CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Blockchain Voting Elections

Blockchain Technology In Online Voting

Blockchain Technology In Online Voting

Online Voting Technology Blockchain Technology in Online Voting The blockchain the engine onwhich Bitcoin is built is a newkind of distributed consensussystem that allows transactions, orother data, to be securely storedand verified without any centralizedauthority at all. With blockchain technology, youcould create a truly tamper-proofrecord system records can go intothe Blockchain in a way that I knowif anybody tries to change it. You should be taking this technology as seriously as you should have been taking the development of the Internet in the early 1990s. Both the financial services and Bitcoin communities perked up last week when Citi, Nasdaq, Visa and other large financial institutions invested in Chain.com, a Bitcoin blockchain services provider. Bitcoin is giving banks a run fortheir money. Now the sametechnology threatens to eradicatesocial networks, stock markets, evennational governments. A blockchain is an audit trail for a database which is managed by a network of computers where no single computer is responsible for storing or maintaining the database, and any computer may enter or leave this network at any time without jeopardizing the integrity or availability of the database. Any computer can rebuild the database from scratch by downloading the blockchain and processing the audit trail. Traditional databases are maintained by a single organization, and that organization has complete control of the database, including the ability to tamper with the stored data, to censor otherwise valid changes to the data, or to add data fraudulently. For most use cases, this is not a problem since the organization which maintains the database does so for its own benefit, and therefore has no motive to falsify the databases contents; however, there are other use ca Continue reading >>

One Place Where Blockchain Could Really Help: Voting

One Place Where Blockchain Could Really Help: Voting

One Place Where Blockchain Could Really Help: Voting {{article.article.images.featured.caption}} Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. The author is a Forbes contributor. The opinions expressed are those of the writer. This story appears in the {{article.article.magazine.pretty_date}} issue of {{article.article.magazine.pubName}}. {{article.article.magazine.subscription_text}} In most parts of America, technology plays no role in voting. If theres anything more hyped than Bitcoin right now, its blockchain the technology that enables cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Blockchain is being touted as the magic bullet that could end money laundering, let homeowners sell self-generated electricity back into the grid and even revolutionize economies in Africa. While all of those blockchain dreams may one day come true, the use that I find the most compelling is voting. As weve seen in election after election, our voting technology is not cutting it. Recently, a contest for a delegate seat in Virginia came down to a tie and had to be decided by drawing a name out of a hat . When elections are contested, officials hole up in a room and hand-count votes for hours setting aside the ones they cant decipher to argue over later. On a larger scale, our election process makes it difficult to vote. Many people struggle to take the time off on a Tuesday to make it to their polling place. Finding that polling place can sometimes be a challenge, and those who decide they want to mail in their ballot often just never get around to it. According to a recent analysis by the Pew Research Center only 55.7% of the voting-age population cast ballots in the 2016 presidential election. That ranks us 28th out of 35 highly developed countries in terms of voter turnout behind countries Continue reading >>

Blockchain For Voting And Elections

Blockchain For Voting And Elections

A look at this technology beyond Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. With a new round of political elections approaching this year, technology has become a focus of attention: its role in how citizens learn about candidates and vote, how secure our voting systems are and how technology can help secure them. Blockchain mostly known for Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies is certainly one of the most talked-about technologies right now. While blockchain technology is relatively new, its also a continuation of a very human story, Bettina Warburg explained in her 2016 TED talk, now the most watched TED talk about blockchain. As our societies grew more complex and our trade routes grew more distant, we built up more formal institutions, institutions like banks for currency, governments, corporations, she said mentioning Nobel prize economist Douglass North. These institutions helped us manage our trade as the uncertainty and the complexity grew, and our personal control was much lower. Eventually with the internet, we put these same institutions online. Warburg believes we are now entering a further and radical evolution of how we interact and trade, because for the first time, we can lower uncertainty not just with political and economic institutions, like our banks, our corporations, our governments, but we can do it with technology alone. Indeed, blockchain can be that technology that can help us lower our uncertainties about identity and what we mean about transparency in long distances and complex trades, like in election systems for instance. Blockchain could revolutionize voting and elections, Terry Brock writes in the Chicago BizJournals . We hear a lot of talk about blockchain being used in areas such as finance and currency as referenced with Bitcoin and other cryptocurr Continue reading >>

Blockchain Could Be Implemented In Electoral Voting As Soon As 2019 | Digital Trends

Blockchain Could Be Implemented In Electoral Voting As Soon As 2019 | Digital Trends

Posted on April 16, 2018 - 3:00AM 4.16.18 - 3:00AM Two major election scandals have plagued the United States over the past twenty years. In 2000, there were widespread reports of a miscount. In 2016, it was alleged that various individuals had committed voter fraud by casting ballots in more than one state. This article is part of our series Blockchain beyond Bitcoin . Bitcoin is the beginning, but its far from the end. To help you wrap your head around why, were taking a deep dive into the world of blockchain. In this series, well go beyond cryptocurrency and hone in on blockchain applications that could reshape medical records, voting machines, video games, and more. Running parallel to these incidents is an effort to use technology to uphold the electoral process. The rise of blockchain in the collective consciousness has led some to argue that it might provide a solution, but others maintain that its not the silver bullet its being made out to be. Blockchain can underpin a tamper-proof ledger of information that the public could access without security concerns. Its combination of anonymous use and decentralized data storage has encouraged a bevy of start-ups to examine blockchain as a way to make voting fair, accountable, and secure. Could blockchain help tackle these problems? We asked experts working in the field. Joe Kiniry, the CEO of Free And Fair, has spent his life focusing on computer systems that need to be impeccably secure; the technology that makes sure planes dont fall from the sky, pacemakers dont fail, and elections arent compromised. I got interested in elections per se because I grew up in Florida, said Kiniry when he spoke to Digital Trends last month. The 2000 election, Bush v. Gore in Florida, was a debacle. I thought, hey, computers could hel Continue reading >>

Can Blockchain Bring Voting Online?

Can Blockchain Bring Voting Online?

Blockchain has the potential to bring online voting to the mainstream, but some experts worry security concerns outweigh its potential benefits. Should somebody develop a means of conducting elections online that the nation finds acceptably secure and private, it could very well transform democracy for the better. It is the hope of those people working on such efforts and no stretch of the imagination to those who arent that online voting would mean more participation from a more representative portion of the people, faster results and even unchallengeable records of the outcome. The minor mountain standing in the way of this vision is, to simplify the issue, cybersecurity. The public is treated regularly to stories of vaunted, savvy organizations brought low at the hands of faceless hackers. The victims: Target, Sony, Equifax, LinkedIn, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. When hackers hit Dyn, the service that helps browsers find websites, the East Coast effectively lost large pieces of the Internet. Blockchain: Is it a Transformative Tech for Government? Illinois Announces Key Partnership in Birth Registry Blockchain Pilot And then there was the hacking of the Democratic National Committee during the 2016 presidential campaign, followed by election system breaches in multiple states. The resulting political chaos has led some, such as U.S. Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., to propose disconnecting voting machines from the Internet entirely. My recommendation, said Ron Rivest, a computer science professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for more than four decades, is to have all voting be done on paper. Why? Because paper inherently solves all the most pressing concerns about elections: It is secure from hackers because one ca Continue reading >>

First Results Of Sierra Leone's Blockchain Vote Are In

First Results Of Sierra Leone's Blockchain Vote Are In

First Results of Sierra Leone's Blockchain Vote Are In Mar 10, 2018 at 11:30 UTC|UpdatedMar 11, 2018 at 23:37 UTC Blockchain startup Agora has published what appears to be the earliest results for the hotly contested Sierra Leone election, the first presidential vote tracked using the technology. After the voting concluded on Wednesday, as many as 400,000 ballots were manually inputted into Agora's blockchain system by a team of 280 accredited observers working in as many locations. Currently, the exact number of votes for each candidate aren't being revealed to the public, just the percentages. But Agora, a Switzerland-based foundation, said it plans to make the results auditable in a public format in the coming days. While this is a milestone for distributed ledger technology, the messy circumstances surrounding the election, not to mention the limited scope of Agora's work, show how far blockchain is from reaching its theoretical potential for voting. For one thing, Agora, which was accredited by Sierra Leone's National Election Committee (NEC), didn't count all the ballots, just those cast in the country's most populous district, where the capital city, Freetown, is located. The NEC's tally is the official one; Agora, like other accredited observers, is providing an independent count for comparison. "These are the final results from Agora to the Western area," said Agora's CEO, Leonardo Gammar. "The NEC is going to have its own results. Other observers are going to have their own results." Further, public blockchain purists may have trouble relying on Agora's count. Some of the technology developed by Agora that grants node operators access is currently patent-pending, Gammar said, so there won't be a fully open-source repository on Github for outsiders to inspect. Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone Just Held The Worlds First Blockchain-powered Election

Sierra Leone Just Held The Worlds First Blockchain-powered Election

For the first time, blockchain was used to oversee a national election verifying the recent results of Sierra Leone's contentious presidential race. On March 7, 2018, blockchain startup Agora oversaw the results of Sierra Leones presidential election, marking the first use of the technology in this capacity. For voters, the process wasnt any different than previous elections. They arrived at their polling center, showed election officials their IDs, and then cast their votes on a paper ballot for one of 16 candidates. What happened next was unlike any other election, though. As Agoras chief operating officer Jaron Lukasiewicz explained to Coindesk , the Swiss startup then manually recorded the votes on a permissioned blockchain. Permissioned blockchains arent quite the same as public blockchains, like those supporting the cryptocurrencies bitcoin. While anyone can validate transactions on a public blockchain, only authorized persons can validate transactions on a permissioned blockchain. In the case of the Sierra Leone election, the authorized parties included people from Agora, the Red Cross, cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the University of Freiburg. However, like a public blockchain, anyone can view transactions recorded on a permissioned blockchain. That means that once the groups managing the blockchain verified the Sierra Leone votes, anyone voters, candidates,or just interested third parties could see the election results. According to Agora, the company even produced their results two hours sooner than election officials. Sierra Leone has a history of violence surrounding elections , with several incidents reported in the days prior to 2018s presidential election. The nations government is also more corrupt than most, so the small West African Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone Blockchain Election: Election Commission Denies Use Of Blockchain Quartz

Sierra Leone Blockchain Election: Election Commission Denies Use Of Blockchain Quartz

Sierra Leone received extensive global attention after it was reported by multiple outlets, including Quartz , that blockchain was being used to power its recent presidential elections. Now, with the elections deadlocked, the countrys electoral commission is seeking to clarify the limited extent to which the technology was used. As Quartz initially reported , Agora, a Swiss foundation focused on digital solutions, was accredited as an independent observer by Sierra Leones national electoral commission (NEC) to test its permissioned blockchain technology during elections earlier this month. While the NEC doesnt provide a definition of the function of international observers on its website, observers are generally invited by local election commissions to monitor electoral processes at polling booths to measure transparency. In that capacity, Agora manually entered votes announced by local polling station agents from 280 polling centers in Sierra Leones Western District on its blockchain ledger, which could be accessed publicly. It published the results of its blockchain count on its website. These results could be checked against those tallied by the NEC. News of the implementation of this technology quickly spread. But the NEC this week sought to correct the idea that blockchain technology was being used for the entire election to officially tally votes: #NEC Chair Mohamed Conteh makes clear that "the NEC has not used, and is not using #blockchain #technology in any part of the electoral process. #votesalone National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone (@NECsalone) March 18, 2018 The NEC has not responded to Quartzs email enquiries seeking further clarification. In an updated statement , Agora said that it had experienced pushback on the extent of its involvement in th Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone And The Blockchain Election That Wasn't

Sierra Leone And The Blockchain Election That Wasn't

Sierra Leone and the Blockchain Election That Wasn't Sierra Leone and the Blockchain Election That Wasn't The big news on March 8, 2018, was that Sierra Leone had just run the first blockchain-based election. The big news in the days and weeks that followed, however, became that the government of Sierra Leone was denying that it happened. In a press release from Swiss-based blockchain technology company Agora on March 8, 2018, the company led off with this statement: Sierra Leones 2018 presidential elections, which took place on March 7th, represents the first time in history that blockchain technology has been used in a national government election. West Districts results were registered on Agoras unforgeable blockchain ledger, and the tally made publicly available days before the usual manual count. The press release goes on to mention that the company is an internationally accredited observer and how results were posted within hours of the polls closing and various advantages to using their blockchain-based voting technology. Soon after, the story started breaking around the web that Agora, as the only company in the world with a fully-functional blockchain voting platform, had just run the first blockchain-based election for Sierra Leone. The results for this election are still unclear and a runoff election will be held on March 27, 2018 ; however, controversy over Agoras claims erupted soon after the mainstream media began to pick up on the story. On March 19, the National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone (NEC) sent out the following tweet: National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone (@NECsalone) March 19, 2018 The NEC also posted the election results online. According to RFI, the NEC confirmed that Agora had only been given observer status for the polls and Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone's Blockchain Election That Wasn't

Sierra Leone's Blockchain Election That Wasn't

Sierra Leone's Blockchain Election That Wasn't A slew of stories about the use of blockchain to ensure election security don't reflect the reality on the ground. A women cast her ballot as part of the general elections, on March 7th, 2018, at a polling station in Freetown. Recently, a number of technology blogs breathlessly brought news that Sierra Leone "became the first country in the world to use blockchain during an election" on March 7th. "The tech, created by Leonardo Gammar of Agora, anonymously stored votes in an immutable ledger, thereby offering instant access to the election results," according to TechCrunch . Blockchain ledgers, the theory goes, are more difficult to tamper with than traditional methods for storing vote data. PCMag called the election a "milestone," showing that "blockchain networks and immutable ledgers can serve as a foundation for new trusted systems, redefining how we interact with an evolving digital world." To be fair, these items, based on Agora's own press release, generally noted several paragraphs below their headlines about a "blockchain-based election" that Agora was not verifying the official nationwide countit had simply been registered as an observer in one district. It was a test of the technology, in other words. But the hype was such that the National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone felt compelled to put out a statement Monday clarifying that its in-house database "does not use Blockchain in any way." Agora has put out its own follow-up statement clarifying its role in the campaign and blaming a competing organization for critical local media reports about its role. As the Register notes, this is an example of how "enthusiasm for crypto-anything can get around the world before proper analysis gets out of bed." It's al Continue reading >>

No, Sierra Leone Did Not Just Run The World's First 'blockchain Election'

No, Sierra Leone Did Not Just Run The World's First 'blockchain Election'

Blockchain enthusiasts may be a little deflated today, after the nation of Sierra Leone took to Twitter to debunk claims it had conducted the worlds first blockchain election. But its not all bad news for blockheads, because distributed ledgers were used during the poll and performed well, just not in an official capacity and not for the whole electorate. The claim of the first blockchain election seems to have started with a press release (PDF) from a blockchain outfit named Agora. Titled Swiss-based Agora powers worlds first ever blockchain elections in Sierra Leone the release was picked up by media who swallowed it whole. But buried in the release is one word observer that appears to have been overlooked. As was the mention of the company covering only one of the nations electoral districts. Trump blocks use of Venezuelan Petro cryptocoins in the US Agora talked up blockchain as a fine way to ensure the integrity of votes in any election, especially those conducted with known-to-be-fallible voting machines. The company duly conducted its experiment as an observer and published its results , which reflected the National Electoral Comissions results. But the results came with a disclaimer that Agoras numbers do no [sic] intend to be representative of the final results for the full country, which will be published by the National Electoral Commission. But enthusiasm for crypto-anything can get around the world before proper analysis gets out of bed. So the National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone eventually felt obliged to hose down reports of its blockhain breakthrough the situation with this tweet. National Electoral Commission of Sierra Leone (@NECsalone) March 19, 2018 Agora, meanwhile, has taken to Medium to claim that media reports critical of its role were Continue reading >>

Why You Could Soon Be Voting In A Blockchain-powered Election

Why You Could Soon Be Voting In A Blockchain-powered Election

Why You Could Soon Be Voting In A Blockchain-Powered Election Representatives served as international observers in the countrys election, but some felt they exaggerated their role for their own benefit. [Photo: Eva Diallo Gehri, courtesy of Agora] Could blockchain technology be the key to ensuring the integrity of the democratic process? A recent blockchain project aiming to replace cumbersome voting technology around the world got its first test in this months presidential election in Sierra Leone. Though the experiment had a shaky debut, amid accusations that the role of the technology was exaggerated, its potential benefits are impressive and it seems clear that we can expect to see plenty of future elections using blockchain. Representatives from the Switzerland-based project, called Agora , served as outside observers at some polling sites for the election, which was conducted using the countrys traditional paper ballots. Along with other observer groups, Agora representatives were shown the cast ballots. They used their equipment to record the votes to Agoras proprietary blockchain, without voters needing to do any additional work, says Agora CEO Leonardo Gammar. Nothing changed for themthey just go to the polling station and they put their votes in the boxes, he says. They vote with their fingerprintsthey put their fingerprints next to the photos of their candidates. [Photo: Eva Diallo Gehri, courtesy of Agora] But the experiment made for an unintentionally rocky public debut, after headlines from international blockchain and tech publications appeared to exaggerate the role that Agoras software played in the election. Those initial stories and subsequent updates, coming at a time when tech startups and blockchain projects are facing increased skepticism around Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone Becomes First Country With Blockchain-verified Election Voting

Sierra Leone Becomes First Country With Blockchain-verified Election Voting

Sierra Leone Becomes First Country With Blockchain-Verified Election Voting Jeff Francis March 11, 2018 7:00 pm Election history was recently made as Sierra Leone became the first country to use blockchain technology to verify voting results in their presidential election. The application of blockchain technology recorded another milestone recently. While the innovative technology has made tremendous strides in business, it is now putting its stamp upon the political sphere. The country of Sierra Leone has the distinction of being the first to feature blockchain-verified voting in the countrys presidential election. In last weeks presidential election in Sierra Leone, blockchain technology was used to verify voting results. However, the new tech was not used throughout the whole country. Rather, it was confined to the countrys most populous region. The voting process was overseen by Agora, a Swiss-based blockchain startup. Once the voting had taken place, up to 400,000 ballots were then manually entered into Agoras blockchain. The final result for the region (not country!) as tabulated by Agora : Samura Kamara (APC) was the winner with 54.7% of the votes, while Julius Bio (SLPP) came in second with 32.5%. Agora CEO Leonardo Gammar was pleased by how well the process worked and of future possibilities, saying: I strongly believe that this election is the beginning of a much larger blockchain voting movement. However, the presidential election in Sierra Leone is not the first time that blockchain technology has been used in the political realm. Moscow is using the technology as part of its Active Citizen voting system where residents can vote on city issues (but not political candidates). Brazil is also using the technology to allow citizens to easily sign and verify pop Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone Uses Blockchain To Track Election Results, Swiss Company Provides Expertise

Sierra Leone Uses Blockchain To Track Election Results, Swiss Company Provides Expertise

Sierra Leone Uses Blockchain To Track Election Results, Swiss Company Provides Expertise Sierra Leone counts presidential elections with the Blockchain, Swiss company Agora provides expertise and technology. In an apparent first, the African nation of Sierra Leone has employed Blockchain technology in tallying its presidential elections, according to Agora CEO Leonardo Gammar March 7. Agora is the Swiss -based Blockchain voting technology company which participated in tallying Sierra Leones presidential election results yesterday. Jason Lukasiewicz, the COO of Agora, told Cointelegraph that this is the first time in history a Blockchain has been used in any government election, ever. Gammar sent a message to Agoras Telegram group earlier today stating that the Agora team is engaged in Sierra Leones presidential elections, and that they are currently located in Freetown, Sierra Leones capital, to assist their Blockchain node operators in auditing the election results. In a message to Cointelegraph, Gammar noted that he and his team havent slept for 2 days. Gammar said in the Telegram group chat that throughout the elections, Agora partnered with the European Commission, and has helped the Blockchain node operators who come from the Red Cross , the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and the University of Fribourg. This presidential election is the fourth since the end of the countrys civil war in 2002. 16 candidates participated in the election, contributing to the likelihood of a second round of voting as it will be very difficult for any single candidate to win the required 55 percent of the vote. Gammar wrote in the Telegram group at 1:56 am GMT that the team was proud to announce that our results in the western district are 2 hours ahead of the National Election Continue reading >>

Sierra Leone Just Ran The First Blockchain-based Election

Sierra Leone Just Ran The First Blockchain-based Election

Sierra Leone just ran the first blockchain-based election The citizens of Sierra Leone went to the polls on March 7 but this time something was different: the country recorded votes at 70% of the polling to the blockchain using a technology that is the first of its kind in actual practice. The tech, created by Leonardo Gammar of Agora , anonymously stored votes in an immutable ledger, thereby offering instant access to the election results. Anonymized votes/ballots are being recorded on Agoras blockchain, which will be publicly available for any interested party to review, count and validate, said Gammar. This is the first time a government election is using blockchain technology. Sierra Leone wishes to create an environment of trust with the voters in a contentious election, especially looking at how the election will be publicly viewed post-election. By using blockchain as a means to immutably record ballots and results, the country hopes to create legitimacy around the election and reduce fall-out from opposition parties, he said. Why is this interesting? While this is little more than a proof of concept it is not a complete voting record but instead captured a seemingly acceptable plurality of votes its fascinating to see the technology be implemented in Sierra Leone, a country of about 7.4 million people. The goal ultimately is to reduce voting costs by cutting out paper ballots as well as reducing corruption in the voting process. Gammar, for his part, sees the value of a decentralizes system. Were the only company in the world that has built a fully-functional blockchain voting platform. Other electronic voting machines are block boxes that have been increasingly shown to be vulnerable to security attacks. For that reason, many US states and foreign nations have Continue reading >>

More in ethereum