits, goodwill or data that occurs as a result. Some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion of certain warranties or the limitation or exclusion of liability for certain types of damages. Therefore, some of the above limitations in this section may not apply to a user. In particular, nothing in these terms shall affect the statutory rights of any user or exclude injury arising from any willful misconduct Continue reading >>

A Quick Comparison Between Lisk And Ethereum

A Quick Comparison Between Lisk And Ethereum

A Quick comparison between Lisk and Ethereum Posted by Navin Purohit | Last Updated: 30-Oct-17 Lisk and Ethereum both provide similar platform, Decentrilized Applications ( Blockchain Applications ). Ethereum the second most popular network after bitcoin while another most successful altcoin introduced in 2016 'LISK'. According to CoinGecko, Lisk is ninth biggest market cap with 64 million US dollars, that too increasing. Lisk differ from Ethereum in many ways. We differentiate these two platforms one by one : Ethereum first release in 30 July 2015 while Lisk introduced on 24 May 2016. Ethereum is written in C++, Go, Rust and Lisk is written in node.js . For Lisk MIT provide the licence while for ethereum GPLv3, LGPLv3. In popularity , Ethereum is second most popular cryptocurrency after bitcoin and Lisk got ninth position in popularity according to CoinGecko offical site. LISK and ethereum got funcding 5,750,000 USD , 18,439,086 respectively. LISK provide total supply of 100M LSK + Forging while Ethereum provide total supply of 72M ETH + Mining. Foundation allocation in LISK is 8M LSK(8%) and in Ethereum is 12M (16.67%). In distribution, lisk used 85M LSK+ Forging and ethereum used 60M ETH + Mining in ICO. Both have different Forging/Mining Reward functionality. As a consensus algorithm, Lisk utilize DPoS and Ethereum utilize PoW. Blocks are created after certain period , in lisk time is 10s and in ethereum time is 15s. Official blockchain explorer are explorer.lisk.io and frontier.ether.camp for Lisk and Ethereum respectively . Continue reading >>

11 Best Ethereum Development Tools To Grow Yourstack

11 Best Ethereum Development Tools To Grow Yourstack

CTO of blockchain startups Dispatch Labs, and @HappyChainAPI Organizer of SF Ethereum Meetup DJ/Producer/Model All my social medias: @ZaneWithSpoon 11 Best Ethereum Development Tools to Grow YourStack Blockchain tech is getting chief officers hot and heavy. When its your turn to show them your stack, will you distress or impress? Heres 11 tools for building on the Ethereum blockchain The foxy doggo chrome extension is goodboy 1. Mist nothing gets them going like pulling out yourwallet Use Mist to create wallets you wont lose right when your Uber is pullingup Store Ether, send transactions, deploy contracts and more with Mist. You can use the native application to play around on the blockchain or testnet while you get the hang of this whole blockchain thing. Super useful for quick transactions. When youre ready to ditch the training wheels, switching to the command line will make you look like a real hacker . Geth can do anything Mist can do plus some important functionality like serving as an RPC endpoint to connect to the blockchain over http. 3. Parity promote your side client tobae Parity is an ethereum client written in the new low level language Rust. Formed by Dr. Gavin Wood, the former CTO of Ethereum, this client is a fast, lightweight way to run an Ethereum node. Run Parity and hop over to localhost:8080 to play around in their web UI. Honestly, its a pain in the ass to install, but once its up and running Parity is a big upgrade from Geth. 4. MetaMask furry fun keeps chrome interesting The foxy doggo chrome extension is goodboy MetaMask is If youre building a app you actually want people to use. MetaMask support is a must-have. This little chrome extension drastically improves how easily people can interact with your app (distributed app). If you havent alrea Continue reading >>

Choosing An Ethereum Client | Truffle Suite

Choosing An Ethereum Client | Truffle Suite

There are many Ethereum clients to choose from. We recommend different clients depending on whether you are developing or deploying. We recommend Ganache , a personal blockchain for Ethereum development that runs on your desktop. Part of the Truffle Suite, Ganache simplifies dapp development by placing your contracts and transactions front and center. Using Ganache you can quickly see how your application affects the blockchain, and introspect details like your accounts, balances, contract creations and gas costs. You can also fine tune Ganache's advanced mining controls to better suit your needs. Ganache is available for Windows, Mac and Linux, and you can download it here . Ganache, when launched runs on It will display the first 10 accounts and the mnemonic used to create those accounts. ( Read more about account mnemonics .) By default, Ganache will use the following mnemonic: candy maple cake sugar pudding cream honey rich smooth crumble sweet treat This mnemonic can be changed to be randomly generated, or you can input your own. Warning: Do not use this mnemonic on the main Ethereum network (mainnet). If you send ether to any account generated from this mnemonic, you will lose it all! We also recommend using Truffle Develop, a development blockchain built directly into Truffle. Truffle Develop helps you set up an integrated blockchain environment with a single command, no installation required. Run Truffle Develop by typing the following into a terminal: This will run the client on It will display the first 10 accounts and the mnemonic used to create those accounts. ( Read more about account mnemonics .) Truffle Develop uses the same mnemonic every time to make developing your applications as easy as possible: candy maple cake sugar pudding cream honey rich smoot Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric Andcorda

Comparison Of Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric Andcorda

Comparison of Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric andCorda Authors: Martin Valenta, Philipp Sandner. Download the article as PDF file . More information about the the Frankfurt School Blockchain Center on the Internet , on Twitter or on Facebook . With this paper, we provide a brief analysis of the most notable differences between the distributed ledger technologies (DLT) Hyperledger Fabric, R3 Corda and Ethereum. Our intention is to give decision makers new to DLT guidance for what use cases Hyperledger Fabric, Corda and Ethereum are most suitable. From the white papers of Hyperledger Fabric, R3 Corda (in the following only referred to as Fabric and Corda, respectively) and Ethereum it becomes obvious that these frameworks have very different visions in mind with respect to possible fields of application. Development of both Fabric [i] and Corda [ii] is driven by concrete use cases, whereas Cordas use cases are drawn from the financial services industry. Consequently, this is where Corda sees its main field of application. In contrast, Fabric intends to provide a modular and extendable architecture that can be employed in various industries, from banking and healthcare over to supply chains. Ethereum also presents itself as utterly independent of any specific field of application. [iii] However, in contrast to Fabric, it is not modularity that stands out but the provision of a generic platform for all kinds of transactions and applications. Table 1 provides a summary of the three frameworks. Table 1: Comparison of Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric andCorda With conventional central data storage, only a single entity, the owner, keeps a copy of the underlying database, e.g. a ledger. Consequently, this entity controls what data is contributed and what other entities are permitted Continue reading >>

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