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Bitcoin Heist 2017

Who Pulled Off The Biggest Bitcoin Heist In History?

Who Pulled Off The Biggest Bitcoin Heist In History?

Who Pulled Off the Biggest Bitcoin Heist in History? Inside the mystery of how Mark Karpels and his Mt. Gox company lost almost $500 million in cybercurrency. Even in the midst of hell, it all depends on how much Bitcoin youve got. That would be modern version of an old Japanese saying () but it still holds hold true. Bitcoin is worth a lot of money and that can open many doors. Bitcoin was supposed to be to currency what the internet was to information: liberating. In neither case did it quite work out that way. In February of 2014, we had no idea what Bitcoin was but with the collapse of what was the worlds largest bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox , in Tokyo, suddenly my writing partner, Nathalie-Kyoko Stucky and I needed to know a lot about itvery quickly. And then in March, when we had to chase Newsweeks dubious expose on the mythological creator of the cyber currency, Satoshi Nakamoto , The Banksy of Bitcoin we found ourselves knee deep in BTC (bitcoin)and here we are today. And were still learning. This book, which originated from over two years of reporting on Bitcoin for The Daily Beast, is the summation of what we learned. Pay The Devil In Bitcoin is a dense, darkly humorous primer on Bitcoin, Japan, and the real world chaos the virtual currency stirs up. Its also the story of the extremely lucky and also unlucky Mark Karpels , and his motley crew who created Mt. Gox, which made the currency takeoff and later would bring the value crashing down. In 2014, the exchange collapsed with nearly half a billion dollars worth of bitcoin missing, perhaps the greatest bitcoin heist in history. If it was a heist In just under a 110 pages, follow the virtual money as it is created and then sought by by hucksters, hackers, cyber criminals, drug dealers, corrupt federal agents, eva Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Heist (2016) Review

Bitcoin Heist (2016) Review

Bitcoin Heist | Blu-ray & DVD (Well Go USA) Cast: Kate Nhung, Thanh Pham, Petey Majik Nguyen,Suboi, Jayvee Mai, Lam Thanh My, Teo Yoo, Veronica Ngo Before we get to talking about what kind of movieBitcoin Heistis, Im going to start off the same way that the film does by attempting to explain what bitcoins are. Bitcoins are a digital currency with no central repository and no national fingerprint. Its a peer-to-peer exchange system with a public digital ledger that all users are expected to help maintain. Bitcoins are encrypted and untraceable, as far as I understand, and are a favorite form of currency on the Dark Web for hackers and all manner of other secretive professions. Bitcoins are flashy, mysterious, and new to the general public. And were just starting to hear more about Ransom Ware and the Dark Web this year in the news. All three of these new internet-based concepts figure into the Vietnamese thrillerBitcoin Heist. And in that respect, I gotta give writer/editor/director Ham Tran (Journey from the Fall) some credit, because hisBitcoin Heistmakes pretty good use of the new tech to tell his story. With the exception of perhaps TVsMr. Robot, Im unaware of other dramas that have featured the tech so prevalently for storytelling purposes. Its the sort of thing you can imagine Hollywood couldve gotten on top of, thrown an A-List movie star on the poster, and called it topical and timely. InBitcoin Heist, a dangerous Dark Web millionaire known as the Ghost is being tracked by Detective Dada (Kate Nhung). She manages to catch the Ghosts accountant, Phuc (Thanh Pham), but not without getting into a shootout that claims the lives of multiple officers and suspects. The police chief who is also Dadas dad takes her badge and gun, saying it was a meaningless sacrifice con Continue reading >>

North Korea Suspected In Latest Bitcoin Heist In South Korea | Fortune

North Korea Suspected In Latest Bitcoin Heist In South Korea | Fortune

Read: CEO Says Beware of North Korean Hackers Building a Cache of Bitcoin South Korean law enforcement is investigating the heist, but those familiar note that evidence points to North Korea being responsible. This is not the first time Kim Jong-un and his cronies have been accused of bitcoin theft. The perpetrators of this years WannaCry attack demanded bitcoin payment for the release of the digital files they had locked. On Tuesday, the White House claimed that the attack was carried out by Lazarus, a group that works on behalf of the North Korean government. Read: Bitcoin Price Drops Below $14,000 as Cryptocurrency Competition Heats Up Radio Free Asia reported in April that North Korea stole more than $88,000 worth of bitcoin between 2013 and 2015. And hackers linked to the North Korean government stole nearly 4,000 bitcoins from Youbit earlier this year. Due to the similar nature of this most recent attack, it is expected that North Korea is likely responsible. Youbit publicized the attack early Tuesday morning, not disclosing how many bitcoins had been stolen, but noting that a share of its total assets were gone. Following the heist, the exchange suspended trading and filed for bankruptcy. Continue reading >>

Hackers Steal More Than $70 Million In Bitcoin

Hackers Steal More Than $70 Million In Bitcoin

Hackers Steal More Than $70 Million in Bitcoin Theft prompts shutdown of NiceHash, which markets itself as the largest cryptomining marketplace More than $70 million worth of bitcoin was stolen from a cryptocurrency-mining service called NiceHash following a security breach, causing the company to halt operations for at least 24 hours. Andrej P. kraba, head of marketing at NiceHash, said to The Wall Street Journal that approximately 4,700 bitcoin had been stolen from a bitcoin wallet, an online account that stores the digital currency. Bitcoin wallets, like other online bank accounts, have been targets of hackers in the past. The WSJs Thomas Di Fonzo visits one of New York City's bitcoin ATMs to demonstrate how volatile the virtual currency can be in just a day. Photo: Alexander Hotz / The Wall Street Journal Copyright 2017 Dow Jones & Company , Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  • Disgraced Us Secret Service Agent Coughs To Second Bitcoin Heist

    Disgraced Us Secret Service Agent Coughs To Second Bitcoin Heist

    An ex-Secret Service agent who stole Bitcoins from the Silk Road dark web drugs bazaar he was supposed to be investigating has admitted stealing even more sacks of the digital currency. Shaun Bridges, who is already serving a six-year sentence for nicking Bitcoins from the underground souk, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing a further 1,600 Bitcoin (worth $359,005 at the time and approximately $6.6m today) during a separate investigation. According to court documents [PDF] Bridges, 35, was probing European Bitcoin trading firm Bitstamp, which led to the US government seizing 1,606.6488 BTC in November 2014. These were transferred into a digital wallet that only Bridges had the access code for. In March 2015, while under investigation for the Silk Road thefts, Bridges resigned from the Secret Service and in June pleaded guilty to money laundering and obstruction charges. A month later, while still free and awaiting sentencing, he took the Bitcoins seized from Bitstamp and moved them into an account run by the BTC-E exchange. Over the next four months Bridges shifted small amounts of Bitcoin into various different digital wallets for his use prison commissaries can be expensive places. However, these movements were traced by Uncle Sam's g-men and agents sized 600 of the Bitcoin. Bridges, of of Laurel, Maryland, has now returned the rest of the Bitstamp dosh as part of agreeing to plead guilty to one count of money laundering in the US District Court of the Northern District of California. He faces sentencing in November and can expect an extension to his stretch in the cooler. Continue reading >>

    Bitcoin Heist Suspect Allegedly Escapes Prison, Flees To Sweden | Fortune

    Bitcoin Heist Suspect Allegedly Escapes Prison, Flees To Sweden | Fortune

    A man who is accused of a Bitcoin heist that included stealing about 600 computers escaped a low-security prison in Iceland this week and reportedly fled to Sweden. On Tuesday, Sindri Thor Stefansson is believed to have escaped the low-security prison he was transferred to 10 days prior through a window, according to the Associated Press . He then allegedly traveled 59 miles to Icelands international airport in Keflavik, where law enforcement believe he boarded a flight to Sweden, the BBC reported . He had an accomplice, Police Chief Gunnar Schram told Visir , an Icelandic online news outlet. We are sure of that. Police said the plane ticket was in somebody elses name, according to the AP, adding that he likely didnt use a passport because he was allegedly traveling to Sweden, which is within Europes Schengen area. Though Iceland is not part of the European Union, it is part of the Schengen Agreement, where there is no border patrol. There is currently an international warrant out for his arrest. Earlier this year, Stefansson was arrested as a suspect in what Icelandic media have called the Big Bitcoin Heist , and according to the Guardian, he is suspected to have been the mastermind behind the operation. In a series of four burglaries three in December, and one in January $2 million worth of computers were stolen by a group of 10 people. The computers are still missing. This is a grand theft on a scale unseen before, Reykjanes peninsula police commissioner Olafur Helgi Kjartansson told the AP in March. Everything points to this being a highly organized crime. Iceland has seen an increase in Bitcoin mining due to its renewable energy and cold climate, which are ideal for high-powered servers. So-called mining of Bitcoin on high-powered computers takes a large amount of Continue reading >>

    Review: Bitcoin Heist (vietnam, 2016)

    Review: Bitcoin Heist (vietnam, 2016)

    Explore and connect the world through a cinematic lens "Bitcoin Heist" is an action-packed digital heist movie that showcases Vietnam's modernity. Truth be told, Bitcoin Heist is the first Vietnamese movie Ive seen. Despite having a population of 90 million, Vietnam has only recently started making blockbusters that can hold their own against imports, thanks in part to returning diaspora talent. Bitcoin Heist appears to be part of that trend. Helmed by Vietnamese-American director Ham Tran, the film is a rollicking action-thriller that showcases a vibrant, modern Vietnam in the process. Bitcoin Heist is like a combination of Oceans Eleven and Now You See Me, but with bitcoin. The films main character is Dada (Kate Nhung), an Interpol agent who assembles an unconventional team of criminals in order to nab a digital currency-laundering mobster called The Ghost. Dadas team includes a middle-aged forger and his cat-thief daughter, a mob accountant, a female hacker/pro-gamer (played by rapper performed for Barack Obama), and a flamboyant magician/pickpocket (played by Vietnamese-Australian Petey Majik Nguyen, whos an actual magician). You definitely dont need to be a digital currency enthusiast or even know what bitcoin is to enjoy Bitcoin Heist. If anything, the usage of bitcoin as a plot device is more a signal of the films aspirations at modernity. Such aspirations are, intentionally or not, reflective of Vietnams own. After three decades of economic liberalization and socialist-oriented market economy, Vietnam is starting to imagine itself within the same club as economically ascendant, technologically advanced Asian countries like South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. Being a member of this club requires a certain level of cultural sophistication, a certain cosmopolitan life Continue reading >>

    Bitcoin, Ethereum Prices Fall On November 21 After $31m Tether Theft - Business Insider

    Bitcoin, Ethereum Prices Fall On November 21 After $31m Tether Theft - Business Insider

    Men wearing masks of characters from the Sony video game "Payday: The Heist" at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles in 2011. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok Tether, the company behind a cryptocurrency pegged to the US dollar, said $31 million was stolen from its main wallet on Sunday. Heist appears to have shaken markets, with bitcoin, Ethereum, and bitcoin cash all falling. LONDON The major cryptocurrencies bitcoin and Ethereum were falling against the dollar on Tuesday morning after a $31 million heist elsewhere in the digital currency world. Tether, which created a cryptocurrency called USDT that is pegged to the dollar, said in a blog post on Tuesday that "funds were improperly removed from the Tether treasury wallet through malicious action by an external attacker." The US company said $30,950,010 was taken Sunday. "As Tether is the issuer of the USDT managed asset, we will not redeem any of the stolen tokens, and we are in the process of attempting token recovery to prevent them from entering the broader ecosystem," Tether said. Tether is down 0.3% against the dollar on the back of the news, according to CoinMarketCap.com . The theft appears to have shaken wider confidence in crypto markets. Bitcoin was down almost 1% against the dollar at 7.45 a.m. BST (2.45 a.m. ET): Continue reading >>

    Britain's First Bitcoin Heist As Trader Forced At Gunpoint To Transfer Cyber Currency

    Britain's First Bitcoin Heist As Trader Forced At Gunpoint To Transfer Cyber Currency

    Britain's first Bitcoin heist as trader forced at gunpoint to transfer cyber currency The raid happened in the village of MoulsfordCredit:Ric Mellis/INS Armed robbers broke into the family home of a city financier turned Bitcoin trader and forced him to transfer the digital currency at gunpoint, in what is believed to be the first heist of its kind in the UK. Four robbers in balaclavas forced their way into the home of Danny Aston, 30, who runs a digital currency trading firm, before reportedly tying up a woman and forcing Mr Aston to transfer an unknown quantity of the cryptocurrency . Mr Aston lives in the picturesque village of Moulsford in South Oxfordshire, where episodes of Midsomer Murders have been filmed, in a rented four-bedroom converted barn estimated to be worth at least 700,000 on a private drive. Police were called at around 9.40am on Monday to attend the home after raiders are reported to haveentered the property by kicking down the door. The Mail on Sunday reported that the men tied up a woman and kept a baby outside in a pram while forcing Mr Aston to transfer theBitcoin. The value of a single Bitcoin is now around 8,000. A neighbour confirmed on Sunday the property where the violent burglary took place, but said that Mr Aston and a woman believed to be his partnerleft Moulsford on Monday to stay with relatives and have not returned. The cryptocurrency has proved popular with investorsCredit:Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images AsiaPac They said:"I was not here at the time, but I know the couple have left and are staying with relatives, they haven't been back since. "We are all obviously a bit shaken up, even though a few days have passed now. It is not what you expect to happen around here." Mr Aston - who lives with his 31-year-old business partner Amy Jay, Continue reading >>

    Iceland's 'big Bitcoin Heist' Suspect Has Been Arrested

    Iceland's 'big Bitcoin Heist' Suspect Has Been Arrested

    Iceland's 'Big Bitcoin Heist' Suspect Has Been Arrested Iceland's now-infamous bitcoin miner thief has reportedly been arrested. A Dutch police spokesperson confirmed that Sindri Thor Stefansson - who is accused of masterminding the theft of $2 million worth of mining hardware in what's being called the "Big Bitcoin Heist" - was arrested in the Amsterdam on Sunday night. Prosecutors are now looking to extradite him back to Iceland, the News Observer reported. Stefansson walked out of a low-security prison and traveled to Sweden last week, as previously reported . In a letter sent to Icelandic news organization Frettabladid, he claimed he was held "for two and a half months ... without evidence," and kept in isolation during his imprisonment. After his order of detention expired, he left the prison and took a taxi to the airport. "I simply refuse to be in prison of my own will, especially when the police threatens to arrest me without explanation," he wrote to the newspaper. Stefansson did say he wanted to return to Iceland and claimed that he had been negotiating with police to arrange his return. He also threatened to use a fake identification to stay hidden from authorities. In his letter, Stefansson did not address the 600 computers he was accused of stealing, nor have police given any indication that they have located the missing machines. The owner of the bitcoin mining hardware has offered a $60,000 reward. The computers were stolen across four separate thefts in what is Iceland's largest crime to date . Last month, police officials saidthat "everything points to this being a highly organized crime." The leader in blockchain news, CoinDesk is a media outlet that strives for the highest journalistic standards and abides by a strict set of editorial policies . Coin Continue reading >>

    Bitcoin Heist Adds $77 Million To Total Hacked Hauls Of $15 Billion

    Bitcoin Heist Adds $77 Million To Total Hacked Hauls Of $15 Billion

    Bitcoin Heist Adds $77 Million To Total Hacked Hauls Of $15 Billion A highly professional heist sucked millions dollars in bitcoin out of Slovenian website NiceHash, the latest in a series of big cryptocurrency thefts. Slovenian website NiceHash , which lets users buy and sell computer time for mining cryptocurrency, lost about $77 million when its payment system was hacked in a highly professional heist, it told Reuters. In total, about 980,000 bitcoins, worth about $15 billion in todays skyrocketing prices, have been stolen from exchanges over the currencys lifetime, the wire service estimates. But exactly who is behind the theft, or other recent cryptocurrency heists, is unclear. In September, security firm FireEye reported it had seen signs of North Korea targeting South Korean cryptocurrency exchanges, but given cryptocurrencys relative anonymity and rapidly rising prices, exchanges are likely natural targets for skilled digital criminals from around the world. Chart of the wallet used in the NiceHash heist, with a value at press time of $77.89 million [Image: Bitinfocharts .] Other recent cryptocurrency thefts of note: Last month, Tether , which distributes cryptocurrencies tied to the value of the dollar and other traditional currencies, reported close to $31 million in its dollar-linked coin was stolen. It pushed out updates to its software to freeze the stolen tokens from further transfer. In a stranger incident last month, a bug in wallet provider Parity enabled a user to take control of, then permanently freeze, roughly $300 million in ethereum. Parity has said its investigating ways the ethereum codebase could be patched to recover the funds. In July, cryptocurrency trading platform CoinDashs website was hacked during an initial coin offering, causing would Continue reading >>

    Blu-ray Review: Bitcoin Heist Is Too Clever For Its Own Good

    Blu-ray Review: Bitcoin Heist Is Too Clever For Its Own Good

    Hackers have become the bank robbers in the new world of crypto-currency. In order to catch the most wanted hacker, The Ghost, an Interpol special agent assembles a team of thieves to plan the ultimate heist. But as any good criminal knows, there is no honor among thieves. Bitcoin Heist is an amalgamation of Oceans Eleven and Now You See Me 2, movies that I thoroughly enjoyed but where this film falls down, is not knowing what genre it wants to be. It starts off as an action movie, then turns into a buddy-cop flick, and then a heist movie, followed by betrayal and ultimately, revenge. Director Ham Tran desperately wants his movie to be an assortment of various shooting styles, from American to Tsui Hark and early John Woo but it fails BECAUSE of this aspect. By all means, mix your story up, baffle the viewer, but by the end of your story, you need to explain everything that has transpired. Here, Ham Tran delivers moments of brilliance but the film is let down by the constantly expanding story exposition which steadily increases with each new scene, filling the script to capacity and eventually, causing it to buckle under its own weight. Sometimes, less is more. For those not familiar with Bitcoin, it is a new currency that was created back in 2009 by an anonymous source using the alias Satoshi Nakamoto. There are no middlemen (banks) and no transaction fees and because of this, it is considered illegal in many countries. In Bitcoin Heist, a hacker known as The Ghost, is stealing bitcoin currency from banks and wealthy people. After a transaction meeting between a prospective client and Ky (Veronica Ngo), an assassin who works for the Ghost, goes horribly wrong, Ky manages to escape along with the Ghosts accountant, Phc (Thanh Pham). With her bitcoin wallet intact but h Continue reading >>

    Inside Bitfinex's Comeback From A $69 Million Bitcoin Heist

    Inside Bitfinex's Comeback From A $69 Million Bitcoin Heist

    stole $69 million from Bitfinex last year, the bitcoin exchanges fate seemed sealed: lawsuits, bankruptcy and years of liquidation proceedings. Thats what happened to Mt. Gox, the high-profile marketplace for trading the virtual currency, which lost $480 million. There were also other smaller implosions such as Cointrader and Bitcurex. Photographer: Christopher Goodney/Bloomberg But against the odds, Bitfinex pulled out of its spiral dive, announcing last month that all customers were repaid. The exchange posted its most profitable month and claimed its spot as the largest bitcoin venue for U.S. dollar trading. Weve demonstrated an alternative to bankruptcy, said Phil Potter, 45, Bitfinexs chief strategy officer. Behind the turnaround, unusual in an industry with few safeguards, is a combination of an uptick in market activity that boosted fee-based income and a mostly successful effort to mollify angry customers with an innovative market-based solution to how everyone would be compensated. Assuming the strategy doesnt unravel down the road, Bitfinex may prove to be a valuable template for how the bitcoin community deals with a crisis in the future. On Aug. 2, as the U.S. presidential election got into full swing after the Republican and Democratic conventions, Potter got an early morning phone call at his beach home in Long Island saying hackers had breached security and were draining customer deposits. Bitfinexs executives dont work in a single location, but are peppered throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia. Its parent company iFinex Inc. is incorporated in the British Virgin Islands, while back office functions are done in Taiwan, technology support is concentrated in London and the compliance team is run out of Hong Kong. While the exchange succeeded in protecting Continue reading >>

    Millions 'stolen' In Nicehash Bitcoin Heist

    Millions 'stolen' In Nicehash Bitcoin Heist

    Millions 'stolen' in NiceHash Bitcoin heist Dave Lee North America technology reporter These are external links and will open in a new window Image caption NiceHash was targeted by hackers in the early hours of Wednesday "Highly professional" hackers made off with around 4,700 Bitcoin from a leading mining service, a Bitcoin exchange has said. The value of Bitcoin is currently extremely volatile, but at the time of writing, the amount stolen was worth approximately $80m. The hacked service was NiceHash, a Slovenia-based mining exchange. It said it was working hard to recover the Bitcoin for its users, adding: "Someone really wanted to bring us down." The attack happened early on Wednesday, said NiceHash's chief executive Marko Kobal. Attackers accessed the company's systems at 01:18 CET (00:18 GMT). By 03:37 the hackers, whom the company believes were based outside the European Union, had begun stealing Bitcoin. The theft comes as the price of Bitcoin continues to surge, dumbfounding experts and stoking concerns of a bubble. High-stakes attacks like this are not uncommon, with several large breaches and thefts hitting Bitcoin and other related services over the past year. NiceHash is a mining service, a company that pairs up people with spare computing power with those willing to pay to use it to mine for new Bitcoin. Mr Kobal appeared on Facebook Live to address concerns about the hack. "We have not abandoned you guys," he said. He explained that an employee's computer was compromised in the attack. He added that "forensic analysis" involving local and international authorities was taking place, but did not expand on which specific agencies were involved when asked by the BBC. The company was heavily criticised by its users who commented in droves on Facebook. Communi Continue reading >>

    The $1.5b Bitcoin Heist: Hackers Have Snatched 14 Per Cent Of Cryptocurrencies

    The $1.5b Bitcoin Heist: Hackers Have Snatched 14 Per Cent Of Cryptocurrencies

    The $1.5b Bitcoin heist: Hackers have snatched 14 per cent of cryptocurrencies The $1.5b Bitcoin heist: Hackers have snatched 14 per cent of cryptocurrencies Digital currencies and the software developed to track them have become attractive targets for cybercriminals while also creating a lucrative new market for computer-security firms. In less than a decade, hackers have stolen $US1.2 billion ($1.5 billion) worth of Bitcoin and rival currency Ether, according to Lex Sokolin, global director of fintech strategy at Autonomous Research. Given the currencies' explosive surge at the end of 2017, the cost in today's money is much higher. "It looks like crypto hacking is a $US200 million annual revenue industry," Sokolin said. Hackers have compromised more than 14 per cent of the Bitcoin and Ether supply, he said. All told, hacks involving cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have cost companies and governments $US11.3 billion through lost potential tax revenue from coin sales and illegitimate transactions, according to Susan Eustis, chief executive officer of WinterGreen Research. The Bitcoin mania has created an estimated $250 million-a-year crypto hacking industry. The blockchain ecosystem -- the decentralised "distributed ledgers" that track crypto transactions -- is also vulnerable. Those losses could snowball as more companies and investors rush into the white-hot cryptocurrency market without weighing the dangers or taking steps to protect themselves. Blockchain records are shared, making them hard to alter, so some users see them as super-secure. But in many ways they are no safer than any other software, Matt Suiche, who runs the blockchain security company Comae Technologies, said in a phone interview. And since the market is immature, blockchains may even be more vulner Continue reading >>

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