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Cryptography Video Lectures

Cs276 - Cryptography

Cs276 - Cryptography

Teaching Assistant(s): Manuel Sabin (msabin[at]eecs[dot]berkeley[dot]edu) Office Hours: MW 16:00-17:00 in 651 Soda Hall with Manuel This course offers a graduate introduction to cryptography, the science of securing data and computation against various adversarial behaviors. Topics covered include fundamental tools (such as encryption, pseudorandomness, digital signatures, zero knowledge, and secure computation) as well as a selection of tools with more advanced security properties (options include fully-homomorphic encryption, obfuscation, delegation protocols, and others). The official prerequisite is CS 170 (or equivalent). All students with "mathematical maturity" (ease with proofs, algorithms, elementary number theory, and discrete probability) and curiosity about cryptography are welcome. Completing the course requires completing four (4) homework assignments and a final project; in addition, students will rotate in producing scribe notes for the lectures. Grading will be based 60% on the problem sets, 30% on the final project, and 10% on class attendance and participation. The TeX template for homework assigments is here , and the that for scribe notes is here . This course has no required textbook, but essentially all the material covered in class can be found online. For example, the following references could be useful. Continue reading >>

Stanford Cryptography Professor Releases Free Cryptocurrency Lecture

Stanford Cryptography Professor Releases Free Cryptocurrency Lecture

Stanford Cryptography Professor Releases Free Cryptocurrency Lecture For those who are particularly interested in delving a bit more into cryptocurrency, a Stanford University cryptography PhD professor has recently released his lecture material for free. For those who are particularly interested in delving a bit more into cryptocurrency, a Stanford University cryptography PhD professor has recently released his lecture material for free . The lecture material which is currently available online and contains the complete course for CS 251: Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies . The material contains the complete course syllabus and overview and according to its description: The course covers all aspects of cryptocurrencies, including distributed consensus, Blockchains, smart contracts and applications. We will focus in detail on Bitcoin and Ethereum as case studies. The Stanford University professor who released the lecture material online for free is Dr. Dan Boneh. Boneh who was born in Israel in 1969, has obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Princeton University in 1996. He is also one of the principal contributors to the development of pairing-based cryptography from the Weil Pairing, along with Matt Franklin of the University of California, Davis. He joined the faculty of Stanford University in 1997 and became professor of computer science and electrical engineering. Those who are looking to explore future applications of Blockchain, several US Universities have been offering Blockchain courses . Continue reading >>

Cryptography And Network Security

Cryptography And Network Security

Introduction Overview on Modern Cryptography Introduction to Number Theory Probability and Information Theory Classical Cryptosystems-Cryptanalysis of Classical Ciphers-shannons Theory Symmetric Key Ciphers Block Cipher Standards Linear Cryptanalysis Differential Cryptanalysis Few other Cryptanalytic Techniques Overview on S-Box Design Principles -Modes of Operation of Block Ciphers tream Ciphers Pseudorandomness Cryptographic Hash Functions Message Authentication Codes More Number Theoretic Results The RSA Cryptosystem primality Testing Factoring Algorithms Some Comments on the Security of RSA Discrete Logarithm Problem (DLP) The Diffie Hellman Problem and Security of ElGamal Systems An Introduction to Elliptic Curve Cryptography Application of Elliptic Curves to Cryptography Implementation of Elliptic Curve Cryptography Secret Sharing Schemes A Tutorial on Network Protocols-System Security Firewalls and Intrusion Detection Systems Side Channel Analysis of Cryptographic Implementations Continue reading >>

Lecture 21: Cryptography: Hash Functions

Lecture 21: Cryptography: Hash Functions

Description: In this lecture, Professor Devadas covers the basics of cryptography, including desirable properties of cryptographic functions, and their applications to security. Download this transcript - PDF (English - US) The following content is provided under a Creative Commons license. Your support will help MIT OpenCourseWare continue to offer high quality educational resources for free. To make a donation, or view additional materials from hundreds of MIT courses, visit MIT OpenCourseWare at ocw.mit.edu. SRINIVAS DEVADAS: All right, let's get started. Good morning everyone. I see a lot of tired faces. I'm not tired. Why are you tired? I only lecture half the time. You guys take the class all the time. So today's lecture is about hash functions. And you may think that you know a lot about hash functions, and you probably do. But what we're going to do today is talk about really a completely different application of hash functions, and a new set of properties that we're going to require of hash functions that I'll elaborate on. And we're going to see a bunch of different applications to things like password protection, checking the integrity of files, auctions, and so on and so forth. So a little bit of a different lecture. Both today and on Thursday I'm going to be going to be doing cryptography and applications, not too much of algorithms. But we will do a little bit of analysis with respect to whether properties are satisfied, in this case by hash functions or not. So let's just dive right in. You all know what hash functions are. There's no real change in the definition. But the kinds of hash functions that we're going to be looking at today are quite different from the simple hash functions, like taking a mod with a prime number that we've looked at in the pa Continue reading >>

Summary Of Selected Areas In Cryptology - 8ec

Summary Of Selected Areas In Cryptology - 8ec

Please visit the course homepages for details. For the first part that is For the second part that is The goal of this course is to provide insight into cryptography secure against quantum computers (post-quantum cryptography) as well as various methods for the mathematical cryptanalysis of cryptographic systems Cryptology deals with mathematical techniques for design and analysis of algorithms and protocols for digital security in the presence of malicious adversaries. For example, encryption and digital signatures are used to construct private and authentic communication channels, which are instrumental to secure Internet transactions. This course in cryptology consists of two main topics: The first part focuses on post-quantum cryptography dealing with cryptographic systems that are secure even given the existence of quantum computers and the second part focuses on cryptanalysis, the analysis of the security of cryptographic systems. After a general introduction to cryptography (the constructive side of cryptology) and cryptanalysis the course introduces the main contenders for secure systems: lattice-based encryption, code-based encryption, hash-based signatures, and multivariate-quadratic-based signatures. These systems are examples of public-key systems and this is the main area affected by quantum computers; symmetric-key systems, such as hash functions and block and stream ciphers) are used as building blocks inside them and for the transmission of data in bulk. The second part of the course will cover various generic attacks against common cryptographic primitives (e.g., block ciphers, hash functions) and cover important cryptanalytic attack techniques like time-memory tradeoffs, linear cryptanalysis, differential cryptanalysis and algebraic cryptanalysis. Bas Continue reading >>

Lecture 22: Cryptography: Encryption

Lecture 22: Cryptography: Encryption

Description: In this lecture, Professor Devadas continues with cryptography, introducing encryption methods. Download this transcript - PDF (English - US) The following content is provided under a Creative Commons license. Your support will help MIT OpenCourseWare continue to offer high quality educational resources for free. To make a donation or view additional materials from hundreds of MIT courses, visit MIT OpenCourseWare at ocw.mit.edu. SRINIVAS DEVADAS: All right. Good morning, everyone. So more of the same in terms of cryptography and cryptographic techniques similar to Tuesday's lecture. So if you liked it, you'll like this one. If you didn't like it, well, it's going to be more of the same, so sorry. But what we're going to do today is do a couple of things a little bit differently. We're going to talk about encryption. So we talked about hashing, which, of course, you know about from the use of dictionaries. We haven't really talked about encryption in 046 or even in 006 previously. But we look at two different kinds of encryption algorithms. We spend a little bit of time on symmetric key encryption, which is really something that was used in encoding machines including the enigma from World War II that you probably saw if you saw The Imitation Game. So there you have a shared secret. And it's that single, what's called, symmetric shared secret. Both parties know the secret. And very quickly, we'll talk about what it means to actually exchange a secret. So we'll talk about key exchange. And then I'll move to asymmetric key encryption, which I alluded to a little bit when we talked about digital signatures last time. I talked about public keys and private keys. But we're going to actually look at a couple of different public key encryption algorithms today. T Continue reading >>

Reviews For Cryptography I From Coursera | Class Central

Reviews For Cryptography I From Coursera | Class Central

Sign up to Coursera courses for free Learn how Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key. Throughout the course participants will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field and work on fun (optional) programming projects. In a second course (Crypto II) we will cover more advanced cryptographic tasks such as zero-knowledge, privacy mechanisms, and other forms of encryption. Week 1. This week's topic is an overview of what cryptography is about as well as our first example ciphers. You will learn about pseudo-randomness and how to use it for encryption. We will also look at a few basic definitions of secure encryption. Week 2. We introduce a new primitive called a block cipher that will let us build more powerful forms of encryption. We will look at a few classic block-cipher constructions (AES and 3DES) and see how to use them for encryption. Block ciphers are the work horse of cryptography and have many applications. Next week we will see how to use block ciphers to provide data integrity. The optional programming assignment this week asks students to build an encryption/decryption system using AES. Week 3. This week's topic is data integrity. We will discuss a number of classic constructions for MAC systems that are Continue reading >>

Cryptography I | Coursera

Cryptography I | Coursera

About this course: Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protecting information in computer systems. In this course you will learn the inner workings of cryptographic systems and how to correctly use them in real-world applications. The course begins with a detailed discussion of how two parties who have a shared secret key can communicate securely when a powerful adversary eavesdrops and tampers with traffic. We will examine many deployed protocols and analyze mistakes in existing systems. The second half of the course discusses public-key techniques that let two parties generate a shared secret key. Throughout the course participants will be exposed to many exciting open problems in the field and work on fun (optional) programming projects. In a second course (Crypto II) we will cover more advanced cryptographic tasks such as zero-knowledge, privacy mechanisms, and other forms of encryption. Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. Average User Rating 4.8 See what learners said Week 1. This week's topic is an overview of what cryptography is about as well as our first example ciphers. You will learn about pseudo-randomness and how to use it for encryption. We will also look at a few basic definitions of secure encryption. Reading: Lecture slides for all six weeks Reading: Course overview and additional reading resources Video: Discrete Probability (Crash Course) Video: Discrete Probability (Crash Course, Cont.) Video: Information Theoretic Security and The One Time Pad Video: Stream Ciphers and Pseudo Random Generators Video: Attacks on Stream Ciphers and The One Time Pad Video: Stream Ciphers are Semantically Secure [optional] Practice Quiz: Week 1 - Programming Assignment [optional] Week 2. We introduce a new primitive called a block cipher that will Continue reading >>

Cs127 | Boaz Barak

Cs127 | Boaz Barak

syllabus - FAQ - schedule - piazza - canvas - gradescope - lectures Please read the syllabus and FAQ carefully for course policies and information. Join the Piazza website (see link above) Homework Zero is now posted ( pdf , markdown , LaTeX ). I recommend you do it before the first lecture and in any case you will need to submit it by Thursday January 25 at midnight. Feedback from prior versions of this course: Spring 2016 , Spring 2010 (Princeton) Cryptography is as old as human communication itself, but hasundergone a revolution in the last few decades. It is now aboutmuch more than secret writing and includes seemingly paradoxicalnotions such as communicating securely without a shared secret, andcomputing on encrypted data. In this challenging but rewardingcourse we will start from the basics of private and public keycryptography and go all the way up to advanced notions such as fully homomorphic encryption and indistinguishability obfuscation . Mathematical background: This is a proof-based course that will be best appreciated by mathematically mature students, see the FAQ . I highly recommend you go over my CS 121 lectures on mathematical background and probability before the course starts.I will also publish about a week before the first lecture a homework zero that students are highly encouraged to complete before the course begins. The graduate version of this course, CS-227, will involve an extra project. This course has lecture notes but no official textbook.However, the following books can be helpful: Introduction to Modern Cryptography / Katz and Lindell . This is an undergraduate textbook that can be a very useful companion, especially for the first part of the course. A graduate course in applied cryptography / Boneh and Shoup . This book in preparation Continue reading >>

Cs255 Introduction To Cryptography

Cs255 Introduction To Cryptography

Cryptography is an indispensable tool for protectinginformation in computer systems. This course explains the inner workings of cryptographic primitives and how to correctly use them. Monday, Wednesday, 1:30-2:50pm, Gates B01 Friday, 2:30-3:20pm, Huang 18 (starting next week at Nvidia aud.) cs255 online (for video lectures covering the material in class) Students may take the final at either one of the following two dates: Option 1: (scheduled) Wednesday, 3/21, 3:30-6:00pm, Gates B01, B03, and nVidia auditorium in Huang. Option 2: (alternate) Tuesday, 3/20, 3:30-6:00pm, 420-041. 2018.pdf , 2017.pdf , 2016.pdf , 2015.pdf , 2014.pdf , 2013.pdf , 2012.pdf , 2011.pdf , 2010.pdf , 2009.pdf , 2008.pdf . For remote SCPD students: Please email [email protected] with your email address, theemail address of your SCPD monitor if you have one, and which day you would like to take the exam. We will email a pdf to you which you should print, complete, and email back to us.We will email you with confirmation of receipt so hold on to your exam until you receive confirmation. Note that if you are local to the bay area, you must come to one of two exam slots unless you contact us in advance. All homework submission is to be done via Gradescope . Please use course code 9KYX4N to sign up. Note that Gradescoperequires that the solution to every problem start on a new page. Continue reading >>

Principles Of Modern Cryptography

Principles Of Modern Cryptography

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video From the course by University of Maryland, College Park Course 3 of 5 in the Specialization Cybersecurity This course will introduce you to the foundations of modern cryptography, with an eye toward practical applications. Professor, University of Maryland, and Director, Maryland Cybersecurity Center [SOUND] In the last lecture we began talking about the possibility of proofs of security and the need for formal definitions of security. In this lecture I just want to discuss these issues in a more general content. As two of the three core principles of modern cryptography. As we have pointed out before, historically speaking, Schemes like the shift cipher and visionaire cipher were developed and analysed in a relatively ad hoc and heuristic manner. While there was some guiding principles in place, there was no agreement on when or if any particular scheme could be classified as secure. continuing today, cryptography began to develop into much more of a science. And I think you can isolate three fundamental principles of modern cryptography that have really helped move the field forward. The three core principles that distinguish modern cryptography from classical cryptography are definitions, assumptions, and proofs of security. as we've discussed briefly already provide a precise mathematical model in which to analyze schemes, as well as a formal definition of what security means. Proofs, which we've also discussed before, give us confidence in the security of particular schemes and more importantly, allow us to move away from the design-break-patch cycle that was used historically. That is, rather than propose a scheme and wait for someone to come along and b Continue reading >>

Lectures (topics In Cryptography - Spring 2018)

Lectures (topics In Cryptography - Spring 2018)

Lectures (Topics in Cryptography - Spring 2018) Here you can find the slides and videos (in collab) of the lecture as well as related notes for each class. The pdf scribed lecture nodes will be posted with a bit of delay compared with other resources. The posts are in reverse chronological order. You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 9 - Mar 23: Trapdoor Permutations, RSA, and Digital Signatures Reading: Chapter 12 (12.1-12.4) of Katz-Lindell book. You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 8 - Mar 16: Public-Key Encryption (PKE) and Key-Agreement (KA) + Diffie-Hellman KA Reading: Chapter 10, 11 (11.1-11.4), and 8 (8.1-8.3) of Katz-Lindell book. You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 7 - Mar 2: CCA secure encryption from CPA security + MACs You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 6 - Feb 23: Message Authentication Codes You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 5 - Feb 16: Pseudorandom functions (PRFs), and how to use them to obtain CPA secure encrypion. You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 4 - Feb 9: How to expand PRGs further; Hash Functions; Randomized Encryption; Multi-message and Chosen Plaintext Security (of private-key encrytion). You can find the video of this class here , the slides are here , and the lecture notes will be here . Class 3 - Feb 2: Compu Continue reading >>

Cryptography - Wikiversity

Cryptography - Wikiversity

Four rotor German naval Enigma machine on display at Bletchley Park . Cryptography (sometimes known as cryptology) is the mathematical and computational study of information security; in particular the study of methods used to transmit information securely between two or more parties, unreadable by unauthorized eavesdroppers. Cryptography finds many applications in the modern world, e.g. protecting online logins, smart card protocols, email privacy, confidential documents, and so on. Usually, to protect information from being revealed, a person will attempt to render the information unreadable by anyone without some secret information. This process is called encryption. The original data is usually called the plaintext, while the resulting scrambled data is usually called the ciphertext. The secret information can take the form of a password, a number, a file, etc. and is usually called the key (as it can "unlock" the ciphertext). Any authorized party should be able to, given a ciphertext and its secret key, reconstruct the original information, in a process known as decryption. This allows several parties to transmit information securely using a shared secret key. There are many different methods to perform encryption, varying widely in simplicity and security. These methods are usually called ciphers. Much of cryptography is also devoted to the opposing field of cryptanalysis , the act of trying to "break" a cipher so that encrypted information can be retrieved, using only part or none of the secret key, by an adversary. The continuous feedback between cryptographers, who develop ciphers, and cryptoanalysts, who break them, has led to the development of many advanced and secure ciphers used today. There is also some confusion between codes and ciphers. A code is a sy Continue reading >>

Caltech Offers Open Online Course On Quantum Cryptography

Caltech Offers Open Online Course On Quantum Cryptography

Caltech Offers Open Online Course on Quantum Cryptography Thomas Vidick, Assistant Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences Credit: Lance Hayashida/Caltech Office of Strategic Communications This summer, Caltech's Thomas Vidick spent a month delivering a series of lectures about quantum cryptography to an empty room. On October 9, students around the world will be able to enjoy them. Vidick, assistant professor of computing and mathematical sciences in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science, is participating in a massive open online course (MOOC) that will be available, along with two other courses from Caltech, to thousands of students through the edX online education platform . The class CS/Ph 120, Quantum Cryptography is cotaught by Vidick and his longtime colleague Stephanie Wehner from QuTech at the Delft University of Technology. Both Vidick and Wehner also will have classroom components to their courses, at their respective institutions. Vidick says that he was inspired to teach the course through conversations with his PhD advisor at Berkeley, Umesh Vazirani, who taught a MOOC titled "Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Computation." Vidick's course focuses on the ways in which quantum mechanics can be used to create secure lines of communication. Though the concept was first proposed in the 1970s, it has only recently gone mainstream, with the first quantum bank transaction taking place in 2004. "It's a hot topic, but there are very few resources for people wanting to go beyond just the basics. Very few schools will even have a quantum cryptography course," Vidick says. So far, CS/Ph 120 has 5,500 registered studentssmall, by the standards of MOOCs, which average 43,000 students, according to a 2014 study by a researcher at the Open University in th Continue reading >>

Quantum Cryptography

Quantum Cryptography

Mondays, 14:15-15:45, room 220(Dominique; may sometimes be switched with tutorial) Tuesdays, 14:15-15:45, room 219 (Dominique / Ehsan) January 18, 10:00-13:00, Room 111 (Liivi 2) See also the blackboard photos and the practice blackboard photos . States invariant under rotation. Simple multi-qubit circuits. Review of homework 1. Quantum teleportation. Review of homework 2. Implementing classical functions using quantum gates. Review of homework 3. Quantum one-time pad. Purification of quantum circuits. Exercises for computing partial traces. Review of homework 4. Explicit computation of trace distance. Trace distance of orthogonal states. Analysis of an equivalent QKD security definition. Guessing the key in QKD (if no classical postprocessing used). Review of Homework 7. Proving a missing claim from QKD proof. Applying the impossibility result to a concrete commitment protocol. Your current amount of points in the homework can be accessed here (as soon as the first sheet has beencorrected). In quantum cryptography we use quantummechanical effects to construct secure protocols. The paradoxicalnature of quantum mechanics allows for constructions that solveproblems known to be impossible without quantum mechanics. This lecturegives an introduction into this fascinating area. You need no prior knowledge of quantummechanics. You should have heard some introductory lecture oncryptography. You should enjoy math and have a sound understanding oflinear algebra. [NC00]Nielsen, Chuang. "Quantum Computation and Quantum Information"Cambridge University Press, 2000. Astandard textbook on quantum information and quantum computing. Alsocontains some quantum cryptography. Furtherreading may be suggested during thecourse. See the "further reading" paragraphs in the lecture notes. Continue reading >>

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