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Estonia Healthcare Blockchain

Estonian Ehealth And The Blockchain

Estonian Ehealth And The Blockchain

/review/Pages/Estonian-eHealth-and-the-blockchain.aspx Estonian eHealth and the blockchain Tiny Estonia is a world leader in digital citizenship and the provision of secure, safe online government services. So it's no surprise that the country is also leading the way when it comes to one of the biggest buzzwords in tech today: the blockchain and what to do with it In less than a year after the Estonian eHealth Foundation announced that it planned to use blockchain technology to secure the public health records of Estonia's 1.3 million citizens , a ground-breaking system was up and running. The system facilitates improved access to vital information for health professionals, while simultaneously guaranteeing patient confidentiality and the integrity of their files.It's a holy grail of healthcare. Some of the brightest and best minds on the globe have been applying themselves to the issue of making blockchain both practically useful and commercially viable. So how did the Estonian state and a local firm partner up to achieve what others are still only aspiring to? To understand fully the significance of the achievement, it's best to take a step back and look at what blockchain technology is. A blockchain is a "distributed ledger", a single database which is synchronised across multiple machines in a peer-to-peer network. Every machine in the network has a copy of the complete blockchain, which means a single version of the blockchain cannot be tampered with or changed without it being immediately noticeable and rejected by other machines in the network. Transactions are usually written into the chain as "blocks" of encrypted data, and multiple machines must confirm an entry before it is added to the master chain along with a cryptographic timestamp that cannot be changed Continue reading >>

Digital Health Has Potential But Needs To Be Secure

Digital Health Has Potential But Needs To Be Secure

Digital health has potential but needs to be secure Some hospitals' IT infrastructures still use long-forgotten versions of the Windows operating system. (Photo: Wikimedia ) The Estonian presidency of the Council of the EU has put e-health under the political spotlight once again. But this year's cyberattacks - affecting the UK's National Health Service (NHS) and targeted at consumer credit company Equifax in the United States - has highlighted how vulnerable sensitive personal, social security and health data can be to hackers. Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver. Sign up for 30 days' free trial , no obligation. Full subscription only 15 / month or 150 / year. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states. If you already have an account click here to login. Within the EU, Estonia is considered a digital leader. The country was ranked sixth overall in a recent report on data innovation in the EU . The victim of a major cyberattack in 2007 (the first known on an entire country) - that took down internet sites and servers of media outlets, banks and government bodies - Estonia has recovered by investing greatly in data and cybersecurity. One of Estonia's flagship digital health policies is to put its citizens' medical records on blockchain. The encrypted, peer-to-peer method of storing data is seen by the Estonian government as a good bet to keep its citizens data safe from malicious state or criminal attempts to access it. Estonia is far ahead of many other EU member states, where patient records may not even be digitised. A change in the government's mindset, first prompted by security risks, has now developed into genuine digital enthu Continue reading >>

Estonia-based Startup Healthureum Is Bringing Blockchain To Indian Healthcare

Estonia-based Startup Healthureum Is Bringing Blockchain To Indian Healthcare

Estonia-based startup Healthureum is bringing blockchain to Indian healthcare Healthureum has involved key stakeholders in India's healthcare ecosystem, and found the response welcoming. It says the government's keen interest in Blockchain will drive adoption of its services. Healthcare is one sector where the impact of new technology is playing out on a large scale. While AI, machine learning, robotics and IoT are already transforming medical processes for both patients and doctors, the rise of blockchain will lead to further efficiencies in the space. Estonia-based startup Healthureum, spearheaded by a team of medicine specialists, data scientists and technologists, is bringing Blockchain to Indian healthcare through an Ethereum-based platform that consolidates all medical data and secures it with encrypted codes. This technology helps ease the tracking of transaction nodes between all key stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem drug manufacturers, wholesalers, pharmacists, medical representatives, diagnostic centres, patients, doctors, and so on. Typically, medical information ends up in silos that act as bottlenecks in the sharing of data, causing frustration among providers, regulators, researchers and patients. There is a lack of interoperability in healthcare, which Healthureum aims to address with its platform. Because Blockchain operates on a decentralised approach, no single stakeholder is in charge of storing the data, but all participants on the network share the responsibility for maintaining it. Malcolm Wilkinson, Data Scientist & CTO, Healthureum, says, By adopting a decentralised approach to data management, we eliminate human errors, third-party influence, the risk of tampering and manipulation. Thus, we can achieve a more robust means for storing and Continue reading >>

Blockchain Innovation In Healthcare And Life Sciences

Blockchain Innovation In Healthcare And Life Sciences

Blockchain Innovation In Healthcare And Life Sciences The blockchain is the most consequential technology since the internet. The internet is programmable information. The blockchain is programmable scarcity. Balaji Srinivasan , CEO of 21.co The internet is entering a second era thats based on blockchain, this according to futurist Don Tapscotte . Blockchain will also disrupt every industry . Venture capitalist Bill Tai believes that blockchain has the potential to birth the largest companies in the world. Dubai is working towards becoming the first government powered by blockchain . There are now cities that are using blockchain to issue passports. #Blockchain has the potential to birth companies that are "2-5 orders of magnitude larger" than Facebook or Google. pic.twitter.com/v7cyWILR0m Vala Afshar (@ValaAfshar) September 15, 2017 Dubai is working towards becoming the first government powered by blockchain pic.twitter.com/jCvWPgtTRC Vala Afshar (@ValaAfshar) September 12, 2017 The first city in the world to issue #blockchain passports pic.twitter.com/dUcMPubD3d Vala Afshar (@ValaAfshar) September 5, 2017 I recently interviewed Balaji Srinivasan , CEO of 21.co that is using blockchain to revolutionize sales and marketing . Srinivasan recently noted that blockchain is the internet of money . With the blockchain, everything that was scarce now becomes programmable. That means cash, commodities, currencies, stocks, bondseverything in finance is going to be transformed, and aspects of finance baked into everything else. If you deal with information, you need the internet. If you deal with money, you need to deal with blockchains. Balaji Srinivasan Blockchain is a type of data structure thats used to create a digital ledger of transactions and share it among a distributed Continue reading >>

A Case Study In Blockchain Health Care Innovation

A Case Study In Blockchain Health Care Innovation

global leadership in blockchain technology when it announced it would use blockchain technology to secure the health records of over a million citizens. Estonias systemati blockchain technologies through GovTech partnerships demnostrates how innovation is a process. Estonia also identified early the value of the blockchain as a disruptive platform innovation. The application of blockchain technology to h previous applications have been in the financial and legal sectors. is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Att reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Healthcare is at a crisis globally, with global demand for medical services outpacing the ability to pay for it. As the population ages, the ratio of elderly people to working age people is rapidly growing. The result is a greater need for healthcare services by the elderly, with fewer working age people to provide financial support for medical insurance. In outpace inflation, with the average global rise in medical care projected to be 7.8% in 2017, up from 7.3% in 2016 and 7.5% . These two factors, an aging population with fewer steadily increasing costs of medical care, are creating an enormous pressure on governments and businesses to find innovative ways to make the delivery of health care more efficient and less costly. Advances in technol bureaucratic burden of medical care will provide a breakthrough occurred in 2008 with the publication of Satoshi way to create a safe and secure system of money built upon a distributed ledger known as the blockchain. This innovation was a revolutionary, disruptive breakthrough. Through the use of a blockchain, control of financial transactions could be Elson S Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University, PO H Continue reading >>

Thought Leadership In Digital Health | London | Uk

Thought Leadership In Digital Health | London | Uk

Estonia has become the first country in the world to introduce blockchain technology within electronic healthcare systems. TheEstonian eHealth Foundation and Guardtime partnered tointegrate KSI blockchain with existing Oracle databases to enable increased security andaudit functionsfor the management of patient records.KSI is a blockchain technology designed in Estonia and used globally to make sure networks, systems and data are free of compromise, all while retaining 100% data privacy. A blockchain is a distributed public ledger a database with a set of pre-defined rules for how the ledger is appended by the distributed consensus of the participants in the system. Due to its widely witnessed property, blockchain technology makes it also impossible to change the data already on the blockchain. Estonia has been at the forefront of innovation in digital society for the last 20 years and is the only country where a majority of citizens carry a PKI smart card providing access to over 1000 electronic government services that are actively used. Electronic patient records are a critical component of these services and by integrating Guardtimes blockchain technology it becomes possible to provide an independent forensic-quality audit trail for the lifecycle of those patient records, making it impossible for anyone who gains access to those records to manipulate information and cover their tracks. Estonian eHealth Foundation uses Oracle technology to process and store the patient records and Guardtime's KSI blockchain will be integrated at the Oracle database engine, providing increased security, transparency, auditability and governance for electronic systems and lifecycle management of patient records. KSI instrumented records will be irrefutable. Mike Gault CEO of Guardtime Continue reading >>

Estonia Prescribes Blockchain For Healthcare Data Security - Health Matters

Estonia Prescribes Blockchain For Healthcare Data Security - Health Matters

Discussing issues across public and private health, social care, and pharmaceutical and life sciences sectors. Estonia prescribes blockchain for healthcare data security Estonia has long been known as one of the most digitally advanced countries in Europe. And now its government is putting ground-breaking blockchain technology to use in securing its citizens medical data. The countrys eHealth Authority has signed a deal with Guardtime, a blockchain pioneer, to secure the health records of over a million Estonians. Trust, transparency and value: How blockchain will impact the health sector Blockchain has the potential to revolutionise data security. And, while it employs advanced data architecture and cutting-edge cryptographic technologies, at its core is a very simple idea. That is, that rather than storing and administrating data in a single database, multiple copies of the same data are synchronised in ledgers shared across a network of users. Blockchain is in this way a distributed ledger. And when changes are made in one copy of a distributed ledger, each other copy held in every other location is simultaneously updated. The network as a whole polices and guarantees the validity of the data. This has a number of powerful applications in healthcare. First, health records can be stored securely in a ledger on which all participants (health professionals, patients, insurers) can rely. Doctors, surgeons, pharmacists and other medical professionals all have instant access to an agreed set of data about a patient. This means better data for better care in acute, life-threatening situations, and for the treatment of chronic longer-term conditions. Second, a ledger of secure, validated data has the potential to be shared, subject to strict privacy limitations, with insure Continue reading >>

Estonia, The Digital Republic

Estonia, The Digital Republic

Itsgovernment is virtual, borderless, blockchained, and secure. Has this tiny post-Soviet nation found the way of the future? The Estonian government is so eager to take on big problems that many ambitious techies leave the private sector to join it. Itsgovernment is virtual, borderless, blockchained, and secure. Has this tiny post-Soviet nation found the way of the future? The Estonian government is so eager to take on big problems that many ambitious techies leave the private sector to join it. Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. Up the Estonian coast, a five-lane highway bends with the path of the sea, then breaks inland, leaving cars to follow a thin road toward the houses at the waters edge. There is a gated community here, but it is not the usual kind. The gate is lowa picket fenceas if to prevent the dunes from riding up into the street. The entrance is blocked by a railroad-crossing arm, not so much to keep out strangers as to make sure they come with intent. Beyond the gate, there is a schoolhouse, and a few homes line a narrow drive. From Tallinn, Estonias capital, you arrive dazed: trees trace the highway, and the cars go fast, as if to get in front of something that no one can see. Within this gated community lives a man, his family, and one vision of the future. Taavi Kotka, who spent four years as Estonias chief information officer, is one of the leading public faces of a project known as e-Estonia: a cordinated governmental effort to transform the country from a state into a digital society. E-Estonia is the most ambitious project in technological statecraft today, for it includes all members of the government, and alters citizens daily lives. The normal services that government is involved wi Continue reading >>

Medical Records On The Blockchain - Estonia And Dubai Case Studies

Medical Records On The Blockchain - Estonia And Dubai Case Studies

We live in a digital world, yet the majority of medical records such as blood test reports or x-rays are stored on paper. Moreover, most hospitals dont share access to medical records, which is time consuming for doctors when prescribing treatments and inconvenient for patients. Having medical records on the blockchain can have a positive effect on disease management, disease prevention, and minimize unnecessary healthcare expenses . Digital health records will also open up the possibility for cross-border sharing of medical data if a patient is on holidays and requires treatment abroad. Estonia and Dubai are the frontrunners when it comes to management of medical records on the blockchain. Estonia is the first country in the world to have embraced the blockchain technology in its live production systems for ensuring the integrity of records, logs and systems. As one of the most digitally advanced in Europe, Estonia is among the few countries where it is possible to access hundreds of government services with an e-ID . The Estonian e-Health Foundation is now developing a blockchain-based system that will secure medical records of more than 1 million patients. The project is based on Keyless Signature Infrastructure , which protects the data from interference, glitches and viruses. This system enables only the entry of new data and keeps the records secure from any alteration. As a result, medical records on the blockchain will contribute to patients empowerment, medical transparency and improved dialog between caregivers and patients. The government support is very important when it comes to digitising services and Dubai has one of the most tech-savvy governments in the world. Dubais government is currently testing blockchain technology for securing electronic medical Continue reading >>

Estonia E-residency & Blockchain Governance, Explained

Estonia E-residency & Blockchain Governance, Explained

Estonia E-Residency & Blockchain Governance, Explained Estonia is a small Baltic nation of 1.3 million people, but theyre leading a digital revolution in governance with the Estonia e-Residency program. Its a country where the state drives technological innovation, not just the private sector. Since 2007, theyve been working on proposals to digitize identity and citizenship. Today, every citizen of Estonia has their own ID card and PIN that links with their digital identity. Recently, in 2015, Estonia opened this digital identity system up to non-citizens. Anyone in the world can now apply to become an e-resident of Estonia. Being an e-resident doesnt confer citizenship, but it does allow you to open a bank account and start a business in Estonia. In the future, Estonia hopes to expand the capabilities of e-residency. In this article, well look at what e-residency entails, how to become an e-resident, and Estonias future plans for digital identity and blockchain-based governance. Estonia is well-known in the region as a tech and startup hub. Theyve been at the forefront of digitizing state services over the past few years. U.S. President Barack Obama, when visiting Estonia, remarked, With their digital IDs, Estonians can use their smartphones to get just about anything done online, from their childrens grades to their health records I should have called the Estonians when we were setting up our health care website. Citizens can use their ID cards to vote online and all government records are accessible online. Moreover, Estonian citizens control their data. They can choose to restrict access to various information in their personal profiles. The new e-residency program opens some of the functionality of citizen IDs to the entire world. The Estonian government calls the Continue reading >>

Blockchain Startup To Secure 1 Million E-health Records In Estonia

Blockchain Startup To Secure 1 Million E-health Records In Estonia

Blockchain Startup to Secure 1 Million e-Health Records in Estonia Mar 3, 2016 at 21:40 UTC|UpdatedMar 3, 2016 at 22:51 UTC Data securitystartup Guardtime hasannounced a partnership with the Estonian eHealth Foundation that will see itdeploy a blockchain-based systemto secure over 1 million patient healthcare records. Under the deal, the foundationwill integrate Guardtime 's keyless signature infrastructure (KSI) blockchain into the foundation's Oracle database engine to provide"real-time visibility" into the state of patient records. Estonia has become notable for its e-government system , which was established in 1997. This is enabled bya chip-embedded IDcard that gives the nation'scitizensaccess to over 1,000 e-government services, such as filing taxes and voting, almost instantly andviajust one website. Also included in the system are electronic patient records, whichthe rollout of Guardtime's technology is aimed to protect withan "independent forensic-quality audit trail". The company claims this will makeit impossible to alter theinformation, illicitly or otherwise, without it being noticed. A spokesperson forthe company told CoinDesk: "In guarding sensitive records, the danger is that they could be altered, deleted, improperly changed or updated, affected by hackers, malware, system issues, etc. The blockchain in this case can prove the integrity of the record, and everything that has happened to it over time." Margus Auvrt, who heads the eHealth Foundation , said that Guardtime will allow it to maintain real-time awareness of health records. "It enables us to react to any incidents immediately, before potentially larger-scale damages can occur,"Auvrt said. Launched in 2011, Guardtime originally marketed itself as a provider of " keyless signatures " that would Continue reading >>

Data, Security, Insurance: How Blockchain Is Disrupting The Health Industry

Data, Security, Insurance: How Blockchain Is Disrupting The Health Industry

Data, Security, Insurance: How Blockchain Is Disrupting The Health Industry From improved security to fighting counterfeit drugs: Blockchain startups are changing the healthcare industry The health industrys potential for Blockchain has been outlined numerous times, and new startups continue to emerge in 2018. On Monday, April 9 it was announced that a German consulting firm developed a Blockchain-based solution for the management of sensitive medical data, while a week prior to that an important industry player in the US stepped up with a foray into Blockchain as well. What exactly can Blockchain startups bring to the table? Well, a lot: improved security, effective distribution of information among involved parties, anonymized data pools for research companies and new ways to fight counterfeit drugs. Healthcare is an industry where patients information could be processed by numerous institutions - for example, private or public hospitals and clinics, general practitioners and analysis labs. Therefore, the ultimate goal is to provide both easy and safe access to that information. In 2016, John Halamka, chief information officer at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston collaborated with a group of scientists at MIT to come up with a Blockchain-based project for convenient storage of patients information. The project was named MedRec. MedRec is based on Ethereums smart contracts and links healthcare providers together, allowing them to share their data. Only the patients can cryptographically sign smart contracts on the Blockchain, ensuring that theyre in control of where their medical history goes. Our system gives patients a comprehensive, immutable log and easy access to their medical information across providers and treatment sites, states the projects whit Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Healthcare: The Estonian Experience

Blockchain And Healthcare: The Estonian Experience

Blockchain and healthcare: the Estonian experience by Taavi Einaste, Head of Digital Healthcare at Nortal, February 21, 2018 Language not available. For the sake of viewer convenience, the content is shown below in the alternative language. You may click the link to switch the active language. In 2016, the Estonian government was looking for new and innovative ways to secure the health records for its 1.3 million residents. It turned to blockchain technology. It may or may not revolutionize the internet, depending on who you ask. But without doubt, the incorruptible distributed ledger technology known as blockchain has proved its potential for applications where data integrity is critical. Away from the frenetic world of cryptocurrency, developers and investors are searching high and low for new areas they can unleash blockchains power. Finance, logistics and electronic copyrights top the list as the most talked about. The same goes for healthcare in Estonia, specifically with regard to securing patients electronic health records. Still, practical cases have proven hard to identify . Estonia, home to one of the worlds most e-savvy governments, has become the first country to dabble in using blockchain for healthcare on a national scale. In 2016, the Estonian E-Health Foundation launched a development project aimed at safeguarding patient health records using blockchain technology in archiving related activity logs. Estonia has become the first country to use #blockchain for healthcare on a national scale We are using blockchain as an additional layer of security to help us ensure the integrity of health records. Privacy and integrity of healthcare information are a top priority for the government and we are happy to work with innovative technologies like the blockchain Continue reading >>

E-health Records E-estonia

E-health Records E-estonia

The Electronic Health Record (e-Health Record) is a nationwide system integrating data from Estonias different healthcare providers to create a common record every patient can access online. Functioning very much like a centralized, national database, the e-Health Record actually retrieves data as necessary from various providers, who may be using different systems, and presents it in a standard format via the e-Patient portal (link). A powerful tool for doctors that allows them to access a patients records easily from a single electronic file, doctors can read test results as they are entered, including image files such as X-rays even from remote hospitals. For assuring the integrity of retrieved electronic medical records as well as system access logs, blockchain technology is used. 97%of patients have countrywide digital record For example, in an emergency situation, a doctor can use a patients ID code to read time-critical information, such as blood type, allergies, recent treatments, on-going medication or pregnancy. The system also compiles data for national statistics, so the ministry can measure health trends, track epidemics, and make sure that its health resources are being spent wisely. Patients have access to their own records, as well as those of their children. By logging into the e-Patient portal with an electronic ID-card, the patient can review doctor visits and current prescriptions, and check which doctors have had access to their files. Visit the Estonian e-Health Records here . One of the key innovations in Estonias cutting-edge e-Healthcare system, e-Prescription, is a centralized paperless system for issuing and handling medical prescriptions. When a doctor prescribes medicine using the system, he or she does so electronically, with the aid of an Continue reading >>

Estonian Ehealth | Health Care Blockchain

Estonian Ehealth | Health Care Blockchain

Estonian eHealth Authority Partners with Guardtime to Accelerate Transparency and Auditability in Health Care Estonian eHealth Foundation and Guardtime partner to accelerate adoption of Guardtimes KSI blockchain with Estonian electronic health-care systems. Parties integrate KSI blockchain with existing Oracle databases to provide increased security, transparency, auditability and governance for electronic systems and lifecycle management of patient records. Provides a template for other nations with health care fraud measured in the hundreds of billions of dollars every year. Guardtime, the first and only platform for ensuring the integrity of data and systems at industrial scale, today announced a partnership with the Estonian e-Health Authority to accelerate adoption of blockchain based transparency and auditability the lifecycle management for patient health care records. Estonia has been at the forefront of innovation in digital society for the last 20 years and is the only country where a majority of citizens carry a PKI smart card providing access to over 1000 electronic government services that are actively used. Electronic patient records are a critical component of these services and by integrating Guardtimes blockchain technology it becomes possible to provide an independent forensic-quality audit trail for the lifecycle of those patient records, making it impossible for anyone who gains access to those records to manipulate information and cover their tracks. Estonian eHealth Foundation uses Oracle technology to process and store the patient records and Guardtime's KSI blockchain will be integrated at the Oracle database engine, providing increased security, transparency, auditability and governance for electronic systems and lifecycle management of patient Continue reading >>

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