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Blockchain Privacy Protection

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving GDPR compliance and data privacy using blockchain technology CxOs, data engineers, programmers, and software developers A basic understanding of blockchain technology Learn how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulation The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an EU regulation acting as a one-stop shop for all data privacy rules across the EU. GDPR governs all global entities dealing with EU citizens data in any form or shape. Ajay Mothukuri, Arunkumar Ramanatha, and Vijay Srinivas Agneeswaran explain how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement GDPR. GDPR aims to ensure the data privacy of EU citizens through a single set of rules for data protection, increased responsibility and accountability for those entities processing personal data, required notification of any data breaches in stipulated timelines, the pseudonymization of personal data in such a way that resulting data cannot be attributed to a specific data subject without use of additional nonpersonal information, more accessible personal data, the ability to transfer personal data from one service provider to another easily (data portability), a right to be forgotten, and data protection by design and by default. These rules apply to all foreign companies and entities that are active in EU market and offer their services to EU citizens, and there are heavy sanctions for any violations, that can total up to 4% of annual global turnover. Blockchain technologies can help companies fall in line with GDPR directives. Pseudonymization is built into the blockchain, as all the data in a blockchain is encrypted and undersigned with the users digital signatures Continue reading >>

Is Your Blockchain Business Doomed?

Is Your Blockchain Business Doomed?

Bloomberg the Company & Its Products Bloomberg Anywhere Remote LoginBloomberg Anywhere Login Bloomberg Terminal Demo Request Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Europes new data protection regulation could spell trouble for companies. Illustration: Aaron Fernandez for Bloomberg Businessweek Blockchain, the technology behind Bitcoin and Ether, can securely record transactions, store huge amounts of data forever, and offer transparency by letting anyone view the information it contains. That makes it ideal for virtual currencies and some applications in insurance, health care, and other industriesand a thorny problem for a new European law on privacy. Under the European Unions General Data Protection Regulation, companies will be required to completely erase the personal data of any citizen who requests that they do so. For businesses that use blockchain, specifically applications with publicly available data trails such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, truly purging that information could be impossible. Some blockchains, as currently designed, are incompatible with the GDPR, says Michle Finck, a lecturer in EU law at the University of Oxford. EU regulators, she says, will need to decide whether the technology must be barred from the region or reconfigure the new rules to permit an uneasy coexistence. Compliance headaches could afflict thousands of companies. More than 1,000 apps are being built on the Ethereum blockchain alone, ac Continue reading >>

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology In the fourth blog post by Austrian law firm Stadler Vlkel Arthur Stadler and Sarah Pichler focus on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Blockchain Technology. General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology The most important reason for the interest in Blockchain and the latest discussions about its potential areas of application are the positive attributes linked to its mode of operation: security, anonymity and data integrity, without any third party serving as an authority and being in control of the transactions. Blockchains thus are not only decentralized, but based on distributed ledgers. Data integrity is ensured by the creation of new blocks in a consensus procedure, meaning that each subsequent block contains a cryptographic image of the previous block. Each block therefore consists of multiple data points. This also leads to the fact that data cannot be manipulated or deleted once it is written, entered into the block and linked to the previously written block. Transparency in all aspects is given, as the public can see all transactions, but allegedly without information linking these transactions to identities. Personal Data in Blockchains Anonymous Content? From a legal point of view, many aspects have to be considered when applying effective legal frameworks to rather new technical systems like Blockchain national legislation as well as EU law have to be taken into account. One of the most recent Acts on EU level creating implementation requirements of great impact for companies is the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 (General Data Protection Regulation, Continue reading >>

How Does The Eus Gdpr Apply To Hashed Data On The Blockchain?

How Does The Eus Gdpr Apply To Hashed Data On The Blockchain?

How does the EUs GDPR apply to hashed data on the blockchain? Despite blockchains superior technical capacity for data privacy and security, lack of control over personal data is a major issue for the many companies subject to the EUs new digital data privacy lawthe General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)which comes into effect May 2018. In May 2015, the European Commission published its Digital Single Market strategy, designed to produce a seamless commercial market across national borders to improve online access to goods and services, set a level playing field for competing firms, and spur economic growth. As part of this regulatory harmonization, the EU adopted the GDPR to facilitate net neutrality, cloud computing, access to big data and protection of citizens personal data. Traditionally, Europe has followed stricter standards of data privacy than their American counterparts who often place a stronger emphasis on free expression and access to information. The GDPR focuses on digital identity governance , to give citizens more control of their personal data, limit the scope of lawful data processing by data controllers and enforce 1) a right to erasure of data, aka the right to be forgotten, 2) a right to data portability, and 3) a right to consent to uses of ones personal data. Enter blockchain, dubbed data protection by design and default in which data is either two-way encrypted, so as to be unreadable without a private key, or hashed in one direction. Blockchain hashing is very important for commercial functions like automated cross-border authentication of documents that do not contain personally identifiable information. But what happens when personal data is being processed in a blockchain? The GDPR does not apply to anonymized data that cannot be traced Continue reading >>

What Blockchain Is And What It Can Do For Your Data Protection - Acronis

What Blockchain Is And What It Can Do For Your Data Protection - Acronis

Acronis Notary is a new, innovative service based on blockchain technology . But before we move into that, lets define what a blockchain is. It can be known to some due to its usage in Bitcoin currency, but its a lot more than just bitcoin technology and it can be used in a much wider set of scenarios, such as for data protection. Many industries have already started to use blockchain or are actively looking into it. For example, cloud storage, art and ownership, anti-counterfeiting, governance, Internet of things, and digital identity. Ablockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of records that are secured from tampering and revision. It consists of data-structureblocks that may contain data or programs, with each block holding batches of individualtransactions, and the results of any blockchain executables. Every nodein a decentralized system has a copy of the blockchain. No centralized "official" copy exists and no user is "trusted" more than any other. The blockchain resides across a network of computers (nodes). Whenever new transactions occur, the blockchain is authenticated across this distributed network, before the transaction can be included as the next block on the chain. So, the consensus of nodes is required to add the block into the blockchain. The blockchain creates trust because a complete copy of the chain, which shows every transaction, is held by the entire network. If someone attempts to cheat the system, they can be easily identified. To summarize, a blockchain is an append-only database with transaction order and the following data protection properties: Acronis Notary service: How does it work? Acronis Notary is the universal solution for timestamping and fingerprinting any data objects and streams. It is impr Continue reading >>

How Blockchains Will Enableprivacy

How Blockchains Will Enableprivacy

Blockchain | Artificial Intelligence | Creating Massive Value | Enhancing Transactions | Increasing Personal Freedoms | Twitter: @ShaanRay Technology has eroded our privacy protections. Most things individuals or organizations do are now in the public domain. Third-parties monitor, store, and use personal and organizational data, patterns, preferences, and activities. Many emerging business models rely on the collection, organization, and resale of our personal data. Technology has also made it easier to link data back to an individual, even if that individual opts out of social networking platforms. For example, breakthroughs in facial recognition technology have found broad application in commerce and security, especially in China and Russia. Blockchain technology could potentially limit the impact of this erosion of privacy, while still releasing personal information when it is useful. For example, a user could store personal information on a blockchain and release parts of it temporarily to receive services. Bitcoin and other blockchain-based digital currencies have demonstrated that trusted and transparent computing is possible using a peer-to-peer decentralized network and a public ledger. This essay explores the impact that data generation by individuals and organizations is having on privacy. It also briefly considers how blockchain-enabled systems could help put users back in charge of their data. Privacy is important to individuals because their personal information is valuable to organizations, marketers and other individuals. A common saying among internet users is: if you arent paying for the product, you are the product. This means that for companies that offer free services, such as social networking platforms, personal information is valuable. In the US Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology May Not Be The Best Solution For Gdpr Compliance

Blockchain Technology May Not Be The Best Solution For Gdpr Compliance

Blockchain technology may not be the best solution for GDPR compliance Use commas to separate multiple email addresses GDPR deadline looms: The price and penalties | Salted Hash Ep 20 (13:48) With the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) deadline fast approaching, host Steve Ragan explores the implications of noncompliance for companies -- and possible penalties -- with Greg Reber, founder/CEO of AsTech Consulting. GDPR deadline looms: The price and penalties | Salted Hash Ep 20(13:48) Despite facing attacks from Chinese regulators and even Jamie Dimon last month, Bitcoin has never been more popular. In fact, a single bitcoin is currently valued at over $5,000 and rising up from roughly $630 at this point last year.Part of the cryptocurrencys appeal can be traced to its use of blockchain, a decentralized ledger technology that anonymizes person-to-person transactions and updates client transactions and balances without going through a bank or other centralized authority. This helps ensure that transactions are not only anonymous, but difficult to taint or tamper. Many companiesincluding those in the financial industryare exploring new ways to incorporate this into day-to-day business activities. Companies such as NASDAQ, Bank of America, and Goldman Sachs, for example, have already filed patents that apply blockchain technology towards day-to-day financial tasks. Some of these patents, for example, apply blockchain principles to creating audit-friendly backup databases for financial documents , streamlining securities settlements , and creating buyer & seller aliases to anonymize person-to-person payments . [ Learn how to protect PII under GDPR . | Get the latest from CSO by signing up for our newsletters . ] Can companies also use blockchain technology to meet th Continue reading >>

The Blockchain-gdpr Paradox

The Blockchain-gdpr Paradox

The General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR in short, will become enforceable from 25 May 2018. Fact is, this will have (and already has) a major impact in organisations both large and small. In this post I will highlight some topics on how GDPR relates to blockchain technology. Especially on how GDPR has the opposite effect in some ways, when it comes to making Blockchain Architecture compliant with GDPR. To explain why GDPR has to opposite effect in certain areas when applied to blockchain technology, we need to go over some basic concepts first. Both encryption and hashing are fundamental to blockchain technologies. In short, hashing is a one-way transformation of data to an unreadable piece of data (hash value). With encryption you can have a two-way transformation: You encrypt data with a certain key, so it becomes unreadable. With this key you can always decrypt this unreadable piece of data to the original value. By now, you will have heard that transactions on a blockchain are immutable. You cannot change these transactions once they are written on a blockchain. You cannot delete this data, since this would break the chain in a sense, rendering the complete blockchain useless. As an individual, you can browse through the complete history of all bitcoin transactions, making the transactions on this public blockchain technology completely transparent. Transparency in private blockchains is another matter, but it is still guaranteed in other ways. This post will be focused on permissioned blockchains where nodes are permissioned hosted although a lot of arguments below are still applicable to public blockchains. CRUD stands for Create-Read-Update-Delete. These are the basic operations of persistent storage . Now remember from the basic blockchain topics mentio Continue reading >>

Privacy On The Blockchain

Privacy On The Blockchain

Blockchains are a powerful technology, as regular readers of the blog already likely agree. They allow for a large number of interactions to be codified and carried out in a way that greatly increases reliability, removes business and political risks associated with the process being managed by a central entity, and reduces the need for trust. They create a platform on which applications from different companies and even of different types can run together, allowing for extremely efficient and seamless interaction, and leave an audit trail that anyone can check to make sure that everything is being processed correctly. However, when I and others talk to companies about building their applications on a blockchain, two primary issues always come up: scalability and privacy. Scalability is a serious problem; current blockchains, processing 3-20 transactions per second, are several orders of mangitude away from the amount of processing power needed to run mainstream payment systems or financial markets, much less decentralized forums or global micropayment platforms for IoT. Fortunately, there are solutions , and we are actively working on implementing a roadmap to making them happen. The other major problem that blockchains have is privacy. As seductive as a blockchains other advantages are, neither companies or individuals are particularly keen on publishing all of their information onto a public database that can be arbitrarily read without any restrictions by ones own government, foreign governments, family members, coworkers and business competitors. Unlike with scalability, the solutions for privacy are in some cases easier to implement (though in other cases much much harder), many of them compatible with currently existing blockchains, but they are also much less s Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain could help us take back control of our privacy The Cambridge Analytica breaches show the dangers of leaking personal, sensitive data online but theres a way to avoid this Last modified on Sat 24 Mar 2018 22.56EDT Facebooks data centre in Prineville, Oregon. The company has suffered a major breach.Photograph: Facebook/EPA The Cambridge Analytica scandal poses some serious questions about the integrity of democracies in the information age. From Trump to Brexit , the dirty tricks apparently offered by CAs top executives should cause concern everywhere that elections happen. But the episode is also worrying because of its specific focus: data. We create reams of data every day every time we open a browser window and every time we make a contactless payment. We do this without thinking. The Cambridge Analytica news demonstrates the power that this data can have when we lose control of it. Facebook isnt the only huge data company to have suffered a major breach in recent years. In September it was revealed that 143 million Americans and 44 million Britons had sensitive information stolen from Equifax, the credit rating firm, including home addresses and social security numbers. The kicker in this case was that many of those affected had no idea the company was holding that information in the first place such is the staggering growth of data creation and collection, and the lack of controls enjoyed by consumers over who gets to keep it. Clearly, its time for a radical rethink about the data we are producing and the processes governing its collection and maintenance. The EU has already gone some way to addressing these questions through the introduction of General Data Protection Regulation , a set of new rules dictating how businesses can handle personal infor Continue reading >>

Blockchain's Roles In Strengthening Cybersecurity And Protecting Privacy

Blockchain's Roles In Strengthening Cybersecurity And Protecting Privacy

Volume 41, Issue 10 , November 2017, Pages 1027-1038 Blockchain's roles in strengthening cybersecurity and protecting privacy Author links open overlay panel NirKshetri Blockchain could provide a solution and high level of privacy protection. The cloud and blockchain have differences from security and privacy standpoints. Governments should provide legal clarity for parties to engage in smart contracts. Publicprivate partnership can enrich the blockchain ecosystem to enhance security and privacy. Blockchain can play a role in tracking sources of insecurity in supply chains related to IoT devices. This paper evaluates blockchain's roles in strengthening cybersecurity and protecting privacy. Since most of the data is currently stored in cloud data centers, it also compares how blockchain performs vis-vis the cloud in various aspects of security and privacy. Key underlying mechanisms related to the blockchain's impacts on the Internet of Things (IoT) security are also covered. From the security and privacy considerations, it highlights how blockchain-based solutions could possibly be, in many aspects, superior to the current IoT ecosystem, which mainly relies on centralized cloud servers through service providers. Using practical applications and real-world examples, the paper argues that blockchain's decentralized feature is likely to result in a low susceptibility to manipulation and forgery by malicious participants. Special consideration is also given to how blockchain-based identity and access management systems can address some of the key challenges associated with IoT security. The paper provides a detailed analysis and description of blockchain's roles in tracking the sources of insecurity in supply chains related to IoT devices. The paper also delves into how blo Continue reading >>

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains and Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained Apr 26, 2017 at 13:30 UTC|UpdatedApr 26, 2017 at 16:34 UTC Jacek Czarnecki is an attorney at Warsaw-based law firm Wardynski & Partners, where he specializes in areas including fintech, digital currencies and blockchain. In this opinion piece, Czarnecki discusses data protection laws in the EU,outlining in an easy-to-read overview how they present both challenges and opportunities for industry innovators. Not a day goes by whenwe don't hear about a new application for blockchain technology. A cryptographically secure distributed ledger (secured by means of member consensus )is turning out to be the solution for many problems and inefficiencies in the world around us. And this isn't just about technological improvements or the reconstruction of business models: different blockchain use cases will leave a mark on the economy, society and, perhaps, also on politics. Blockchains - especially public ones such as bitcoin or ethereum - break many paradigms, including legal ones. We are thus entering an interesting transition period when successive applications of this technology will encounter legal norms not always adapted to the new reality. One of the more interesting examplesto look at is personal data protection. Legal regulations protecting personal data are of great importance in many areas where blockchains already exist: finance, healthcare, electronic identification systems, etc. And whilethe application of existingdata protection regulations in blockchain technology will cause issues, there are solutions. First things first,why are blockchains a challenge for the protection of personal data? There are three main reasons: Blockchains are decentralized and distributed. It is virtually impossible to identi Continue reading >>

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments June 2017 - Blockchain | Cyber Security | Data Protection & Privacy | Encryption Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments Matteo Cagnazzo and Chris Wojzechowski, both researchers at the Institute for Internet Security, explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology. Blockchain is currently one of the most-hyped technologies. In this short article we will try to show where current downsides in blockchain security and privacy are. We will explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology and outline the challenges ahead. Transactions are globally published and are not encrypted in most applications. If this data is personal data, for example medical or financial data, this leads to regulatory and legal problems, especially in Germany. One solution is to store only encrypted data in the blockchain, which leads to another problem: If the key to decrypt specific information is lost, the data may not be recovered accurately. Furthermore, if a key is stolen and published, all the data is forever decrypted in the blockchain since the data cannot be altered. However, blockchain can also help to improve defensive cybersecurity strategies, especially in terms of identity and access: One attack scheme for man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks is to get the Certificate Authority (CA) to provide the user with forged public keys (Public-Key Substitution MITM attack). This can lead to the decryption of sensitive information. In a blockchain approach whereby users put their public keys in published blocks, the information is distributed over the participating nodes with links to previous and following blocks. This makes the public key immutable and it becomes harder for attackers to pub Continue reading >>

Blockchainand Privacy: Transparency And Innovation Pose Challenges For Data Protection

Blockchainand Privacy: Transparency And Innovation Pose Challenges For Data Protection

BlockchainAnd Privacy: Transparency And Innovation Pose Challenges for Data Protection A blockchain is a peer network of nodes that use a distributed ledger that can be used to track transactions involving value including money, votes, property, etc. The most well-known application of blockchain technology is bitcoin. Transactions on a blockchain are not regulated by any central counterparty: the individuals involved in a given transaction provide their information (including personal information), a record is created that can be verified by nodes in the network. In this sense, the users forming the community act as their own regulators. In its openness, blockchain technology is full of new opportunities to transact in different ways. However, in the case of a public blockchain, in order to allow security and certainty, every transaction is recorded on a publicly available ledger and the disclosed transaction information is unalterable. This latter rule is one of the most fundamental in the functioning of blockchain. Indeed, data can only be added to blockchain, rather than removed (as each node contains a replication of the blockchain). If a change is applied to a node, such change would be rejected by the other nodes in the network. It provides a great certainty over the time within the chain of transactions. Altering a node would be like activating a time machine: it is impossible not to change the present if you alter the past, the entire chain of information is thus modified. Although the above is justifiable from a technological standpoint (an can even facilitate anti-money laundering measures), blockchains inalterability can raiseissues for individuals who wish to protect their privacy (including as regards the nascent and evolving right to be forgotten, which i Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Privacy - Privacy Protection - United States

Blockchain And Privacy - Privacy Protection - United States

Discussions about "blockchain" technology seem to beeverywhere these days, with potential applications spanningindustries as diverse as banking, healthcare, real estate, lawenforcement, entertainment, and jewelry sales. Different applications ofblockchain present different and unique challenges andopportunities for data security and privacy, but there are threegeneral categories currently preoccupying legal privacy experts.The first involves the necessary bridge between thephysical-cyberspace boundary; the second involves sensitiveinformation actually stored on the blockchain; and the thirdinvolves the very existence of blockchains themselves. Blockchain is, at its core, a distributed ledger forstoring information about transactions. With blockchain, instead ofinputting and storing transactional information in some centrallocation (for example, logging a real estate transaction in acentral ledger at City Hall), the transaction is uploaded andstored as a "block" of information on thousands ofdifferent computers, or "nodes," located around theworld. Subsequent transactions can be input as a new block into anynode and, once the new transaction is verified (using a complicatedprocess beyond the scope of this post), the new block is added tothe existing blocks on all other nodes housing the information forthe original transaction, creating identical "chains" ofinformation inextricably linking the transactions back to theinitial block of information, or "genesis block." A blockchain network can be public, meaning any computer canfunction as a node, or it can be private, meaning only certainapproved computers are allowed access. The network can be governedby a strong central authority, a weak central authority, or nocentral authority at all. Meanwhile, the data in the blocks Continue reading >>

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