CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personaldata

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personaldata

This paper concerns privacy issues that user faces while using website or apps in mobile. While installing apps on mobile, app request for permission related to security, data usage etc. User approves them without knowing underlying actual terms and pollicies. These apps constantly collects personal data of which user has no specific knowlege or control. And after installation user can not change the data access permissions. These data may contains personel transaction details, contacts, website visits and many more. This paper proposes protection against the common privacy issues;Data ownership the system recognizes the users as the owners of the data and the services as guests with delegated permissions. Data transparency and auditability Each user has complete transparency over what data is being collected about her and how they are accessed. Fine-grained access control At any given time the user may alter the set of permissions and revoke access to previously collected data. Continue reading >>

Research Lab

Research Lab

Quickly view the latest and most impactful news and research regarding blockchain technology, cryptocurrency, and decentralized economics. A digital currency, such as Bitcoin or Ethereum, utilizes encryption techniques to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central authority. A decentralized-planned economy is a type ofeconomic system in which decision-making is distributed among various economicagents or localized within production units instead of a centralized authority. A blockchain is a digital, peer to peer, smart ledger with programmable functions and cryptographic securities in real time using distributed network topologies. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Cryptocurrency Market The cryptocurrency market surpassed the barrier of $100 billion market capitalization in June 2017, after months of steady growth. Here, we consider the history of the entire market and analyse the behaviorof 1, 469 cryptocurrencies introduced between April 2013 and June 2017. Breaking Down the Blockchain Hype Towards Blockchain Market Engineering First, we conduct a comprehensive literature review of the most relevant and recent IS research on blockchain. Second, based on the findings of our review, we build on existing research and propose a Blockchain Market Engineering Framework, which can support researchers as well as practitioners in analyzing and designing the elements of blockchain-based markets on an individual and global level. Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Can Protect Our Personal Data From Hackers - Marketwatch

How Blockchain Can Protect Our Personal Data From Hackers - Marketwatch

The way companies store personal data is broken. The cybersecurity industry has mushroomed in recent years, but the data breaches just keep coming. Almost every day brings news of a new data breach , with millions of records compromised including payment details, passwords, and other information that makes those customers vulnerable to theft and identity fraud. Its bad news for the companies too, as not only do they face huge fines (which are only getting tougher), they also suffer serious reputational damage. These are not small, naive businesses; they are major, often global, brands. They spend millions of dollars on security and yet still find themselves suffering. The best way to avoid a data breach is to not store any data. That sounds obvious, but until now its been virtually impossible. Merchants need user names, passwords, payment details and other personal details to deliver their services. And they usually need to keep hold of that information which means there are or thousands of databases worldwide containing some of your most sensitive personal data. No one would leave a written list of all their personal details at every physical store they go into but online we do it all the time. No wonder the Webs inventor, Tim Berners-Lee, said in March 2017 that Weve lost control of our personal data. Bring on the blockchain. The advent of decentralized blockchains means we now have the opportunity to store, share and pay in a completely new safer way, which puts the user back in control. The existing data security model is clearly dead. Blockchain is the fundamental change we need to protect both consumers information and businesses reputations. A combination of biometric security on your device, and the blockchain principles of private keys controlled solely by the Continue reading >>

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains and Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained Apr 26, 2017 at 13:30 UTC|UpdatedApr 26, 2017 at 16:34 UTC Jacek Czarnecki is an attorney at Warsaw-based law firm Wardynski & Partners, where he specializes in areas including fintech, digital currencies and blockchain. In this opinion piece, Czarnecki discusses data protection laws in the EU,outlining in an easy-to-read overview how they present both challenges and opportunities for industry innovators. Not a day goes by whenwe don't hear about a new application for blockchain technology. A cryptographically secure distributed ledger (secured by means of member consensus )is turning out to be the solution for many problems and inefficiencies in the world around us. And this isn't just about technological improvements or the reconstruction of business models: different blockchain use cases will leave a mark on the economy, society and, perhaps, also on politics. Blockchains - especially public ones such as bitcoin or ethereum - break many paradigms, including legal ones. We are thus entering an interesting transition period when successive applications of this technology will encounter legal norms not always adapted to the new reality. One of the more interesting examplesto look at is personal data protection. Legal regulations protecting personal data are of great importance in many areas where blockchains already exist: finance, healthcare, electronic identification systems, etc. And whilethe application of existingdata protection regulations in blockchain technology will cause issues, there are solutions. First things first,why are blockchains a challenge for the protection of personal data? There are three main reasons: Blockchains are decentralized and distributed. It is virtually impossible to identi Continue reading >>

Alex Pentland - Publications

Alex Pentland - Publications

Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA, United States Tree Info Grants Similar researchers Related pubs Distance to... Nearest Nobel PubMed Report error 150 high-probability publications.We are testing a new system for linking publications to authors. You can help! If you notice any innacuracies, please sign in and mark papers as correct or incorrect matches.If you identify any major omissions or other inaccuracies in the publication list, please let us know . Barlacchi G, De Nadai M, Larcher R, Casella A, Chitic C, Torrisi G, Antonelli F, Vespignani A, Pentland A, Lepri B. A multi-source dataset of urban life in the city of Milan and the Province of Trentino. Scientific Data. 2: 150055. PMID 26528394 DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2015.55 Pentland A. Economics: Simple market models fail the test. Nature. 525: 190-1. PMID 26331547 DOI: 10.1038/nature15215 de Montjoye YA, Radaelli L, Singh VK, Pentland AS. Identity and privacy. Unique in the shopping mall: on the reidentifiability of credit card metadata. Science (New York, N.Y.). 347: 536-9. PMID 25635097 DOI: 10.1126/science.1256297 Zyskind G, Nathan O, Pentland AS. Decentralizing privacy: Using blockchain to protect personal data Proceedings - 2015 Ieee Security and Privacy Workshops, Spw 2015. 180-184. DOI: 10.1109/SPW.2015.27 Singh VK, Mani A, Pentland A. Social persuasion in online and physical networks Proceedings of the Ieee. 102: 1903-1910. DOI: 10.1109/JPROC.2014.2363986 Stadtfeld C, Pentland A. Partnership ties shape friendship networks: A dynamic social network study Social Forces. 94: 453-477. DOI: 10.1093/sf/sov079 Shmueli E, Mazeh I, Radaelli L, Pentland AS, Altshuler Y. Ride sharing: A network perspective Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Including Subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence a Continue reading >>

Guy Zyskind

Guy Zyskind

I am a Graduate Student and Research Assistant at the MIT Media Lab , in the Human Dynamics group. My advisor is Prof. Alex Sandy Pentland. My research interests lie at the intersection of Data, Privacy and Bitcoin. How these concepts come together is the core focus of my work. I follow my own curiosity, which has so far led me to exciting opportunities. I was fortunate to lead the development of several start-up companies. Most recently, I was the Chief-Technology-Officer of Athena Wisdom (now Endor ), an MIT spin-off focused on network analysis research and Big Data. I received my B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Tel-Aviv University, where my senior thesis was selected as the best undergraduate project . Today, Im a dedicated Bitcoin evangelist. As part of my ongoing work on blockchain applications, Im developing a technology that enables secure (privacy-preserving) cloud computing at scale (see: ). Ultimately, this platform would allow researchers, companies and governments to make use of our data without ever directly accessing them in their raw form. I'm also teaching MAS.S65 - Blockchain Technologies: Decentralize all the Things this fall, which is the first engineering class about Bitcoin/Blockchain and cryptocurrencies at MIT. Other research projects include applications of machine learning and network analysis on complex systems. For example, how do trends form and evolve in networks? What can we infer from our social interaction patterns as measured by mobile and wearable devices? Continue reading >>

Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Privacy In The Scenario Of Online Taxi-hailing | Zhang | International Journal Of Computers Communications & Control

Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Privacy In The Scenario Of Online Taxi-hailing | Zhang | International Journal Of Computers Communications & Control

International Journal of Computers Communications & Control School of Information, Central University of Finance and Economics School of Information, Central University of Finance and Economics Using Blockchain to Protect Personal Privacy in the Scenario of Online Taxi-hailing Personal privacy protection issues has gradually caused widespread concern in society which will lead to economic and reputation losses, hinder network and E-commerce innovation or some other consequences if not handled properly. In this paper, we make use of the de-centralization, permanent and audibility of the blockchain to propose a blockchain-based personal privacy protection mechanism, which uses Online taxi-hailing as the application scenario. We not only provide the details of the blockchain custom transaction domain used by the scene, but also expound the information exchanging and blockchain auditing between passengers, Online taxi-hailing platform and drivers in Online taxi-hailing scene, providing a case model for the blockchain solution to personal privacy protection and a technical mechanism solution for further study of personal privacy protection issues. Online taxi-hailing, blockchain, personal privacy protection Barlas P., Heavey C., Dagkakis G. (2015); An Open Source Tool for Automated Input Data in Simulation, International Journal of Simulation Modelling, 14(4), 596-608, 2015. Claassen R. A. (2016); An introduction to bitcoin and blockchain technology, Kaye Scholer LLP, 2016. Cotet C.E., Popa C.L., Enciu G., Popescu A., Dobrescu T. (2016); Using CAD and Flow Simulation for Educational Platform Design and Optimation, International Journal of Simulation Modelling, 15(1), 5-15, 2016. Forte P., Romano D., Schmid G. (2015); Beyond bitcoin part 1: acritical look at blockchain-based Continue reading >>

The Govlab Selected Readings On Blockchain Technology And Its Potential For Transforming Governance

The Govlab Selected Readings On Blockchain Technology And Its Potential For Transforming Governance

The GovLab Selected Readings on Blockchain Technology and Its Potential for Transforming Governance in Featured Website , GovLab Blog , Selected Readings , Technology ByPriankaSrinivasan, Robert Montano, Andrew Young, and Stefaan G. Verhulst As part of an ongoing effort to build a knowledge base for the field of opening governance by organizing and disseminating its learnings, the GovLab Selected Readings series provides an annotated and curated collection of recommended works on key opening governance topics. In this edition, we explore the literature on theBlockchain Technology. To suggest additional readings on this or any other topic, please email [email protected] . In 2008, an unknown source calling itself Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper namedBitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash Systemwhich introduced blockchain technology.Blockchainis a novel system that uses a distributed ledger to record transactions and ensure compliance.Blockchain technology relies onan abilityto act as a vast, transparent, and secure public database. It has since gained recognition as a tool to transform governance by creating a decentralized system to incentivize smarter social and business contracts. These applications cast blockchain as a tool to confront certain public problems in the digital age. The readings below represent selected readings on the applications for governance. They have been categorized by theme Governance Applications,Identity Protection and Management,Tracing and Tracking, andSmart Contracts. Atzori, Marcella The Center for Blockchain Technologies (2015) Blockchain Technology and Decentralized Governance: Is the State Still Necessary? Aims to investigate the political applications ofblockchain, particularly in encouraging government decentralization by consi Continue reading >>

Information | Free Full-text | Bbds: Blockchain-based Data Sharing For Electronic Medical Records In Cloud Environments | Html

Information | Free Full-text | Bbds: Blockchain-based Data Sharing For Electronic Medical Records In Cloud Environments | Html

Information 2017, 8(2), 44; doi: 10.3390/info8020044 BBDS: Blockchain-Based Data Sharing for Electronic Medical Records in Cloud Environments Qi Xia *, Emmanuel Boateng Sifah, Abla Smahi, Sandro Amofa and Xiaosong Zhang Center for Cyber Security, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China Academic Editors: Man Ho Au, Jinguang Han, Joseph K. Liu and Ali El Kaafarani Received: 1 March 2017 / Accepted: 13 April 2017 / Published: 17 April 2017 Disseminating medical data beyond the protected cloud of institutions poses severe risks to patients privacy, as breaches push them to the point where they abstain from full disclosure of their condition. This situation negatively impacts the patient, scientific research, and all stakeholders. To address this challenge, we propose a blockchain-based data sharing framework that sufficiently addresses the access control challenges associated with sensitive data stored in the cloud using immutability and built-in autonomy properties of the blockchain. Our system is based on a permissioned blockchain which allows access to only invited, and hence verified users. As a result of this design, further accountability is guaranteed as all users are already known and a log of their actions is kept by the blockchain. The system permits users to request data from the shared pool after their identities and cryptographic keys are verified. The evidence from the system evaluation shows that our scheme is lightweight, scalable, and efficient. cloud computing; blockchain; data sharing; privacy; access control; electronic medical records The migration of medical records to cloud-based platforms has facilitated the sharing of medical data between healthcare and research institutions, Continue reading >>

Cybersecurity In A Data-driven World

Cybersecurity In A Data-driven World

A system based on Blockchain can help secure digital transactions while also protecting userprivacy Note: Professor Alex Pentland of MITs Media Lab, will host a panel on Big Data 2.0: Next-Gen Privacy, Security, and Analytics , at the upcoming MIT CIO Symposium on May 18. This article focuses on one aspect of his work. The exponential growth of mobile and ubiquitous computing together with big data analysis, are transforming the entire digital landscape, or data ecology. These shifts are having a dramatic impact on peoples personal data-sharing awareness and sensitivities as well as their cybersecurity: The more data created and shared, the more concerns rise. Recently, apprehensions have reached critical mass regarding privacy and the use of personal data, partially due to media exposure of cybersecurity breaches and intelligence scandals. The surge of mobile transactions, micropayments, and connected sensors in both private and public spaces is expected to further exacerbate this tension. Whats needed is a new deal on data where security concerns are matched with transparency, control and privacy, and are designed into the core of any data-driven service [1]. In order to demonstrate that such a win-win data ecology is possible, my students and I have developed Enigma, a decentralized, computation platform enabling different participants to jointly store and run data computations while keeping the data completely private [2]. Enigma promotes a viable digital environment by supporting four key requirements: That computation happens on encrypted data only That data owners will control access precisely, absolutely and with an audit trail That there are means to reliably enable payment to data owners for use of their data From the users perspective, Enigma is a hosted com Continue reading >>

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain to Protect Personal Data (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)Oz Nathan2 The recent increase in reported incidents of surveillance and security breaches compromising users' privacy call into question the current model, in which third-parties collect and control massive amounts of personal data. Bit coin has demonstrated in the financial space that trusted, auditable computing is possible using a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a public ledger. In this paper, we describe a decentralized personal data management system that ensures users own and control their data. We implement a protocol that turns a block chain into an automated access-control manager that does not require trust in a third party. Unlike Bit coin, transactions in our system are not strictly financial -- they are used to carry instructions, such as storing, querying and sharing data. Finally, we discuss possible future extensions to block chains that could harness them into a well-rounded solution for trusted computing problems in society. Continue reading >>

Decentralizing Privacyusing Blockchain To Protect Personal Data,usenix Security Workshop,2015

Decentralizing Privacyusing Blockchain To Protect Personal Data,usenix Security Workshop,2015

This paper mainly discuss the application of blockchain in secure data storage. The data is stored off-chain in a distributed way, and the blockchain serves as an access control list. In the case when a mobile phone application want to read/write the user's personal data, the verification program must be made and recorded through the blockchain. In this way, a data owner can surely own and Implementation(senario,framework,algorithm) The proposed system focus specifically on mobile paltforms, and consists of three entities, the user, the third-party services and the blockchain, which can ben seen in Fig.1. The user can commit a transaction called T_access which is used to dynamiclly change the access control list and the service can commit the T_data transaction to store or read the user's data. The Distributed Hash Table(DHT) shows in Fig.1. is the structure for storing data with added an interface to the blockchain. This paper also emphasized the DHT scheme can be replaced by other off-chain solutions, for example, the centralized cloud. The concrete protocol include four parts. How does the user and the service share some neccessary keys to perform the ACL permission check. How does the user commit and store the ACL in the blockchain. How does the blockchain executes the ACL permission check when a service want to access the user's data. How does the service store and load data after succeed in permission check. Corresponding to these four problems, there are four different protocols. We introduce the four protocols in a high level. Protocol 1(Generating a compound identity) The user and a service generate the a key pairs and send it in a secure channel. This Protocol is executed when a user commit a T_access transaction, the blockchain first parse the transaction m( Continue reading >>

Us9635000b1 - Blockchain Identity Management System Based On Public Identities Ledger - Google Patents

Us9635000b1 - Blockchain Identity Management System Based On Public Identities Ledger - Google Patents

US9635000B1 - Blockchain identity management system based on public identities ledger - Google Patents Blockchain identity management system based on public identities ledger US9635000B1 US15163922 US201615163922A US9635000B1 US 9635000 B1 US9635000 B1 US 9635000B1 US 15163922 US15163922 US 15163922 US 201615163922 A US201615163922 A US 201615163922A US 9635000 B1 US9635000 B1 US 9635000B1 Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.) Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.) Business Information Exchange System Corp Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.) H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security H04L63/04Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for providing a confidential data exchange among entities communicating through data packet networks H04L63/0428Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for providing a confidential data exchange among entities communicating through data packet networks wherein the data content is protected, e.g. by encrypting or encapsulating the payload H04L63/0435Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for providing a confidential data exchange among entities communicating through data packet netw

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data | Alex Pentland, Guy Zyskind, And O. Nathan - Academia.edu

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data | Alex Pentland, Guy Zyskind, And O. Nathan - Academia.edu

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain to Protect Personal Data Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain to Protect Personal Data Guy Zyskind Oz Nathan Alex Sandy Pentland MIT Media Lab Tel-Aviv University MIT Media Lab Cambridge, Massachusetts Tel-Aviv, Israel Cambridge, Massachusetts Email: [email protected] Email: [email protected] Email: [email protected] AbstractThe recent increase in reported incidents of surveil- autonomous deployment of a PDS which includes a mecha-lance and security breaches compromising users privacy call into nism for returning computations on the data, thus returningquestion the current model, in which third-parties collect and con- answers instead of the raw data itself [6]. Across the industry,trol massive amounts of personal data. Bitcoin has demonstrated leading companies chose to implement their own proprietaryin the financial space that trusted, auditable computing is possible authentication software based on the OAuth protocol [19], inusing a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a publicledger. In this paper, we describe a decentralized personal data which they serve as centralized trusted authorities.management system that ensures users own and control their From a security perspective, researchers developed variousdata. We implement a protocol that turns a blockchain into an techniques targeting privacy concerns focused on personalautomated access-control manager that does not require trust ina third party. Unlike Bitcoin, transactions in our system are not data. Data anonymization methods attempt to protect person-strictly financial they are used to carry instructions, such as ally identifiable information. k-anonymity, a common propertystoring, querying and sharing data. Finally, we discuss possible of anonymized datasets r Continue reading >>

Blockchains Can Assist Eu Regulatory Fight For Personal Data Protection

Blockchains Can Assist Eu Regulatory Fight For Personal Data Protection

Blockchains Can Assist EU Regulatory Fight for Personal Data Protection The European Union passed a new regulation and is cracking down on multinational technology giants operating in Europe in order to protect the personal data of its citizens. Blockchains can assist the EU in this fight for personal data protection. The European Union (EU) has indicated its strong interest in protecting the personal data of its countries citizens by recently passing one of the strongest personal data protection regulations in the world that will complement the EUs existing code of online rights . This reform is, at least in part, the response to a survey where nine out of ten Europeans expressed concern about mobile apps collecting their data without their consent, and seven out of ten indicated that they worry about the potential uses that companies may make of the information disclosed to them. On April 27, 2016, the EU adopted, as part of the data protection reform package, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) with the intent to give citizens control over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment for international business through uniform regulations. The GDPR takes effect on May 25, 2018 and replaces the current Data Protection Directive (DPD). A regulation is more forceful than a directive, as it does not need to be adopted separately by each member nation. Instead, on its effective date, a regulation is immediately applicable and enforceable as law in all member states simultaneously. The GDPR is more inclusive than the DPD. For example, under Article 4 of the GDPR personal data is defined as, any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (data subject); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directl Continue reading >>

More in ethereum