CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Do Capital Letters Matter In Bitcoin Address

Coinreport Dont Lose Your Bitcoin Wallet! Tips On How To Secure Your Bitcoins

Coinreport Dont Lose Your Bitcoin Wallet! Tips On How To Secure Your Bitcoins

Gotten yourself a couple of bitcoins and trying to find a way to keep them safe? Just like a regular wallet, you have to take precaution with your bitcoin wallet since you dont want to lose your money. It may seem a bit difficult to protect a virtual wallet, but if done properly you can definitely secure it. The following guide will explain a few practices you can do to keep your virtual coins safe and sound. Keep Only a Small Amount of Bitcoins in Your Wallet In having a wallet, whether a virtual or physical one, you wouldnt want to have all of your money in it since if you lose your wallet you are broke. Therefore, it is advised that you store only a few coins on your phone or computer which will be your everyday spending money. The rest should be kept secure at another location. This is a web-based wallet that stores your private bitcoin key online. This means your coins are controlled by someone other than you. In addition, it can place great power into the hands of the organization that runs your online wallet because they have the private key. On the other side, having a web based wallet is a good for when you want to have access to your bitcoins anywhere at any time. Here are a couple of known online wallet sites: Blockchain , Coinbase , Strongcoin . Out of these three, Strongcoin is the only one that allows you to encrypt your private keys before sending them online, offering a bit more security. A basic, yet imperfective way to protect your coins is to encrypt your wallet. Encrypting means setting a very strong (at least 16 letter) password with capital letters, punctuation marks, numbers, etc. This helps against most robbing mishaps, however there are limitations: Hackers could use a software to log your keystrokeshence even if you have a super strong passwor Continue reading >>

Up Close With The New Multibit Hd Bitcoin Wallet

Up Close With The New Multibit Hd Bitcoin Wallet

Up Close With the New MultiBit HD Bitcoin Wallet May 23, 2014 at 18:50 UTC|UpdatedMay 23, 2014 at 18:51 UTC MultBit has been quietly dropping scraps of information about its new MultBit HD wallet for months now. At the recent Bitcoin2014 conference, Jim Burton and Gary Rowe of MultiBit gave CoinDesk a hands-on preview of the new software. One of the most popular wallets out there , MultiBit gets around 4,500 downloads every day. Since its launch in 2011, MultiBit has been downloaded 1.8 million times. That's a lot of users and a great deal of pressure when it comes to producing a product that will last. Rowe said: "We wanted [to build] software that could scale up to tens of millions of people." The new wallet is less of a redesign and more of a reimagination of their wallet; it has been totally rebuilt from the ground up. On the surface, the changes are obvious. In the current version of MultiBit known as MultiBit Classic in anticipation of the new wallet the technical aspects of bitcoin are clearly on show. Your address is shown in its raw form, for example. MultiBit HD hides all of that away behind a clean design that's heavy on accessibility. Large buttons make navigating the interface intuitive and it now includes a more refined contacts list, creating the sense that you're sending money to a person instead of a string of letters and numbers. "This is the kind of wallet you can give your mum," says Rowe. Under the hood, the software incorporates the standards that the most demanding bitcoin users would expect. MultiBit HD will be compatible with the Trezor hardware wallet and the HD label refers to the fact that it will be a " hierarchical deterministic "wallet, meaning that you will be able to regain access to addresses created by MultiBit HD with a single 'seed' Continue reading >>

Drawing The Distinction Between The Uppercase B And Lowercase B In Bitcoin

Drawing The Distinction Between The Uppercase B And Lowercase B In Bitcoin

Share your email with us to receive updates on Blockchain and the industry. A commonarea of confusionwhen talking about Bitcoin is the use of the uppercase B versus the lowercase b. What is the difference, and when do you use each one? In this post, we take a few minutes to explain what each of them represent, and how to use them. Bitcoin (the protocol and payment network) Bitcoin with a capital B is typically associated with Bitcoin the protocol and payment network. The uppercase form, Bitcoin, is also often used to refer to as the ecosystem as a whole. Using Bitcoin with a capital B is the common way of referencing Bitcoin when writing about it in general terms. An example would be, I just learned about Bitcoin, and its a fast and cheap way for merchants to accept payments. Bitcoin with a lowercase b written as bitcoin is usually associated specifically with bitcoin as the currency. When you intend to referencehow much of the currencywas transacted, or youre focusing solely on the currency and not the broader payment network or protocol as a whole, you can use the lowercase form, bitcoin. An example would be, I just sent two bitcoins from my Blockchain Wallet to the merchant. These are not hard and fast rules, but they can helpful when trying to avoid confusion. Whichever way you decide to write Bitcoin, making sure you provide adequate context is usually all you need to ensure youre explaining yourself clearly. It becomes particularly significantto draw the distinction when writing about the technical aspects of Bitcoin, and when explaining the differences between the protocol and the currency like we did here. Is there a bitcoin topic that you want us to cover and help you understand? Post a comment below, and let us know! Headz up Nic, we dont pluralise bitcoin! Continue reading >>

Before You Buy Bitcoin, Read This

Before You Buy Bitcoin, Read This

The underlying technology securing bitcoin is known as the blockchain. The underlying technology securing bitcoin is known as the blockchain. Many investors are asking: Should I buy bitcoins or other cryptocurrencies? And if not, why? Bitcoin , the leading digital money, has risen 700 percent this year to as high as $7,146, and is up 3,500 percent since a low in January 2015. Nearly every day bitcoin and other cryptos are making headlines. Some experts call them the new gold. But are bitcoin, Ethereum and other digital currencies real investments or a speculator's game? And what about initial coin offerings, a hybrid of initial public offering and crowdfunding that has spawned Etherum and other projects? Even Wall Street is divided, so many experts warn Main Street investors to stay away or proceed with great caution. No less than Goldman Sachs ( GS ) is said to be considering a cryptocurrency trading operation, according to the Wall Street Journal. Yet JPMorgan Chase ( JPM ) CEO Jamie Dimon recently called bitcoin "a fraud" and said it would likely stay on the black market. Far from being safe for widows and orphans, like utilities, the bitcoin market which hit $150 billion in August looks more like the 1840s gold rush. Many rushed in, but few got rich. On Saturday, bitcoin fell to around $5,500, wiping out a rally on news that a plan to split the crypto currency was called off. It's bounced back since and was trading above $6,400 midday Monday. MarksJarvis: Why investors should be wary of bitcoin One risk is that governments likely will limit the currencies' use, such as barring them for tax payments, which would keep them out of the mainstream, according to UBS . China recently banned initial coin offerings and trading in cryptocurrencies, and it may not be the last Continue reading >>

Top 5 Bitcoin Vanity Addresses

Top 5 Bitcoin Vanity Addresses

Throughout the course of Bitcoin history, there have been some rather unique addresses. Some users resort to vanity generation solutions, which allow anyone to create an address with specific letter combinationsthat matter to them. In 2017, this process has become more complicated, as it takes days, or even weeks, to generate a vanity address.Some have spent a long time searching for those addresses, while others luckily stumbled upon them. As most people are well aware of, some Bitcoin addresses are generated automatically yet seemingly contain a word that exists. Lightlord, a long-standing Bitcoin user, generated the worlds longest real-world prefix address known to date. Through a very thorough vanity generation process, he managed to find an address containing the word Embarassable . Even though the address contains upper and lower case letters, it is the longest word found in a single Bitcoin address so far. One thing that makes Bitcoin addresses so difficult to remember and type in manually is the mix of lowercase and uppercase letters. RyanC successfully generated a Bitcoin address which contains no uppercase letter whatsoever . Even though this address does not contain sequence of words whatsoever, it is well worth noting. Under the current circumstances, generating such a password would take up a lot of time and computational resources. Palindromes are quite intriguing in their own right, even though most people would never give them a second glance. The Bitcoin world has at least one palindrome address, which was generated by xhomerx10. To be more precise, it is an address that starts with 1234 and ends with 4321:. Having a Bitcoin address that begins with 1234 is rather unusual, to begin with, although not all of these wallet addresses are the product of van Continue reading >>

Why Should You Order 2 Or More Hardware Wallets At The Same Time?

Why Should You Order 2 Or More Hardware Wallets At The Same Time?

Why Should You Order 2 Or More Hardware Wallets At The Same Time? By: Sudhir Khatwani In: Wallets Last Updated: Today I am going to answer a very intriguing question on hardware wallets . Why should we have two or more hardware wallets at the same time? For a long time, I was not able to comprehend the benefits of owning two or more hardware wallets at the same time. Moreover, I knew many people who were holding back on owning just one hardware wallet! For those who dont know, hardware wallets are wallets that keep your private keys offline and away from easily hackable devices like computers and smartphones. If you dont take care of your private keys, then it just a matter of time until you get hacked. This is becauseyour bitcoins = your private keys.If you dont own your private keys, you dont own your bitcoins. <br /> Can't load widget<br /> To know about hardware wallets, I suggest you go through this post and this post . Why You Should Order 2 Or More Hardware Wallets Suppose you only have one hardware wallet which is now damaged or has become lost. Luckily, you have not lost your coins because you still have the seed key. You are now in a hurry tospend your bitcoins, and naturally, you go out searching for ways to restore your wallet using the seed key. You come across the first online wallet you find and input your seed key there. But that wallet wasnt trustworthy! Youve just given your seed key away to a hacker, and now, youve gone and lost all of your coins! Alternatively, if you had owned two hardware wallets (like the Ledger or Trezor ), then you would have safely and securely configured your seed key and have accessed your restored wallet without any problems. The second benefit is to have two clone wallets. Lets suppose you are h Continue reading >>

Zcash - Frequently Asked Questions

Zcash - Frequently Asked Questions

For troubleshooting, please see our Github wiki . You can buy ZEC from participating online exchanges/markets with another cryptocurrency or fiat currency (depending on which exchange you use). We put together a list of exchanges supporting Zcash trades at launch here but these are just a few of the first exchanges and wallets that supported Zcash at launch. There have been many more that have come into existence. We encourage the community to host their own lists and repositories of successful providers such as in this Zcash community blog . You might also have luck finding someone to buy Zcash from in-person or offering services/products to be paid for in Zcash. And of course, you are highly encouraged to run a Zcash mining node to earn tokens for taking part in securing the decentralized network! You can get more info on installing a node and sending ZEC in our 1.0 Guide . There are already a variety of third-party options for storing and sending ZEC, in addition to the officially supported core client, zcashd . Many of these third-party wallets have limitations in their support for Zcash; in particular including shielded addresses in a transaction requires a large amount of computer memory and most wallets (both hardware and web-based) have yet to integrate this feature. You can browse a list we put together of third-party support at launch here . As mentioned in the above question, these are a few of the first exchanges and wallets that supported Zcash at launch. There have been many more that have come into existence. We encourage the community to host their own lists and repositories of successful providers such as in this Zcash community blog . What is the difference between addresses that start with "t" and addresses that start with "z"? Zcash is built upon an Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Addresses - Dummies

Bitcoin Addresses - Dummies

Similar to the way e-mail addresses work, a bitcoin address can be used to both send and receive data or in this case, bitcoins. That said, there is one major distinction to be made between bitcoin addresses and e-mail addresses. People can have multiple bitcoin addresses they can use to send and receive transactions. In fact, it is advisable to use a brand new bitcoin address for every transaction, which may or may not be manageable for individual users depending on how many transactions they intend to process on a daily basis. Contrary to popular belief, the generation of a new bitcoin address does not require an active Internet connection. A bitcoin address is an identifier representing a possible destination or origin for a bitcoin transaction. Every bitcoin address is between 26 and 35 alphanumeric characters in length and can start with a 1 or a 3. Creating new or additional bitcoin addresses can be done free of charge through the installed bitcoin software, or you can obtain a bitcoin wallet address from an exchange or online wallet provider. One important aspect of a bitcoin address to keep in mind is that every address is case sensitive and exact. A bitcoin address like the following has both uppercase and lowercase letters in its string of characters: Changing an uppercase letter to a lowercase letter or vice versa would result in an invalid recipient address, and the funds would not be transferred. There is always an off chance of an invalid address being accepted as a recipient, but that only occurs once every 4.29 billion transactions. Use a different bitcoin address for every transaction. Keep in mind that there is technically nothing wrong with using the same address over and over again, but using a new address for every transaction creates an additional Continue reading >>

Understanding Bitcoin Addresses And Private Keys.

Understanding Bitcoin Addresses And Private Keys.

Understanding Bitcoin addresses and private keys. I have recently thought about bitcoin addresses and the private keys, and just cant get my head around how they are created and link together, would love if someone could break it down into laymans term. My understanding of it is that a long string of ?? is passed through sha256 and creates an address (bitcoin address). from the address you can not go backwards and find the original string of ? but if you have the private key which in some way is related to the string ? then you can access the address and the bitcoin stored there. . I am probably way off but sure thats why i'm here, to learn There's a good video somewhere. Sorry can't remember what it was called. It's on YouTube. its not a straight private to public one step conversion.. remember google is your friend, so is the development section of this forum I DO NOT TRADE OR ACT AS ESCROW ON THIS FORUM EVER. Don't take any information given on this forum on face value. Please do your own due diligence & respect what is written here as both opinion & information gleaned from experience. If you wish to seek legal FACTUAL advice, then seek the guidance of a LEGAL specialist. u can explain it in laymans terms almost anyway u want though really u should go through the math process if u can explain it in laymans terms almost anyway u want though really u should go through the math process if i do want to understand it properly but a basic understanding of the principles first is a good beginner. seriously you can ask nothing on here with out some know it all giving their opinion. u can explain it in laymans terms almost anyway u want though really u should go through the math process if i do want to understand it properly but a basic understanding of the principles first Continue reading >>

Yet Another Cool Checksum Address Encoding #55

Yet Another Cool Checksum Address Encoding #55

My preference is that a checksum-enabled Ethereum address is immediately recognizable as such. The proposed solution is not immediately recognizable as being distinct from a standard Ethereum address and could be confused for being a strangely-cased version of non-checksummed addresses. Although it offers superior backwards compatibility, I believe will only cause additional confusion to the end-user. Since the change in format serves to make the address less error prone through checksums, I posit they should also be immediately recognizable through a fixed prefix or otherwise obvious identifier. One reason why I prefer ICAP over this proposed solution is that it signals to the user clearly that this is an Ethereum address and cannot be confused with a transaction/block hash. I disagree @tgerring that it will cause confusion: to a layman, it will be indistinguishable from a normal address. This approach is very easy to implement in the client side and doesnt require much. I would say this could be adopted as a great intermediary before ICAP also would be a good alternative if ICAPs don't catch on. I did a rudimentary implementation on javascript in the web3 object: var isAddress = function (address) { if (!/^(0x)?[0-9a-f]{40}$/i.test(address)) { // check if it has the basic requirements of an address return false; } else if (/^(0x)?[0-9a-f]{40}$/.test(address) || /^(0x)?[0-9A-F]{40}$/.test(address)) { // If it's all small caps or all all caps, return true return true; } else { // Otherwise check each case address = address.replace('0x',''); // creates the case map using the binary form of the hash of the address var caseMap = parseInt(web3.sha3('0x'+address.toLowerCase()),16).toString(2).substring(0, 40); for (var i = 0; i < 40; i++ ) { // the nth letter should be uppe Continue reading >>

Blockchain Address Explained: What Are Addresses On Blockchains?

Blockchain Address Explained: What Are Addresses On Blockchains?

in cryptocurrency 2 years ago (edited) Blockchain Addresses are an important concept in cryptocurrencies and blockchains. In my guide, i explain what addresses are, how they are created and what the differences between different kind of addresses on different blockchains are. In the early days of Bitcoin, it was possible to send payments to an IP-address like 52.206.89.4 (which is steemit.com). This was planned to be a convenient method to use Bitcoins without dealing with unhandy public keys and addresses. However, after the Bitcoin developers realized that this way of sending coins could be subject to serious man- in-the-middle-attacks, the option was disabled and did never come back. This anecdote of Bitcoins early days seems to have mostly historic values. But it demonstrates what an address is: It is not something special or something set in stone. It is just a placeholder to accept and send blockchain transactions. Like an IBAN or SWIFT address. The address itself doesnt matter, nor does its format. The only thing matters are that the address serves its purpose to enable payments to an entity which has a unique information. Usually, a private key, to exclusively access the funds. The address is nothing but a secure identifier. However, while SWIFT or IBAN numbers are assigned by central authorities like banks, blockchain addresses exist. Every blockchain address possible already existed, long before a wallet found it. The reason is that blockchain addresses are the result of a mathematical operation. The Public Key: Where the Blockchain Address Generation begins After Pay to IP had been abandoned in Bitcoin, P2PKH became the new standard format for Bitcoin addresses. You might know it; it looks like this: 1K31KZXjcochXpRhjH9g5MxTHPi123zEXb A standard P2PKH addres Continue reading >>

11 Best Bitcoin Wallet Hardware & App Reviews 2017 / 2018

11 Best Bitcoin Wallet Hardware & App Reviews 2017 / 2018

Restrict unsupervised access. Set a strong password and close all ports and maintain a strict firewall. Frequently change address. Use a different address for every transaction. Multiple Signatures (Multi-sig). Multiple private keys to deter breaches. Bitcoins simply consist of a string of data. Thats why they can be stored anywhere. You could paint Bitcoin on a wall with your blood. Nobody does that though. Hopefully. Instead, we store BTC on computers because we need them handy to trade. After all, we need to be connected to the internet to send value from one wallet to another over the Blockchain. To some readers this might seem like a weird question. Truth is, people coming from a financial or business background are likely to expect Bitcoin to be a direct alternative to our current financial system. This is not the case. You dont need a Bitcoin account. There is no such thing really. You just need a wallet. The only accounts you might encounter are online wallets that are separated into various accounts via a user system. Web-wallet. Accessed via web-browser. Access to money gained through username or password. Access gained via physical access to computer. Access gained via physical access to phone. Hardware wallets delimit access of your funds to the hardware device alone. The coins are stored in a microcontroller, and are to be transferred only when authorized. The act of storing of your wallets private keys in a way that is completely detached from a network. How do I know which wallet is best for me? Lets be honest. Its unreasonable to expect anyone else to make this decision for you. After all, your preference depends entirely on your personality and needs. So just be honest with yourself. Frankly, you shouldnt need anything complicated if youre using the wa Continue reading >>

Smtp - Are Email Addresses Case Sensitive? - Stack Overflow

Smtp - Are Email Addresses Case Sensitive? - Stack Overflow

I've read that by standard first part of e-mail is case sensitive, however I've tried to send e-mail to [email protected], [email protected] and [email protected] - it has arrived in each case. How do mail servers handles usernames? Is it possible to miss with case and that message wouldn't be delivered? Is it really very important to use exactly same letter case, as was written while registering when giving your e-mail address? The standard mailbox naming convention is defined to be "[email protected]"; contemporary usage permits a much broader set of applications than simple "user names". Consequently, and due to a long history of problems when intermediate hosts have attempted to optimize transport by modifying them, the local-part MUST be interpreted and assigned semantics only by the host specified in the domain part of the address. So yes, the part before the "@" could be case-sensitive, since it is entirely under the control of the host system. In practice though, no widely used mail systems distinguish different addresses based on case. The part after the @ sign however is the domain and according to RFC 1035, section 3.1, "Name servers and resolvers must compare [domains] in a case-insensitive manner" In short, you are safe to treat email addresses as case-insensitive. 'In short, you are safe to treat email addresses as case-insensitive.' I'd phrase it stronger: "you're unsafe to treat email-addresses as case-sensitive manner" Especially when checking for duplicates in user-databases, etc. Geert-Jan Nov 16 '13 at 23:00 I'd disagree with the conclusion. If you're looking for duplicates in a database - yes, a case insensitive match is probably the best way to go, but I've seen code where the email address is converted to lower case prior to sending. That's not a go Continue reading >>

What Are Addresses On Blockchains? Blockchain Address 101

What Are Addresses On Blockchains? Blockchain Address 101

Blockchain Address 101. Blockchain Addresses are an important concept in cryptocurrencies and blockchains . In our guide, we explain. What addresses are, how they are created and what the differences between different kind of addresses on different blockchains are. What Are Addresses on Blockchains? Blockchain Address 101 In the early days of Bitcoin , it was possible to send payments to an IP-address like 104.25.248.32 (which is blockgeeks.com). This was planned to be a convenient method to use Bitcoins without dealing with unhandy public keys and addresses. However, after the Bitcoin developers realized that this way of sending coins could be subject to serious man- in-the-middle-attacks, the option was disabled and did never come back. This anecdote of Bitcoins early days seems to have mostly historic values. But it demonstrates what an address is: It is not something special or something set in stone. It is just a placeholder to accept and send blockchain transactions. Like an IBAN or SWIFT address. The address itself doesnt matter, nor does its format. The only thing matters are that the address serves its purpose to enable payments to an entity which has a unique information. Usually, a private key, to exclusively access the funds. The address is nothing but a secure identifier. However, while SWIFT or IBAN numbers are assigned by central authorities like banks, blockchain addresses exist. Every blockchain address possible already existed, long before a wallet found it. The reason is that blockchain addresses are the result of a mathematical operation. The Public Key: Where the Blockchain Address Generation begins After Pay to IP had been abandoned in Bitcoin , P2PKH became the new standard format for Bitcoin addresses. You might know it; it looks like this: A st Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Addresses

Bitcoin Addresses

A bitcoin address is like your bank account number. A bitcoin address is what people use to send payments to you. Bitcoin addresses are 26-35 characters made up of letters and numbers, starting with a 1 or 3 (we'll explain the difference shortly). Bitcoin addresses slightly differ from bank account numbers, as you can actually create as many addresses as you like, all linked to your same bitcoin wallet. Bitcoin addresses are case sensitive, however not to worry if you do accidentally typo one character your wallet will not send the bitcoins, as the address will be invalid. As Bitcoin addresses are a little long and complex for most users to type out, QR codes are used to help make this part of the process more user friendly. a QR code is embedded with the bitcoin address and sometimes even an amount, which can then be scanned by mobile wallets. This will automatically complete the Bitcoin address for you, making it very quick and simple to send a payment. Multi-signature addresses are typically prefixed with a 3 instead of the original 1. A multi-signature is effectively just requiring 2 (or more) private keys to sign a transaction before it can be sent. This is more of an advanced feature of bitcoin, but is becoming more popular with a variety of wallets. Bitcoin vanity addresses are like having a personalised car registration plate You can choose the first part of the address. These are not often used, but can be quite a nice novelty idea. Continue reading >>

More in ethereum