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Advantages Of Running An Ethereum Node

The Role Of Bitcoin Nodes: Do Full Nodes Running In Data Centers Benefit The Bitcoin Network?

The Role Of Bitcoin Nodes: Do Full Nodes Running In Data Centers Benefit The Bitcoin Network?

Since its launch, Bitcoin Classic 's node count has steadily increased. The latest release of the alternative Bitcoin implementation even topped the charts , with almost 3,000 Bitcoin Classic 0.12 nodes reachable on the network. But a closer look at these statistics reveal some odd details. First, IP-data suggests that many Bitcoin Classic nodes might not really be many Bitcoin Classic nodes at all. Instead, a single node could use multiple IP addresses to spoof total node count. This possibility appears more likely in light of the observation that very few Bitcoin Classic nodes seem to be replacing existing Bitcoin Core nodes, indicating that these are new nodes, rather than node operatorsactually make the switch. That said, it is theoretically possible that many new users are simply firing up (and shutting down ) Bitcoin Classic nodes in the same geographical area simultaneously. However, it is certain that a lions share of all Bitcoin Classic nodes are hosted in data centers, predominantly by Amazon Web Services and Choopa . That's unsurprising, as dedicated websites offer such services, and this practice is encouraged by Bitcoin Classic supporters. Recent data analysis , moreover, shows that a vast majority of nodes in these data centers are almost certainly paid for by a relatively small group of people. This raises the question: Is it useful to run full nodes from data centers at all? Does the sharp increase of Bitcoin Classic nodes in any way benefit Bitcoin, Bitcoin Classic or both? Lets take a look at why anyone would want to run a full node. Perhaps the most important reason to operate a full node is validation. With a full node, users can check whether transactions are valid according to all of Bitcoin's rules. Using nothing but the open source software, nod Continue reading >>

What's The Advantage Of Running A Full Node?

What's The Advantage Of Running A Full Node?

What's the advantage of running a full node? As far as I know, in BTC network miners are not necessarily full nodes. Miners earn profit for mining blocks. With mining blocks, they contribute to the BTC network, but they do not contain the whole blockchain. Full nodes have the whole blockchain downloaded. So, I have a few questions related the two or three expressions. I think, it will be helpful to clarify to others too. Sooo What are the differences between full nodes and not full nodes? What are the differences between not full nodes and miners? I think, giving simple and exact definition to each expression clears up all. But I also opened this thread because I want to hear your opinion What are the advantages of running one or another? Are you running any of them and why? CodeX Quote from: PremiumCodeX on February 08, 2017, 09:15:45 PM As far as I know, in BTC network miners are not necessarily full nodes. Miners earn profit for mining blocks. With mining blocks, they contribute to the BTC network, but they do not contain the whole blockchain. ] Wrong. How would they be able to verify that a block is valid or not without having a blockchain? Miners should have a full copy of the ledger. There is also something called SPV mining, i.e. where miners build upon a block that they've received without validating it. However, this is unsafe and has caused issues in the past. Quote from: PremiumCodeX on February 08, 2017, 09:15:45 PM What are the differences between full nodes and not full nodes? You use weird wording. Are you referring to 'pruned nodes' as in "not full nodes"? Otherwise your question makes little sense. Quote from: PremiumCodeX on February 08, 2017, 09:15:45 PM No. Full nodes are vital to the security of the ecosystem. However, they aren't primarily designa Continue reading >>

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

Choosing A Client Ethereum Homestead 0.1 Documentation

What should I install on my desktop/laptop? Most users will likely just install Mist / Ethereum Wallet and that will be enough for their needs. The Ethereum Wallet is a single dapp deployment of the Mist Browserwhich will be the centerpiece of the Metropolis phase of development, whichcomes after Homestead. Mist comes with bundled go-ethereum and cpp-ethereum binariesand if you are not running a command-line Ethereum client when Mist startsthen it will start syncing the blockchain using one of the bundled clients(defaulting to geth). If you want to use Parity with Mist, or to run Mist againsta private network, just start your node before Mist, and Mistwill connect to your node rather than starting one itself. Work is underway to add Parity and other clients as first-class entitiesto Mist too. If you want to interact with Ethereum on the command-line, and to takeadvantage of the Javascript console then you will want to install one ofthe client applications directly, as well as Mist. Follow the links inthe table above for further instructions. If you want to do mining then Mist will not be sufficient. Check outthe Mining section. What should I install on my mobile/tablet? We are at the very beginning of our support for mobile devices. The Goteam are publishing experimental iOS and Android libraries, which somedevelopers are using to start bootstrapping mobile applications, but thereare not yet any mobile Ethereum clients available. The main hinderance to the use of Ethereum on mobile devices is that theLight Client support is still incomplete. The work which has been done isoff in a private branch, and is only available for the Go client.doublethinkco will be starting development of Light Client for the C++ clientin the coming months, following grant funding. Check out S Continue reading >>

You Really Should Run A Bitcoin Full Node: Here's Why

You Really Should Run A Bitcoin Full Node: Here's Why

You Really Should Run a Bitcoin Full Node: Here's Why On day one of the 2017 MIT Bitcoin Expo , Sia Co-Founder David Vorick , who has contributed to Bitcoin Core , gave a presentation on the important role played by full nodes in digital currency networks. In his view, economically relevant full nodes are the ones that have voting power (for lack of a better term) in attempted hard-forking changes to the rules of Bitcoin. Early in his talk, Vorick focused on the general role played by full nodes on the network. Full nodes validate transactions on the Bitcoin network, he stated. Bitcoin has this longest-chain rule where the chain with the most work in it is the one that everybody follows, except this chain also has to follow all of the rules that the network has. The full nodes are the ones [that] check that the chain follows the rules, and if a chain doesnt follow the rules, it doesnt matter how much hashrate is behind it, that chain is ignored. According to Vorick, of all the different types of Bitcoin users, full nodes are the only ones that check that the rules are followed. Those who run an SPV node or use some sort of web wallet are putting their trust in others to verify that certain rules are being followed correctly on the most-work chain. Theyre faster, Vorick said in terms of SPV nodes. They download all the headers. They make sure that they are on the chain with the most work, but they dont actually check that the chain with the most work is legal or is valid. Vorick went on to state that SPV nodes are essentially betting that the rest of the network will sufficiently handle the validation process for them. SPV nodes just blindly have faith in the broader network to do this process that makes sure that the longest chain is always valid, Vorick continued. The Continue reading >>

On Public And Private Blockchains

On Public And Private Blockchains

Over the last year the concept of private blockchains has become very popular in the broader blockchain technology discussion. Essentially, instead of having a fully public and uncontrolled network and state machine secured by cryptoeconomics (eg. proof of work, proof of stake), it is also possible to create a system where access permissions are more tightly controlled, with rights to modify or even read the blockchain state restricted to a few users, while still maintaining many kinds of partial guarantees of authenticity and decentralization that blockchains provide. Such systems have been a primary focus of interest from financial institutions, and have in part led to a backlash from those who see such developments as either compromising the whole point of decentralization or being a desperate act of dinosaurish middlemen trying to stay relevant (or simply committing the crime of using a blockchain other than Bitcoin ). However, for those who are in this fight simply because they want to figure out how to best serve humanity, or even pursue the more modest goal of serving their customers, what are the practical differences between the two styles? First, what exactly are the options at hand? To summarize, there are generally three categories of blockchain-like database applications: Public blockchains: a public blockchain is a blockchain that anyone in the world can read, anyone in the world can send transactions to and expect to see them included if they are valid, and anyone in the world can participate in the consensus process the process for determining what blocks get added to the chain and what the current state is. As a substitute for centralized or quasi-centralized trust, public blockchains are secured by cryptoeconomics the combination of economic incentive Continue reading >>

Definitions | Ethereum Use Cases

Definitions | Ethereum Use Cases

Directory of Practical Applications of the Ethereum Blockchain with Definitions The block chain is the immutable public ledger of a network. Blockchain is an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way. ( ) Blockchain is not Ethereum and Bitcoin is not a blockchain. An Ethereum node outputs modifications to the existing Ethereum blockchain. Bitcoin nodes also output modifications to its blockchain. Each network has a separate blockchain. For this document, we only talk about the Ethereum Blockchain because by definition an Ethereum Use Case has to touch the Ethereum blockchain. So, for this website, when I say blockchain, I mean the Ethereum blockchain. Burned money ceases to exist. It is entirely analogous to burning cash. Planned for October 2017. The main features are speed and transaction efficiency. This will allow Ethereum to handle yet more transactions, up from its previous 5 or 6 per second. The main added feature is zk-snarks. This allows encryption of aspects of the blockchain content improving privacy options for new software. DAO Decentralized Autonomous Organization A DAO is decentralized (because it is on Ethereum), Autonomous because once started it runs on its own without human intervention and an Organization because it acts on multi-faceted groups of rules that it appears as a complex Organization. In fact, a DAO is just a set of smart contracts. But these smart contracts must meet a specific definition. It must hold capital (Tokens, ether, something more than just information) It must make at least some decisions itself It must have low limits on the number of external participants. Some smart contracts by definition Have a specific number of participants. A DAO must not Continue reading >>

What Are The Valuable Benefits Of Having A Node?

What Are The Valuable Benefits Of Having A Node?

Supposedly I'd like to help Ethereum to expand (in terms of the World Computer), so I'd like to setup a Linux machine which can run smart contracts. What kind of benefits I can get from doing that? Do I earn anything particular? If so, what I can get and would it increase over time? If you setup a full node alone today, you won't get any ether reward. But you can run it AND mine using GPUs. You will earn ether as block reward. Note that it's not very valuable today due to the difficulty to mine in front of the cost of purchasing mining hardware and and the cost of electricity. But you can get pleasure to do it. Running a full node also enable to have a direct access to the Ethereum blockchain. If you don't have one, you will have to connect to another node, mainly using RPC connection. But you have to trust this node. Running your own removes your need to trust anyone except you and your hardware. In a near future, Ethereum will move to PoS (Proof of Stake) system instead of PoW (Proof of Work). So mining will stop working. Having a node will only make you able to access the network except if you are one of the lucky validators that will stake their Ether and be the miners of PoS, but without GPUs need. However, hardware requirements to be a validator will be hard to reach for regular people (needs of security, availability, many RAM and CPU, ... and of course a lot of Ether to stake). So your best way to benefit from a node is that it removes your need to trust anyone. Continue reading >>

Remix - The Ethereum Wiki

Remix - The Ethereum Wiki

Remix, previously known as Browser Solidity, is a web browser based IDE that allows you to write Solidity smart contracts, then deploy and run the smart contract. You can run Remix from your web browser by navigating to , or by installing and running in on your local computer. Instead of running Remix from , you can download the latest package from . You will have to switch to the branch gh-pages. Download the .zip file with a name similar to remix-0f851e3.zip into a directory on your computer. Unzip the .zip file. Load index.html in your browser. The advantage of running Remix from your local computer is that it can communicate with an Ethereum node client running on your local machine via the Ethereum JSON-RPC API . You can then execute your smart contracts in Remix while connected to your local development blockchain, the Testnet blockchain, or the Mainnet blockchain. Whether you are running Remix from it's website, or from your local installation, you should see a screen resembling the one below. Following is the source code for a simple example that you can copy and paste into the left section of your Remix screen. 1 pragma solidity ^0.4.8; 2 3 contract Hello { 4 5 // A string variable 6 string public greeting; 7 8 // Events that gets logged on the blockchain 9 event GreetingChanged(string _greeting);10 11 // The function with the same name as the class is a constructor12 function Hello(string _greeting) {13 greeting = _greeting;14 }15 16 // Change the greeting message17 function setGreeting(string _greeting) {18 greeting = _greeting;19 20 // Log an event that the greeting message has been updated21 GreetingChanged(_greeting);22 }23 24 // Get the greeting message25 function greet() constant returns (string _greeting) {26 greeting = _greeting;27 }28 } On the right Continue reading >>

Quiknode Adds Tutorials For Easy Setup

Quiknode Adds Tutorials For Easy Setup

Nodes are essential parts of the Ethereum ecosystem, so it is important that as many people as possible run these nodes. They provide quicker transactions, validate blocks, and improve the overall health of the ecosystem. However, running nodes is not always feasible due tocomputational and data limitations. A service called QuikNode has recognizedthis and aims to empower users insetting up their own Ethereum nodes. The Benefits of Running an Ethereum Node Through QuikNode There are a few reasons to run an Ethereum node with QuikNode. As itsname suggests, setting up the node is incredibly quick and itboasts a 10 minute turnaround to get it up and running. Running a node with QuikNode also allows users to transact with a private Ethereum node. This means that their transactions will go through quicker. This is particularly advantageous for individuals looking to jump intoan ICO without having to queue in public nodes . Finally, running nodes benefits the ecosystem as a whole. To help people get acquainted with and set up nodes even quicker, QuikNode recently added tutorial articles for its users. Lets take a look at those here. Many users want to connect their nodes to MetaMask . Thefirst step in doing sois getting QuikNode. Users are directed to click the three horizontal bars on the MetaMask extension, whichhas the user copy and paste a URL as the new RPC URL. Pressing enter saves the change. The current network changes to the QuikNode URL, and it will sayprivate network at the top. Users then go about their usual business, onlynow with their own private Ethereum node. This could be particularly advantageous for ICO investors, since a private node plus custom gwei could help secure their place in a crowdsale. One of the most popular Ethereum wallet solutions is MyEthe Continue reading >>

Tutorial - How To Run A Full Ethereum Node On Windows - Deep Dot Web

Tutorial - How To Run A Full Ethereum Node On Windows - Deep Dot Web

Initiate ether transactions from an address to the other 1. All Geths versions are available for download at: For every version, an archive (.zip file) as well as an installer (.exe) package are available for download. The installer package will put geth automatically into your PATH, while the archive includes the command .exe files, so that they can be used without installation. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will install the Geth 1.6.1 release. Press on the Geth 1.6.1 installer link, as shown on the below screenshot and download the .exe file. 2. Press I Agree to accept the license agreement and start the installation process. 3. You will be prompted to choose whether or not to install Ethereums development tools in addition to Geth. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will install only Geth, so keep the box of Development tools unchecked. 4. You will then be prompted to choose the destination folder for your installation. By default, the program will be installed under C:\Program Files\Geth 5. The installation process will be completed, press close to exit the installation window. 6. Now, open a command prompt instance, via pressing the Windows button and typing command prompt. Press on the programs icon that will appear. 7. Now, change the directory to the directory where Geth is installed , via the chdir command, so as we installed Geth onto the Program Files directory, we will type the following onto the command prompts instance: 8. Now, type Geth onto the command prompt instance, after changing the directory and the client will start up and begin connecting to peers, as shown on the below screenshot: Congratulations, you are now running a full ethereum node, and receiving blocks as shown on the above screenshot. Running an Ethereum Node via Installing and Continue reading >>

Installing And Running A Node | Ethereum Frontier Guide

Installing And Running A Node | Ethereum Frontier Guide

The Frontier tool is called Geth (the old english third person singular conjugation of "to go". Quite appropriate given geth is written in Go . Geth is a multipurpose command line tool that runs a full Ethereum node implemented in Go. It offers three interfaces: the command line subcommands and options , a Json-rpc server and an interactive console. In order to install Geth, open a command line or terminal tool (if you are unsure how to do this, consider waiting for a more user friendly release) and paste the command below: bash <(curl This script will detect your OS and will attempt to install the ethereum CLI. For more options including package managers, check the OS-specific subsections. For the purposes of this guide, we will focus on the interactive console, a JavaScript environment. The history of the console is persisted between sessions, providing for a powerful and flexible way of using the client. You can navigate your command history by using the up and down arrow keys, like a standard command line. To get started Type the code below on your terminal Once geth is fully started, you should see a > prompt, letting you know the console is ready. To exit, type exit at the prompt and hit [enter]. Output from the console can be logged or redirected: Using standard tools, the log can be monitored in a separate window: Alternatively, you can also run one terminal with the interactive console and a second one with the logging output directly. In the second terminal type tty. The output will be something like /dev/pts/13 In your main terminal, type: geth console 2>> /dev/pts/13 This will allow you to monitor your node without cluttering the interactive console. Continue reading >>

6 Reasons To Run A Bitcoin Full Node

6 Reasons To Run A Bitcoin Full Node

Antonio Madeira March 18, 2017 8:00 am Running a Bitcoin full node isnt just for mining pools and companies. Today, were going to outline 6 reasons why the average user should also consider running their own Bitcoin full node. With current events pointing towards a possible change in the Bitcoin consensus rules, it isimportant to remind users that, now more than ever, there are multiple advantages to running a Bitcoin full node . It isadvisable that users run the popular Bitcoin Core client, as there may be certain risks to running less popular clients like Bitcoin Unlimited. Only two days ago, a bug was found and exploited on the Bitcoin Unlimited client, which led a large portion of BU nodes to go offline. The problem was fixed and the BU node count has since recovered. Yetanother bug was also found in the BU client a few weeks ago, which caused the Bitcoin.com pool to mine an invalid block bigger than 1 MB.In light of these recent events, running a Bitcoin Core node may be the safest choice available. Today, there are 6734 nodes online, 83% of which are Bitcoin Core nodes , whose numbers have been climbing after the BU bug was discovered. Overall, more Bitcoin nodes translate into a faster, more stable, and more decentralized network. To that end, weve compiled a list of 6reasons to run a Bitcoin Full Node. Running your own full node is the only way to have full control and to ensure that all the rules of Bitcoin are being followed. Nodes do this by rejecting blocks and transactions that dont follow the consensus rules and by rejecting connections from peers that send them (or too many of them). In this sense, nodes are more important than hash power as they are the ones that verify that the blockchain is following the rules. Even withthe longest Proof-of-Work chain Continue reading >>

How To Turn A Raspberry Pi Into A Crypto Wallet

How To Turn A Raspberry Pi Into A Crypto Wallet

How to turn a Raspberry Pi into a crypto wallet With a little bit of work, you can turn a Raspberry Pi into a functional Ethereum node, complete with a built-in wallet. While using an online wallet is convenient, using your own wallet allows you to hold your private keys and have direct control over your cryptocurrency. This isnt the only advantage however, as running an Ethereum node allows you to interact directly with the blockchain and store any compatible ERC-20 tokens. It should be noted that by creating an Ethereum node on your Raspberry Pi and storing your cryptocurrency in it, you are responsible to back up and secure those keys. If you lose your private key, the cryptocurrency associated with that key will also be lost. While it may be easier to download and run an Ethereum client on your desktop PC, running a node on a Raspberry Pi draws far less power. To set up an Ethereum node on a Raspberry Pi, you will need the following components: Additionally, you may want to use a USB keyboard and monitor when setting up your Raspberry Pi node. There are a number of ways to install an Ethereum client on your Raspberry Pi, but the easiest is to simply download a compatible version of the Geth or Parity clients from GitHub. The light versions of these clients can be installed directly onto the Pi using the command line interface. Running a light node means you will not be downloading the entire Ethereum blockchain, which is helpful considering the limited storage space of the Raspberry Pi. For a step-by-step installation of Parity or Geth on your Raspberry Pi, you can use the compatible image provided by the EthRaspbian project. This process will set up your device to run either the Parity or Geth clients on startup, automatically turning it into a functional node. Si Continue reading >>

How To: Run An Ethereum Node Onaws

How To: Run An Ethereum Node Onaws

High volume rewards handling uses an AWS SQS queue to retry any reward that fails Upgraded to Web3J 3.1 to make use of the new status flag from the Byzantium fork of Ethereum (currently in QA) Researching ways to reduce or eliminate Ethereum gas costs including Brave, Raiden, 0x, and IOTA Youve figured out how to run Geth (go-ethereum) to start interacting with the blockchain from your computer, but what happens if you want to run Geth on your server so that all of your clients can connect to it as well? In our case, we wanted all of our Android, iOS, and Web clients to be able to interact with Ethereum without having to run an entire node themselves, and we wanted to leverage the security benefits of running our own node on a cloud service like AWS. This guide will walk you through firing up a Geth node on an AWS EC2 instance from a Mac, and assumes some knowledge of AWS and Ethereum . Make sure you have Homebrew installed, then install AWS Command Line Interface by entering the following in a terminal window. Youll need to create a key pair , security group , and access key before you start. Make sure to download the keypair file that is generated on creation. Before creating the keypair, ensure the region in the upper right corner matches the region you specify in the configure step below. Weve selected Ohio (us-east-1) to keep costs down. Weve selected json as the default output format, but you can output in whatever format fits your project best. AWS Access Key ID [None]: AWS Secret Access Key [None]: For more information, consult the AWS Documentation . Now, lets create the EC2 instance where our node will run. Well use the most recent stable Ubuntu AMI with hardware virtualization and SSD volumes for performance. The Continue reading >>

Jonas Schnelli Wants You To Run A Bitcoin Full Node

Jonas Schnelli Wants You To Run A Bitcoin Full Node

Jonas Schnelli Wants You to Run a Bitcoin Full Node Jan 12, 2018 at 07:00 UTC|UpdatedJan 12, 2018 at 22:48 UTC That's the maximum load some personal laptops will store. It's also roughly the amount of space the bitcoin blockchain currently requires. These bloating storage requirements are a longstanding problem for the community's efforts to keep bitcoin decentralized. But Bitcoin Core contributor and maintainer Jonas Schnelli has spent the past few years trying to make full nodes easier to run for a wider audience despite this huge data cost - and in turn, make bitcoin more resistant to centralization. With so much information to download, setting up a bitcoin full node currently takes days or even weeks. This issue was at the heart of bitcoin's years-long scaling debate. While increasing transaction capacity by raising the block size limit might have eased the network's steadily rising transaction fees, it also would have disqualified more users from running bitcoin's core infrastructure. And even though the block size held steady, the pressures favoring centralization remain, because of the storage space and time it takes to set up a full node. Yet, developers argue that running a full node is the best way to use bitcoin (some even going as far as to claim that without a full node to validate bitcoin transactions themselves, users are just wasting their time on cryptocurrency). In this way, users take full advantage of all bitcoin's benefits, including censorship-resistance and the minimization of trust in third parties. "It's very important to run bitcoin full nodes. It's the main or at least a significant reason to use bitcoin," Schnelli told CoinDesk. "If we throw that away we lose one of the more interesting parts of bitcoin." Schnelli's particular focus is on m Continue reading >>

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