CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

C Blockchain Implementation

How To Implement A Blockchain Project In 5steps

How To Implement A Blockchain Project In 5steps

How To Implement A Blockchain Project In 5Steps From the initialization of the network to the execution of a smart contract and the selection of the necessary tools, here are the main steps for implementing a blockchain application. The blockchain has passed the course of evangelization. It is no longer necessary to recall the interest represented by blockchain technology . A kind of decentralized account ledger (and therefore very difficult to falsify), it allows validating transactions in near real-time without going through a trusted third party. The use cases are endless and many companies have moved from PoC (proof of concept) to concrete achievements. The underlying technologies are available in open source, any aspiring developer can implement a small private blockchain on his workstation and run it on a network of a few machines. The opportunity to learn through practice the concepts behind such an environment, such as mining or the execution of a smart contract. The point on the major stages of such a project. The Ethereum blockchain network is unanimous. Due to the dynamism and responsiveness of its community but also the wealth of its documentation, the promise of the blockchain is that the objects will become fully autonomous and belong to themselves. They will be able to execute code: in exchange for money (a form of code), the door releases its access (via code) to be used during the authorized time. Ethereums development environment is based on the most common languages such as C ++ (Cpp-ethereum), Haskell (ethereumH), JavaScript (EthereumJS-lib) or Python (Pyethapp). The one based on the language Go will be retained (Go-ethereum or Geth). It is the most used customer in the Ethereum world. By default, it connects to Homestead, the main network of the pl Continue reading >>

Technology Choices When Building Your Own Blockchain

Technology Choices When Building Your Own Blockchain

Research/writing, blockchain tech. Mostly Bitcoin & @cosmos. Comms @Tendermint_team. Passion for subversion. Ex @NASAJPL Technology Choices When Building Your Own Blockchain You want to create your own cryptocurrency but your options are dismally limited. If youre new to blockchain development and are weighing the options about which path to take to bootstrap your token, you have just about three good ones: 1) fork an existing codebase like Bitcoins, 2) write a smart contract under a token standard on Ethereum, or 3) use a developer-friendly blockchain framework like the Cosmos-SDK . While forking the battle-hardened codebase of a protocol that hasnt been broken in the history of its existence appears to be erring on the safe side, its far from being your best option. In this blog post, youll develop the understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of creating tokens from option 1) forking an existing codebase and option 3) using a blockchain framework like the Cosmos-SDK. For this post, option 2) is out of scope. A more comprehensive deep dive in a future post about the various platforms, tools, and tradeoffs of each can be written contingent upon demand. Forking an existing codebase like that of Bitcoins may be the simplest option at the outset, but it has many drawbacks that are guaranteed to make your developer tear their hairs out maintaining your forked codebase. Technical debt. Bitcoin Core developers make bug fixes, patches, and upgrades via bandages, leading to legacy code riddled with technical debt. Navigating this terrain can take as much effort as writing your codebase from scratch. Unmaintainable codebase. Bitcoind is still in the midst of a substantial refactor and cleanup of the initial somewhat deficient codebase. This results in frequent large changes Continue reading >>

Blockchain - Wikipedia

Blockchain - Wikipedia

For other uses, see Block chain (disambiguation) . Blockchain formation. The main chain (black) consists of the longest series of blocks from the genesis block (green) to the current block. Orphan blocks (purple) exist outside of the main chain. A blockchain [1] [2] [3] originally block chain [4] [5] is a continuously growing list of records , called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography . [1] [6] Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block, [6] a timestamp and transaction data. [7] By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. Harvard Business Review defines it as "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way." [8] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority. Blockchains are secure by design and are an example of a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault tolerance . Decentralized consensus has therefore been achieved with a blockchain. [9] This makes blockchains potentially suitable for the recording of events, medical records, [10] [11] and other records management activities, such as identity management , [12] [13] [14] transaction processing , documenting provenance , or food traceability . [15] The first blockchain was conceptualised in 2008 by an anonymous person or group known as Satoshi Nakamoto and implemented in 2009 as a core component of bitcoin where it serves as the public ledger for all transactions. Continue reading >>

Build A Blockchain With C++

Build A Blockchain With C++

So, you might have heard a lot about something called a blockchain lately and wondered what all the fuss is about. A blockchain is a ledger which has been written in such a way that updating the data contained within it becomes very difficult, some say the blockchain is immutable and to all intents and purposes theyre right but immutability suggests permanence and nothing on a hard drive could ever be considered permanent. Anyway, well leave the philosophical debate to the non-techies;youre looking for someone to show you how to write a blockchain in C++, so thats exactly what Im going to do. Before I go any further, I have a couple of disclaimers: This tutorial is based on one written by Savjee using NodeJS; and Its been a while since I wrote any C++ code, so I might be a little rusty. The first thing youll want to do is open a new C++ project, Im using CLion from JetBrains but any C++ IDE or even a text editor will do. For the interests of this tutorial well call the project TestChain, so go ahead and create the project and well get started. If youre using CLion youll see that the main.cpp file will have already been created and opened for you; well leave this to one side for the time being. Create a file called Block.h in the main project folder, you should be able to do this by right-clicking on the TestChain directory in the Project Tool Window and selecting: New > C/C++ Header File. Inside the file, add the following code (if youre using CLion place all code between the lines that read#define TESTCHAIN_BLOCK_H and #endif): Continue reading >>

How Is A Blockchain Implemented In Code?

How Is A Blockchain Implemented In Code?

Originally Answered: How does blockchain work in terms of coding? Blockchain is decentralized, distributed ledger. A Ledger is basically an accounting book which is used to record the financial transactions. So the digital implementation of this Ledger is blockchain. Blockchain is cryptographic ally secured and immutable. Being decentralized, each node in the network will have a copy of blockchain. With this definition, lets come back to your question How does blockchain work in terms of coding?. I assume that you want to know blockchain in terms of how it is implemented in terms of code? To understand blockchain implementation in terms of code, you need to understand 3 main core technical components which constitute a blockchain. Blockchain is mainly built around the above technical concepts. Apart from this, if you dig deeper into blockchain, you will see many more things like. The consensus mechanism used in blockchain for authorizing and authenticating transactions Mechanism of Creating blocks and adding to chain The merkel tree structure used in blockchain The Linking of blocks in the chain using hash pointers, similar to linked list Blockchain support for smart contracts etc So, with this over view, you can first acquire the knowledge of technology which constitutes a blockchain, then you can apply your knowledge to go through the blockchain code and understand. Multichain is an open source blockchain which is fork of bitcoin blockchain. Multichain can be a right candidate to experiment with. Answered Jun 2, 2016 Author has 169 answers and 266.8k answer views Its a complex data structure in which you can add blocks at the top, switch to a different top block (in case of forks), and get some information relative to any blocks in it. There are a bunch of function t Continue reading >>

Github - Tko22/simple-blockchain: My Implementation Of A Blockchain In C++ - Peer-to-peer Network, Sha-256, Merkle Trees, Mining, Etc.

Github - Tko22/simple-blockchain: My Implementation Of A Blockchain In C++ - Peer-to-peer Network, Sha-256, Merkle Trees, Mining, Etc.

My implementation of a blockchain in C++ - Peer-to-Peer network, SHA-256, Merkle Trees, Mining, etc. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download Xcode and try again. If nothing happens, download the GitHub extension for Visual Studio and try again. My implementation of a blockchain in C++ I created for fun :)Follows some Bitcoin design principles including a peer-to-peer network, SHA-256 to hash headers and blocks, merkle trees, and "mining"(more on that below). Uses C++14, OpenSSL library, Simple-Web-Server, and a JSON library Includes a Command line interface that allows you to view blockchains at different indices and add new blocks. Youcan do that 20 times until it automatically quits but you can change that. Control-c to quit. And unfortunately, everything is stored in memory and is deleted when program quits. At first, I used WebSockets but a peer-to-peer system would require setting up a WS server and WS clients for each and every node. So instead, I make HTTP requests to connect to nodes to the network Get the latest chains from every node -- to validate your chain & get up to date when a new node is added to the network Send out your chain to the network when a new block is added There can only be one explicit set of blocks in the chain at a given time. If there are conflicts(e.g. when the chains at different nodes have the same size but have different blocks), the longest chain is chosen. So if some other node sends in a new chain that's longer than yours, your chain is replaced. Note: this was a simple implementation and thus, it replaces the entire chain except for the genesis block. For future improvements, each node should check the new chain with other Continue reading >>

Learn Blockchain In C++

Learn Blockchain In C++

Blockchain is platform and language agnostic. That means, you can use any popular programming language to create a blockchain. Some of the popular blockchains are developed using C++, Java, JavaScript, Go, Python, C#, Ruby, Solidity, and PHP. You can create your blockchain using JavaScript but only some portions of it. A blockchain is a combination of several technologies including cryptography, distributed ledger technology, P2P network programming, database storage and sharing, network communication and notifications, backend services, UI components and so on. So building a complete blockchain product may require more than just one language. Here is a list of resources that you may use to learn blockchain development in C++. In this video, youll learn how to create a block, create a blockchain, add blocks to a blockchain, and how to implement Proof of Work. My implementation of a blockchain in C++ I created for fun :) Follows some Bitcoin design principles including a peer-to-peer network, SHA-256 to hash headers and blocks, merkle trees, and "mining"(more on that below). Uses C++14, OpenSSL library, Simple-Web-Server, and a JSON library Includes a Command line interface that allows you to view blockchains at different indices and add new blocks. You can do that 20 times until it automatically quits but you can change that. Control-c to quit. This talk will explain what public blockchain systems like Bitcoin and Ripple are, the unique challenges of developing software for them, and how C++ helps to meet these challenges. Security issues are paramount. Blockchain systems are open source, have large attack surfaces, and can cause significant financial damage if they have exploitable defects. Performance and scalability are also major concerns. C++ provides a unique bal Continue reading >>

Github - Lhartikk/naivechain: A Blockchain Implementation In 200 Lines Of Code

Github - Lhartikk/naivechain: A Blockchain Implementation In 200 Lines Of Code

A blockchain implementation in 200 lines of code If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download Xcode and try again. If nothing happens, download the GitHub extension for Visual Studio and try again. Naivechain - a blockchain implementation in 200 lines of code All the current implementations of blockchains are tightly coupled with the larger context and problems they (e.g. Bitcoin or Ethereum) are trying to solve. This makes understanding blockchains a necessarily harder task, than it must be. Especially source-code-wisely. This project is an attempt to provide as concise and simple implementation of a blockchain as possible. From Wikipedia : Blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continuously-growing list of records called blocks secured from tampering and revision. Check also this blog post for a more detailed overview of the key concepts Use Websockets to communicate with other nodes (P2P) Super simple "protocols" in P2P communication No proof-of-work or proof-of-stake: a block can be added to the blockchain without competition For a more extensive tutorial about blockchains, you can check the project Naivecoin . It is based on Naivechain and implements for instance Proof-of-work, transactions and wallets. (set up two connected nodes and mine 1 block) npm installHTTP_PORT=3001 P2P_PORT=6001 npm startHTTP_PORT=3002 P2P_PORT=6002 PEERS=ws://localhost:6001 npm startcurl -H "Content-type:application/json" --data '{"data" : "Some data to the first block"}' (set up three connected nodes and mine a block) docker-compose upcurl -H "Content-type:application/json" --data '{"data" : "Some data to the first block"}' Continue reading >>

Pwc's Blockchain Services

Pwc's Blockchain Services

Set preferences for tailored content suggestions across the site Save content to reading lists (coming soon) Imagine being able to transfer value or prevent contractual disputes over the Internetwithout going through a third party. Confidently. Securely. Almost instantly. Blockchain-based technology could revolutionize business practices as we know them. PwC sees enormous potential for blockchain in financial services. Weve developed the strategic and implementation capabilities necessary to help financial institutions, technology companies and startups take advantage of this transformative technology. Our global team of experienced business, technology and regulatory leaders can help you identify how blockchain can benefit your organization and how to rapidly move these initiatives forward. Playback of this video is not currently available Not sure what blockchain is? Haskell Garfinkel, Strategy& Partner, defines the concept with examples, including the Bitcoin protocol. While blockchain's potential is transformational, the landscape is nascent and developing. PwC has been a valuable advisor, both strategically and technically, as we experiment and prototype practical use cases around blockchain. - Emerging Technology Leader, worldwide financial services company How can my team and I learn more about blockchain? DeNovo is the digital front door providing access to PwCs expertise in emerging technologies within financial services. The online platform delivers on-demand proprietary blockchain and cryptotechnology content, insights and research, developed by a dedicated team of subject matter experts. Review real-time blockchain content and analysis developed and maintained by more than 60 subject matter experts, a dedicated team of research analysts, and access to PwCs Continue reading >>

A Blockchain In 200 Lines Ofcode

A Blockchain In 200 Lines Ofcode

I like programming and Careless Whisper. The basic concept of blockchain is quite simple: a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of ordered records. However, it is easy to get mixed up as usually when we talk about blockchains we also talk about the problems we are trying to solve with them. This is the case in the popular blockchain-based projects such as Bitcoin and Ethereum . The term blockchain is usually strongly tied to concepts like transactions , smart contracts or cryptocurrencies . This makes understanding blockchains a necessarily harder task, than it must be. Especially source-code-wisely. Here I will go through a super-simple blockchain I implemented in 200 lines of Javascript called NaiveChain . The first logical step is to decide the block structure. To keep things as simple as possible we include only the most necessary: index, timestamp, data, hash and previous hash. The hash of the previous block must be found in the block to preserve the chain integrity The block needs to be hashed to keep the integrity of the data. A SHA-256 is taken over the content of the block. It should be noted that this hash has nothing to do with mining , since there is no Proof Of Work problem to solve. To generate a block we must know the hash of the previous block and create the rest of the required content (= index, hash, data and timestamp). Block data is something that is provided by the end-user. A in-memory Javascript array is used to store the blockchain. The first block of the blockchain is always a so-called genesis-block, which is hard coded. At any given time we must be able to validate if a block or a chain of blocks are valid in terms of integrity. This is true especially when we receive new blocks from other nodes and must decide whe Continue reading >>

Blockchain Coding: The Many Different Languages You Need!

Blockchain Coding: The Many Different Languages You Need!

Blockchain Coding: The Many different Languages You Need! Blockchain Coding: The Many different Languages You Need! The blockchain technology is incredibly fascinating. It wont be far-fetched to think of a future which will be built entirely on it. So, what do you need to learn in order to start developing on the blockchain? Which languages will give you the edge? In this guide, we will go through some of the more major ones. Problems with developing blockchain software Before we begin, lets checkout some of the challenges that a blockchain developer faces. Creating and maintaining a public blockchain is not easy because of a number of reasons. (Before we continue, a huge shoutout to David Schwartz for his keynote address regarding C++ use in blockchain software development in CPPCON 2016.) Blockchain Coding: The Many different Languages You Need! Blockchains, as David Schwartz puts it, should be fortresses. Firstly, the code is public and open for all to see. Anyone can look over the code and check for bugs and vulnerabilities. However, unlike other open code resources, the downside of finding vulnerabilities on blockchain code is massive. Any programmer can hack in and get away with potentially millions and millions of dollars. Because of these legitimate security concerns, development on blockchain is usually very slow . It is important to keep pace with the network. You cannot fall too far behind and not keep up with all the network demands. You should be well equipped to handle remote and local queries. The blockchain must always perform at its highest possible capabilities, but for that to happen the language chosen must be extremely versatile. The thing is that there are certain tasks in the blockchain which are parallelizable whilst there are some tasks which c Continue reading >>

Graphene An Open Source Blockchain

Graphene An Open Source Blockchain

By Phil Mesnier, OCI Partner & Principal Engineer By now, you have likely heard words like "bitcoin" and "blockchain," perhaps even "Ethereum," and wondered what they all mean. Do they refer to something useful, and if so, how would you go about using it? This article is intended to put meaning behind these words and others, by highlighting one instance of the technology behind the concepts. Blockchain , like many other technologies supported and used by OCI, is middleware. It is not an end in itself; rather it is the means to an end. Blockchains are useful in the way databases are, storing data and allowing its manipulation, but with a twist. Data is stored in a blockchain as an immutable record of transactions. Integrity of the chain is maintained through the use of an algorithm, which verifiably links each new block to the history of blocks that precede it back to the origin of the chain. Graphene, an Open Source, mostly C++, blockchain implementation was originally developed as the foundation of Bitshares , a cryptocurrency exchange marketplace. The Graphene source is available in numerous variations, as it has been forked and adapted many times. The original release is managed by an organization known as Cryptonomex. Graphene is interesting because it is Open Source, but also because it was developed in a modular fashion, making it adaptable to many different uses. In addition to Bitshares, Graphene serves as the blockchain foundation for Steemit.com , a news aggregation site similar in concept to reddit.com and PeerPlays.com , a gaming site. FollowMyVote.com is another example of a service built on the Graphene blockchain. FollowMyVote uses Graphene to facilitate secure, yet private, internet-based municipal voting. There are many other users of Graphene beyond t Continue reading >>

Blockchain Definition | Investopedia

Blockchain Definition | Investopedia

Blockchain: The Backbone of Finance's Entire Future A block is the current part of a blockchain, which records some or all of the recent transactions. Once completed, a block goes into the blockchain as a permanent database. Each time a block gets completed, a new one is generated. There is a countless number of such blocks in the blockchain, connected to each other (like links in a chain) in proper linear, chronological order. Every block contains a hash of the previous block. The blockchain has complete information about different user addresses and their balances right from the genesis block to the most recently completed block. The blockchain was designed so these transactions are immutable, meaning they cannot be deleted. The blocks are added through cryptography, ensuring that they remain meddle-proof: The data can be distributed, but not copied. However, the ever-growing size of the blockchain is considered by some to be a problem, creating issues of storage and synchronization. The blockchain is perhaps the main technological innovation of Bitcoin. Bitcoin isnt regulated by a central authority. Instead, its users dictate and validate transactions when one person pays another for goods or services, eliminating the need for a third party to process or store payments. The completed transaction is publicly recorded into blocks and eventually into theblockchain, where its verified and relayed by other Bitcoin users. On average, a new block is appended to the blockchain every 10 minutes, through mining . Based on the Bitcoin protocol, the blockchain database is shared by all nodes participating in a system. Upon joining the network, each connected computer receives a copy of the blockchain, which has records, and stands as proof of, every transaction ever executed. I Continue reading >>

Implementing A Simple Proof Of Work Algorithm For The Blockchain

Implementing A Simple Proof Of Work Algorithm For The Blockchain

Implementing a simple proof of work algorithm for the Blockchain Refer to previous article for a boilerplate blockchain code. In the earlier example , we implemented a mechanism to add blocks In reality we cannot add a new block so easily. There are numerous checks in place like Proof of work, Proof of stake etc. The first blockchain was conceptualized by an anonymous person or group known as Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. It was implemented in 2009 as a core component of Bitcoin. Like our Fruit spreadsheet example, the words block and chain were used separately in Satoshi Nakamotos original paper, but were eventually popularized as a single word, blockchain. Satoshi leveraged the existing peer-to-peer networks with clever cryptography to create a consensus mechanism that could solve the double-spend problem as well as, if not better than a trusted third party. To achieve this, the bitcoin network uses a Proof of work (PoW) mechanism. Miners or participants on the network who run bitcoin nodes gather up recent transactions as a block of data where each block must refer to the previous block. This process repeats every 10 minutes. The problem is that there are multiple miners trying to solve for the same block. To select a miner who will be assigned to solve a block of transactions, we create a mathematical puzzle that is hard to solve, i.e. it takes a lot of work. The puzzle often is to find a really long number (hash value) where the computer tries to guess each number. Whoever solves the puzzle first gets to mine the block. In exchange for mining the block, the miner receives bitcoin as a reward. After every successful transaction, the puzzle starts increasing in complexity i.e. miners need to look for an even larger hash value. The complexity of the puzzle also depends o Continue reading >>

The Strategic Business Value Of The Blockchain Market | Mckinsey

The Strategic Business Value Of The Blockchain Market | Mckinsey

Companies can determine whether they should invest in blockchain by focusing on specific use cases and their market position. Speculation on the value of blockchain is rife, with Bitcointhe first and most infamous application of blockchaingrabbing headlines for its rocketing price and volatility. That the focus of blockchain is wrapped up with Bitcoin is not surprising given that its market value surged from less than $20 billion to more than $200 billion over the course of 2017. 1 1.Cryptocurrency market value is subject to high variation due to the specific volatility of the market. Yet Bitcoin is only the first application of blockchain technology that has captured the attention of government and industry. Blockchain was a priority topic at Davos; a World Economic Forum survey suggested that 10 percent of global GDP will be stored on blockchain by 2027. 2 2.Deep shift: Technology tipping points and societal impact, World Economic Forum, September 2015, weforum.org. Multiple governments have published reports on the potential implications of blockchain , and the past two years alone have seen more than half a million new publications on and 3.7 million Google search results for blockchain. Most tellingly, large investments in blockchain are being made. Venture-capital funding for blockchain start-ups consistently grew and were up to $1 billion in 2017. 3 3.Blockchain startups absorbed 5X more capital via ICOs than equity financings in 2017, CB Insights, January 2018, cbinsights.com. The blockchain-specific investment model of initial coin offerings (ICOs), the sale of cryptocurrency tokens in a new venture, has skyrocketed to $5 billion. Leading technology players are also heavily investing in blockchain: IBM has more than 1,000 staff and $200 million invested in the Continue reading >>

More in cryptocurrency