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Blockchain Data Privacy

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving Gdpr Compliance And Data Privacy Using Blockchain Technology

Achieving GDPR compliance and data privacy using blockchain technology CxOs, data engineers, programmers, and software developers A basic understanding of blockchain technology Learn how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulation The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an EU regulation acting as a one-stop shop for all data privacy rules across the EU. GDPR governs all global entities dealing with EU citizens data in any form or shape. Ajay Mothukuri, Arunkumar Ramanatha, and Vijay Srinivas Agneeswaran explain how to use open source blockchain technologies such as Hyperledger to implement GDPR. GDPR aims to ensure the data privacy of EU citizens through a single set of rules for data protection, increased responsibility and accountability for those entities processing personal data, required notification of any data breaches in stipulated timelines, the pseudonymization of personal data in such a way that resulting data cannot be attributed to a specific data subject without use of additional nonpersonal information, more accessible personal data, the ability to transfer personal data from one service provider to another easily (data portability), a right to be forgotten, and data protection by design and by default. These rules apply to all foreign companies and entities that are active in EU market and offer their services to EU citizens, and there are heavy sanctions for any violations, that can total up to 4% of annual global turnover. Blockchain technologies can help companies fall in line with GDPR directives. Pseudonymization is built into the blockchain, as all the data in a blockchain is encrypted and undersigned with the users digital signatures Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain Could Help Us Take Back Control Of Our Privacy

How Blockchain could help us take back control of our privacy The Cambridge Analytica breaches show the dangers of leaking personal, sensitive data online but theres a way to avoid this Last modified on Sat 24 Mar 2018 22.56EDT Facebooks data centre in Prineville, Oregon. The company has suffered a major breach.Photograph: Facebook/EPA The Cambridge Analytica scandal poses some serious questions about the integrity of democracies in the information age. From Trump to Brexit , the dirty tricks apparently offered by CAs top executives should cause concern everywhere that elections happen. But the episode is also worrying because of its specific focus: data. We create reams of data every day every time we open a browser window and every time we make a contactless payment. We do this without thinking. The Cambridge Analytica news demonstrates the power that this data can have when we lose control of it. Facebook isnt the only huge data company to have suffered a major breach in recent years. In September it was revealed that 143 million Americans and 44 million Britons had sensitive information stolen from Equifax, the credit rating firm, including home addresses and social security numbers. The kicker in this case was that many of those affected had no idea the company was holding that information in the first place such is the staggering growth of data creation and collection, and the lack of controls enjoyed by consumers over who gets to keep it. Clearly, its time for a radical rethink about the data we are producing and the processes governing its collection and maintenance. The EU has already gone some way to addressing these questions through the introduction of General Data Protection Regulation , a set of new rules dictating how businesses can handle personal infor Continue reading >>

Fin Identity, Privacy, And The Blockchain

Fin Identity, Privacy, And The Blockchain

In the offline world, identity and privacy are rather straightforward. Peoples identities are proven by simply being who they are, and privacy reflects the ability to control what others know about their identity. Occasionally, tangible objects such as drivers licenses or bills are required to verify identity with businesses or government entities. In the current interconnected and online world, we instead use various digital markers to demonstrate identity. These markers somehow prove we are who we say but are often only tangentially related to the service being accessed and require us to relinquish a significant amount of privacy. There are a number of problems with the current systems used as proxies for identity, but new technologies like blockchain might be able to help us reclaim our online (and offline) selves. Markers of identity are often required to be very personal pieces of data. Consider the litany of personal information collected when someone opens a checking account, such as street address and identification (drivers license or passport). Its easy to take these pieces of data for granted, as weve generally become accustomed to handing them over at the drop of a hat. But lets take a moment to consider what giving up these pieces of identity really means and whether its really necessary. In handing over a passport to a banker, a person gives the bank full permission to record not only their date and place of birth, but also everywhere he or she has traveled. This might not seem like a big deal, but what does place of birth really have to do with whether or not a bank allows someone to deposit money in their accounts? This isnt to say that banks shouldnt require identity verification; regulations like KYC and AML exist for a reason. However, because our cu Continue reading >>

Dspace@mit: Invisible Ink : Blockchain For Data Privacy

[email protected]: Invisible Ink : Blockchain For Data Privacy

Other Contributors:Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. Department:Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. Publisher:Massachusetts Institute of Technology The problem of maintaining complete control over and transparency with regard to our digital identity is growing more urgent as our lives become more dependent on online and digital services. What once was rightfully ours and under our control is now spread among uncountable entities across many locations. We have built a platform that securely distributes encrypted user-sensitive data. It uses the Bitcoin blockchain to keep a trust-less audit trail for data interactions and to manage access to user data. Our platform offers advantages to both users and service providers. The user enjoys the heightened transparency, control, and security of their personal data, while the service provider becomes much less vulnerable to single point-of failures and breaches, which in turn decreases their exposure to information-security liability, thereby saving them money and protecting their brand. Our work extends an idea developed by the author and two collaborators, a peer-to- peer network that uses blockchain technology and off-blockchain storage to securely distribute sensitive data in a decentralized manner using a custom blockchain protocol. Our two main contributions are: 1. developing this platform and 2. analyzing its feasibility in real-world applications. This includes designing a protocol for data authentication that runs on an Internet scale peer-to-peer network, abstracting complex interactions with encrypted data, building a dashboard for data auditing and management, as well as building se Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technologies And The Data Privacy Revolution: Who Has The Power Over Userdata?

Blockchain Technologies And The Data Privacy Revolution: Who Has The Power Over Userdata?

Blockchain Technologies and the Data Privacy Revolution: Who Has the Power Over UserData? It makes sense to be protective of our possessions. But what about intangible possessions like data? People all around the world are increasingly becoming more and more protective over their personal data, with the underlying sentiment of why should someone else profit off of information about me? Today, theres one key problem thats stirring up the data privacy world, and thats who owns user data? In actual fact, data doesnt belong to someone just because its about them. So even though you might not own your data, do you still have power over it? We only have to look at the likes of Amazon, Facebook, and LinkedIn to know that data privacy has, for all intents and purposes, blown up in the last few years. These networks all keep tabs on who we are, what we do, and how we behave online in order to better serve us. But is this a ploy for something else? Something more sinister? There are plenty of people out there that believe big data is being used to drum up personalized political propaganda, to infiltrate our rational minds and change how we think and vote. In fact, this was hinted at during both the US election and the EU referendum. A series of articles claimed that a company called Cambridge Analytica swayed both major political events by mining peoples data from Facebook, using it to predict their personalities, and serving up ads tailored specifically to them. This might sound like something out of a dystopian novel, but there are a lot of people out there who believe it is happening right now and on a much deeper level than we could ever imagine. Which is why the answer to who has the power over our data might well be changing. You see, the concept of data is evolving every Continue reading >>

Privacy On The Blockchain

Privacy On The Blockchain

co-founder @scalarcapital, burner, #bitcoin enthusiast, previously growth eng @coinbase Privacy in an open society requires anonymous transaction systems. Until now, cash has been the primary such system An anonymous system empowers individuals to reveal their identity when desired and only when desired. Co-founder of the cypherpunk movement, UC Berkeley mathematician Financial matters are often ill-suited for public attention Theres a popular misconception that Bitcoin is anonymous and untraceable. Its an understandable mistake given Bitcoins first popular use case was the infamous Silk Road a market known for dealing in illicit substances. The truth is that Bitcoin is pseudonymous and fully traceable. In fact, every transaction in Bitcoin maps inputs to outputs, allowing anyone to follow the money trivially. Satoshi even went so far as defining a bitcoin literally as a history of its custody: We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures. Bitcoins transactions are tracked as a graph that resides on the blockchain permanently. If someone learns of information that links your identity to your bitcoin address, they can learn a ton about you. Its possible to infer your spending patterns (where you spend, how much, how often), your wealth and income, whom you associate with. How do you feel knowing those whom you transact with may be able to learn so many personal facts about you? There are countless ways that identities can be linked to a wallet address. Some people share their address publicly. The exchange you bought your bitcoin from has both your identity and your addresses. Merchants you pay can make the association. Two companies, Elliptic and Chainalysis , are in the business of linking identities to addresses, and compiling all their insights into Continue reading >>

A Cyber & Data Security Guide To Blockchain Technology:

A Cyber & Data Security Guide To Blockchain Technology:

A Cyber & Data Security Guide to Blockchain Technology: In the world of increasing cyber-crimes and businesses struggle to cope with data security, its regulation and privacy concerns, can blockchain be a great relief? Previously I have discussed the potential of blockchain in terms of security and privacy of the transactions. In this post, we will see this in a more comprehensive way to reveal its capabilities specifically for cyber and data security proposes. The blockchain is the distributed file system that keeps files copies of the participants who agree on the changes by mutual consensus. The file consists of blocks, where every block has a cryptographic signature of the last block, making an immutable record. Judd Bagley, the director of communications at the Salt Lake City-based Overstock.co , states that blockchain trading is much secured than any current system. The distributed network that verifies the transactions integrity and related accounts balances make even the smartest attack quite impossible. He also said that blockchain technology is fully transparent and transactions cannot be changed. Putting immutability and transparency together, it becomes a dream scenario for the compliance officers, regulators and auditors. Its not only stock trading. The blockchain is now hyped as the solution to replace all inefficient information processing set ups, like recording of the property transfers, legal contracts and escrow services. One thing almost all of these systems hold in common is the centralized aspect. In most of the cases, there is just one control system that is hosted on a single computer or a set of computers from one place. There is no failover in the place if something goes wrong, either through computers own failure or a hacking attack. Decentra Continue reading >>

Privacy On The Blockchain

Privacy On The Blockchain

Blockchains are a powerful technology, as regular readers of the blog already likely agree. They allow for a large number of interactions to be codified and carried out in a way that greatly increases reliability, removes business and political risks associated with the process being managed by a central entity, and reduces the need for trust. They create a platform on which applications from different companies and even of different types can run together, allowing for extremely efficient and seamless interaction, and leave an audit trail that anyone can check to make sure that everything is being processed correctly. However, when I and others talk to companies about building their applications on a blockchain, two primary issues always come up: scalability and privacy. Scalability is a serious problem; current blockchains, processing 3-20 transactions per second, are several orders of mangitude away from the amount of processing power needed to run mainstream payment systems or financial markets, much less decentralized forums or global micropayment platforms for IoT. Fortunately, there are solutions , and we are actively working on implementing a roadmap to making them happen. The other major problem that blockchains have is privacy. As seductive as a blockchains other advantages are, neither companies or individuals are particularly keen on publishing all of their information onto a public database that can be arbitrarily read without any restrictions by ones own government, foreign governments, family members, coworkers and business competitors. Unlike with scalability, the solutions for privacy are in some cases easier to implement (though in other cases much much harder), many of them compatible with currently existing blockchains, but they are also much less s Continue reading >>

Major Blockchain Group Says Europe Should Exempt Bitcoin From New Data Privacy Rule

Major Blockchain Group Says Europe Should Exempt Bitcoin From New Data Privacy Rule

Major blockchain group says Europe should exempt Bitcoin from new data privacy rule Since people can store personal data in blockchains, the technology could fall under the purview of the upcoming European change to privacy law. But blockchain technology may be fundamentally incompatible with Europes new privacy rules, Washington, DC think tank Coin Center said today in a new post . The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will take effect on May 25th this year, more than two years after it was first signed into law. Under the new rule, if an EU citizen requests that their personal data be erased from a companys records, the company will have to obey. But with blockchain, a complete erasure of any stored personal data might not be possible, experts told The Verge. Modifying data on a blockchain is very hard, Oxford Law lecturer Michle Finck told The Verge, If you were to delete or modify data from the blockchain to comply with the GDPRs rights to amendment or the right to be forgotten, you wouldnt just change that piece of data, but the hash of the block containing the data and of all subsequent blocks. Finck added, I think its safe to say that currently, most blockchains are incompatible with the GDPR, especially permissionless blockchains. She said that although many blockchain projects are currently thinking about how to design tech that would be GDPR-compliant, the problem is that there are so many points of tension...way beyond the right [for personal data] to be forgotten. Its the basics of blockchain technology. By their very nature, transactions on a blockchain arent meant to be deleted but to be recorded permanently. It would also be difficult to stop every place transmitting a Bitcoin transaction. This is by design, Andries Van Humbeeck, co-founder and b Continue reading >>

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains And Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained

Blockchains and Personal Data Protection Regulations Explained Apr 26, 2017 at 13:30 UTC|UpdatedApr 26, 2017 at 16:34 UTC Jacek Czarnecki is an attorney at Warsaw-based law firm Wardynski & Partners, where he specializes in areas including fintech, digital currencies and blockchain. In this opinion piece, Czarnecki discusses data protection laws in the EU,outlining in an easy-to-read overview how they present both challenges and opportunities for industry innovators. Not a day goes by whenwe don't hear about a new application for blockchain technology. A cryptographically secure distributed ledger (secured by means of member consensus )is turning out to be the solution for many problems and inefficiencies in the world around us. And this isn't just about technological improvements or the reconstruction of business models: different blockchain use cases will leave a mark on the economy, society and, perhaps, also on politics. Blockchains - especially public ones such as bitcoin or ethereum - break many paradigms, including legal ones. We are thus entering an interesting transition period when successive applications of this technology will encounter legal norms not always adapted to the new reality. One of the more interesting examplesto look at is personal data protection. Legal regulations protecting personal data are of great importance in many areas where blockchains already exist: finance, healthcare, electronic identification systems, etc. And whilethe application of existingdata protection regulations in blockchain technology will cause issues, there are solutions. First things first,why are blockchains a challenge for the protection of personal data? There are three main reasons: Blockchains are decentralized and distributed. It is virtually impossible to identi Continue reading >>

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation And Blockchain Technology

General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology In the fourth blog post by Austrian law firm Stadler Vlkel Arthur Stadler and Sarah Pichler focus on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Blockchain Technology. General Data Protection Regulation and Blockchain Technology The most important reason for the interest in Blockchain and the latest discussions about its potential areas of application are the positive attributes linked to its mode of operation: security, anonymity and data integrity, without any third party serving as an authority and being in control of the transactions. Blockchains thus are not only decentralized, but based on distributed ledgers. Data integrity is ensured by the creation of new blocks in a consensus procedure, meaning that each subsequent block contains a cryptographic image of the previous block. Each block therefore consists of multiple data points. This also leads to the fact that data cannot be manipulated or deleted once it is written, entered into the block and linked to the previously written block. Transparency in all aspects is given, as the public can see all transactions, but allegedly without information linking these transactions to identities. Personal Data in Blockchains Anonymous Content? From a legal point of view, many aspects have to be considered when applying effective legal frameworks to rather new technical systems like Blockchain national legislation as well as EU law have to be taken into account. One of the most recent Acts on EU level creating implementation requirements of great impact for companies is the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 (General Data Protection Regulation, Continue reading >>

Why Blockchain Technology Matters For Healthcare Security

Why Blockchain Technology Matters For Healthcare Security

Why Blockchain Technology Matters for Healthcare Security Blockchain technology is quickly becoming a hot topic in the healthcare industry, but covered entities need to understand how it potentially affects their healthcare data security measures. With technological innovations continuing to find a place in the healthcare industry, health data security must remain a top priority for organizations of all sizes. More electronic data is available than ever before, and covered entities are looking to find the most efficient and secure ways to manage it all. Blockchain technology organizes data so transactions can be verified and recorded through the consensus of all parties involved.It is perhaps best known for being used in the Bitcoin world and has an authoritative ledger that records events. For healthcare, this means that any data entered into a computer system or EHR/EMR can have each transaction or entry validated. This could include anything from a financial transfer to an update to an individuals personal health record. Each new action is verified against an authoritative ledger of previous events. With blockchain, each member who can enter information has his or her own copy of the ledger instead of the data being held in one location. However, no new transaction can be approved unless a majority agrees that the requested action is indeed accurate. This could greatly affect healthcare as providers often have their own versions of a patients record and these records are not always validated against one another. If a patient visits four different providers and each provider makes a separate error in the record, then that patient could encounter issues when it comes to his or her personal care. Could Blockchain Control Population Health Management Costs? How does blo Continue reading >>

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain To Protect Personal Data

Decentralizing Privacy: Using Blockchain to Protect Personal Data Abstract: The recent increase in reported incidents of surveillance and security breaches compromising users' privacy call into question the current model, in which third-parties collect and control massive amounts of personal data. Bit coin has demonstrated in the financial space that trusted, auditable computing is possible using a decentralized network of peers accompanied by a public ledger. In this paper, we describe a decentralized personal data management system that ensures users own and control their data. We implement a protocol that turns a block chain into an automated access-control manager that does not require trust in a third party. Unlike Bit coin, transactions in our system are not strictly financial -- they are used to carry instructions, such as storing, querying and sharing data. Finally, we discuss possible future extensions to block chains that could harness them into a well-rounded solution for trusted computing problems in society. Continue reading >>

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security And Privacy In Blockchain Environments

Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments June 2017 - Blockchain | Cyber Security | Data Protection & Privacy | Encryption Security and Privacy in Blockchain Environments Matteo Cagnazzo and Chris Wojzechowski, both researchers at the Institute for Internet Security, explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology. Blockchain is currently one of the most-hyped technologies. In this short article we will try to show where current downsides in blockchain security and privacy are. We will explore how security and privacy can be enhanced by blockchain technology and outline the challenges ahead. Transactions are globally published and are not encrypted in most applications. If this data is personal data, for example medical or financial data, this leads to regulatory and legal problems, especially in Germany. One solution is to store only encrypted data in the blockchain, which leads to another problem: If the key to decrypt specific information is lost, the data may not be recovered accurately. Furthermore, if a key is stolen and published, all the data is forever decrypted in the blockchain since the data cannot be altered. However, blockchain can also help to improve defensive cybersecurity strategies, especially in terms of identity and access: One attack scheme for man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks is to get the Certificate Authority (CA) to provide the user with forged public keys (Public-Key Substitution MITM attack). This can lead to the decryption of sensitive information. In a blockchain approach whereby users put their public keys in published blocks, the information is distributed over the participating nodes with links to previous and following blocks. This makes the public key immutable and it becomes harder for attackers to pub Continue reading >>

Data Security: How Blockchain Transforms Five Different Markets

Data Security: How Blockchain Transforms Five Different Markets

Data security: How blockchain transforms five different markets 26th Apr `17, 08:00 AM in Privacy / Security Security is a huge concern for everyone, especially when it comes to online transactions. The increasing number of Security is a huge concern for everyone, especially when it comes to online transactions. The increasing number of cases of fraud, hacking and unauthorized personnel access of data poses a significant risk for all businesses. So, how do we secure online transactions? According to many data security experts , the answer lies in two buzz words: big data and blockchain. Both have the potential to change the way businesses operate and can help businesses become more secure and efficient. Satoshi Nakamotos landmark technology, a blockchain is a decentralized and distributed digital ledger that records transactions across many computers in such a way that the registered transactions cannot be altered retroactively. It accepts inputs from several different parties and can only be changed when there is a consensus among the group, making it more secure and eliminating the need for a central authority to approve transactions. This innovative technology controls digital information by allowing it to be distributed but not copied. Originally developed for the digital currency, Bitcoin is increasingly being used in different business sectors, with some parts of the financial industry taking advantage of the technology already, and others are sure to follow. There are numerous other practical uses for blockchains. Here are five potential uses of blockchain technology: At present, the process of buying or re-financing property involves significant transaction costs because these are labor intensive. Putting property records on the blockchain can help cut admin co Continue reading >>

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