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Blockchain Data Protection

The Blockchain-gdpr Paradox

The Blockchain-gdpr Paradox

The General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR in short, will become enforceable from 25 May 2018. Fact is, this will have (and already has) a major impact in organisations both large and small. In this post I will highlight some topics on how GDPR relates to blockchain technology. Especially on how GDPR has the opposite effect in some ways, when it comes to making Blockchain Architecture compliant with GDPR. To explain why GDPR has to opposite effect in certain areas when applied to blockchain technology, we need to go over some basic concepts first. Both encryption and hashing are fundamental to blockchain technologies. In short, hashing is a one-way transformation of data to an unreadable piece of data (hash value). With encryption you can have a two-way transformation: You encrypt data with a certain key, so it becomes unreadable. With this key you can always decrypt this unreadable piece of data to the original value. By now, you will have heard that transactions on a blockchain are immutable. You cannot change these transactions once they are written on a blockchain. You cannot delete this data, since this would break the chain in a sense, rendering the complete blockchain useless. As an individual, you can browse through the complete history of all bitcoin transactions, making the transactions on this public blockchain technology completely transparent. Transparency in private blockchains is another matter, but it is still guaranteed in other ways. This post will be focused on permissioned blockchains where nodes are permissioned hosted although a lot of arguments below are still applicable to public blockchains. CRUD stands for Create-Read-Update-Delete. These are the basic operations of persistent storage . Now remember from the basic blockchain topics mentio Continue reading >>

What Does The Eus General Data Protection Regulation Mean For Open Blockchain Networks? | Coin Center

What Does The Eus General Data Protection Regulation Mean For Open Blockchain Networks? | Coin Center

What does the EUs General Data Protection Regulation mean for open blockchain networks? Thats the question many are asking themselves ahead of the sweeping new law taking effect next month. Bloomberg gives us the gist: Under the European Unions General Data Protection Regulation, companies will be required to completely erase the personal data of any citizen who requests that they do so. For businesses that use blockchain, specifically applications with publicly available data trails such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, truly purging that information could be impossible. Some blockchains, as currently designed, are incompatible with the GDPR, says Michle Finck, a lecturer in EU law at the University of Oxford. EU regulators, she says, will need to decide whether the technology must be barred from the region or reconfigure the new rules to permit an uneasy coexistence. As provocative as it may be to European regulators, the better conception may be to see the new law as incompatible with the reality of open blockchain networks. That is to say, the GDPR presumes that there will be central intermediaries that can erase information, but the world is trending toward ever more decentralized and immutable technologies. While firms may alter their behavior to comply with the new law, decentralized networks are global and unowned and wont change. The result of the law, then, may be that Europe is closing itself off from the future of the Internet to its detriment. That said, were optimistic that our European friends will come to see that their legitimate privacy concerns are best addressed not through law, but through decentralizing technology itself. Open blockchain networks, cryptocurrency, and general encryption are the backbone of a new more secure and private Internet on which in Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain could help us take back control of our privacy The Cambridge Analytica breaches show the dangers of leaking personal, sensitive data online but theres a way to avoid this Last modified on Sat 24 Mar 2018 22.56EDT Facebooks data centre in Prineville, Oregon. The company has suffered a major breach.Photograph: Facebook/EPA The Cambridge Analytica scandal poses some serious questions about the integrity of democracies in the information age. From Trump to Brexit , the dirty tricks apparently offered by CAs top executives should cause concern everywhere that elections happen. But the episode is also worrying because of its specific focus: data. We create reams of data every day every time we open a browser window and every time we make a contactless payment. We do this without thinking. The Cambridge Analytica news demonstrates the power that this data can have when we lose control of it. Facebook isnt the only huge data company to have suffered a major breach in recent years. In September it was revealed that 143 million Americans and 44 million Britons had sensitive information stolen from Equifax, the credit rating firm, including home addresses and social security numbers. The kicker in this case was that many of those affected had no idea the company was holding that information in the first place such is the staggering growth of data creation and collection, and the lack of controls enjoyed by consumers over who gets to keep it. Clearly, its time for a radical rethink about the data we are producing and the processes governing its collection and maintenance. The EU has already gone some way to addressing these questions through the introduction of General Data Protection Regulation , a set of new rules dictating how businesses can handle personal infor Continue reading >>

Blockchain Data Protection Law | Deloitte Legal Deutschland

Blockchain Data Protection Law | Deloitte Legal Deutschland

IV. Potential conflicts with data protection law Blockchain applications are currently amongst the most discussed topics when it comes to the precursors of the fourth industrial revolution. Within the global Deloitte network, the Deloitte Blockchain Institute was founded in order to analyze and consult on the technical and economic potentials and risks of blockchain applications for sector-specific industries (e.g. telecommunications or media ). The following article deals with blockchain applications from the perspective of data protection law, in particular the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 (General Data Protection Regulation - "GDPR"), which will enter into force in May 2018. In addition to an approximation to the term blockchain (cf. section I.), the main question addressed by this article is, to what extent this technology will impact on those areas of life that have been traditionally regulated by analogue law and institutions (cf. section II.). Finally, the potential of blockchain is briefly addressed as an instrument of data protection (cf. section III.) and explains the extent to which data protection law may create certain boundaries to potential applications of blockchain technology (cf. section IV.). As the term already suggests, one of the essential characteristics of a blockchain is the concatenation of blocks. More specifically, such blocks are comprised of a certain number of cumulative records, the contents of which are interconnected in such manner that each subsequent block contains a cryptographic image of the previous block. Thus it can be ensured that data cannot be manipulated unrecognized after the respective data has been entered into a block, completed and "attached" to a subsequent blo Continue reading >>

Major Blockchain Group Says Europe Should Exempt Bitcoin From New Data Privacy Rule

Major Blockchain Group Says Europe Should Exempt Bitcoin From New Data Privacy Rule

Major blockchain group says Europe should exempt Bitcoin from new data privacy rule Since people can store personal data in blockchains, the technology could fall under the purview of the upcoming European change to privacy law. But blockchain technology may be fundamentally incompatible with Europes new privacy rules, Washington, DC think tank Coin Center said today in a new post . The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will take effect on May 25th this year, more than two years after it was first signed into law. Under the new rule, if an EU citizen requests that their personal data be erased from a companys records, the company will have to obey. But with blockchain, a complete erasure of any stored personal data might not be possible, experts told The Verge. Modifying data on a blockchain is very hard, Oxford Law lecturer Michle Finck told The Verge, If you were to delete or modify data from the blockchain to comply with the GDPRs rights to amendment or the right to be forgotten, you wouldnt just change that piece of data, but the hash of the block containing the data and of all subsequent blocks. Finck added, I think its safe to say that currently, most blockchains are incompatible with the GDPR, especially permissionless blockchains. She said that although many blockchain projects are currently thinking about how to design tech that would be GDPR-compliant, the problem is that there are so many points of tension...way beyond the right [for personal data] to be forgotten. Its the basics of blockchain technology. By their very nature, transactions on a blockchain arent meant to be deleted but to be recorded permanently. It would also be difficult to stop every place transmitting a Bitcoin transaction. This is by design, Andries Van Humbeeck, co-founder and b Continue reading >>

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments June 2017 - Blockchain | Cyber Security | Data Protection & Privacy | Encryption Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments Matteo Cagnazzo and Chris Wojzechowski, both researchers at the Institute for Internet Security, explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology. Blockchain is currently one of the most-hyped technologies. In this short article we will try to show where current downsides in blockchain security and privacy are. We will explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology and outline the challenges ahead. Transactions are globally published and are not encrypted in most applications. If this data is personal data, for example medical or financial data, this leads to regulatory and legal problems, especially in Germany. One solution is to store only encrypted data in the blockchain, which leads to another problem: If the key to decrypt specific information is lost, the data may not be recovered accurately. Furthermore, if a key is stolen and published, all the data is forever decrypted in the blockchain since the data cannot be altered. However, blockchain can also help to improve defensive cybersecurity strategies, especially in terms of identity and access: One attack scheme for man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks is to get the Certificate Authority (CA) to provide the user with forged public keys (Public-Key Substitution MITM attack). This can lead to the decryption of sensitive information. In a blockchain approach whereby users put their public keys in published blocks, the information is distributed over the participating nodes with links to previous and following blocks. This makes the public key immutable and it becomes harder for attackers to pub Continue reading >>

Blockchain Prevalence, Privacy And General Data Protection Regulation

Blockchain Prevalence, Privacy And General Data Protection Regulation

Blockchain prevalence, privacy and General Data Protection Regulation Blockchain prevalence, privacy and General Data Protection Regulation 05th Apr `18, 10:10 AM in Privacy / Security Online security has always been a major concern for individuals on the internet. Whether the general population knows Online security has always been a major concern for individuals on the internet. Whether the general population knows it or not, there are issues here which destroy the goodwill of those who decided to give major online industries the benefit of the doubt. Hot off of the heels of Facebooks recent drama concerning stored user text message data, this problem is finally seeing some changes within the EU. These changes adopt components that have long been key to the world of cryptocurrencies, specifically those surrounding the technology of blockchain. So, where do these changes come from, who will they effect, and what advantages can the end user hope to see? As is often the case with developments in modern online systems and the way in which they integrate with the world, regulations are playing catch-up . The rapid development of technology means that laws and regulations can go out of date quickly. Unfortunately, this means that loopholes and similar security flaws can appear in unpatched systems, potentially exposing both customers and businesses to data theft. Understand this was the key as to why the EU has decided to enact new regulations on big data. One of these methods comes in the form of the General Data Protection Regulation , or GDPR, which takes effect on May 28, 2018. In general terms, this law aims to require firms to first gain consent on the exact type of data which they will receive from users, and for them to clearly state the ultimate purpose for which Continue reading >>

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains and Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained Apr 26, 2017 at 13:30 UTC|UpdatedApr 26, 2017 at 16:34 UTC Jacek Czarnecki is an attorney at Warsaw-based law firm Wardynski & Partners, where he specializes in areas including fintech, digital currencies and blockchain. In this opinion piece, Czarnecki discusses data protection laws in the EU,outlining in an easy-to-read overview how they present both challenges and opportunities for industry innovators. Not a day goes by whenwe don't hear about a new application for blockchain technology. A cryptographically secure distributed ledger (secured by means of member consensus )is turning out to be the solution for many problems and inefficiencies in the world around us. And this isn't just about technological improvements or the reconstruction of business models: different blockchain use cases will leave a mark on the economy, society and, perhaps, also on politics. Blockchains - especially public ones such as bitcoin or ethereum - break many paradigms, including legal ones. We are thus entering an interesting transition period when successive applications of this technology will encounter legal norms not always adapted to the new reality. One of the more interesting examplesto look at is personal data protection. Legal regulations protecting personal data are of great importance in many areas where blockchains already exist: finance, healthcare, electronic identification systems, etc. And whilethe application of existingdata protection regulations in blockchain technology will cause issues, there are solutions. First things first,why are blockchains a challenge for the protection of personal data? There are three main reasons: Blockchains are decentralized and distributed. It is virtually impossible to identi Continue reading >>

What Blockchain Is And What It Can Do For Your Data Protection - Acronis

What Blockchain Is And What It Can Do For Your Data Protection - Acronis

Acronis Notary is a new, innovative service based on blockchain technology . But before we move into that, lets define what a blockchain is. It can be known to some due to its usage in Bitcoin currency, but its a lot more than just bitcoin technology and it can be used in a much wider set of scenarios, such as for data protection. Many industries have already started to use blockchain or are actively looking into it. For example, cloud storage, art and ownership, anti-counterfeiting, governance, Internet of things, and digital identity. Ablockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of records that are secured from tampering and revision. It consists of data-structureblocks that may contain data or programs, with each block holding batches of individualtransactions, and the results of any blockchain executables. Every nodein a decentralized system has a copy of the blockchain. No centralized "official" copy exists and no user is "trusted" more than any other. The blockchain resides across a network of computers (nodes). Whenever new transactions occur, the blockchain is authenticated across this distributed network, before the transaction can be included as the next block on the chain. So, the consensus of nodes is required to add the block into the blockchain. The blockchain creates trust because a complete copy of the chain, which shows every transaction, is held by the entire network. If someone attempts to cheat the system, they can be easily identified. To summarize, a blockchain is an append-only database with transaction order and the following data protection properties: Acronis Notary service: How does it work? Acronis Notary is the universal solution for timestamping and fingerprinting any data objects and streams. It is impr Continue reading >>

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving GDPR compliance and data privacy using blockchain technology CxOs, data engineers, programmers, and software developers A basic understanding of blockchain technology Learn how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulation The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an EU regulation acting as a one-stop shop for all data privacy rules across the EU. GDPR governs all global entities dealing with EU citizens data in any form or shape. Ajay Mothukuri, Arunkumar Ramanatha, and Vijay Srinivas Agneeswaran explain how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement GDPR. GDPR aims to ensure the data privacy of EU citizens through a single set of rules for data protection, increased responsibility and accountability for those entities processing personal data, required notification of any data breaches in stipulated timelines, the pseudonymization of personal data in such a way that resulting data cannot be attributed to a specific data subject without use of additional nonpersonal information, more accessible personal data, the ability to transfer personal data from one service provider to another easily (data portability), a right to be forgotten, and data protection by design and by default. These rules apply to all foreign companies and entities that are active in EU market and offer their services to EU citizens, and there are heavy sanctions for any violations, that can total up to 4% of annual global turnover. Blockchain technologies can help companies fall in line with GDPR directives. Pseudonymization is built into the blockchain, as all the data in a blockchain is encrypted and undersigned with the users digital signatures Continue reading >>

Can Blockchain Satisfy Gdprs User Data Protection Requirements For Targeted Ads?

Can Blockchain Satisfy Gdprs User Data Protection Requirements For Targeted Ads?

Stay marketing and tech-savvy. Get the latest in martech - subscribe to MarTech Today. Can blockchain satisfy GDPRs user data protection requirements for targeted ads? New York City-based blockchain ad tech firm MadHive thinks so. Barry Levine on August 16, 2017 at 3:59 pm Next spring, GDPR could upset everything in digital marketing. Thats because, when the European Unions General Data Protection Regulation ( GDPR) goes into effect in May 2018, it will require a variety of new permissions and protections for consumer data. Companies doing business in the EU could face massive fines, but brands elsewhere might also be at risk, since the regulations apply to the use of EU citizens data in any country. Some site- and app-based permission templates for GDPR have emerged, such as from Janrain and Evidon . But what is also needed is a reliable mechanism to manage permissions and privacy across targeted ad campaigns. Thats where blockchain technology comes in, says Stacy Huggins, co-founder and CMO of the blockchain-based ad tech platform MadHive . Huggins acknowledged that blockchain technology is not yet ready for prime time, since there are latency issues that MadHive and others are working on. She said her company is currently conducting proof-of-concept development and testing, with the expectation that speed issues will be resolved by the time GDPRs Zero Day hits. If latency is solved, blockchain could act as a kind of automatic governor on targeted ad campaigns. A specially-crafted blockchain layer could be called during the regular ad-buying and delivery process of, say, a supply-side platform (SSP), perhaps as a lookup before the ad is served. For the near future, she said, blockchain can only handle programmatic direct ad sales, manual direct ad sales and private m Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Data Protection Law: When Anonymous Data Becomes Personal

Blockchain And Data Protection Law: When Anonymous Data Becomes Personal

Blockchain and Data Protection Law: When Anonymous Data Becomes Personal December 2017 - Blockchain | Data Protection & Privacy | IT Law | GDPR Blockchain and Data Protection Law: When Anonymous Data Becomes Personal Data processing on a blockchain is widely perceived to be completely anonymous and therefore immune to data protection laws which are applicable only for processing of personal data. However, this perceived immunity is not at all absolute rather, data processing on a blockchain may fall under data protection laws. Lawyers Natalie Eichler and Thorsten Jansen demonstrate some current and future applications of blockchain technology where data protection laws may in fact apply. At first sight, data stored on a blockchain appear to be anonymous, consisting mostly of hashed values and cryptic wallet ID numbers which cannot be directly linked back to the individual to which they relate. As a result, some may assume that, due to the apparent anonymity, there is no room for the application of European data protection laws. Data stored on a blockchain may not be considered anonymous, but as personal data, because the individual person is identifiable. In fact, a closer look at European data protection laws pertaining to the identifiability of an individual person reveals that data stored on a blockchain may not be considered anonymous, but as personal data, because the individual person is identifiable. According to recital 26 of Directive 95/46/EC and recital 26 of the GDPR , when assessing whether an individual person is identifiable, all sources of information and all measures must be considered that are reasonably likely to be used to identify a person. This includes measures and information sources available not only to the person currently processing the data Continue reading >>

How To Achieve Data Privacy In Blockchain Ledgers

How To Achieve Data Privacy In Blockchain Ledgers

Join our community of Direct2DellEMC blog readers and never miss another post by subscribing to our email newsletter. Fill out the brief form below and you will get a confirmation e-mail for your subscription. I agree to receive Direct2DellEMC blog notifications and email communications regarding offers and announcements from DellEMC, its group of companies, subsidiaries and business partners. I understand that I may unsubscribe from these communications at any time by using the unsubscribe link at the bottom of the DellEMC email. Almost finished... We need to confirm your email address. To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you. If you do not receive the confirmation email after signing up, please try checking your Junk/Spam/Bulk E-mail folder. In 2017, the blockchain concept took center stage. It was suddenly everywhere in the news, and people were talking about it as if it were the Holy Grail. Just consider the constant stream of news on the Bitcoin cryptocurrency and payment system, one of the early blockchain implementations. And now people are thinking more broadly, and talking about all kinds of use cases for blockchain ledgers from processing land titles and loans to sharing product construction plans. Thats all exciting stuff. But the story shouldnt stop there. Theres another side to the blockchain concept that people need to focus on: data privacy which is currently a missing link in the blockchain. Lets take Bitcoin as an example. In order to let the simple smart contract of Bitcoin validate the distributed ledger continuously, all transaction data including amount, source account and target account must be available to all network participants in unencrypted form. This means that the much-heralded anonymity on Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology Is On A Collision Course With Eu Privacy Law

Blockchain Technology Is On A Collision Course With Eu Privacy Law

Blockchain technology is on a collision course with EU privacy law Those who have heard of "blockchain" technology generally know it as the underpinning of the Bitcoin virtual currency, but there are myriad organizations planning different kinds of applications for it: executing contracts , modernizing land registries , even providing new systems for identity management . There's one huge problem on the horizon, though: European privacy law. The bloc's General Data Protection law, which will come into effect in a few months' time, says people must be able to demand that their personal data is rectified or deleted under many circumstances. A blockchain is essentially a growing, shared record of past activity that's distributed across many computers, and the whole point is that this chain of transactions (or other fragments of information) is in practice unchangeable this is what ensures the reliability of the information stored in the blockchain. For blockchain projects that involve the storage of personal data, these two facts do not mix well. And with sanctions for flouting the GDPR including fines of up to 20 million or 4 percent of global revenues, many businesses may find the ultra-buzzy blockchain trend a lot less palatable than they first thought. "[The GDPR] is agnostic about which specific technology is used for the processing, but it introduces a mandatory obligation for data controllers to apply the principle of 'data protection by design'," said Jan Philipp Albrecht, the member of the European Parliament who shepherded the GDPR through the legislative process. "This means for example that the data subject's rights can be easily exercised, including the right to deletion of data when it is no longer needed. "This is where blockchain applications will run into Continue reading >>

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology In the fourth blog post by Austrian law firm Stadler Vlkel Arthur Stadler and Sarah Pichler focus on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Blockchain Technology. General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology The most important reason for the interest in Blockchain and the latest discussions about its potential areas of application are the positive attributes linked to its mode of operation: security, anonymity and data integrity, without any third party serving as an authority and being in control of the transactions. Blockchains thus are not only decentralized, but based on distributed ledgers. Data integrity is ensured by the creation of new blocks in a consensus procedure, meaning that each subsequent block contains a cryptographic image of the previous block. Each block therefore consists of multiple data points. This also leads to the fact that data cannot be manipulated or deleted once it is written, entered into the block and linked to the previously written block. Transparency in all aspects is given, as the public can see all transactions, but allegedly without information linking these transactions to identities. Personal Data in Blockchains Anonymous Content? From a legal point of view, many aspects have to be considered when applying effective legal frameworks to rather new technical systems like Blockchain national legislation as well as EU law have to be taken into account. One of the most recent Acts on EU level creating implementation requirements of great impact for companies is the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 (General Data Protection Regulation, Continue reading >>

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