CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Estonia Blockchain Voting

How Estonia Brought Blockchain Closer To Citizens: Govtech Case Studies

How Estonia Brought Blockchain Closer To Citizens: Govtech Case Studies

How Estonia Brought Blockchain Closer to Citizens: GovTech Case Studies Estonia will be more noticeable on the global Blockchain map as Blockchain and Bitcoin Conference Tallinn starts on March 9. States without limits, banking without bank accounts and deals based on smart contracts. On March 9, Tallinn will host the first large-scale conference dedicated to Blockchain and cryptocurrencies Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference Tallinn . Key focus areas will include open and private Blockchains in Govtech and Fintech segments, which Estonia focuses on. Participants will share experiences concerning the establishment and the promotion of Blockchain-based products and discuss the impact of technologies on business processes. In 2015, Estonia announced itself as a leading country in the development of Blockchain-based services. It is remarkable that not only the commercial sector but also the government, giving the go-ahead for Govtech developments , has become interested in this technology: Public Notary (based on the already operating electronic residency system) and the project on transferring medical records of Estonian citizens into the Blockchain. Public Notary is an electronic version of a notary with remote access from anywhere globally. It was designed by developers of the e-Residency project, allowing foreign citizens to establish a business within Estonian jurisdiction. E-Residency creation was preceded by several years of digitalization and IT sector development. The countrys whole territory provides access to high-speed Internet and its socio-economic environment is quite attractive for highly experienced programmers from Belarus, Ukraine, Russia and even Finland. Specialists from the EU and US countries are also frequent guests because of low taxes. As to further Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Voting; How To Change The Democratic Process

Blockchain And Voting; How To Change The Democratic Process

Blockchain and Voting; How to Change the Democratic Process Blockchain and Voting; How to Change the Democratic Process by @vanrijmenam Distributed ledger technologies such as Blockchain are a hot topic at the moment. Startups incorporating blockchain technology are raising hundreds of millions of dollars using a new form of crowdfunding called the Initial Coin Offering (ICO). Many of these startups offer new solutions for existing problems or are adapting existing services with Blockchain to differentiate themselves. It seems that almost any industry or service can and will be disrupted by Blockchain. One area that I would like to discuss in this article is the usage of Blockchain for the democratic process, because as it seems using blockchain in our democratic processes could significantly improve the democratic system. Voting using blockchain could eliminate electoral fraud by making votes immutable, verifiable and traceable and it will make results available instantly, as soon as the election closes. As such, when votes are recorded on a blockchain, it will enable citizens to be 100% sure that their vote is submitted, that it is counted and that it has not been changed while ensuring complete privacy for the voter. One country that has been experimenting with blockchain-based voting is Estonia. Estonia is by far the most advanced country in terms of electronic voting. This is made possible because of the Estonian Digital ID card, a mandatory smart card for government services based on Public Key Infrastructure. Estonia started with electronic voting in 2005 and in 2007, Estonia was the first country in the world to allow online voting. In the 2015 parliamentary elections, 30,5% of the Estonians eligible to vote, did so over the internet. Although voting over the i Continue reading >>

Estonia, The Digital Republic

Estonia, The Digital Republic

Itsgovernment is virtual, borderless, blockchained, and secure. Has this tiny post-Soviet nation found the way of the future? The Estonian government is so eager to take on big problems that many ambitious techies leave the private sector to join it. Itsgovernment is virtual, borderless, blockchained, and secure. Has this tiny post-Soviet nation found the way of the future? The Estonian government is so eager to take on big problems that many ambitious techies leave the private sector to join it. Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. Up the Estonian coast, a five-lane highway bends with the path of the sea, then breaks inland, leaving cars to follow a thin road toward the houses at the waters edge. There is a gated community here, but it is not the usual kind. The gate is lowa picket fenceas if to prevent the dunes from riding up into the street. The entrance is blocked by a railroad-crossing arm, not so much to keep out strangers as to make sure they come with intent. Beyond the gate, there is a schoolhouse, and a few homes line a narrow drive. From Tallinn, Estonias capital, you arrive dazed: trees trace the highway, and the cars go fast, as if to get in front of something that no one can see. Within this gated community lives a man, his family, and one vision of the future. Taavi Kotka, who spent four years as Estonias chief information officer, is one of the leading public faces of a project known as e-Estonia: a cordinated governmental effort to transform the country from a state into a digital society. E-Estonia is the most ambitious project in technological statecraft today, for it includes all members of the government, and alters citizens daily lives. The normal services that government is involved wi Continue reading >>

In Estonia, Almost Everything From Voting To Updating Medical Records Can Be Done Online

In Estonia, Almost Everything From Voting To Updating Medical Records Can Be Done Online

In Estonia, almost everything from voting to updating medical records can be done online Informatics teacher Jevgeni Mihhailov inspects computers in an empty classroom in a school in Tallinn, Estonia, onMarch 7, 2012. Here's a fantasy: Aworld where you never had to wait in line at the Department of Motor Vehicles. Save for the driving test, you could do almost everything online from changing your address to renewing your license. Other things in life like voting and going to the doctor would work just as efficiently. Any doctor you'd visit would already have access to your digitally stored medical records, and youd never have to fill out one of those medical history forms in the waiting room. In the event of an emergency, ambulance workers would be able to pull up that data using your digital identity numberand understand your medical history. To some, it may sound like an Orwellian dystopia. To others, it sounds like a digital utopia. In Estonia, its already a reality. The smallBaltic nation has a population less than half of Silicon Valley, but has managed to put itself on the map though its E-Stonia Project , a government-led initiative that has digitized almost all aspects of citizen life. Estonias former President Toomas Hendrik Ilves was a driving force behind the project. On a recent visit to Boston, he sat down with PRIs The World for an interview on the ambitious undertaking. What does it mean to live in a digital society? It's nothing too sophisticated. It simply means that you can do digitally what you otherwise do on paper and it's more transparent, more open, faster and efficient. It's really not that odd at all.It's just you think about instead of signing papers and having them move from one place to another, you sign something digitally.You have a legal Continue reading >>

Welcome To The Blockchain Nation

Welcome To The Blockchain Nation

The worlds most advanced digital nation is helping entrepreneurs unleash the potential of blockchain technology. If you want a glimpse at the future potential of blockchain, visit Estonia . Ten years ago, our country gained the unenviable title of being the first in the world to experience a nationwide cyber attack. Although no data was compromised, the attackers sent large amounts of web traffic to overwhelm systems in an attempt to take them offline. This caused temporary disruption to a country that was already investing heavily in digital governance and emerging as a thriving startup hub, particularly for digital services. Skype was born here just five years earlier. As a result, the attack also served as a wake-up call for how the countrys digital infrastructure could be further secured through radical new technology. The longer term impact of the attack is that it helped Estonia develop into what is now widely considered to be the worlds most advanced digital nation. Today, almost all public services in Estonia are digitalised and accessed through secure digital identities that are provided to every citizen and resident. The technology behind this digital infrastructure is incredibly impressive. The Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and eID system is based on advanced encryption technology and includes 2-factor authentication. Data is decentralised, yet never duplicated and always shared securely thanks to the X-Road. You can find out more in this short video. One of the innovations that was integrated into several of these services is a distributed ledger that can never be erased or rewritten. This kind of ledger technology is now more commonly known as a blockchain and is more famous for its role in enabling cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum to operate w Continue reading >>

Verizon To Use Estonian Technology To Create Blockchain Platform Services

Verizon To Use Estonian Technology To Create Blockchain Platform Services

Verizon to use Estonian technology to create blockchain platform services Verizon, one of the largest telecommunication companies in the world, is to use technology created by the Estonian company, Guardtime, to launch a global portfolio of blockchain platform services. The US-based Verizon Enterprise Solutions, a division of Verizon Communications that provides services and products for its business and government clients around the world, announced that later in 2018, it will launch a portfolio of blockchain platform services based on Guardtimes KSI Blockchain capabilities, where KSI stands for Keyless Signature Infrastructure. Consumed as a service, Verizons enterprise and government customers will be able to integrate proven blockchain solutions into their existing business processes, Verizon said in a statement. The company said that large enterprises and government agencies were seeking new ways to maintain the integrity of their critical infrastructure, protect physical and digital supply chains, and safeguard customers essential information systems and thats why the new portfolio of services will be launched. Increasingly, our enterprise customers want to effectively leverage blockchain to meet the security demands from their customers, Alex Schlager, the executive director security services of Verizon Enterprise Solutions, said in a statement. Combining our security expertise with Guardtimes blockchain platform offers customers an advanced solution, he added. The company said its blockchain platform services will focus on privacy, portability and scalability adding proven managed security services on top of leading technology from Guardtime. Guardtime is a software security company, founded in 2007 in Estonia and headquartered in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. It Continue reading >>

I-voting E-estonia

I-voting E-estonia

Government Cloud i-Voting State e-Services Portal e-Cabinet Estonia has been a pioneer in converting public services into flexible e-solutions for its citizens and e-residents. The implementation of the Government Cloud solution provides an excellent foundation for public e-services and solutions, which makes Estonia the most digital country in the world. With the Government Cloud solution Estonia is taking the next step in its digital evolution to expand its ICT society. The Estonian Government Cloud will lead to the modernization and renewal of existing information systems, to embrace the opportunities offered by cloud technology and allow more agility in provision of e-services by the Estonian government agencies and critical service providers to residents and e-residents. The solution will help to integrate the existing siloed IT infrastructure of the Estonian public sector into shared pool of resources. The Estonian public institutions will gradually transit from existing legacy systems to a new Government Cloud solution, which has been developed in accordance with the national IT Security Standard (ISKE), to ensure the compliance with safety and quality requirements. For example sensitive personal data is stored and handled with confidentiality, and integrity. To accommodate physical security requirements, the Estonian Government Cloud will be deployed in two locations, having one location outside of the capital. This will allow to manage data and information systems in a distributed manner. To support the Estonian digital independence and uninterrupted operation of public IT services in state of emergency there is a long-term plan to establish e-embassies outside Estonia in friendly foreign countries. The Estonian Government Cloud is developed in collaboration b Continue reading >>

Nasdaq To Launch Blockchain Voting Trial For Estonian Stock Market

Nasdaq To Launch Blockchain Voting Trial For Estonian Stock Market

Nasdaq to Launch Blockchain Voting Trial for Estonian Stock Market Nasdaq to Launch Blockchain Voting Trial for Estonian Stock Market Global stock market giant Nasdaq has announced it is developing an electronic shareholder voting system based on blockchain technology. According to Nasdaq representatives, the trial marks the first steps in a project that would allow shareholders of companies listed on the Nasdaq OMX Tallinn Stock Exchange Estoniasonly regulated securities market to more frequently participate in voting processes. Currently, they suggested, these processes are out of touch with the needs of the market. In comments to CoinDesk, officials connected to the project cited statistics that show shareholder engagement in public company voting is low, with roughly 1% of shareholders participating in acts of governance such as general meetings. Representatives said Estonias market is ideal for testingthe system, as Nasdaq will have access to investor data through the countrys e-Residency platform , meaning it will be able to create voting accounts for users. They further cited the countrys love of IT innovation as a sign it would potentially gain support, and upon completion, wider use. Nasdaq president Hans-Ole Jochumsen said in a statement: Estonias robust information society and forward thinking coupled with the agility its size affords, creates a unique opportunity to premiere the e-voting pilot in Estonia. The announcement marks the companys second formal blockchain project, following the debut of Nasdaq Linq , a product that seeks to ease the issuance and management of shares in private companies, and that is currently open to a small group of initial test users. Apart from the broad vision of the project, however, Nasdaq was not forthcoming with design det Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Change The Way You Vote And Pay Taxes

How Blockchain Could Change The Way You Vote And Pay Taxes

How Blockchain Could Change the Way You Vote and Pay Taxes Because, in the future, if you file taxes or vote online, youll probably have blockchain to thank. In an age when we can communicate, work, study, move money and even watch movies or read a book from the comfort of our own beds, iPhone in hand, its remarkable that our relationships with government are so un-techy. We have to fill out and sign paper forms in order to set up a business or pay taxes, we have Social Security numbers printed on a physical card that our entire lives are tied to and we even have to drive to a high school or town hall to vote in elections in person, often by marking a slip of paper with a pen. Its all very 20th century. Not so in the small European nation of Estonia , where you can pay taxes, buy and sell property, sign contracts, conduct business and even vote in elections online . And when I say you can, I mean it Estonia has taken its digital governance project to a whole new level since 2014, when it launched a program called e-residency. Now anybody around the world can apply online to become a digital Estonian, accessing the same online platforms that the countrys physical economy is based on and the same online public services that domestic citizens can utilize (although, of course, only physical residents of Estonia can vote). In the past couple of years the decades-long effort to digitize the countrys government services has accelerated thanks to blockchain, the tech underpinning Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Blockchain, a way of storing information about transactions that is secure, distributed, encrypted and unchangeable, has the power to transform the digital infrastructure behind everything from Wall Street trades and movie streaming to industrial supply chains and n Continue reading >>

Nasdaq's Blockchain Technology To Transform The Republic Of Estonia's E-residency Shareholder Participation

Nasdaq's Blockchain Technology To Transform The Republic Of Estonia's E-residency Shareholder Participation

Nasdaq's Blockchain Technology to Transform the Republic of Estonia's e-Residency Shareholder Participation Nasdaq (Nasdaq: NDAQ ) and the Republic of Estonia have announced that Estonia's e-Residency platform will be facilitating a blockchain-based e-voting service to allow shareholders of companies listed on Nasdaq's Tallinn Stock Exchange, Estonia's only regulated securities market, to vote in shareholder meetings. The country's e-Residency platform is an electronic identity system used by both Estonian residents and those with business interests in the country to access government services through e-Residency digital authentication. The program marks the second official blockchain project Nasdaq is executing on after successfully delivering the first private securities issuance between an investor and company via Nasdaq Linq, its blockchain-enabled platform. As part of the program's pilot, shareholders who are Estonian or Estonian e-residents will be able to participate in the corporate governance of companies more conveniently and securely than ever before. The e-Residency platform vastly improves the ability to authenticate shareholders for the e-voting service, while blockchain technology will allow votes to be quickly and securely recorded, streamlining a proxy voting process that has historically been labor-intensive and fragmented. The pilot is aimed to launch in 2016. "I'm delighted Nasdaq will be using the e-Residency platform to offer shareholders a new e-voting system," said Kaspar Korjus, Program Director, e-Residency. "When we started the e-Residency project a year ago we knew we would change the way people think about nations and citizenship. Now, via our e-voting collaboration with Nasdaq, we will be revolutionizing corporate governance." Making it ea Continue reading >>

Strate To Apply Nasdaq Blockchain For Proxy Voting

Strate To Apply Nasdaq Blockchain For Proxy Voting

Strate to apply Nasdaq blockchain for proxy voting South Africa's central securities depository Strate is to implement blockchain-based e-voting technology from Nasdaq to surmount the administrative hurdles facing shareholders and corporations in conducting Annual General Meetings. Strate is taking technology that was first implemented in late 2015 as a proof-of-conept at Nasdaq's Estonian subsidiary. The PoC relied on smart contract technology from Chain to implement the voting functionality while piggy-backing off Estonia's e-Residency platform - a digital authentication service used by both Estonian residents and those with business interests in the country to access government services - to identify shareholders and then record votes on a private blockchain. Tanya Knowles, managing executive of Fractal Solutions, a division of Strate says: "One needs to understand that the environment at the moment is very administratively intensive, which means there are many inefficiencies and risks associated with it. The solution aims to service our clients' needs across the market from transfer secretaries to issuers, custodians, asset managers and those holding shares in listed companies. Given that it is an end-to-end solution - from the time a meeting is announced and all the way through the voting process to the publishing of results - it means that all stakeholders will truly benefit within the process." Strate's interest in the applicability of distributed ledger technology to proxy voting is long-standing. The South African depository is a member of an international CSD Working Group - alongside depositories from Russia, Switzerland, Sweden, Chile, Argentina and UAE - that has developed a model for an international e-proxy voting product embedded with the relevant ISO 2 Continue reading >>

Is Blockchain The Answer To E-voting? Nasdaq Believes So .

Is Blockchain The Answer To E-voting? Nasdaq Believes So .

Is Blockchain the Answer to E-voting? Nasdaq Believes So Is Blockchain the Answer to E-voting? Nasdaq Believes So In 2016, Nasdaq announced its interest in developing a new e-voting platform on our Tallinn exchange in Estonia using blockchain technology. The project involved various stakeholders, including collaborating with our technology partner, Chain . It also leveraged local digital identification solutions, which are used by the government to issue identity cards to foreigners by the Estonian state through their e-Residency program. What follows is a brief background and progress update. Annual General Meetings (AGM) tend to be necessary high-cost events with, on average, fairly low shareholder participation. As cross-border investments grow, there is more pressure for greater investor engagement, calling for a secure, cost-effective and flexible solution that facilitates shareholder participation and voting from a distance. This would also encourage intermediate communication between investors and company representatives. In addition, creating a lower cost, easier access solution to allow exercising cross-border shareholders rights could potentially facilitate further growth in cross-border listing, trading and settlement activity. There are several web-based voting solutions currently on the market, yet there is still a preferred preference by investors to attend and cast their vote in person at the AGM. Further, investors often do not have control over their votes (and easy access to their voting history), particularly if they give voting rights to their proxies. This presents two opportunities for a new approach: 1) create an alternative solution that could potentially leverage blockchains secure technology and improve voting transparency; and 2) partner with Continue reading >>

Nasdaq Successfully Completes Blockchain Test In Estonia

Nasdaq Successfully Completes Blockchain Test In Estonia

Nasdaq successfully completes blockchain test in Estonia NEW YORK, Jan 23 (Reuters) - Nasdaq Inc has successfully completed a test using blockchain technology to run proxy voting on its Estonian exchange and is now assessing whether to implement the new system, the company said on Monday. The technology allowed investors who own shares in companies listed on the Tallinn Stock Exchange, the countrys only regulated secondary securities market, to vote online during investor meetings or transfer their voting rights to a proxy, the global exchange and clearing house operator said in a report published on Monday. The proxy voting test, first announced in late 2015, is one of a growing batch of experiments by large financial institutions using the technology that first emerged as the system underpinning cryptocurrency bitcoin. Blockchain is a distributed and immutable record of transactions that is maintained by a network of computers on the internet, without approval from a central authority. As it creates a shared golden record of data, market infrastructure providers and banks hope that it can reduce complexity and costs of financial processes ranging from securities settlement to corporate actions. Nasdaq has been one of the earliest and most vocal supporters of the technology in the exchange industry and already uses the technology to power its market for shares of private companies. Its proxy voting experiment was aimed at streamlining a process which is currently highly manual and time-consuming. While e-voting technology may not be the next killer app, it is very much a practical, necessary, solution that has many potential applications around the world, said the Nasdaq report. For example, we envision the end-users potentially being listed and non-listed companies, Continue reading >>

Estonia Experiments With Blockchain, Smart Services And 'data Embassies' -- Gcn

Estonia Experiments With Blockchain, Smart Services And 'data Embassies' -- Gcn

Estonia experiments with blockchain, smart services and 'data embassies' Estonias digital cred is well established, and its programs that let citizens use their smartphones to access government services are a source of envy among other tech-savvy nations. I should have called the Estonians when we were setting up our health care website, then-President Barack Obama even joked in a 2014 press conference . Lately, the country is focused on security threats to citizens and the nation as a whole. The heart of Estonias digital government is identity. Citizens get an ID Card that serves a number of different purposes, including acting as a national health insurance card and serving as authentication for bank accounts, digital signatures and voting. Creating these digital IDs is a vital part of having a digital government, President Kersti Kaljulaid said at an April 4 event hosted by the Atlantic Council In the real world, or the analog world, you dont imagine that you cant identify the other person with whom you are talking or interacting or contracting, she said. "Governments have exactly the same obligation in the digital sphere to provide people with identification. The large amount of data created by digital services is managed by Estonia's X-Road, a secure and standardized platform that enables data exchange across various information systems. The data in the system stays where it is created. It is shared with others that might need to access it, but is never duplicated and stored in other system. The government sees even more potential in blockchain to improve upon this process, Kaljulaid said. Estonia envisions an environment where the government anticipates the services its citizens need without them having to go through an application process. If a family has a chil Continue reading >>

Blockchain And E-governance: From Estonia To Bitnation

Blockchain And E-governance: From Estonia To Bitnation

Blockchain and e-governance: from Estonia to BITNATION Blockchain technology has found plenty of advocates in the world of finance, banking and trade. But, it's in the unlikely field of democracy where it may soon be making its presence felt most acutely. Blockchain technology has found plenty of advocates in the world of finance, banking and trade. But, it's in the unlikely field of democracy where it may soon be making its presence felt most acutely. Indeed, governments around the world have been keen to implement e-governance systems for many years now to reduce costs, boost efficiency and bring their operations up to date. However, many high-profile attempts to bring the democratic process into the 21st century have found themselves beset with problems. In Australia last year, PM Malcolm Turnbull asked IBM to fork out some US$23 million for its part in the so-called CensusFail affair. Critics have dubbed the Australian governments latest attempt at introducing online voting CensusFail 2.0. And while other industries long ago went fully digital, government operations still find themselves mired down in mountains of paperwork. This is particularly noticeable when referendums and general elections come around. Here printed ballots are still the norm, and the laborious task of hand-counting votes has proven both inefficient and time-consuming. Through blockchain technology, though, it seems that experts may well have come up with a way to finally ditch the documentation and harness the power of immutable digital ledgers. If they succeed, the way we vote and are governed could be about to change forever. The Baltic nation of Estonia is often heralded as a shining example of forward-thinking blockchain development, particularly in the sphere of government. Indeed, earlie Continue reading >>

More in ethereum