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Hyperledgers Monthly Technical Update

Hyperledgers Monthly Technical Update

As our incubated projects continue to mature, wed like to update the community monthly on the progress we make. Below are June updates on Hyperledger projects. Implementation of dynamic memory on the Ethereum Virtual Machine New type-safe Application Binary Interface package for translating data to Ethereum contracts into packed Ethereum bytes for transaction formulation (logical requirement for Ethereum chain; but all package implementations thus far have been GPLv3 licensed, as such in tooling code not included in Burrow; this new package will be able to go into Hyperledger Burrow under Apache license) Alpha of batching client for new API with high transaction throughput (> 400 tx/s) First prototype of Burrow EVM to run as transaction processor on Hyperledger Sawtooth Ledger A user dashboard was added to support seeing blockchain status and chaincodes. The k8s support features was started with intern students; Upgrade swarm support to latest version (17.04). Refine the installation scripts to support multi-os-distributions. Fabric 1.0-* supported scripts was added. We completed all rebranding activities as part of the move to Hyperledger we moved to the Hyperledger Docker Hub organization, and renamed the Yeoman generator module. We added support for modelling and publishing events from a transaction processor function, allowing client applications and existing systems to respond to events from a deployed business network. We made extensive changes to our new user and getting started documentation, including reworked installation guides and tutorials which are available in the docs: We delivered a set of nodes for Node-RED which allow developers to easily build outbound and inbound integration between a deployed business network and external system using IoT/MQTT, We Continue reading >>

Building Private Ethereum Networks With Docker Compose

Building Private Ethereum Networks With Docker Compose

In my previous article about building a blockchain application , I shared some of the tools, tips and techniques I used to create an end-to-end blockchain web application. Lets hone in on a specific part of that and explain in more depth how I built an underlying Ethereum private blockchain for testing purposes. I mentioned that I predominantly used testrpc to stand up a simple, single-node Ethereum instance which had the APIs exposed and some accounts pre-filled with Ether for testing. Testrpc is a great tool, super simple and fast to get started, which makes it ideal for development and if you are new to the tech. However there are some situations where you might want some extra flexibility or you need to test different scenarios where you require a more production like setup. These include - Testing the effects of a network of nodes (e.g. a multi-node Ethereum cluster with each node in sync with other nodes via the P2P protocol) Access to other Ethereum APIs, for example the management API Access to the Ethereum JavaScript Console The confidence of developing against a full Geth node Easier integration with or ability to test alongside other tools or technology such as IPFS If you find yourself having to set up a private Ethereum cluster (as I did) youll find that its not actually a straightforward process. While there are one or two pretty clear tutorials out there as well as some scripts both for me had some problems. The scripts prefer that you are running Ubuntu, the preferred/recommended platform for Ethereum and the tutorials contain anywhere between 5-20 steps. I wanted a simple, repeatable and cross platform way to bring up and tear down my clusters. Enter Docker and Docker Compose . Today Im announcing our open-sourced ethereum-docker which contains a bunch Continue reading >>

Building An Ethereum Playground With Docker (part 2dockerimage)

Building An Ethereum Playground With Docker (part 2dockerimage)

@vertigobr Founder & CTIO, disrupting things for fun. Building an Ethereum playground with Docker (part 2 DockerImage) I have updated this article on December/2017. I no longer create a custom Docker image, because Ethereum official image already brings an all-tools version that includes bootnode and other treats. This is the second article in an ongoing series Building an Ethereum Playground with Docker. The articles already published are: We will cover using the official ethereum/go-ethereum Docker image, playing with Ethereum Wallet, provisioning the ethereum nodes on public clouds and deployment of a sample app. This article uses " ethereum/client-go " Docker image to run several Ethereum nodes locally (and safely). It also assumes you have a Docker engine available to you (and know a bit about it), probably after installing Docker for Mac or Docker for Windows on your notebook. All sources are located in . There is a public official image "docker pull ethereum/client-go" that will serve as the base of this work. We will create scripts with some functionality and configuration options to make it generally useful for our evil machinations. This original public base image is a nice piece of work: you can use it to participate on the main public Ethereum network with a simple command: The starting point is the creation of a "genesis.json" file that defines the genesis block of the blockchain. The "genesis.sh" script does that for you, and it can be edited to provide custom values for some variables Some variables on the top of this script can be modified to define your very own genesis block, the main point being that all containers will mount the same genesis.json file when launched with the helper scripts. Nodes that share the same genesis block and are capable of f Continue reading >>

License

License

enumerated a few common parameter combos to get you up to speed quickly on how you can run your By far the most common scenario is people wanting to simply interact with the Ethereum network: create accounts; transfer funds; deploy and interact with contracts. For this particular use-case the user doesn't care about years-old historical data, so we can fast-sync quickly to the current Start geth in fast sync mode (--fast), causing it to download more data in exchange for avoiding processing the entire history of the Ethereum network, which is very CPU intensive. Bump the memory allowance of the database to 512MB (--cache=512), which can help significantly in sync times especially for HDD users. This flag is optional and you can set it as high or as low as you'd like, though we'd recommend the 512MB - 2GB range. Start up Geth's built-in interactive JavaScript console , (via the trailing console subcommand) through which you can invoke all official web3 methods This too is optional and if you leave it out you can always attach to an already running Geth instance Transitioning towards developers, if you'd like to play around with creating Ethereum contracts, you almost certainly would like to do that without any real money involved until you get the hang of the entire system. In other words, instead of attaching to the main network, you want to join the test network with your node, which is fully equivalent to the main network, but with play-Ether only. $ geth --testnet --fast --cache=512 console The --fast, --cache flags and console subcommand have the exact same meaning as above and they are equally useful on the testnet too. Please see above for their explanations if you've skipped to Specifying the --testnet flag however will reconfigure your Geth instance a bit: Inst Continue reading >>

Released: Geth 1.4 Rc2 - Ethereum

Released: Geth 1.4 Rc2 - Ethereum

Among others, this second release candidate also contains the Geth release oracle , which is a multi-sig Ethereum contract tracking the latest Geth releases. Its goal is to allow Geth clients to periodically check for new releases on-chain, without any centralized server. New releases need to be signed off by 2 out of 3 current signers (Jeff/@obscuren, Felix/@fjl and Peter/@karalabe) to be accepted by the oracle and users be notified of it. Note, that we do not do any automatic upgrades, only display a small CLI notification to the user every once in a while. The verified contract is live at 0xFA7B9770Ca4cb04296Cac84F37736d4041251CDF . The full contract ABI is available here , but you can also use a reduced ABI that just contains the list of signers and the current release version. This is great stuff. You might want to give a head's up to the Mist team (if you haven't already), they were looking into something like this with a feature suggestion I made awhile back: Actually we've discussed it and decided against it. The reason is that Go builds aren't AFAIK binary reproducible (meaning that a rebuild produces a different hash, in part because Go uses random iterated maps). This could cause confusion with people who aren't aware of this, and also interesting corner cases where downloading from an Ubuntu PPA will have a different hash than the distributed binary from GitHub, and even different between PPA builds and Ubuntu versions. In general, we just wanted an easy way to notify people that they are running stale software and wanted to keep clear of any auto-update mechanisms that could have unforeseen vulnerabilities. In the future we can most definitely consider polishes, further updates, etc to the version oracle, but we wanted to start out small and grow as need b Continue reading >>

Go Ethereum - How Can I Completely Automate A Docker Image And Dockerfile For A Geth Test Network - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Go Ethereum - How Can I Completely Automate A Docker Image And Dockerfile For A Geth Test Network - Ethereum Stack Exchange

How can I completely automate a Docker image and Dockerfile for a geth test network I would like to create a Docker image for a test network that has everything ready to go - pre-created accounts with ether already allocated. The problem is there doesn't seem to be a way to do this the Docker Way(tm). In order to create ether out of thin air, I have to put addresses in the genesis.json 'alloc' section. In order to get the addresses, I have to create accounts with multiple invocations of geth and then manually edit genesis.json. Manual steps are not the Docker Way(tm), you are supposed to create a Docker file that does all these steps automatically. My current best bet seems to be to to create a script that creates the accounts I need and the gets the account addresses from the geth command line option for that and then edits genesis.json on the fly. That seems... rather crude, and adds more tools to the docker image to do this (at least something that can parse JSON). Creation of accounts is not idempotent, so I can't just run the same script every time I start the container. I'm sure the geth community has solved this problem for their own automated testing. Please share :-) I've read everything on the first page of this Google Search . They all have manual steps, which doesn't work for automation that Docker and automated test systems demand. Do you mind if the docker image always uses the same addresses? You could allocate the Ether, and just either have the private key files already in the keystore, or programmatically add them with a plaintext private key. Tjaden Hess Feb 21 '16 at 2:04 Same addresses is fine. I just use indexes in my web3.js code. However if you note in the geth documentation, creation and importation of accounts mucks with the indexes. Paul S Fe Continue reading >>

Getting Started With Containers

Getting Started With Containers

Troubleshooting an issue? Try Solution Engine our new support tool. If you are a new customer, register now for access to product evaluations and purchasing capabilities. If your company has an existing Red Hat account, your organization administrator can grant you access. Increase visibility into IT operations to detect and resolve technical issues before they impact your business. Engage with our Red Hat Product Security team, access security updates, and ensure your environments are not exposed to any known security vulnerabilities. Chapter1.Get Started with Docker Formatted Container Images The Docker project was responsible for popularizing container development in Linux systems. The original project defined a command and service (both named docker) and a format in which containers are structured. This chapter provides a hands-on approach to using the docker command and service to begin working with containers in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and RHEL Atomic Host by getting and using container images and working with running containers. Containers provide a means of packaging applications in lightweight, portable entities. Running applications within containers offers the following advantages: Smaller than Virtual Machines: Because container images include only the content needed to run an application, saving and sharing is much more efficient with containers than it is with virtual machines (which include entire operating systems) Improved performance: Likewise, since you are not running an entirely separate operating system, a container will typically run faster than an application that carries with it the overhead of a whole new virtual machine. Secure: Because a container typically has its own network interfaces, file system, and memory, the application running i Continue reading >>

Askmike.org

Askmike.org

I am Mike van Rossum. Here you'll find tech tutorials and tips for a lot of tools I've discovered since I started learning. Run Ethereum in a docker container on your Raspberry Pi For a project I need to run geth 1.6 in a docker container on my Raspberry Pi that has raspbian jessie installed. I was looking online for such a docker image, but after some searching I gave up and just created my own dockerimage. I am using this image as a basis for other docker images that set a geth node up for a private ethereum blockchain. There are a dozen of Ethereum docker images already, but none (that I could find) played nice with the ARM architecture of therpi. You can find the prebuild image on dockerhub/askmike/ethereum-raspbian . Running ethereum in docker on your rpi is as easyas: docker pull askmike/ethereum-raspbian:latestdocker run -t askmike/ethereum-raspbian:latest Note that if you are going to use this for anything serious (or if money is involved) always compile from source! The Dockerfile can be found on github/askmike/ethereum-raspbian-docker . It builds on top of an image that installs golang (so geth can be compiled), you can get that from dockerhub/askmike/golang-raspbian (dockerfile on github/askmike/golang-raspbian ). If the images dont work for you, please post an issue on github:) Posted at May 01, 2017, under devops sysadmin . Now weve set up Prometheus we can very easily start logging interesting metrics from our nodejsapp. The idea is that we will include an external node module in our app, that module will provide easy functions for the by Prometheus supported metric types . In this post we will use the metric types Counter and Gauge. The module will then expose the statistics using a lightweight express server, which Prometheus willscrape. Prometheus is a Continue reading >>

Monero Mining On Linux Made Easy With Docker

Monero Mining On Linux Made Easy With Docker

Monero Mining on Linux made easy with Docker Monero Mining on Linux made easy with Docker One week ago we published our Monero Mining Benchmarks: CPU Mining With Select Dual Intel Xeon E5 Systems article. At the end of that article, and in the STH forums we posted a quick how-to instruction guide for using Docker on Ubuntu Linux, CentOS or any other Linux operating system and mining Monero. In the past week since we published that article, we have now had over 50,000 pulls from our Docker hub repository which is an amazing response. Today we are going to have our formal guide on running the Docker-basedCPU miner. At the turn of 2017, and for the past several years, Bitcoin has been the largest cryptocurrency by far. Monero is a cryptocurrency that put an emphasis on privacy and is considered significantly more anonymous than Bitcoin. As a result, Monero has moved from a $0.50 / 1 XMR currency a year ago to $12.50/ 1 XMR as of today. That movement, and the privacy focus, has made Monero a top 5 cryptocurrency and pushed it into the mainstream with even a recent WIRED article on the currency. The advantage of this has been that Monero is now very easy to exchange and has tools that are more mature than several other cryptocurrencies. For STH readers there is a larger implication. Unlike Bitcoin mining which is dominated by ASICs, Monero is currently best mined on GPUs. CPU mining can be profitable as well. That means STH readers have theinfrastructure able to mine Monero. There are hundreds of questions out there on how to mine Monero with CPUs andvarious Linux distributions. Docker and our pre-made container makes that ridiculously simple. There is no more dependency hunting, build troubleshooting, or other work. Just a simple command to run the popular Wolfs CPU miner. Continue reading >>

Client Ethereum Mac - Asic Bitcoin Miner Block Erupter Blade Gen2

Client Ethereum Mac - Asic Bitcoin Miner Block Erupter Blade Gen2

Client ethereum mac - Asic bitcoin miner block erupter blade gen2 Update: Wallet Support BitCap Oct 30, MistMac PC Download Guide. Npm install save ethereum client binaries. 0 documentation To generate a new Ethereum wallet / Please enter your existing wallet file password: Wallet for address 0x19e03255f667bdfd50a32722df860b1eeaf4d635 loaded Please confirm address of running Ethereum client you wish to send the transfer request to Connected. , der Homestead Hardfork steht bevor. How to use ethereum. LaBlockchain May 31 These three are CLI sCommand Line Interface) Ethereum clients available on Windows, Mac Linux. The Top 10 Best Ethereum Wallets Edition) CoinSutra 3 days ago Jaxx wallet is available for Android Windows, iOS, Mac OS Linux. Com MyEtherWalletMEW) is a free open source client side interface for generating Ethereum wallets more. De Feb 21 Informationen ber Ethereum und eine Anleitung fr den offiziellen Ethereum Wallet Mist um den Start mit Ethereum erfolgreich zu meistern. Here s how I built a private blockchain network are serious about GPU mining, you can too Sep 4, If you want added security by running two different implementations in parallel then the C Eth client is for you. MetaMask includes a secure identity vault providing a user interface to manage your identities on different sites sign. Well, maybe not that much but it really helps me to get a grasp on things. Electrum servers are decentralized and redundant. Let s take a quick look. Client ethereum mac. Compatible with: Windows Mac OSX Linux. Wallets Ethereum and Blockchain Resources ETHNews. Bitstamp logo bitexla logo mycelium logo coinpayments logo bitstamp logo bitwala logo Litecoin Ethereum Dash Ethereum Classic ZCash. Which can take a long time and requires significant storage space. 10) OS Continue reading >>

Deploying An Ethereum Viper Smart Contract

Deploying An Ethereum Viper Smart Contract

Deploying an Ethereum Viper Smart Contract Viper is missing a lot of documentation(though it has gotten better). It took a lot of trial and error to finally figure out how to deploy a contract to an Ethereum blockchain. This information may not be very useful for people who have deployed compiled smart contracts before. This is more geared towards people who are using Viper as their first language to create Ethereum smart contracts but are familiar with common Python development practices, and their local system. I'd recommend using this docker container . I updated it slightly from the original and doesn't match what's in Docker Hub. Alternatively, testrpc is easier to setup, but has on occasion had me chasing bugs for too long(YMMV). Either way, it's a lot better to test things out before real money is at stake on the main net. Alternatively, you could setup a full node on a test network, but the test networks are not always completely functional, so probably not the best choice for quick dev. In this article, I'm going to be deploying the contract using geth( go-ethereum ), but the geth commands should be loosely similar to any web3 interface or library. I may add information on how to use Mist and other Web3 browsers/wallets to deploy contracts later, but for now I haven't needed or wanted it. First and foremost, read the documentation they have . It's the only authoritative information about the language there is, so it's a good(only) goto for reference. For people familiar with some of the newer concepts of Python 3, it should be mostly straight forward. It utilizes type hinting a lot. Though of course there are some significant differences. I won't be going into that in depth here but I will point out some differences that were important when writing my first co Continue reading >>

Introduction To Docker Tutorial | Toptal

Introduction To Docker Tutorial | Toptal

#DevOps #Docker #Sandboxing #SystemIsolation If you like whales, or are simply interested in quick and painless continuous delivery of your software to production, then I invite you to read this introductory Docker Tutorial. Everything seems to indicate that software containers are the future of IT, so lets go for a quick dip with the container whales Moby Dock and Molly . Docker, represented by a logo with a friendly looking whale, is an open source project that facilitates deployment of applications inside of software containers. Its basic functionality is enabled by resource isolation features of the Linux kernel, but it provides a user-friendly API on top of it. The first version was released in 2013, and it has since become extremely popular and is being widely used by many big players such as eBay, Spotify, Baidu, and more . In the last funding round, Docker has landed a huge $95 million . The philosophy behind Docker could be illustrated with a following simple analogy. In the international transportation industry, goods have to be transported by different means like forklifts, trucks, trains, cranes, and ships. These goods come in different shapes and sizes and have different storing requirements: sacks of sugar, milk cans, plants etc. Historically, it was a painful process depending on manual intervention at every transit point for loading and unloading. It has all changed with the uptake of intermodal containers. As they come in standard sizes and are manufactured with transportation in mind, all the relevant machineries can be designed to handle these with minimal human intervention. The additional benefit of sealed containers is that they can preserve the internal environment like temperature and humidity for sensitive goods. As a result, the transportation Continue reading >>

Docker Parity Ethereum Documentation

Docker Parity Ethereum Documentation

Docker containers for Parity are available via Docker Hub : $ docker search parity/parityNAME DESCRIPTION STARS OFFICIAL AUTOMATEDparity/parity Parity is Ethcore's initial fully-featured... 0parity/rust Rust stable, beta and nightly for GitLab C... 0 [OK]parity/snapcraft Docker image for build snap application (U... 0 [OK]parity/rust-arm RUST for GitLab CI runner (ARM architecture) 0 [OK] To get a list of available versions, use curl and jq: $ curl -sS '| jq '."results"[]["name"]' | sort"nightly""v1.6.8""v1.6.9""v1.6.10""v1.7.0" To run Parity with an interactive pseudo-tty shell, run: Parity can be configured using either the CLI options or a config file . Should the CLI flags and the config file disagree about a setting, the CLI takes precedence. You can list all CLI options by running: For Docker specific options, please refer to the Docker documentation , or run docker --help or docker run --help. To publish Paritys ports to the host machine, use the -p option: $ docker run -ti -p 8180:8180 -p 8545:8545 -p 8546:8546 -p 30303:30303 -p 30303:30303/udp parity/parity:v1.7.0 --ui-interface all --jsonrpc-interface all For example, this will expose the User Interface, the JSONRPC-API, and the listen port to the host. Now you can open Parity UI from the Docker host computer to access the Parity Wallet. To enable external discovery where desired (for example for PoA sealing nodes), specify the external IP by appending the flag --nat extip:133.3.3.37, where 133.3.3.37 is to be replaced by your actual external IP of the host. To pass further operating options to Parity, simply append them to the docker run command: $ docker run -ti parity/parity:v1.7.0 --no-ui --no-dapps --no-discovery In this case, it disables the Wallet, the DApps Server, and discovery. For more complex node Continue reading >>

Ethereum/swarm - Gitter

Ethereum/swarm - Gitter

user guide: - dev guide: because i am connected to swarm, i can upload by command a file ah. I don't know it. You say it stopped working? swarm.upload(new Buffer(data)).then( function(value) { var filehash = value;}) it keeps running without any output, because i use that filehash after in my code and when i commented this specific part of the code, it is working yeah. I don't know. You'd have to ask @MaiaVictor yes @MaiaVictor i need your help about swarm-js library hi guys, is there anyone that managed to run swarm in a docker container? I tried using the ethereum/go-client from docker hub. But unfortunately I can run geth only. the swarm command is not available, although it is listed ( ). I assume that it is not fully installed. There is also a note that in order to get the full utility suite one is required to run "make all" instead of "make geth". Well, I honestly did not run the make command at all. Would be glad to get some help. Cheers I attended the Swarm Talks during the Ethereum Meetup today and have a question regarding the one-time pad-like splitting of files to prevent censorship. As I understand, original data is split up in random content-addressed data sets and then stored in the swarm. They can then be retrieved and combined (example XORing) to arrive at the original data. While this prevents nodes to be held accountable for storing "questionable" data, I wonder how the censorship prevention works. Doesn't the information which parts to combine to arrive at the original data stored in the network as well? If so, couldn't this combination information become subject to censorship? Would be great if someone could explain this in more detail. @JacobEberhardt Censoring that partial data, might make the other combination into non-censurable data unavailabl Continue reading >>

Setting Up Docker Client Within A Docker Image

Setting Up Docker Client Within A Docker Image

Setting up Docker client within a Docker image Sometimes, life is not easy. And DevOps can be a pain. Strangely, it was Docker that was causing it. Recently, I set up Jenkins for continuous integration on DigitalOcean. There are so many ways to do the same thing. And if something does not work, you try to tweak some settings to get it to work. Thankfully, there is a standard way to do things. And I found out how to do it with the help of Edward Viaene in an Udemy course. So, I set up Jenkins based on an Udemy course! It all works fine. I have an Express API. Whenever there is a push to the repo, Jenkins packages it as a Docker image and publishes it to Docker Hub. All set, right? No, not really. Who is going to deploy the Docker image to all my servers? I was hoping Jenkins will do it for me. Unfortunately, it wont. DeployDocker image to DigitalOcean servers We know the manual way of creating new containers using command-line. docker container rm -f api-serverdocker container run --name api-server --detach --publish 3000:3000--link mysql-server:mysqlvijayst/myapi:$1 The shell script removes a container by name of api-server.Then, it recreates a new one of the same name. While recreating the container, we use a different tag (image tag) as indicated by the $1 argument. Whenever an image is pushed to the public repository, I want to call the script. DockerHub allows setting a webhook (API). DockerHub calls the POST method of the API with the relevant details. Webhook is any API. For our example, we create a simple Express API. The Express API receives the event from DockerHub. It retrieves the image tag. And executes the shell script. const express = require('express');const app = express();const bodyParser = require('body-parser');const { exec } = require('child_process Continue reading >>

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