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Is Git Blockchain

Git As The Blockchain For Process Changes

Git As The Blockchain For Process Changes

Git as the blockchain for process changes Blockchain: any sha gives complete and unmodifiable history, can only change by doing an opposite transaction (transfer back) Git: any sha gives complete and unmodifiable history, can only change by doing an opposite transaction (revert ac ommit) Bitcoin: prevent alteration of the log between organizations Protected git branches: prevent alteration of the log within an organization Software, documentation, idea's (issue tracking) and process Process is interesting, organizations used to do ISO 9000. But the hard thing is changing it. You should not change the process first and then have a person write it up 3 months later. People should change the process by proposing a change to the documentation. This is possible with GitLab, we're doing this ourselves with - Blockchain: any sha gives complete and unmodifiable history, can only change by doing an opposite transaction (transfer back)- Git: any sha gives complete and unmodifiable history, can only change by doing an opposite transaction (revert ac ommit)- Bitcoin: prevent alteration of the log between organizations- Protected git branches: prevent alteration of the log within an organization- Software, documentation, idea's (issue tracking) and process- Process is interesting, organizations used to do ISO 9000. But the hard thing is changing it. You should not change the process first and then have a person write it up 3 months later. People should change the process by proposing a change to the documentation. This is possible with GitLab, we're doing this ourselves with Continue reading >>

Reddit: The Front Page Of The Internet

Reddit: The Front Page Of The Internet

From the HN link: "Git is a peer-to-peer tool, but flexible enough to let you use a workflow with a more-equal-than-others peer, or even communicate with actual centralized servers that expose a git interface. Git doesn't swarm in a way that often gets associated with the idea of "p2p" by the prevalence of more popular p2p protocols used for file-sharing or cryptocurrencies. Nor is it geared towards world-readability. But none of those are intrinsic properties of peer to peer protocols. I can (and do) use the git software on my computer to pull from co-workers development desktops running the same git software as me. And they pull from me, all with no external servers used coordinate that exchange of trees. That makes git peer to peer. No amount of tools built on top of git that require treating one peer as the a point of centralization can undo that. It just means that those tools aren't p2p. This distinction is often invisible to users, and I don't blame people for missing it because the business model of GitHub and GitHub-competitors rests on everyone thinking they're necessary." From git source book: "Unlike Centralized Version Control Systems (CVCSs), the distributed nature of Git allows you to be far more flexible in how developers collaborate on projects. In centralized systems, every developer is a node working more or less equally on a central hub. In Git, however, every developer is potentially both a node and a hub that is, every developer can both contribute code to other repositories and maintain a public repository on which others can base their work and which they can contribute to. This opens a vast range of workflow possibilities for your project and/or your team, so well cover a few common paradigms that take advantage of this flexibility. Well go ove Continue reading >>

Hash - Why Is Git Not Considered A

Hash - Why Is Git Not Considered A "block Chain"? - Stack Overflow

"In blockchains, the ledger is an immutable history." - So is the git history. When "rewriting history", you start from a point in the past and add new commits. The same is possible with block chains and in fact, it happens every time a fork occurs, even if it is later abandoned. Holger Just Sep 13 '17 at 10:06 As far as I understand block chains vs. Git, you can also rewrite block chains, unless you solve the hash collision problem. And for Git, yes you can rewrite, but all remotes still have the original history. Rewriting history creates new hashes and a different tree. If block chain doesn't over such an operation, that's not a valid argument, because I could implement it if I want to. Or in reverse I can reject forced pushes by setting a branch as protected. Paebbels Sep 13 '17 at 10:08 @HolgerJust the git history is mutable. In doing a push --force on a single branch you are losing references to commits that are cleaned up by the garbage collector. This is different than a fork which is not a rewriting of history but rather an alternative development path. houtanb Sep 13 '17 at 11:08 Can we summarize, that Git could be operated in a block chain mode by applying a special workflow and forbidding several operations? Paebbels Sep 13 '17 at 13:09 @Paebbels yes, I would agree with that. By default and in regular use it isn't, but with a special workflow it would be. houtanb Sep 13 '17 at 13:14 Continue reading >>

The Blockchain, From A Gitperspective.

The Blockchain, From A Gitperspective.

The blockchain is a revolution idea thats changed the way computation and transaction will be done for decades to come. There is already plenty of information out there on this topic, so Ill spare the internet yet another tutorial. However, I do think I have an interesting perspective to bring to the discussion. I often tend to view the blockchain as very similar to the wildly popular version control software git. In this post Ill be both teaching, as well as defending my unique position. If youve spent even a small amount of time in tech youve heard of git. git is decentralized source control, and has revolutionized the way software developers collaborate on projects. The idea behind git, is essentially a linked-list where each commit is a new node in the linked list pointing back to a previous snapshot of the code. Whats interesting about git, is you can have forks in your linked-list, and these can be merged or deleted (or, orphaned, in blockchain parlance) at will. In a sense, git is a controllable linked list history of your project (note, that this can be any project, not just software, even artists should use git). Now, lets talk about the blockchain. The blockchain, is like git, except inside of the linked-lists nodes lie transactions, rather than code changes. Thats all bitcoin is, a big long string of git commits with balances of addresses in the commits rather than code changes. So what is the big deal? When youre using git, you dont really care what a developer does if they fork your code and make changes to it, as long as you get to decide what gets merged back into your original code beforehand. The same cant be said of financial transactions. You do care if someone makes changes to that history. For example, lets say I was able to fork the bitcoin blockc Continue reading >>

Does The Blockchain Work In A Similar Way To Git?

Does The Blockchain Work In A Similar Way To Git?

Answered Dec 15, 2017 Author has 323 answers and 390.7k answer views In the very broadest sense, yes, it does work in a similar way. However, when you get into the details there are very many differences. In particular, the key innovation of Bitcoin - the proof of work - has no direct counterpart in git. You can see the similarity between git and blockchain by considering the following analogy between git and blockchain Of course, where they differ in a large way is how consensus is achieved. In git, consensus still usually requires review by trusted authorities (humans) whereas in blockchain consensus is achieved by algorithmic means by machines, with no human input - humans still author many of the transactions, of course. I personally think that the conceptual framework introduced with git may well have influenced Satoshi Nakamoto in his thinking about the design of Bitcoin, but I have no evidence to support this - it is just a personal hunch. The conceptual framework popularised by git has also clearly influenced another very important technical innovation in recent times - docker. Answered Dec 15, 2017 Author has 1k answers and 1.2m answer views Git essentially has a central repository and just clones subsets of data locally and keeps a record of which files need to be updated. (it maintains multiple versions of files and their edit histories) A block-chain is basically everyone having a complete copy of exactly the same blocks on their computers and when a new one is added to the chain it is replicated across the network and verified by each node. (in a block-chain there is only one version of each block(file) for everyone) Git is a centrally managed distributed file system. Block-chain is a decentralized distributed ledger. Continue reading >>

Github - Openblockchains/awesome-blockchains: A Collection About Awesome Blockchains - Open Distributed Public Databases W/ Crypto Hashes Incl. Git ;-). Blockchains Are The New Tulips . Distributed Is The New Centralized.

Github - Openblockchains/awesome-blockchains: A Collection About Awesome Blockchains - Open Distributed Public Databases W/ Crypto Hashes Incl. Git ;-). Blockchains Are The New Tulips . Distributed Is The New Centralized.

Mining Digital Gold one Block at a Time?! Don't Expect to Get Insanely Rich (Quick) Tulips (like Blockchains) are Great and Gorgeous (and will Endure) b0 = Block.first( { from: "Dutchgrown", to: "Vincent", what: "Tulip Bloemendaal Sunset", qty: 10 }, { from: "Keukenhof", to: "Anne", what: "Tulip Semper Augustus", qty: 7 } )b1 = Block.next( b0, { from: "Flowers", to: "Ruben", what: "Tulip Admiral van Eijck", qty: 5 }, { from: "Vicent", to: "Anne", what: "Tulip Bloemendaal Sunset", qty: 3 }, { from: "Anne", to: "Julia", what: "Tulip Semper Augustus", qty: 1 }, { from: "Julia", to: "Luuk", what: "Tulip Semper Augustus", qty: 1 } )... (Source: blockchain_with_transactions.rb ) A collection about awesome blockchains - open distributed databases w/ crypto hashes incl. git ;-). Blockchains are the new tulips Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q.s) & Answers A: A blockchain is a distributed database with a list (that is, chain) of records (that is, blocks) linked and secured bydigital fingerprints (that is, cryptho hashes).Example from blockchain.rb : [#, #, #, ... Q: What's a Hash? What's a (One-Way) Crypto(graphic) Hash Digest Checksum? A: A hash e.g. eb8ecbf6d5870763ae246e37539d82e37052cb32f88bb8c59971f9978e437743is a small digest checksum calculatedwith a one-way crypto(graphic) hash digest checksum functione.g. SHA256 (Secure Hash Algorithm 256 Bits)from the data. Example from blockchain.rb : def calc_hash sha = Digest::SHA256.new sha.update( @timestamp.to_s + @previous_hash + @data ) sha.hexdigest ## returns "eb8ecbf6d5870763ae246e37539d82e37052cb32f88bb8c59971f9978e437743"end the block timestamp (e.g. 1637-09-15 20:52:38) and the hash from the previous block (e.g. edbd4e11e69bc399a9ccd8faaea44fb27410fe8e3023bb9462450a0a9c4caa1b) and finally the block data (e.g. Transaction Continue reading >>

What Could Come After Blockchain Technology? The What And Why Of Holochain

What Could Come After Blockchain Technology? The What And Why Of Holochain

What could come after blockchain technology? The what and why of Holochain A deep dive into Holochain - what some are calling an evolution on blockchain technology, operating "in parallel to BitTorrent to power fully distributed apps" Bitcoin made the impossible a reality, and Ethereum aimed to take that same utility into other domains. Artificial intelligences need not beholden to their human masters , and global organizations no longer need be at the mercy of a handful of executives. Truly cooperative, decentralized organizations seem to be just on the edge of becoming a reality. However, despite all the possibilities that blockchain technology has teased us with, weve already started to see limitations: seemingly innocuous apps like CryptoKitties have made the Ethereum network grind to a halt , and multi-signature wallets have been accidentally, irrevocably locked . There are a lot of reasons why blockchains suck , but that topic is for another article. Instead well see how scaling limitations can be overcome, with a particular focus on Holochain. EoS, BitLattice, and Holochain are all examples of an evolution on blockchain technology. Technically, they are not even blockchains at all. Rather than a linear sequence of transactions - a series of 'blocks' - they are more like a mesh of transactions. They all provide cryptographic control of information, but none of them require nearly as much storage and processing power as Bitcoin and Ethereum. This next generation of crypto-networks have some parallels to how Einstein uppercut Newton. Rather than spend huge amounts of energy to construct an objective reality, these fledgling networks have a more relativistic perspective. Data is verified locally, rather than through global consensus mechanisms that make a linear, ab Continue reading >>

Is Git A Blockchain?

Is Git A Blockchain?

Based on a observation made by @Kamran Khan on my previous article where I offered up a simplistic explanation of what a blockchain is and how it works I got to thinking about how Git is and is not a like blockchain in the traditional crypto currency sense.Specifically Git resembles and differs from the blockchains used by various crypto currencies and how it might be used to facilitate a financial transaction system. In this article Ill illustrate my thinking for anybody who is familiar with Git but who struggles with the ins and outs of crypto currency blockchain technology.I hope that this article is helpful. Git is probably the worlds most popular software version control system (VCS) and is used by programmers and others to track changes in a shared or private data repositories.In a team development environment this is very important.A VCS allow developers to keep a history of changes to a code base and look at differences between them. A good VCS facilitates peer review of changes to code prior to them being introduced into a master copy of the code. I only started working with Git since I joined Nest a little over a year ago. Prior to this I was a Perforce man (as opposed to being a Dapper Dan man ;-)).Git is fantastically powerful and like all powerful tools, it is subject to abuse and misuse.There are many ways to use Git wrong and only a few ways to do it right.Prior to wrapping my head around what was actually happening under the covers of Git, and formulating a workflow that meshed with the rest of my team, I was responsible for some serious faux pas in our process and for at least one EPIC screw up that delayed a release.Oh well, I live and learn.I am lucky that I work with good, smart and patient people who jumped in to help me out and to help me develop Continue reading >>

Is Git A Block Chain? | Hacker News

Is Git A Block Chain? | Hacker News

Bitcoin Script is Forth-like RPN, why does it need AST?Do you mean there are plans to add more languages/DSLs to Bitcoin which with multiple compiler front-ends generating ASTs. which then translated to "machine opcodes"? Something similar to Ethereum? Or maybe it's a solution for transaction scriptSig malleability? [1] You can see git's DAG as a dedup'd Merkle tree: in other words, if two child pointers in two places in the tree point to nodes (blobs) with the same hash, make them share a single node instead. This works because the hash "is" the content/entire subtree (modulo hash collisions), so the resulting data structure has the same meaning as before. Content/hash-addressed stores are related to referential transparency and immutability (and deep equality) in languages like Haskell, FWIW. I've always thought it's sort of beautiful how cleanly the ideas come together like that. "Blockchain" is generally used to refer to systems that either 1) use the sequence of blocks to model changes in custodianship or 2) (more generally) enforce a set of rules governing the correctness of a given block. That is, a block in the bitcoin blockchain is valid not only if its hash matches what one would expect given the included transactions, but that those transactions adhere to the rules of bitcoin. (No double-spends, no dust transactions, etc). While there are data structures in a git commit that must be present and/or follow a particular set of semantics, git does not enforce anything about the _contents_ of those commits. Another key distinction: blockchains seek consensus, whereas divergent forks in git repos are by design. EDIT: I should probably not distinguish too much between consensus and rule enforcement, as those two are obviously intertwined. :) I want to make sure peo Continue reading >>

Hash - Where Did The Idea Of Blockchain Come From? Git Was Already Using It Since 2005 - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

Hash - Where Did The Idea Of Blockchain Come From? Git Was Already Using It Since 2005 - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

Where did the idea of blockchain come from? Git was already using it since 2005 With bitcoin's blockchain, each block's hash is computed with the previous block's hash. That makes all blocks an immutable chain. This is not the first time people used a hash-chain. As far as I know, Git was already used it since 2005 for the commit-hash computing. So, what is the earliest use of hash chains? Where did the idea of blockchain come from? According to Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies (BaCT) , the Princeton Bitcoin textbook, the block chain dates back to a "paper by Haber and Stornetta in 1991. Their proposal was a method for secure timestamping of digitaldocuments, rather than a digital money scheme." (BaCT p.15) The chaining of Merkle trees instead of single documents was proposed in a later paper. (BaCT p.16) Although the blockchain as it is used in Bitcoin is a new and novel concept, the idea of a chain of blocks in the field of cryptography goes back to symmetric block cipher modes of operation. Specifically, the common practice of cipher block chaining . This practice was first described in a standard from 1981 , although it was almost certainly in use before then. Although cipher block chaining is fundamentally different than the chain of blocks that Bitcoin uses, it is an example from cryptography where a change to an earlier block affects all subsequent blocks. Continue reading >>

Programming Cryptocurrencies And Blockchains (book Edition)

Programming Cryptocurrencies And Blockchains (book Edition)

Programming Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains (Book Edition) 1. Digital $$$ Alchemy - What's a Blockchain? How-To Turn Digital Bits Into $$$ or ? Decentralize Payments. Decentralize Transactions. Decentralize Blockchains. The Proof of the Pudding is ... The Bitcoin (BTC) Blockchain(s) A Blockchain in Ruby in 20 Lines! A Blockchain is a Data Structure What about Proof-of-Work? What about Consensus? Find the Lucky Number - Nonce == Number Used Once The World's Worst Database - Bitcoin Blockchain Mining Tulips on the Blockchain! Adding Transactions Build Your Own Crypto Hash Trees; Grow Your Own Money on Trees Run Your Own Federated Central Bank Nodes on the Blockchain Peer-to-Peer over HTTP Inside Mining - Printing Cryptos, Cryptos, Cryptos on the Blockchain 1. Digital $$$ Alchemy - What's a Blockchain? How-To Turn Digital Bits Into $$$ or ? Decentralize Payments. Decentralize Transactions. Decentralize Blockchains. The Proof of the Pudding is ... The Bitcoin (BTC) Blockchain(s) Alchemy - How-To Mine Digital Shilling? How-To Turn Digital Bits Into $$$ or ? Blockchain! Blockchain! Blockchain! Decentralize Payments. Decentralize Transactions. Decentralize Blockchains. Consensus with Proof-of-Work or Proof-of-Stake? Digital Fingerprints? Cryptographic Hashes? The Proof of the Pudding is The Bitcoin (BTC) Blockchain(s) May 22, 2010 - Worlds 1st Bitcoin Payment A developer bought two pizzas using 10 000 Bitcoin (BTC) - a then-little-known digital (crypto)currency.Estimated worth about $40. Triva Q: How much is one Bitcoin worth today? Q: How much are 10 000 Bitcoin worth today? $20 Million Dollar Pizza Day - Celebrating the Birth of Bitcoin Alchemy - $$$ A Blockchain in Ruby in 20 Lines! A Blockchain is a Data Structure What about Proof-of-Work? What about Consensus? Find the Continue reading >>

On The Dangers Of A Blockchain Monoculture

On The Dangers Of A Blockchain Monoculture

On the dangers of a blockchain monoculture At first there was Bitcoin: the worlds most successful cryptocurrency to-date. But lately there has been more and more talk about the Bitcoin blockchain, the blockchain, blockchain, or blockchain technology. Bloomberg reports that Nasdaq is seeking to show progress using the much-hyped blockchain . LWN notes The Linux Foundation recently announced a project to advance blockchain technology . The Washington Post lists Bitcoin and the blockchain as one of six inventions of magnitude we havent seen since the printing press . VISA, Citi, and Nasdaq have invested $30 million into a blockchain company . VCs have collectively invested $1 billion in the Bitcoin ecosystem . Bank of America is allegedly trying to load up on blockchain patents . The Bank of England says theres lots of buzz around blockchain and is curious what youd use blockchain for. It seems blockchain is becoming an increasingly generic term, like cloud or cyber. A new breed of snake oil purveyors are peddling blockchain as the magic sauce that will power all the worlds financial transactions and unlock the great decentralized database in the sky. But what exactly is a blockchain? Lets turn to the definitive source, Satoshi Nakamotos seminal paper Bitcoin: A Peer-To-Peer Electronic Cash System . Lets look for the first reference to blockchain. Hmm, there doesnt seem to be one. The paper contains multiple references to a proof-of-work chain, and one reference to a chain of blocks, but other than that neither blockchain or block chain ever make an appearance in the Bitcoin paper. So if its not defined in the Bitcoin paper, what does blockchain actually mean? Ive asked a lot of people this question, ranging from renowned cryptographers and distributed systems experts to Continue reading >>

Is A Git Repository A Blockchain?

Is A Git Repository A Blockchain?

... and they shall know me by my speling errors. tl;dr; It depends on how you define what a blockchain is. But under more general definitions, yes. And under more restrictive definitions, no. Some definitions are more useful than others. I know, my summary is kind of a cop out. Not kind of a cop out, a real big cop out. But unless you go with one of the more narrow descriptions then a Git repository looks, smells, and acts like a blockchain. Just not in the ways you would expect. To understand this I think it would be more instructive to look at what a blockchain is from the most restrictive definitions to the least. The truth lies in the middle ground, I just dont know where that middle ground is. Well, that much should be obvious, that a Git repository is not Bitcoin. Capital B and little b. Neither in structure nor payload is it Bitcoin. There are some purists that when you say blockchain what you should mean is The Blockchain, rooted in the genesis block mined by Satoshi himself (may his work not be in vain). But I reject those maximalists as narrow minded. Relegating blockchain to be a term like Champagne or Caviar only diminishes its meaning and value. Unix went down that path and now only really has scars (and enterprise grade Windows) to show from it. Perhaps we need a snazzier name for the blockchain that Bitcoin runs on. How about referring to it as the Satoshi Chain or the Nakamoto Chain? The Satoshi Nakamoto Chain is too much of a mouthful, and I fear we may soon have multiple active chains that will be rooted off of Satoshis genesis block. But the definition of what a blockchain is should not be judged by its heritage. An Git Repository is not a CryptoCurrency So if we cannot judge blockchainness by heritage, how about judging it by the content it carries? Continue reading >>

Blockchains By Analogies And Applications

Blockchains By Analogies And Applications

Blockchains by analogies and applications How blockchain compares to Git, Raft, and other technologies. Basket of Apples, 1895, by Levi Wells Prentice. (source: Wikimedia Commons ) Blockchain may be the buzzword of 2015, but few understand what blockchains are. In this article, Ill compare the key components of blockchains to their analogues in better-understood technologies, such as Git, BitTorrent, and Raft. In doing so, well develop a sense of what blockchains are and how they present a unified framework to solve problems that are presently solved by many disparate tools. At their core, blockchains are databases. They contain data that is persisted to disk. Blockchains usually employ tabular schemas, which encode their core data types on top of a traditional database. Common tables are accounts, transactions, or blocks. Roughly speaking, a block is a bundle of transactions, which are executed to update account balances. Consider a transaction encoded in SQL-like pseudocode below: UPDATE account_balance SET account_balance = account_balance-50 WHERE account_address = sender; UPDATE account_balance SET account_balance = account_balance+50 WHERE account_address = receiver; This transaction simply sends 50 units of a blockchain-resident currency from the sender to the receiver. The word transaction is appropriate in two senses: the traditional meaning of transaction in database theory is all or nothingall the actions contained in a transaction are completed at the same time, or the partially completed actions will be rolled back. Blockchain transactions are all or nothing, but also encode a global invariant: the total amount of value in the system is constant (note: see discussion of mining, below). Thus, transactions on blockchains are like cash transactionsthe money r Continue reading >>

Do You Need A Blockchain? Probably Less Than Wst And Gervais Think You Do | Attack Of The 50 Foot Blockchain

Do You Need A Blockchain? Probably Less Than Wst And Gervais Think You Do | Attack Of The 50 Foot Blockchain

Tags: /r/buttcoin , arthur gervais , blockchain , git , karl wuest The general answer to do you need a blockchain? is no. As I detail in chapter 11 of the book, append-only transaction ledgers with cryptographic tamper-proofing are good and deserve wider use but the distributed bit is largely superfluous. Youll basically never need a so-called permissioned blockchain. If you have a trusted third party, you dont need any sort of blockchain and in real-world use cases, youll almost always have a trusted third party, or central administrator of some sort. When Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin, he took the append-only ledger a robust construct that had been around for decades and bolted on a torturously convoluted and stupidly wasteful consensus mechanism, to determine who got to write the next block, in order to avoid having any central control whatsoever. This solved a problem only the economically delusional thought they had, and even then it only solved it temporarily Bitcoin had recentralised by 2014. It was an extremely clever and interesting hack but thats not the same as being useful for any other purpose. Most business usage that thinks it needs a blockchain just wants the append-only ledger. And weve had those for decades. The best-known example is probably Git from 2005, four years before Bitcoin. This is a program by Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux its his second big hit. He needed something to store the Linux computer code in, that would let you readily look through the full history of the code, back to the beginning. Git has cryptographic tamper-proofing, as part of how it ensures the data is consistent if a single bit changes, all the hashes change. Software developers routinely copy entire full-history Git repositories around. Git is append-only ledger Continue reading >>

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