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Docs Ethereum Alarm Clock

Call Pricing And Fees

Call Pricing And Fees

The Alarm service operates under a scheduler pays model, which means thatthe scheduler of a call is responsible for paying for the full gas cost andfees associated with executing the call. These funds must be presented upfront at the time of scheduling and are held bythe call contract until execution. When a call is scheduled, the scheduler can either provide values for thepayment and fee, or leave them off in favor of using the default values. The account which executes the scheduled call is reimbursed 100% of the gascost + payment for their service. Both the payment and the fee are multiplied by the GasPriceScalar. GasPriceScalar is a multiplier that ranges from 0 - 2 which is based onthe difference between the gas priced used for call execution and the gasprice used during call scheduling. This number incentivises the callexecutor to use as low a gas price as possible. This multiplier is computed with the following formula. anchorGasPrice is the tx.gasprice used when the call was scheduled. gasPrice is the tx.gasprice used to execute the call. At the time of call execution, the anchorGasPrice has already been set, sothe only value that is variable is the gasPrice which is set by the accountexecuting the transaction. Since the scheduler is the one who ends up payingfor the actual gas cost, this multiplier is designed to incentivize the callerusing the lowest gas price that can be expected to be reliably picked up andpromptly executed by miners. Here are the values this formula produces for a baseGasPrice of 20 and agasPrice ranging from 10 - 40; Continue reading >>

Dapps Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Dapps Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Ethconsole connects to an Ethereum node running in the background (tested with eth and geth) via IPC and provides an interactive javascript console containing the web3 object with admin additions. Here you could find a list of available commands ethereum node control commands To use this console you would need to start a local ethereum node with ipc communication socket enabled (file geth.ipc in data directory).By default ipc socket should be located at you local home directory in .ethereum after you started a node.You could also set --test option to use specific node test commands. > eth --test> ethconsole ipc://path/to/geth.ipc > web3.eth. (arguments, function(){}) Here the defenition of --test mode node commands: > web3.test.addBlock("[RLP]", function(){}) - Add a block from a string containing its hex RLP> web3.test.rewindToBlock:("[int]", function(){}) - Reset the blockchain to specified block number> web3.test.mineBlocks:("[int]", function(){}) - Mine a certain amount of NoProof blocks into chain> web3.test.modifyTimestamp:("[int]", function(){}) - Set current block timestamp> web3.test.setChainParams:("[json]", function(){}) - Reset the blockchain with given node configuration file More information about node configuration file. Continue reading >>

Blockchain - How Can A Contract Run Itself At A Later Time? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Blockchain - How Can A Contract Run Itself At A Later Time? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

How can a contract run itself at a later time? In my blockchain application, I would like to have an event triggered at a later time, hours or perhaps even days after the application has most recently received a transaction from a user. How can I create an "event" that will trigger after a certain amount of time has passed? Disclaimer: I am the developer behind the Ethereum Alarm Clock service and I directly benefit from its usage. There are two fundamental ways of designing a contract to be called at a later time: lazy evaluation or eager evaluation. Lazy evaluation means that the contract's state will be updated only when needed. This often makes sense for contracts that naturally incentivise users to call them at a future date. An example of this might be a trust fund contract that will remain locked until someone's 18th birthday. This individual would be motivated to execute the dispersal of those funds at that time. A more complex example is an interest-bearing contract. Say I deposit 1 ETH, and every month I get 1% interest, compounding. The lazy way: When I want to withdraw my money, I call the contract and it calculates my balance, based on the interest rate, my last known balance, and the elapsed time. The eager way: I use the Ethereum Alarm Clock or some similar service to call the claimInterest() function of the contract, which calculates that month's interest and debits my balance. In this case, lazy evaluation makes sense, because it is easy to calculate the current state based on the past state and elapsed time. Eager evaluation is useful when state transitions are If the contract needs to accept input from or send transactions to another contract Call Scheduling with Ethereum Alarm Clock The Ethereum Alarm Clock service supports scheduling a contract to Continue reading >>

Introduction Ethereum Alarm Clock 1.0.0 Documentation

Introduction Ethereum Alarm Clock 1.0.0 Documentation

The simplest way to explain the utility of the Alarm service is to explain theproblem it solves. First, you need to understand the difference between private key based accountsand contract accounts. There are two types of accounts on the Ethereumblockchain. Contracts (which do not have a private key) Private key accounts are the accounts that humans operate, where as contractaccounts are deployed pieces of code capable of executing some computerprogram. Contract accounts cannot however trigger their own code execution. All code execution in the Ethreum Virtual Machine, or EVM must be triggered bya private key based account. This is done by sending a transaction, which maydo something simple like transfering ether, or it may do something more complexlike calling a function on a contract account. The second part of the problem is that when you send a transaction it isexecuted as soon as it is included in a block. The Ethereum protocol does notprovide any way to create a transaction to be executed at a later time. This leads us to the problem that the Alarm service solves. With thefunctionality provided by this service, transactions can be securely scheduledto be executed at a later time. When a transaction is scheduled a new smart contract is created that holds allof the information needed to execute the transaction. It may be useful tothink of this as an order on an exchange. When called during the specifiedexecution window, this contract will send the transaction as specified and thenpay the account that triggered the execution. These contracts are referred to as TransactionRequest contracts andare written to provide strong guarantees of correctness to both parties. The creator of the TransactionRequest contract can know that theirtransaction will only be sent during t Continue reading >>

Lib4dev

Lib4dev

Note: eac.js is operational but still considered alpha software, released to the public for expirmentation and testing. We do not recommend using it on the mainnet as it will lose you money under certain situations. A tool and library to interact with the Ethereum Alarm Clock protocol.You can use the commandline tool for running an execution client or scheduling a transaction.The library is available to make it easy for developers to get started using the contractsfrom their web3 javascript code. Please see the full documentation for instructions on how to use eac.js commandline tool as well as a full reference of the API library. Run npm test at the root of the directory to run the test script on an isolated virtual blockchain using mocha. Pull requests are always welcome. Not all functionalities of the Ethereum Alarm Clock smart contracts are translated to this library, it was mostly just utilities needed to write the client and grew from there. If you need some functionality and are not finding it in the API docs, please open a issue or contribute a pull request. Since this is alpha software, we highly encourage you to test it, use it and try to break it. We would love your feedback if you get stuck somewhere or you think something is not working the way it should be. Please open an issue if you need to report a bug or would like to leave a suggestion. Pull requests are welcome. Continue reading >>

Index Of Packages Matching 'ether'

Index Of Packages Matching 'ether'

Speculator predicts the price trend of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum with machine learning models and technical analysis. Anora is a simple_tag for Django that determines whether or not a word should have an "a" or "an" in front of it. Adds either one of these depending on the phoentic value of the given text. IOT application that collect data from PLC (ModBus or AnB Ethernet/IP) and send to cloud using https IOT application that collect data from PLC (ModBus or AnB Ethernet/IP) and send to cloud using https A django app that allows the easy addition of EpicEditor markdown editor to a django form field, whether in a custom app or the Django Admin. A predicate class constructed like Django Q objects, used to test whether a new or modified model would match a query StandAlone Async single-file cross-platform no-dependenciesUnicode Python3 Multi-Format Auto Documentation Generator.Imagine that we mix together Sphinx, PanDoc, Material Design, MkDocs, eBooks,LibreOffice Docs, K.I.S.S. principle and take out all the bloat,then Dookumentation born, enjoy 'The Dark Side of Documentation' !. dpcluster is a package for grouping together (clustering) vectors. It automatically chooses the number of clusters that fits the data best based on the underlying Dirichlet Process mixture model. Greenwave is a service to decide whether a software artifact can pass certain gating points in a software delivery pipeline IOT application that collect data from PLC (ModBus or AnB Ethernet/IP) and send to cloud using https A python project to detect whether a given indian mobile number is DND(Do Not Disturb) mode or not Jmbo Foundry ties together the various Jmbo products enabling you to rapidly build multilingual web and mobi sites with the minimum amount of code and customization. Continue reading >>

Home

Home

Schedule any contract function to be called a specified block number in the future. Fully implemented as an ethereum contract with no external services. Call execution can be done by anyone operating an ethereum node. No single point of failure. Contract code can be verified against the published source. Service implements no administrative functionality or special access to any address. The Alarm service does not implement suicide. You can count on it remaining available forever. The Alarm service is thoroughly documented with plenty of examples to help get you started. The Alarm service supports designation of certain addresses as authorized schedulers. Contracts can trust authorized calls were scheduled by an address that they authorized, allowing you to schedule calls to functions that would normally not be publicly callable. Anyone can execute scheduled calls, earning ether by doing so. Continue reading >>

Ethereum Alarm Clock | Hacker News

Ethereum Alarm Clock | Hacker News

While this site looks interesting enough and even the comments below sort of say the same thing. What is this? I mean really. I look at this site and think. I do not know what this is. And even worse there is nothing on the site that even remotely explains it. Why was it even posted? Its a cron system for decentralized apps. Since there's no way to run 'cron' trustlessly, this alarm clock creates an incentive to call functions at given time periods. Its one of those things that you need some background on Ethereum to understand, but if you understand Ethereum you know why something like could be the cornerstone of a lot of apps. A contract is a group of functions that live in the Ethereum Blockchain (a distributed virtual machine for running decentralized applications) > Why would people want one called periodically? For the same reason people need cron to call periodic functions. A contract is the term for an application that has been deployed on Ethereum. Contracts expose functions as an API that others can use to interact with them. > This contract creates a market which allows contracts to hire people to call them at the requested time. Does that mean that if 'market conditions' deteriorate or make it unfavorable to 'take the job' as it were, that the reliability of this system would take a hit? Executing a scheduled call is always profitable, so no. People would just make less money. The market aspect is more akin to a marketplace where people are hired to do a job. And the job is entirely automatable. Is there some world where demand for scheduled calls exceeds the market's capacity to execute them? And no one has the means or immediate liquidity to switch what they're doing to make a profit off that gap? I'm just thinking this is really loosely tied system, and Continue reading >>

Dapps Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Dapps Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Swarm is a distributed storage platform and content distribution service, a native base layer service of the Ethereum web 3 stack. The primary objective of Swarm is to provide a sufficiently decentralized and redundant store of Ethereums public record, in particular to store and distribute dapp code and data as well as block chain data. From an economic point of view, it allows participants to efficiently pool their storage and bandwidth resources in order to provide the aforementioned services to all participants. From the end users perspective, Swarm is not that different from WWW, except that uploads are not to a specific server. The objective is to peer-to-peer storage and serving solution that is DDOS-resistant, zero-downtime, fault-tolerant and censorship-resistant as well as self-sustaining due to a built-in incentive system which uses peer to peer accounting and allows trading resources for payment. Swarm is designed to deeply integrate with the devp2p multiprotocol network layer of Ethereum as well as with the Ethereum blockchain for domain name resolution, service payments and content availability insurance. Continue reading >>

Ethereum/solidity - Gitter

Ethereum/solidity - Gitter

The Solidity Contract-Oriented Programming Langauge I am trying to run the Alarm contract but for some reason its not executing my function that I have registered contract MyContract{ address scheduler=0x26416b12610d26fd31d227456e9009270574038f; //TestNet event print_str(string); function MyContract() { } function start_timer() { //bytes4 sig = bytes4(sha3("pickWinner()")); uint targetBlock = block.number + 15; bytes4 scheduleCallSig = bytes4(sha3("scheduleCall(bytes4,uint256)")); if (!scheduler.call(scheduleCallSig, sig, targetBlock)){ throw; } } function pickWinner() { print_str("pickWinner"); }} I am expecting to see "pickWinner" once 15 blocks has been added to the blockchain, but I don't @lekanovic1_twitter The service doesn't appear to have anyone participating. Their reliability canaries seem to have died you can run the execution client yourself though Is there best practices on developing ethereum contracts? I mean the whole development cycle: writing, testing, deployment, versioning What the flow is and which tools are most widely used by community @tjade273 Thanks for pointing out the alarm client I was not aware of that one. "Canaries have died" Does that mean the services does not work any more? I thought alarm was a reliable service. hi guys, is it possible to search contracts by name? I mean for example if inside a contract function we want to know if there is an active deployed contract named "Foo"? It sounds like you're looking for a nameservice. There are several proposals, including my own one, ENS. You'd need to deploy a resolver, then use its lookup functionality from your contracts. @Arachnid thank you! yes I was looking something like a nameservice... right now I am using a contract to keep track of all the other instances... but I was wondering Continue reading >>

Ethereum Alarm Clock

Ethereum Alarm Clock

I was all ready for deploying the V8 iteration of the Alarm service when the network DOS attacks dropped the gas limit below the level necessary for deployment. Now that things are back to normal I'll be going through the contracts, tests, etc to be sure everything is ready for public consumption. Once I'm satisfied that everything is good to go, I'll be getting the alarm service back up and operational. Timeline for this is tentatively by mid December. TimestampScheduler: 0x3d919bb1e5c58a2dd99ea463d52045b112eb4330 One of the easiest ways to start tinkering with this is going to be with the command line interface (CLI). Documentation for using the CLI can be found here in the Alarm Documentation. I'm currently in the process of getting all of my infrastructure for ensuring that any request which gets scheduled will reliably get executed which has been quite interesting given the recent DOS attacks on the network. However, just as the main network has become more robust in response to these attacks, so has my infrastructure. I'm now running 2 execution servers on the Morden testnet and 5 execution servers on the mainnet. These are a mix of 1/1 parity and geth on Morden and 3/2 parity and geth on the mainnet. I've also been running some experiments on the testnet to see whether my execution servers can handle an extremely high volume of scheduled requests. You can see some of that by digging into the transactions sent by 0xAFFA9e11A8deaC514b93169c764aA042B4fE316F . Things are quickly approaching being ready for deployment on the mainnet, but will be on hold until the gas limit is back above the 3.5 million mark. In the meantime I will be focusing on improving the documentation and expanding on examples of how to both use the service as well as integrate with it at the lo Continue reading >>

Scheduling Ethereum Alarm Clock 1.0.0 Documentation

Scheduling Ethereum Alarm Clock 1.0.0 Documentation

Function calls are scheduled with the scheduleCall function on the Alarmservice. Solidity Function Signature: scheduleCall(address contractAddress, bytes4 signature, bytes32 dataHash, uint targetBlock, uint8 gracePeriod, uint nonce); The scheduleCall function takes the following parameters: address contractAddress: The contract address that the function should becalled on. bytes4 abiSignature: The 4 byte ABI function signature for the call. bytes32 dataHash: The sha3 hash of the call data for the call. uint targetBlock: The block number the call should be executed on. uint8 gracePeriod: The number of blocks after targetBlock that it isok to still execute this call. uint nonce: Number to allow for differentiating a call from another onewhich has the exact same information for all other user specified fields. Prior to scheduling a function call, any call data necessary for the call musthave already been registered. The scheduleCall function has two alternate invocation formats that can beused as well. Solidity Function Signature: scheduleCall(address contractAddress, bytes4 abiSignature, bytes32 dataHash, uint targetBlock, uint8 gracePeriod) public When invoked this way, the nonce argument is defaulted to 0. Solidity Function Signature: scheduleCall(address contractAddress, bytes4 abiSignature, bytes32 dataHash, uint256 targetBlock) public When invoked this way, the gracePeriod argument is defaulted to 255 andthen nonce set to 0. Contracts can take care of their own call scheduling. In this example Lottery contract, every time the beginLottery functionis called, a call to the pickWinner function is scheduled for approximately24 hours later (5760 blocks). Alternatively, calls can be scheduled to be executed on other contracts The Alarm service operates under a scheduler p Continue reading >>

Www.stateofthedapps.com - State Of The Dapps - Send Updates To Support@stateofthedapps.com

Www.stateofthedapps.com - State Of The Dapps - Send Updates To [email protected]

www.stateofthedapps.com - State of the DApps - Send updates to [email protected] prediction, markets, probability, statistics, outcomes development, platform, cryptographic, P2P, nodes, 0x corwdfunding, motion, engage, movement, political exchange, deploying, services, smart contract, transactions Decentralized over-the-air television streaming network Decentralized over-the-air television streaming network Building companies online with a community Building companies online with a community governance, community, companies, collaboration, network virtual, world, real estate, players, ownership api, exchange, bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, transactions Combining a Ponzi-scheme with the MillionDollarHomepage Combining a Ponzi-scheme with the MillionDollarHomepage Browser based solidity contract compiler & runtime Browser based solidity contract compiler and runtime solidity, compiler, development, contracts, browser, metamask Community currency with zero reserve mutual credit and adjustable parameters Community currency with zero reserve mutual credit and adjustable parameters healthcare, medical, devices, pharmaceutical, crowdsourcing Micropayment platform for generic API calls Micropayment platform for generic API calls micropayment, api, payment, consumer, provider wallet, desktop, operating, systems, node Educational ponzi game simulating governmental finances Educational ponzi game simulating governmental finances ponzi, eduational, finances, game, governmental A simple Ethereum lottery with a user-friendly interface A simple Ethereum lottery with a user-friendly interface lottery, wheel, ether, gamble, gambling, earn, user-friendly,interface,visual development, software, applications, create, scripting, consensys Thomas Bertani, Kristina Butkute, Francesco C

Welcome To Ethereum Alarm Clocks Documentation!

Welcome To Ethereum Alarm Clocks Documentation!

Welcome to Ethereum Alarm Clocks documentation! The Ethereum Alarm Clock is a service that allows scheduling transactions to beexecuted at a later time on the ethereum blockchain. This is accomplished byspecifying all of the details for the transaction you wish to send, as well asproviding up-front payment for gas costs, allowing your transaction to beexecuted for you at a later time. The service is completely trustless, meaning that the entire service operatesas smart contracts on the Ethereum blockchain, with no priviledged access givento any party. The code for this service is open source under the MIT license and can beviewed on the github repository . Each release of the alarm service includesdetails on verifying the contract source code. For a more complete explanation of what this service does check out the Introduction . If you are a smart contract developer and would like to start schedulingtransactions now then check out the Quickstart . If you are looking to build a lower level integration with the service then our Continue reading >>

Ethereum Alarm Clock Beta Release0.9.0

Ethereum Alarm Clock Beta Release0.9.0

The Chronologic team has been working on rebuilding the core infrastructure of the Ethereum Alarm Clock smart contracts in order to once again allow users of Ethereum to schedule transaction calls in the future. For those who arent familiar with the Ethereum Alarm Clock (EAC) or Chronologics related work, the EAC is a collection of smart contracts that by working together aim to provide a decentralized and trustless approach to the scheduling and execution of calls. For a while, the EACs original author, Piper Merriam , was the primary maintainer of the Ethereum Alarm Clocks codebase and for this reason the protocol fell out of date to the point where it was no longer usable. Chronologics mission of expanding the time related functionalities in Ethereum seemed like a perfect match for a partnership with this open-sourced project. We are now happy to announce that the EAC is ready for a public beta release on the Ethereum testnets. We hope developers and testers alike will begin to run and test our code. You can find code on the open sourced Github organization . Notably, we have re-organized what used to be a singular repository into three: the ethereum-alarm-clock core contracts and test suite, the eac.js Javscript commandline execution client and scheduling wizard, and the (currently outdated) python client . We hope our work will kick-start the emergence of a vibrant ecosystem of projects and developers who will build on and benefit from the tool. Since this is still a beta release, we are not yet endorsing the use of these contracts or client outside of the testnets. However, if you would like to start exploring the potentials of building on top of the EAC infrastructure we have deployed the latest builds to Kovan, Rinkeby and Ropsten and urge you to checkout the o Continue reading >>

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