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Ethereum Blockchain Bootstrap

Blockchain Technology Expert (ethereum, Node.js, Javascript, Angularjs, Bootstrap, Java, Python Jobs In 10001

Blockchain Technology Expert (ethereum, Node.js, Javascript, Angularjs, Bootstrap, Java, Python Jobs In 10001

blockchain technology expert (ethereum, node.js, javascript, angularjs, bootstrap, java, python jobs in 10001 blockchain technology expert (ethereum, node.js, javascript, angularjs, bootstrap, java, python jobs in 10001 Minimum Required Skills: JavaScript, Python, Ethereum, Go, Angular, C++, React Native, Smart Contracts If you... Minimum Required Skills: JavaScript, Python, Ethereum, Go, Angular, C++, React Native, Smart Contracts If you... full-time JavaScript, Python, Ethereum, Go, Angular, C++, React Native, Smart Contracts - JavaScript, Python, Ethereum, Go, Angular, C++, React Native, Smart Contracts IT Software IT Diploma/Degree/Certification Minimum Required Skills: JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, RESTful APIs, SASS, LESS, AngularJS, Grunt, Gulp Based in... Minimum Required Skills: JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, RESTful APIs, SASS, LESS, AngularJS, Grunt, Gulp Based in... full-time JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, RESTful APIs, SASS, LESS, AngularJS, Grunt, Gulp - JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3, RESTful APIs, SASS, LESS, AngularJS, Grunt, Gulp IT Software IT Diploma/Degree/Certification One of the Top Hedge Funds in the world is looking for a Senior JavaScript... One of the Top Hedge Funds in the world is looking for a Senior JavaScript... full-time JavaScript, React.JS ReactJS Angular AngularJS Software Developer Engineer IOS Android HTML5 CSS Mobile IOS Android Computer Science IT Software IT Diploma/Degree/Certification Minimum Required Skills: Building event/message-driven architecture, Fault tolerant financial trading systems, Scalable... Minimum Required Skills: Building event/message-driven architecture, Fault tolerant financial trading systems, Scalable... full-time Building event/message-driven architecture, Fault tolerant financial trading systems, Scalable systems/AWS/WC2/load- Continue reading >>

A Gentle Introduction To Ethereum Programming, Part1

A Gentle Introduction To Ethereum Programming, Part1

Developer, security researcher, musician & chef at Zeppelin A Gentle Introduction to Ethereum Programming, Part1 Two months ago I was asked to build an Ethereum web application as a work test to join Zeppelin , but I didnt have any idea about blockchain technology at all. I had barely heard of Bitcoin, so there was no other option but to dive in. This will be a series of posts aimed at software developers who want to ramp up to Ethereum. Please keep in mind that I do not consider myself an expert in this subject, Id just like to teach you what I learned and save you some time if you are in the same place I was. By the end of the series you should be able to build a fully-fledged smart-contract-enabled web application (also known as DApp) on your own! Enjoy, and please do not hesitate to reach out with questions, suggestions or feedback. 3. Frameworks & Tools in the real world coming soon 4. A real DApp, a token marketplace coming soon Ill assume you have some basic knowledge about computer programming and what a blockchain data structure looks like. If you dont, please follow this link and come back! Lets start by defining Ethereum, or at least, what I understood about it after my research. Ethereum is an open-source public platform, distributed and based on blockchain technology, to run applications without censorship or third-party interference. Smart contracts are just computer programs. We build Ethereum applications based on smart contracts. Bear in mind that even though this concept comes up with Ethereum these days, it was actually proposed by Nick Szabo in 1996:) The EVM is the sandboxed runtime and completely isolated environment for smart contracts in Ethereum. This means every smart contract running inside the EVM has no access to network, file system or oth Continue reading >>

Faster Mist Wallet Sync?

Faster Mist Wallet Sync?

I have downloaded the Ethereum Mist Wallet for the first time, however when I open the wallet, it takes too long for syncing of the blockchain data files to complete. Isn't there a faster way to do this? It is taking hours to be able to access the Mist wallet itself. I would gladly appreciate your help. Sorry I cannot help you as I use the geth CLI. That too takes time to sync. Not really on topic but, I think the design could be better. Everything seems too low contrast and not organized in the most intuitive manner. Quote from: Minecache on March 07, 2016, 10:32:41 PM Sorry I cannot help you as I use the geth CLI. That too takes time to sync. I have tried Geth as well but I am facing the same issues as you mate. If there were something similar like a bootstrap.dat (like in Bitcoin) where you could download and place on the appdata directory, then it would really speed things up. Is there any way to download blockchain files? (chaindata directory) Quote from: Minecache on March 07, 2016, 10:32:41 PM Sorry I cannot help you as I use the geth CLI. That too takes time to sync. I have tried Geth as well but I am facing the same issues as you mate. If there were something similar like a bootstrap.dat (like in Bitcoin) where you could download and place on the appdata directory, then it would really speed things up. Is there any way to download blockchain files? (chaindata directory) Not that I am aware of, unless you had a friend offer one up. It took me about 2-3 hours from scratch to download everything and get up and running. I recently had to reinstall a Bitcoin wallet and the download took close to two days, so to me this was a breeze (A bit paranoid with security so I don't trust bootstrap files). Of course a lot of it will depend on your connection speed, but now th Continue reading >>

Ethereum Blockchain Download

Ethereum Blockchain Download

tar -jxvf ethereumMainnetBlockchain-2016-05-30.binary.tar.bz2 ./geth import ethereumMainnetBlockchain-2016-05-30.binary Ethereum client will validate this data you have downloaded as correct for the Ethereum network mainnet. This way you save 1 or 2 weeks of data sync. You may also download Testnet Ethereum blockchain as of 2016-06-04 (873MB) from here (thx to Karol Sokolowski): ethereumTestnetBlockchain-2016-06-04.binary.tar.bz2 Ethereum is a public blockchain platform with programmable transaction functionality. It provides a decentralized virtual machine that can execute peer-to-peer Turing-complete smart contracts using a cryptocurrency called Ether (ETH). Ethereum was initially proposed by Vitalik Buterin in late 2013 and in 2014 he described it as "A Next-Generation Cryptocurrency and Decentralized Application Platform". Development was funded by a crowd sale in August 2014. According to Coinbase Co-Founder: Ethereum Could "Blow Past" Bitcoin. All the cool kids are doing Ethereum now. You may find more details about import/export Ethereum blockchain at ethereum.stackexchange.com . Continue reading >>

How To Build A Private Ethereum Blockchain

How To Build A Private Ethereum Blockchain

Step 5: Create an account to use as the coinbase for your blockchain node An Ethereum account is the public key that stores ether that will be used in your private blockchain to pay for gas fees. Before we start the blockchain, we need to create an account that the mining rewards will be deposited too. You will be prompted to set a password for the account, DONT FORGET YOUR PASSWORD, you will not be able to recover it later and wont be able to spend the ether you mine or unlock that account. After entering the password twice, you should expect to get a response back like this: Address: {941f1f0b08757457be0b52d83a1e3e566473ed61} This is the public key of the Ethereum account. Ethereum convention is to prefix accounts with 0x so the account is sometimes seen as 0x941f1fobo8757457be0b52d83a1e3e566473ed61. Step 6: Create JSON File for Genesis Block to Bootstrap Private Blockchain Using a text editor, create a file CustomGenesis.json with the following contents: Step 7: Initialize the blockchain from your CustomGenesis.json file go-ethereum/build/bin/geth init ./CustomGenesis.json You should expect to see output similar to this: INFO[0223|20:20:03] Allotted 128MB cache and 1024 file handles to /home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] closed db:/home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] Allotted 128MB cache and 1024 file handles to /home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] successfully wrote genesis block and/or chain rule set: 5dd3be94dcbf5216aaa3e82700fb51a831257df5d45d984941a0a32ee0f960d8 Congratulations! You have initialized a private Ethereum blockchain!! Before we move on, lets take a break for some optional exploration of the files we have generated. In your home directory you will now see a hidden directory called.ether Continue reading >>

Local Environment For Ethereum Smart Contracts Development Using Docker

Local Environment For Ethereum Smart Contracts Development Using Docker

Local environment for Ethereum Smart Contracts development using Docker Notlong time ago I had a chance to attend series of events about blockchain. Quickly I became interested in the technical side of the trendy idea. After building simple Bitcoin wallet I decided to try something more advanced. In this article I will share a toolset for building, deploying and testing locally your Ethereum Smart Contracts using Docker. First of all there are several options you should consider before start. To test stuff on Ethereum blockchain you could use the next tools Truffle and Ganache - your personal local Ethereum like blockchain and full toolset for smart contracts. Best for quick start. Setup your own local copy of Ethereum. Closest to real world. As for me I've chosen the last one, because I wanted to be close to real world Ethereum Blockchain and still have the possibility to configure all tools myself to get additional knowledge about how it works. Quickly I understood that I need to setup several Ethereum nodes locally and some tool to make sure they are functioning properly. When it comes to trying new software on my machine I prefer Docker. Nothing makes me so happy than running dozens of services without any knowledge how to setup them :D Quick search gave me the result I wanted: already existing Docker Compose based Ethereum solution , which allows to bring up as many Ethereum nodes as you wish, has predefined test users with some ETH on the balance and Netstat to monitor the nodes. Let's take a look at docker-compose.yml file for the project (I skipped volumes and some other stuff) Bootstrap container acts as the node you can use for RPC and setups initial users. To make it close to real world there is second node called eth, which participates in validating transa Continue reading >>

Howto: Set Up An Ethereum Private Local Testnet

Howto: Set Up An Ethereum Private Local Testnet

Crypto, Products, and other Random Thoughts HowTo: Set up an Ethereum private local testnet howto blockchain ethereum guide osx crypto Ethereum is a decentralized blockchain platform for smart contracts. The protocol is designed in such a way that we can run Turing-complete (arbitrary length) applications. In this guide, we will go over how to set up our own private local testnet (Mac OS X). Questions, comments, and suggestions for improvements are always welcome. Anything published on the Ethereum public mainnet is immutable and consumes gas (Ether) to execute, which can be costly for testing purposes. Having our own Ethereum testnet allows us to test any smart contracts before we deploy it to either a public testnet or the public mainnet, which means we can catch as many errors as possible. It also happens to be a great learning experience. Guides already exist but are outdated or incomplete From my research there are three guides that seem to be the most authoritative and useful on setting up a testnet, listed below in #References . If we combine together the three guides and a few of the StackExchange solutions, then we arrive at this guide. There's lots to learn in this post. To help you remember, try my app Harvest : Take Notes and Learn Passively. You can write or highlight any notes, save them, and automatically receive reminders on an optimal learning schedule. There are a few steps we have to do first to get the necessary tooling. The easiest way to get set up with the Go implementation of Ethereum (the most popular and well-supported) is to use Mac's official unofficial package manager brew: brew updatebrew upgradebrew tap ethereum/ethereumbrew install ethereum Most of us will be running this on our laptops. Since disk space (?) and bandwidth are probably at Continue reading >>

Why 2017 Will Prove 'blockchain' Was A Bad Idea - Coindesk

Why 2017 Will Prove 'blockchain' Was A Bad Idea - Coindesk

Why 2017 Will Prove 'Blockchain' Was a Bad Idea Ferdinando Ametrano teaches Bitcoin and Blockchain Technologies at Politecnico di Milano and Milano Bicocca University. He waschairman of Scaling Bitcoin 2016 and is also former Head of Blockchain and Virtual Currencies at Intesa Sanpaolo bank. In this CoinDesk 2016 in Review special feature,Ametrano argues that, despite the hype around enterprise blockchain technologies, achievements in the bitcoin community have been greater. "When the wise man points at the bitcoin, the idiot looks at the blockchain" (Quasi-)Confucius. Another year goes by, another intense chapter in the history of the bitcoin and blockchain ecosystem. There has been no shortage of folklore and drama: 2016 started with the " whiny ragequit " of Bitcoin Core developer Mike Hearn, who shortly after joining banking consortium R3CEV declared bitcoin a failure and sold all his coins. It's worth noting the price of bitcoin has now ended 2016 neara three-year high. Elsewhere, the con artist Craig Wright claimed to be Satoshi Nakamoto, providing laughable cryptographic proofs to bamboozle and discredit reputable people. The unmissable yearly exchange heist this time hit Bitfinex , its $66m theft becoming notable also for the lengths it went to to avoid bankruptcy. Major consortia competed for the membership of financial institutions and technological players, with Hyperledger beating R3 100 to 70 numbers implausible for any kind of sensible action plan but representative of the overblown blockchain hype and the widespread fear of missing out. People have been advocating blockchain as a magic wand to solve many global problems (like securing nuclear weapons and managing the power grid); I have been compelled to humbly add that its potential at scrambling eggs s Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Blockchain

What You Need To Know About Blockchain

The fundamentals of blockchain, explained by an expert. Blockchain has moved from whiteboards to reality, and is gaining momentum in a number of industries. To get a better understanding of what the implications of this are to all of us, ESRA spoke with Daniel Rice, co-founder and CTO of Bootstrap Legal. The topics ranged from the basics of blockchain to its relationship with Bitcoin and smart contracts. The conversation started with the simplest question: What is Bitcoin? The beginning of it was around 2008, 2009, Rice replied. The ideas was to create a form of digital cash. In my mind, the concept of digital cash wasnt possible then, because its based on not being able to copy certain data. If its just a file on your computer, then cant you just copy the file and double your money? He continued: So Bitcoin was a way to say, Heres a way to have digital assets that cant be copied. And the first asset well put out is a form of money called Bitcoin. Its cash you can send to someone else, but theres no party in between. When we look at how we send funds today, you go into your banks portal, you send it to someone with an account at another bank. Its really a transaction between the banks. But what Bitcoin does is take the banks out of the equation. So why Bitcoin, instead of the money you already have? Thats a fundamental question everyone asked when Bitcoin was first launched online by its anonymous creator. There was a big question about whether it had any value and if anyone could use it. Typically, currency has to be backed by something, but what if I create a new type of currency and put it on the Internet? Will it be worth anything? The first big moment for Bitcoin was when it stopped being worth zero and was worth anything, because suddenly you had this make-up cur Continue reading >>

Synchronization - Is There A Downloadable Ethereum Bootstrap? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Synchronization - Is There A Downloadable Ethereum Bootstrap? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Is there a downloadable Ethereum bootstrap? I am trying to synchronize a full node, and this is going very slowly, the progress alternates between bursts of high CPU usage (which is fine, it is heavy but importing), and long times with nothing happening (0% CPU usage). Restarting eth gets it to immediately start importing again, but since it gets stuck every few thousand blocks, this means letting it synchronize on its own will take a very long time. So before I go for a cron that will stop/restart the node every 10 minutes, I would like to know if there is a better solution. There is an "import" command for instance, but I could not find any downloadable bootstrap? Addendum: this would be for eth, not geth, and the aim is to explore the blockchain, so I need all the data (as far as I understand "geth --fast" f.i. would not get all the data) There is no official downloadable boostrap available, as that would require trusting the provider. You can, however, use geth --fast if you are using the geth client. This trades bandwidth for computation power, and should speed up your bootstrapping considerably. I am using eth, not geth... however why would the provider need to be trusted? All the blocks could be validated, just using the file as data source rather than the network. If the file is tampered with, it would either fail the checks, or end up in a fork incompatible with the network. Worst risk would thus be wasted time importing a fork. I am not asking for db files, but a bootstrap like bitcoin's bootstrap.dat, which is trustless Fairglu Mar 3 '16 at 10:38 Oh, I see, you want to have a download that can then be verified by the client. I don't think that would be all that useful, since the limiting factor tends to be CPU power, not network speed Tjaden Hess Mar 3 '16 a Continue reading >>

Quickstart Guide: Bootstrap A Custom Ethereum Network In Azure Government

Quickstart Guide: Bootstrap A Custom Ethereum Network In Azure Government

Tech enthusiast, crypto-crazy. Currently building use cases for M2M communication through blockchain based smart-contracts. Wake Forest University 17 Quickstart Guide: Bootstrap a custom Ethereum network in Azure Government Ethereum Consortium Network in the Azure Marketplace is a blockchain framework implementation that allows developers to easily build a blockchain consensus network using a virtualized infrastructure layer. This quickstart guide will help you get started implementing an Ethereum blockchain network on Azure. You will be able to launch a cluster of connected VM nodes (with connected storage) hosted in Azure. Additional nodes (i.e.- your friends laptops, AWS VMs, etc.) can easily be peered through Geth, given the networks id and genesis.json file. This guide will cover the steps of deploying the network using an Azure resource template, connecting to the tx node via ssh, creating and funding addresses, and mining a basic smart-contract. Developers also have the option to create Hyperledger Fabric, Quorum, and Corda blockchain networks. Quickstart guides for these platforms will also be posted. Before configuring the sample, you must have the following 1.) An active Azure subscription. If you dont have an Azure Government subscription, create a free account before you begin. 2.) Access to an Ubuntu terminal to connect to a VM and execute CLI bash. If on Windows 10, check out the Linux subsystem for Windows: This Azure Government Marketplace template offering generates all of the necessary compute, storage, and networking components to create a private ethereum network on which you can form a shared global ledger state and deploy smart contracts and transactions amongst participating members. The template configures shared transaction nodes and mining nod Continue reading >>

Connecting To The Network

Connecting To The Network

Geth continuously attempts to connect to other nodes on the networkuntil it has peers. If you have UPnP enabled on your router or runethereum on an Internet-facing server, it will also accept connectionsfrom other nodes. Geth finds peers through something called the discovery protocol. Inthe discovery protocol, nodes are gossipping with each other to findout about other nodes on the network. In order to get going initially,geth uses a set of bootstrap nodes whose endpoints are recorded in thesource code. To change the bootnodes on startup, use the --bootnodes option andseparate the nodes by commas. For example: geth --bootnodes enode://[email protected]:port1,enode://[email protected]:port2,enode://[email protected]:port3 Sometimes you just can't get connected. The most common reasons areas follows: Your local time might be incorrect. An accurate clock is requiredto participate in the Ethereum network. Check your OS for how to resyncyour clock (example sudo ntpdate -s time.nist.gov) because even 12seconds too fast can lead to 0 peers. Some firewall configurations can prevent UDP traffic from flowing.You can use the static nodes feature or admin.addPeer() on the consoleto configure connections by hand. To start geth without the discovery protocol, you can use the --nodiscover parameter. You only want this is you are running a test node or an experimental test network with fixed nodes. To check how many peers the client is connected to in the interactive console, the net module has two attributes give you info about the number of peers and whether you are a listening node. To get more information about the connected peers, such as IP address and port number, supported protocols, use the peers() function of the admin object. admin.peers() returns the list of currently connected peers. > ad Continue reading >>

Deploying A Private Ethereum Blockchain On Azure And A Raspberry Pi

Deploying A Private Ethereum Blockchain On Azure And A Raspberry Pi

n. [from Greek nepho-, cloud] someone who goes above the clouds. Deploying a private Ethereum blockchain on Azure and a Raspberry Pi As part of exploring the blockchain technology, and specifically the Ethereum ecosystem, I have settled on an IoT-related use case around solar energy grids. You can read more background in the first article in this series . In this post, I am going to focus on building a small private blockchain that I will later use to deploy Smart Contracts and build my solar energy marketplace demo on. I am going to use an Azure virtual machine to start a reasonably powerful mining node, and a Raspberry Pi 3 to simulate an on-premises equipment running a lighter, non-mining node, but which can still be involved in blockchain transactions. We will be using geth , the Go Ethereum client, to set up our cluster. Since the blockchain is basically a peer-to-peer network, geth is used both as a client and a server connecting to the blockchain. The installation procedures are fairly straightforward, I will be going through all the steps in the next few paragraphs. You can start from one of the Azure DevTest Labs VM templates for Ethereum-Go, or you can install it from scratch on a base Ubuntu VM. In this documentation I will be starting from a blank VM, just because I want to understand how all the bits and pieces fit together. You can follow the official Ethereum installation instructions to install geth on your Ubuntu VM. I would recommend using the latest stable version, i.e. do not add the ethereum-dev repository. sudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereumsudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install ethereum You can choose pretty much any size of Azure VM you would like, but since it is going to be mining (i Continue reading >>

We Already Know Blockchains Killerapps

We Already Know Blockchains Killerapps

Entrepreneur. @Airbnb, @earndotcom alum. Instructor @Outco. Writer. Effective Altruist. Blockchainist. Former poker pro. It wasnt too long ago that Silicon Valley scoffed at cryptocurrencies. All over coffee shops in Mountain View and Menlo Park, you heard the same conversation: Sure, its cool technology, but when are we going to see the killer app? A few merchants dipped their toes into accepting Bitcoin in 2014. But adoption largely backed off. I remember seeing a few Bitcoin ATMs in Austin, and then they disappeared. Bitcoin reneged on its promise to replace cash, so most venture capitalists assumed it was dead on arrival. Without a killer app driving consumer adoption, cryptocurrencies seemed like they would be nothing more than a curiosity for cryptographers and paranoids. In the last year, interest in cryptocurrencies has skyrocketed. The public cryptocurrency market cap has surged to highs of over $170B. With over 1.5B raised through ICOs in 2017, over 70 crypto exchanges open for business, and crypto hedge funds and VCs popping up left and right , it seems that everyone is clambering to get a seat on the rocketship. In all this frenzy, nobody is asking about killer apps anymore. As a consumer technology, cryptocurrencies are a hot mess. Theyre extremely difficult to purchase, the networks are slow, the transaction fees are high, the community is full of trolls, hackers, and scammers, its far too easy to lose your funds or have them stolen, and even if you win the battle to secure your funds or use a custodial service like Coinbase, merchant acceptance is scarce. The developer tools are even worse. The cryptocurrency ecosystem is fragmented and territorial. The tooling, documentation, and developer education are shoddy to nonexistent. Cryptocurrencies suck for b Continue reading >>

Understanding Blockchains Part 3: Ethereum, Or Moving Beyond Bitcoin

Understanding Blockchains Part 3: Ethereum, Or Moving Beyond Bitcoin

Understanding Blockchains Part 3: Ethereum, or moving beyond Bitcoin Readers of our previous posts in this series ( part 1 , part 2 ) should by now have a reasonable understanding of what a blockchain is its rationale, and how it is created and maintained. For continuity, it is important to reiterate that a blockchain is a decentralized ledger (a record of any sort of information) where every node in a peer-to-peer network maintains a copy of that ledger. Even though nodes may go out of synch with their peers from time to time, the ledger is eventually made consistent so that there is a common agreement on its contents. Blockchains differ from each other on the types of entries made to the ledger and how such entries are made, validated and confirmed by all the participants in the system to achieve the common and tamper-proof record. For public blockchains, the mechanisms should ensure that these properties hold even when the participants are not always available, known to each other and, perhaps most important, who may not trust each other. We explained these points using Bitcoin as an example of a successfully deployed public blockchain that records transactions of that eponymous currency. In part 2 of our series, we also used the following architecture picture to separate out and describe the different components that make the entire Bitcoin system tick. The Bitcoin blockchain is an example of a ledger that records transactions the transfer of ownership of some token (e.g., bitcoins) from one participant (represented in Bitcoin by an address) to another. This is sufficient for Bitcoin as its purpose is quite limited the need to create a record of pseudonymous ownership of the crypto-currency that is decentralized, validated and immutable. However, as can be imagined Continue reading >>

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