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Ethereum Client

Ethereum Client Developer Accidentally Locks $150 Million Of Userfunds

Ethereum Client Developer Accidentally Locks $150 Million Of Userfunds

Cryptocurrency Market, Blockchain Tech, & ICO News | Chart & Data Analytics | Join our community on Telegram! Ethereum Client Developer Accidentally Locks $150 Million of UserFunds Due to a security vulnerability within Paritys code one of the largest Ethereum clients over $150 million worth of user funds have been frozen and are unable to be accessed. According to an alert issued by Parity Technologies yesterday (November 7th), the vulnerability was discovered within the standard multi-signature (multi-sig) wallet update that was deployed on July 20th (A wallet multi-sig feature increases security by requiring more than one key to initiate and broadcast Ethereum transactions). The vulnerability itself was discovered yesterday by a client developer that goes by the name devops199, who accidentally deleted a code libarary from the Parity wallet, and then reported it on Github . In consequence of devops199s mistake, all wallets utilizing the companys multi-signature function became frozen, leaving thousands of users completely unable to access their funds an estimated amount of over $152 million. On top of this, several startups and open-source projects that recently launched initial coin offerings (ICOs) have come forward, claiming that their 151 wallet addresses have been affected by the software failure. As expected, this event has placed a considerable amount of attention on Parity Technologies, which also lost $30 million of Ether in July due to a hack. Moreover, it comes at a time when Ethereum itself is receiving a lot of attention for fueling over 10,000 ICO projects, 13 of which raised over $100 million alone. One of these is Polkadot, which raised over $145 million in their token sale last month. Now, due to the clients failure, the blockchain startup is dealin Continue reading >>

Blockchain Bloat: How Ethereum Is Tackling Storage Issues

Blockchain Bloat: How Ethereum Is Tackling Storage Issues

Blockchain Bloat: How Ethereum Is Tackling Storage Issues Jan 18, 2018 at 05:22 UTC|UpdatedJan 24, 2018 at 02:53 UTC 24,270 tokens. 27,358 pending transactions. 463,713 digital kittens . Ethereum has hosted a lot of activity recently, and while many crypto enthusiasts see that as a positive sign, as the network's usage soars, its history gets longer and its blockchain more unruly. And although network congestion leading to transaction backlogs and rising fees has taken the spotlight, there's another issue this scale causes - a growing database that puts significant storage costs on users wanting to run a full node. That database, called the ethereum state, hold all the computations that need to be memorized by the computers supporting the platform and the ethereum blockchain itself. And with the costs (both in time and money) of storing the state increasing, fewer and fewer people are choosing to run full nodes, which many worry will centralize the network into the hands of only a few arbitrators. For one thing, ethereum developers are well underway engineering protocol-level changes such as sharding , aimed at minimizing the database. But since these technologies are still in development, other stakeholders, namely those running ethereum clients - the software needed for users to communicate with the blockchain - have been under fresh pressure to cope with the growth of the state database. "The fact that improving this stuff is critical has been known since late 2016, the ideas have been floating around for half a year to over a year. Where are the implementations?" said ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin on a developer channel recently. The frustration is palpable with both Buterin and Afri Schoedon, who manages technical communications at ethereum software client prov Continue reading >>

Ethereum-client-binaries

Ethereum-client-binaries

Download Ethereum client binaries for your OS. When you wish to run a local Ethereum client node it would be beneficial to firstscan for existing node client binaries on the machine and then downloadappropriate client binaries if none found. This package does both. It is structured so that it can be optionally be used in conjunction with a UI,e.g. if one wishes to allow a user to select the client software they wish todownload. Configurable client types (Geth, Eth, Parity, etc) Security: Binary sanity checks, URL regex checks, SHA256 hash checks Can scan and download to specific folders First a config object needs to be defined. This specifies the possible clientsand the platforms they support. For example, a config object which specifies the Geth client for only 64-bit Linux platforms and the Parity client for only 32-bit Windows platforms might be: Every client must specify one or more platforms, each of which must specifyone or more architectures. Supported platforms are as documented for Node's process.platform except that mac is used instead of darwin and win is used instead of win32. Supported architectures are as documented for Node's process.arch . Each platform-arch entry needs to specify a bin key which holds the name of the executable on the system, a download key which holds info on where the binary can be downloaded from if needed, and a commands key which holds information on different kinds of commands that can be run against the binary. The download key holds the download url, the type of archive being downloaded, and - optionally - the filename of the binary (bin) inside the archive in case it differs from the expected filename of the binary. As a security measure, a sha256 key equalling the SHA256 hash calculation of the downloadable file may be provi Continue reading >>

License

License

enumerated a few common parameter combos to get you up to speed quickly on how you can run your By far the most common scenario is people wanting to simply interact with the Ethereum network: create accounts; transfer funds; deploy and interact with contracts. For this particular use-case the user doesn't care about years-old historical data, so we can fast-sync quickly to the current Start geth in fast sync mode (--fast), causing it to download more data in exchange for avoiding processing the entire history of the Ethereum network, which is very CPU intensive. Bump the memory allowance of the database to 512MB (--cache=512), which can help significantly in sync times especially for HDD users. This flag is optional and you can set it as high or as low as you'd like, though we'd recommend the 512MB - 2GB range. Start up Geth's built-in interactive JavaScript console , (via the trailing console subcommand) through which you can invoke all official web3 methods This too is optional and if you leave it out you can always attach to an already running Geth instance Transitioning towards developers, if you'd like to play around with creating Ethereum contracts, you almost certainly would like to do that without any real money involved until you get the hang of the entire system. In other words, instead of attaching to the main network, you want to join the test network with your node, which is fully equivalent to the main network, but with play-Ether only. $ geth --testnet --fast --cache=512 console The --fast, --cache flags and console subcommand have the exact same meaning as above and they are equally useful on the testnet too. Please see above for their explanations if you've skipped to Specifying the --testnet flag however will reconfigure your Geth instance a bit: Inst Continue reading >>

11 Best Ethereum Development Tools To Grow Yourstack

11 Best Ethereum Development Tools To Grow Yourstack

CTO of blockchain startups Dispatch Labs, and @HappyChainAPI Organizer of SF Ethereum Meetup DJ/Producer/Model All my social medias: @ZaneWithSpoon 11 Best Ethereum Development Tools to Grow YourStack Blockchain tech is getting chief officers hot and heavy. When its your turn to show them your stack, will you distress or impress? Heres 11 tools for building on the Ethereum blockchain The foxy doggo chrome extension is goodboy 1. Mist nothing gets them going like pulling out yourwallet Use Mist to create wallets you wont lose right when your Uber is pullingup Store Ether, send transactions, deploy contracts and more with Mist. You can use the native application to play around on the blockchain or testnet while you get the hang of this whole blockchain thing. Super useful for quick transactions. When youre ready to ditch the training wheels, switching to the command line will make you look like a real hacker . Geth can do anything Mist can do plus some important functionality like serving as an RPC endpoint to connect to the blockchain over http. 3. Parity promote your side client tobae Parity is an ethereum client written in the new low level language Rust. Formed by Dr. Gavin Wood, the former CTO of Ethereum, this client is a fast, lightweight way to run an Ethereum node. Run Parity and hop over to localhost:8080 to play around in their web UI. Honestly, its a pain in the ass to install, but once its up and running Parity is a big upgrade from Geth. 4. MetaMask furry fun keeps chrome interesting The foxy doggo chrome extension is goodboy MetaMask is If youre building a app you actually want people to use. MetaMask support is a must-have. This little chrome extension drastically improves how easily people can interact with your app (distributed app). If you havent alrea Continue reading >>

New Ethereum Client Vulnerabilities Expose Serious Security Problems

New Ethereum Client Vulnerabilities Expose Serious Security Problems

New Ethereum Client Vulnerabilities Expose Serious Security Problems Join the Bitsonline Telegram channel to get the latest Bitcoin, cryptocurrency, and tech news updates: The CVEs in question deal mainly with the JSON-RPC implementations of each Client. Parity, seems to have the most vulnerable configuration of the three. Parity, unsurprisingly, has the least secure JSON-RPC implementation. Paritys whitelist for CORS, a standard that allows non-native resources and third party cross-domain requests, is set to a wildcard, allowing any third party program to access data via its JSON-RPC interface. An attacker can use a simple script on a malicious website to steal a wealth of information about the targets Parity client and the accounts associated with it, and potentially manipulate that information. The Parity client ships with the wildcard in this whitelist by default, putting every user at risk until they either change it themselves or Parity patches this default out. CPP-Ethereum also has interface problems, including a bug that allows attackers to hijack certain client admin functionality (like mining and account management) without authenticating. This is due to an off-spec bind location that allows outside parties to execute arbitrary commands should they gain access. In addition, an attacker can send altered JSON packages that crash or lock up the node. Only the Go implementation seems to have a sane JSON-RPC interface at the moment. The new build of CPP-Ethereum, based on the Constantinople fork of the project, has several new commands and functions. One of these new functions lets a user create a new contract in an automated manner, but in doing so lets a user assign arbitrary memory to that new contract by misusing a few of its parameters. In effect, an attack Continue reading >>

Ethereum Project

Ethereum Project

You are responsible for your own computer security. If your machine is compromised you will lose your ether, access to any contracts and possibly more. You are responsible for your own actions. If you mess something up or break any laws while using this software, it's your fault, and your fault only. You are responsible for your own karma. Don't be a jerk and respect the rights of others. What goes around comes around. The user expressly knows and agrees that the user is using the Ethereum platform at the users sole risk. The user acknowledges that the user has an adequate understanding of the risks, usage and intricacies of cryptographic tokens and blockchain-based open source software, eth platform and ethereum The user acknowledges and agrees that, to the fullest extent permitted by any applicable law, the disclaimers of liability contained herein apply to any and all damages or injury whatsoever caused by or related to risks of, use of, or inability to use, ethereum or the Ethereum platform under any cause or action whatsoever of any kind in any jurisdiction, including, without limitation, actions for breach of warranty, breach of contract or tort (including negligence) and that neither Stiftung Ethereum (i.e. Ethereum Foundation) nor Ethereum team shall be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, exemplary or consequential damages, including for loss of profits, goodwill or data that occurs as a result. Some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion of certain warranties or the limitation or exclusion of liability for certain types of damages. Therefore, some of the above limitations in this section may not apply to a user. In particular, nothing in these terms shall affect the statutory rights of any user or exclude injury arising from any willful misconduct Continue reading >>

Install The Command Line Tools

Install The Command Line Tools

Command line tools for the Ethereum Network These are tools for blockchain developers. The command line tools will allow you to connect your server to or run your application on the Ethereum blockchain or your own private blockchain. For security purposes , three independent implementations were created for Ethereum. The clients have almost identical functionality, so the one you pick is left to personal choice on platform, language and what your planned use is for the network. If you are building a business that needs to have maximum uptime guarantees to the Ethereum network, we recommend that you run at least one instance of both clients to ensure reliability. The Go implementation is called Geth. Geth has been audited for security and will be the future basis for the enduser-facing Mist Browser, so if you have experience with web development and are interested in building frontends for dapps, you should experiment with Geth. Install Homebrew and make sure it's up to date: Then use these commands to install ethereum: brew tap ethereum/ethereumbrew install ethereum For more, see the full documentation on Mac OSX Geth Download the latest stable binary , extract it, download the zip file, extract geth.exe from zip, open a command terminal and type: chdir open geth.exe For more, see the full documentation on Windows Geth sudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereumsudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install ethereum For other environments and more instruction, see the full documentation on Geth The C++ implementation is simply called Eth. If you want added security by running two different implementations in parallel or are serious about GPU mining, then the C++ "Eth" client is for you. Install Homebrew and then make sure it Continue reading >>

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple Vulnerabilities In The Cpp And Parity Ethereum Client

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple Vulnerabilities In The Cpp And Parity Ethereum Client

Vulnerability Spotlight: Multiple Vulnerabilities in the CPP and Parity Ethereum Client Talos Group - January 9, 2018 - 1 Comment Talos is disclosing the presence of multiple vulnerabilities in the CPP and the Parity Ethereum clients. TALOS-2017-0503 / CVE-2017-14457 describes a denial of service vulnerability and potential memory leak in libevm. The function is not currently enabled in the default build. This vulnerability only affects nodes which have manually enabled it during build time. TALOS-2017-0508 / CVE-2017-14460 is an overly permissive cross-domain (CORS) whitelist policy vulnerability in the Ethereum Parity client. It can lead to the leak of sensitive data about existing accounts, parity settings and network configurations, in addition to accounts and parity settings modifications, if certain APIs have been turned on. Further on, TALOS-2017-0464 TALOS-2017-0471 / CVE-2017-12112 CVE-2017-12119 describe multiple Authorization Bypass Vulnerabilities which an attacker could misuse to access functionality reserved only for users with administrative privileges without any credentials. Finally, Talos found TALOS-2017-0471 / CVE-2017-12119, another denial of service vulnerabilities in the CPP-Ethereum JSON-RPC implementation. A specially crafted json request can cause an unhandled exception resulting in a denial of service. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

What should I install on my desktop/laptop? Most users will likely just install Mist / Ethereum Wallet and that will be enough for their needs. The Ethereum Wallet is a single dapp deployment of the Mist Browserwhich will be the centerpiece of the Metropolis phase of development, whichcomes after Homestead. Mist comes with bundled go-ethereum and cpp-ethereum binariesand if you are not running a command-line Ethereum client when Mist startsthen it will start syncing the blockchain using one of the bundled clients(defaulting to geth). If you want to use Parity with Mist, or to run Mist againsta private network, just start your node before Mist, and Mistwill connect to your node rather than starting one itself. Work is underway to add Parity and other clients as first-class entitiesto Mist too. If you want to interact with Ethereum on the command-line, and to takeadvantage of the Javascript console then you will want to install one ofthe client applications directly, as well as Mist. Follow the links inthe table above for further instructions. If you want to do mining then Mist will not be sufficient. Check outthe Mining section. What should I install on my mobile/tablet? We are at the very beginning of our support for mobile devices. The Goteam are publishing experimental iOS and Android libraries, which somedevelopers are using to start bootstrapping mobile applications, but thereare not yet any mobile Ethereum clients available. The main hinderance to the use of Ethereum on mobile devices is that theLight Client support is still incomplete. The work which has been done isoff in a private branch, and is only available for the Go client.doublethinkco will be starting development of Light Client for the C++ clientin the coming months, following grant funding. Check out S Continue reading >>

Ethereum Client Platforms: Parity Versus Go-ethereum

Ethereum Client Platforms: Parity Versus Go-ethereum

Ethereum Client Platforms: Parity versus Go-Ethereum Senior Associate, Total Portfolio Management at CPP Investment Board The next step in the Ethereum world, after mastering the basics of the Solidity language and the smart contract development, is about developing simple production applications. The key ingredient here is client software. In this article, I reviewparity, the newer client software layer, and compare it togeth,the product of the Homestead project. What does the client software do? It downloads the whole blockchain onto your system on a regular basis, keeping the tab on the whole network. It verifies all transactions and contracts on the blockchain. If you are building your own contracts, it broadcasts them to the network so that they are included in the next block and confirmed by the miners. Client software can also do the mining but these days you may need a super-computer do make any ether this way. Why is this important? In order to successfully integrate blockchain transactions into a real-world application, a reliable client layer is needed. Just using or another chain scanner for the back-end would be to defeat the purpose of blockchain, a verified decentralized transaction ledger. Differently coded, independently running clients only can provide the robustness, or "antifragility" (@nntaleb) of the blockchain. With both clients, I recommend downloading the source and compiling the code. The code changes so often than any binaries are already old when you get to them. The situation is complicated by multiple spam attacks on the Ethereum blockchain, including "from Shanghai with love" and , . There is no such thing as stable geth or parity clients so the latest commit is the best call. Both geth and parity require 2-4GB of RAM and 50-100GB of hard Continue reading >>

Choosing An Ethereum Client | Truffle Suite

Choosing An Ethereum Client | Truffle Suite

There are many Ethereum clients to choose from. We recommend different clients depending on whether you are developing or deploying. We recommend Ganache , a personal blockchain for Ethereum development that runs on your desktop. Part of the Truffle Suite, Ganache simplifies dapp development by placing your contracts and transactions front and center. Using Ganache you can quickly see how your application affects the blockchain, and introspect details like your accounts, balances, contract creations and gas costs. You can also fine tune Ganache's advanced mining controls to better suit your needs. Ganache is available for Windows, Mac and Linux, and you can download it here . Ganache, when launched runs on It will display the first 10 accounts and the mnemonic used to create those accounts. ( Read more about account mnemonics .) By default, Ganache will use the following mnemonic: candy maple cake sugar pudding cream honey rich smooth crumble sweet treat This mnemonic can be changed to be randomly generated, or you can input your own. Warning: Do not use this mnemonic on the main Ethereum network (mainnet). If you send ether to any account generated from this mnemonic, you will lose it all! We also recommend using Truffle Develop, a development blockchain built directly into Truffle. Truffle Develop helps you set up an integrated blockchain environment with a single command, no installation required. Run Truffle Develop by typing the following into a terminal: This will run the client on It will display the first 10 accounts and the mnemonic used to create those accounts. ( Read more about account mnemonics .) Truffle Develop uses the same mnemonic every time to make developing your applications as easy as possible: candy maple cake sugar pudding cream honey rich smoot Continue reading >>

Ethereum Light Client Withreact

Ethereum Light Client Withreact

I'm a serial entrepreneur. I enjoy AI, UI, and blockchain. I like history and reading too. This is a basic way to setup Ethereum light client with private network. I will talk about 3 things. Light client is an ethereum client which keeps only keys. You can check accurate definition here . Traditionally in blockchain world, everyone keep same databases. Thats why we can trust entire system. I mean we can trust at least our own data. But light client dont keep data. But problem is keeping entire database is tough. When I created an ethereum wallet first time I needed to download entire ethereum database. That syncing process took almost whole day and the file size was huge. A web site said the storage size was more than 75GB in 2016 and was growing 1GB per month. This is insane and only blockchain enthusiast can keep it. You can not run ethereum full node on mobile devices. Or normal users dont want to keep full node on their devicesanyway. Thats why we need light clients. With light clients, user dont need to keep ethereum node. They can just enjoy decentralized services. This is pretty cool. I experimented light client with my private network. Because we can develop dapps for mobile, this has a huge potential. You need at least 1 ethereum node. Since light client dont run ethereum node, we need to run nodes for clients to connect. I installed geth which is Go implementation of the Ethereum protocol. I think geth is most popular. You can check how to install geth here . Once you install geth, you can setup private network. First, you have to prepare genesis block. You can easily create new genesis block with a command line tool called puppeth which is installed with geth. Heres my example. I choose proof of authorization as my consensus algorithm because I dont want he Continue reading >>

Parity

Parity

Parity comes with an extensive, easy-to-use, in-built Ethereum Wallet and app environment that can be accessed via your Web browser of choice. Account, address book and multi-sig management Hardware and electronic cold wallet support Develop smart contracts and decentralised applications with Parity or build protocol extensions. Check out our Wiki , Gitter and Bug Bounty Program Parity is designed for mission critical use in enterprise environments. Parity has a number of features that make it perfect for deployment in private or consortium setting. The Parity Ethereum client is built from the ground up to the highest standards of software development. Tuned, hand optimised use of low-level Rust language JITEVM turbocharges execution of complex contracts Multi-level in-memory caching Memory and concurrency safety guaranteed by Rust language Actor-based modularity ensures maximal resilience Unit tested and peer reviewed from day one Standard, JSON-based, chain-specification format EVM plugins allow native speed contracts Actor-based modular architecture with IPC Rust's ownership tracking facilitates minimal memory footprint Cache management gives fine control to user State-trie pruning minimises storage footprint 1-line install on Mac and Linux Docker images available Library APIs are fully documented 100% consensus test conformant implementation Complies with standard devp2p network protocol Fully compatible with JSON-RPC API Stable is the most mature and tested software Beta comes with additional features and better performance but may yet have quirks and issues to be fixed Nightly is a cutting edge software build but comes with a strong caveat against using it for managing anything of value From RLP and the Trie to the network subsystem. We aim for our unit tests to Continue reading >>

Getting Started With The Ethereum Client

Getting Started With The Ethereum Client

Nethereum requires an Ethereum client like Geth, eth (c++), parity, etc with RPC / IPC enabled to interact with the network. The client might be installed locally, a server you control or be a public node depending on your needs and use case. For example if you are just interested to retrieve existing data from contracts, or sending offline signed transations you can just use a public node. Here are some quick instructions to get you setup. Installation and configuration of the Ethereum client (Geth) You can download the latest version stable version of geth from Github , installation is as simple as extracting geth.exe from your chosen OS. If you are using a Mac or Linux you can also use Homebrew or PPA. brew updatebrew upgradebrew tap ethereum/ethereumbrew install ethereum sudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereumsudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install ethereum There are several command line options to run geth which can be found on their documentation . But most important you need have enabled RPC or IPC. You can start the HTTP JSON-RPC with the --rpc flag change the default port (8545) and listing address (localhost) with: geth --rpc --rpcaddr --rpcport If accessing the RPC from a browser, CORS will need to be enabled with the appropriate domain set. Otherwise, JavaScript calls are limit by the same-origin policy and requests will fail: geth --rpc --rpccorsdomain "The JSON RPC can also be started from the geth console using the admin.startRPC(addr, port) command. There is already a preconfigured tesnet in Nethereum, which can be downloaded from github The chain keystore in the "devChain" folder contains the keys for the preconfigured account, which is also present in the genesis file "genesis_dev.json". Acc Continue reading >>

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