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Blockchain Intellectual Property Management

Huawei Seeks Patent For Blockchain Rights Management

Huawei Seeks Patent For Blockchain Rights Management

Huawei Seeks Patent for Blockchain Rights Management Mar 7, 2018 at 12:00 UTC|UpdatedMar 7, 2018 at 12:31 UTC Chinese telecoms giant and smartphone maker Huawei may be seeking to use blockchain tech to protect digital property rights. In its latest patent application, released by China's State Intellectual Property Office on Tuesday, the Shenzhen-based technology firm details an invention that claims to add a verification feature to a peer-to-peer content distribution network powered by blockchain technology. According to the filing, first submitted in August 2016, the system would store verification information for digital content on a blockchain. When parties initiate download requests over the peer-to-peer network, the system matches their private keys or licenses for accessing the content with the verification information. Only if a consensus is reached in validating the request will the blockchain allow the download, the patent filing says. Huawei claims that the technology is, in essence, a way to guard intellectual property rights for digital content that is distributed over peer-to-peer networks. Although it remains to be seen whether the application will be granted by the patent office, the filing marks a further effort by Huawei in moving to develop and adopt blockchain technology. The company joined the Hyperledger blockchain consortium in October 2016, months after its patent submission. As reported by CoinDesk in January this year, the telecommunications firm is also among the early adopters of Hyperledger's Sawtooth software, for which the firm is currently developing a decompiler. Huawei intellectual property patent by CoinDesk on Scribd The leader in blockchain news, CoinDesk is a media outlet that strives for the highest journalistic standards and abid Continue reading >>

Intellectual Property Management On The Bitcoin Blockchain

Intellectual Property Management On The Bitcoin Blockchain

Intellectual Property Management on the Bitcoin Blockchain S-Bahn/U-Bahn Marienplatz, exit West/Kaufingerstrasse. Entry at left-hand/East side of the building Kaufingerstr 15. Ring at "Wayra Deutschland" How does it actually look like to work with the Bitcoin blockchain for use cases like managing document ownership, far from any "blockchain voodoo", as one of our members recently so succinctly put it ( ) what's going on in our space sometimes? How do you build such transactions? And how does it all tie in with all the current situation about fees? Heck, why don't you just use $altcoin that is so much easier / cheaper / faster / sexier / unicornier? Florian Weigand ( ), CTO of Munich-based startup bernstein.io ( ) born out of a long-standing previous project ( ) named clipperz ( ) will shed some light, and give us an hands-on presentation of how to secure intellectual property on the Bitcoin blockchain. For this he will create a manual Bitcoin transaction and go in the details of how to select a proper fee to be relayed. Furthermore he will show us some tools the developers at Bernstein are using for their day-to-day work. Target audience: Advanced technical-oriented Bitcoin followers, and developers in general. Because of the ongoing SegWit debate we will most likely give this topic also some room with a discussion round, and we will cover news if there's time. 19:00 Doors open, Food + drinks, socializing 19:15 Introduction, presentation, Q&A, discussions 22:00 End of official part, drinks, socializing Remark: Bernstein Technologies GmbH will introduce themselves also at at additional blockchain events in the coming weeks. At our event we will however be able to go deeper into the technical details. The event takes place in the heart of Munich at the Kaufingerstrae ne Continue reading >>

Blockchain Based Solutions For Intellectual Property Management

Blockchain Based Solutions For Intellectual Property Management

Blockchain based solutions for intellectual property management The Statute of Anne, also known as the Copyright Act1710 One of the most obvious applications of blockchain technology is as a registry of IP rights, to catalogue and store original works. In the UK, copyright is unregistered and comes into existence automatically on creation of an original qualifying work. This means that, unlike registered trade marks which can be recorded and viewed on various registries around the world, there is often no adequate means for authors to catalogue their works. As such, ownership can be hard to prove. It can also be difficult for authors to see who is using their work, and equally difficult for third parties using a work to know who to seek a licence from. The result of this is that authors are often unable to stop infringements or to make the most of monetising their works. Using blockchain as an IP registry may help give clarity to copyright authors, owners and users. By registering their works to a blockchain, authors could end up with tamper-proof evidence of ownership. This is because a blockchain transaction is immutable, so once a work has been registered to a blockchain, that information cannot ever be lost or changed. In theory, third parties could use the blockchain to see the complete chain of ownership of a work, including any licences, sub-licences and assignments. Source: Law firms are partnering with Blockchain platforms In Europe and most countries, the rights to the invention belong initially to the first person to file a patent application (first-to-file system). Therefore, the application date is very important in the patent process. Prior to this date, no protection is provided and unfortunately it can happen that a company is overtaken and finds access Continue reading >>

Bernstein - Blockchain For Intellectual Property

Bernstein - Blockchain For Intellectual Property

A simple web application with powerful features. To get a blockchain certificate for any document or a collection of documents, just upload it. Bernstein will craft a special blockchain transaction that contains both a cryptographic fingerprint of your IP assets and a proof of your ownership.This transaction is the root of the blockchain certificate issued by Bernstein. The Bernstein registration protocol will chain together all certificates related to the same project, therefore allowing users to create a digital trail of records proving the evolution of the project. Each certificate can be independently verified by any third party without any involvement of Bernstein, thanks to the decentralized design of Bernstein registration protocol. Please note: getting a certificate for a document does not make it public, since the blockchain will only contain the cryptographic fingerprint of the document. Thanks to Bernsteins unique zero-knowledge architecture, users will be able to generate certificates for their digital assets without disclosing data to any third party, not even to Bernstein itself! All information and documents submitted by a user will be locally encrypted, right in the browser, before reaching the Bernstein server. And, of course, the encryption key is known only by the user and it never gets sent to the server. Therefore Bernstein is a new kind of notary service that completely ignores the digital assets it certifies. The Bernstein team has a unique experience in browser cryptography, dating back to 2007. Today Bernstein uses the most advanced Web Crypto API and proven cryptographic primitives and protocols. In order to validate a blockchain certificate (as any other digital certificate) the certified documents in their exact original format are needed. N Continue reading >>

Blockchain Certificates For Intellectual Property Management

Blockchain Certificates For Intellectual Property Management

Blockchain certificates for intellectual property management Marco Barulli, Managing Director, Bernstein Technologies GmbH The blockchain is the universal public record humanity has been waiting for. Among the many things that will be revolutionized by it, there is the way we secure, manage and transfer intellectual property assets. We are now able to leverage the openness and immutability of the blockchain to generate certificates for any digital object. And we can use these blockchain certificates to enhance current IP strategies and strengthen common legal frameworks surrounding IP. Bernstein is a company that makes this process easy without compromising the confidentiality of the company data. Why shouldnt the visitor miss your lecture? Because "blockchain technology will completely restructure the principles of intellectual property its protection as well as its use." Moreover, you will learn how to "create a blockchain-based alternative for conventional IPR that is quicker, more transparent, impossible to manipulate, and works without middlemen." Quotes from "The future of IP", 2017, Dennemeyer, 2bAhead. Continue reading >>

Will Blockchain Soon Disrupt Ip Protection?

Will Blockchain Soon Disrupt Ip Protection?

Will blockchain soon disrupt IP protection? Dennemeyer & Associates / September 8, 2017 "Lawyer Monthly" spoke with Dr. Richard Brunner , Global Head of Legal of the Dennemeyer Group, about the challenges that blockchain technologies pose to patent offices, copyright protection organizations and collecting societies. Lawyer Monthly: How do you currently see the global IP landscape evolving? Dr. Richard Brunner: Technology and globalization are the key drivers for the creation and protection of intellectual property. The increasing speed of technology development and shortening innovation cycles, on the one hand, and a progressing territorial expansion of sales markets on the other hand, challenge the traditional mechanisms of protecting Intellectual Property amid intensified competition that comes along with this development. Seen in this light, it is not surprising that the number of registered patents, trademarks, and designs are still on the upswing; however, a territorially fragmented protection of IP rights is in contradiction to globalization and dearly bought, especially considering that effective legal enforcement of intellectual property rights is still not at the level it should be in many jurisdictions. RB: IP strategists usually look at the importance of an innovation for the companys business, the market, and eventual other use cases, when making the decision if and where to apply for patents. IP protection comes at a cost that has to be measured in time, money, and the fact that one must disclose the invention even if the patent is not granted in the end. The grant procedure before the European Patent Office takes three to five yearsand requires validation in its 38 member states; for a more global coverage, PCT nationalizations and other national applica Continue reading >>

Why Blockchain Challenges Conventional Thinking About Intellectual Property

Why Blockchain Challenges Conventional Thinking About Intellectual Property

Why blockchain challenges conventional thinking about intellectual property Blockchain technology has turned conventional thinking about intellectual property and copyright on its head. from www.shutterstock.com, CC BY-ND Why blockchain challenges conventional thinking about intellectual property Associate Professor in Commericial Law , University of Auckland Alexandra Sims receives funding from the New Zealand Law Foundation. She is a member of the Asian Pacific Copyright Association and the Blockchain Association of New Zealand. Cryptocurrencies are getting a lot of attention, but finance is only one of many applications of the blockchain technology behind it. Blockchain technology is poised to revolutionise almost everything from supply chains (including illegal fishing and human rights abuses), insurance and health . It is flourishing in an open-source environment, which raises the question whether our current intellectual property laws are fit for purpose to foster innovation. Read more: Demystifying the blockchain: a basic user guide Intellectual property laws incentive theory Intellectual property laws, such as patents and copyright, are premised on the incentive theory . To incentivise people to create, they are given, in effect, a monopoly (with some exceptions) on their creations and can go to court and stop others from free-riding on their work. The digital world has made the tension between innovators and free riders even more acute. In the pre-digital era, copying a book incurred considerable costs for the copier. Now, given that digital files can be copied indefinitely for near zero cost, one could argue that we need even stronger IP laws to prevent rampant and unfair copying. But theory does not always match reality. History is littered with examples of Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Technology Can Be Used To Protect Intellectual Property

How Blockchain Technology Can Be Used To Protect Intellectual Property

How blockchain technology can be used to protect intellectual property If you write, design or create any media that is protected by Intellectual Property (IP) law, youre probably aware of how easy it is for your content to be stolen online. And if chasing down thieves isnt hard enough, enforcing your legal rights as the owner of the content depends on demonstrating that you are the owner. While copyright law protects your work, until now there hasnt been a definitive registration system to prove ownership. But luckily, this is changing with blockchain. Blockchain is the system that makes Bitcoin work. But more importantly, it is giving creative people effective ways to protect their IP rights like never before. Intellectual property in the age of online Intellectual work is just as hard as physical work. By Daria V. When you create just about anythingbe it a song that is recorded, a piece of writing, a photographyou own it. At least, that is what the letter of the law says. But when it is your word against someone elses (say a thiefs), the lack of any official document or timestamp proving which version of the work came first makes copyright little more than a vanity. If you were an inventor, you could go to the patent office for protection, but as a creative, there is no designated way for you to legitimize your ownership of your work prior to its publication. And with the advent of the internet, the challenges associated with copyright protection have become larger. Now there is a gigantic repository of data online, and sifting through it by yourself just isnt possible. These days, just about anyone can download your work for personal use without your knowledge or consent. That beautiful illustration you spent weeks crafting? Its probably ended up as some anonymous Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology And Ip

Blockchain Technology And Ip

Heralded by some as the future of financial transactions, there is no doubt that blockchain technology has the potential to shake up the world of finance. Already, financial institutions are looking to capitalise on the technology to create fast and low-cost payments for customers, investing millions of pounds in the process. However, the usefulness of blockchain technology is not limited to finance and banking. With its relatively low cost of maintenance, increased transparency, lessened administrative burden and resilience to fraud, blockchain is an attractive prospect to a whole host of different sectors and businesses. So what is blockchain, and could this disruptive technology have any application for intellectual property and its management? Put simply, blockchain (or distributed ledger) technology is a way of creating a shared database, which can record and track transactions and assets. Therefore, in theory, any database or ledger could be created and maintained using blockchain. And it does not have to solely lodge digital assets. For example, startup Everledger has used blockchain to create a database of diamonds, to ensure that they are not being used by militias to fund conflicts. Blockchain is not governed by one single user, so no centralised version of a ledger exists. Instead, it can be widely accessible to the public or to large groups (depending on permissions granted). The chain is also updated with each transaction, so users can see the chronological activity for that particular blockchain. This means that, once something is on the database, it cannot be removed. In practice, changes to the blockchain work as follows: This is broadcast to a network of computers, known as nodes The nodes use algorithms to verify the transaction 'Miners' aggregate tra Continue reading >>

International Conference Digital Transformation: Intellectual Property And Blockchain Technologies

International Conference Digital Transformation: Intellectual Property And Blockchain Technologies

Visioner, investor, adviser to the Chairman of Vnesheconombank International Conference 1.0 involves representatives of the Federal Authorities of the Russian Federation and Heads of BRICS IP offices focusing on global IP systems development and Blockchain Technologies using in IP. For the first time world-class experts in IP and Blockchain Industry will share their views on possible ways to develop and reform the global IP system by using distributed registry technologies at all stages: creation, protection and intellectual property management. Russian and foreign Blockchain projects in the area of IP will be presented during the Conference. Experts will explain how blockchain technologies can be introduced into business processes, express their views on the prospects of technology development and share their expectations. The Conference is a unique opportunity to establish international contacts, improve channels of communication at a global level, and encounter new prospects for development and cooperation. The Conference will provide a platform for development of a unified concept of integration processes between the world's Patent Offices, as well as of the changes to be experienced by the IP field under the new digital paradigm the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology And Intellectual Property Ownership

Blockchain Technology And Intellectual Property Ownership

Blockchain technology and intellectual property ownership Blockchain technology and intellectual property ownership Blockchain technology and intellectual property ownership Blockchain based technology has experienced impressive growth over the past five years. It went from being ignored or unheard of, to becoming a buzz phrase in the innovation and securing the technological world. Before it was researched only by startups. Today it is at the top of the agenda of major multinational companies including the likes of Microsoft, Google, Apple, Amazon and IBM, as well as all leading fintech firms. It is fair to say that blockchain technology has demonstrated its potential to shake up the financial world, with as wide a revolution as that experienced when the internet came to be. It is therefore for good reason that the fintech industry and governments are jumping on the bandwagon to capitalise on the technology and pioneer its potential. But it is not only the financial world that can benefit. With its relatively low cost of maintenance, increased transparency, lessened administrative burden and resilience to fraud in intellectual property ownership, blockchain technology applications are endless and far more radical and diverse, ranging from healthcare to the fashion industry, from solar energy to management of intellectual property rights. Blockchain use for intellectual property rights management There are many countries where copyright does not mandate registration and protection is automatic upon creation of an original qualifying work. This means that there is often no adequate means for authors to catalogue and time stamp their works, making ownership hard to prove. Moreover, it is quite difficult for authors to see who is using their work, and equally challenging Continue reading >>

Unlocking The Blockchain: Using Intellectual Property Rights To Protect Distributed Ledger Technology - Chapter 3

Unlocking The Blockchain: Using Intellectual Property Rights To Protect Distributed Ledger Technology - Chapter 3

Unlocking the blockchain: Using intellectual property rights to protect distributed ledger technology - Chapter 3 | Global law firm | Norton Rose Fulbright Unlocking the blockchain: Using intellectual property rights to protect distributed ledger technology - Chapter 3 Our global blockchain team has published a global legal and regulatory guide titled Unlocking the blockchain. Interest in blockchain technologies has grown dramatically over the last twelve months. This has triggered growth in investment in businesses operating in this area and marked engagement from all industry sectors (and financial institutions in particular) in blockchain technologies and their disruptive potential. Such engagement has led to the development of increasingly sophisticated proof-of-concept use cases and notable live deployments. In view of these developments, we have produced a new global legal and regulatory guide to blockchain technologies in which we explore the regulatory considerations and a range of other legal issues that should be taken into account with any proposed deployment. The guide will be published in a series of chapters, with the first one covering an introduction to blockchain technologies that we invite you to read. Chapter 3: Using intellectual property rights to protect distributed ledger technology A significant amount of attention is being paid to the disruptive potential of distributed ledger technology (DLT) and many businesses are making huge investments in DLT-enabled products and/or services. Whilst a significant amount of time is now being spent by businesses on analyzing the various legal and regulatory issues impacting upon the DLT space, many businesses have not yet considered strategies as to whether to (and how to): Protect their investment in the te Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Ip Law: A Match Made In Crypto Heaven?

Blockchain And Ip Law: A Match Made In Crypto Heaven?

Blockchain and IP law: a match made in crypto heaven? By Birgit Clark, Baker McKenzie, London, United Kingdom Blockchain and related distributed ledger technologies have been a hot topic recently, with multiple industries exploring their possibilities and new blockchain use cases emerging almost every day. But how might these technologies be used in the context of intellectual property (IP) law and practice? Blockchain and related distributed ledger technologies are a hot topic, with new use cases emerging almost every day (photo: Rick_Jo / iStock / Getty Images Plus). Blockchain technology has become famous as the technology behind cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. In its basic form it is an open ledger of information that can be used to record and track transactions, and which is exchanged and verified on a peer-to-peer network. Blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies create a trustworthy and transparent record by allowing multiple parties to a transaction to verify what will be entered onto a ledger in advance without any single party having the ability to change any ledger entries later on. Each transaction or block is transmitted to all the participants in the network and must be verified by each participant node solving a complex mathematical puzzle. Once the block is verified, it is added to the ledger or chain. From the perspective of information, the real innovation of distributed ledger technology is that it ensures the integrity of the ledger by crowdsourcing oversight and removes the need for a central authority. In other words, transactions are verified and validated by the multiple computers that host the blockchain. For this reason it is seen as near unhackable, because to change any of the information on it, a cyber-attack woul Continue reading >>

Where Does Blockchain Fit In Digital Rights Management?

Where Does Blockchain Fit In Digital Rights Management?

Where Does Blockchain Fit in Digital Rights Management? A team of media titans including Amazon, Netflix, Columbia, and several others recently filed suit against TickBox, TV LLC in California. The lawsuit alleges that TickBox sells a product that urges its customers to use [it] as a tool for the mass infringement of Plaintiffs copyrighted motion pictures and television shows. TickBox makes a computer hardware device that allows users to search for unauthorized streams of copyrighted content through the combination of open source media player software, Kodi, and add on software programs. The company boasts that users can quit paying high monthly fees and access the hottest TV shows, blockbusters, premium content, and live sporting events all through the TickBox. The lawsuit is the latest example of content creators chasing down a third party that does not directly infringe content but rather facilitates infringement through a combination of its own hardware and third-party software. Technological advancements have created a sharing environment where boundaries to content are incredibly porous, which begs the question whether new developments can create alternatives to our traditional legal processes for registering, managing, and enforcing digital rights. Currently, the increasingly proposed solution for safeguarding digital information is blockchain technology. Blockchain is being implemented in various industries to solve inefficiencies in areas from identity protection to supply chain management. Several companies, such as Mediachain , Binded , Pixsy , and TinEye , among others, are attempting to use the technology as a tool for managing intellectual property, primarily to register copyrighted works and allow owners to easily protect those works. To understand block Continue reading >>

Blockchain And Intellectual Property: How Bitcoin Technology Might Change Ip Protection And Registry

Blockchain And Intellectual Property: How Bitcoin Technology Might Change Ip Protection And Registry

Blockchain and Intellectual Property: How Bitcoin Technology Might Change IP Protection and Registry - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal October 4, 2017In Blog , Technology By Alessandra Dagirmanjian Blockchain and Intellectual Property: How Bitcoin Technology Might Change IP Protection and Registry The same technology behind the electronic currency bitcoin 1 has continued to find new applications in transactions involving important legal documents and information, including intellectual property. 2 Blockchain technology allows intellectual property creators to store their art or inventions on a secure ledger, so they can keep track of a verifiable copy of their original work. 3 The blockchain, invented by an anonymous cryptographer under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, 4 is a shared ledger for recording the history of transactions that cannot be altered. 5 Typically, when parties enter into an exchange with one another, a centralized third partyusually a bank, or notarymust be involved to validate the transaction. 6 Blockchain allows parties to transact with one another without a third party, through a digital ledger that keeps track of the transaction as a bank would. 7 The ledger is different from a bank, though, because it is not stored in a central entity server, but rather, distributed across a network of private computers. 8 Once the transaction is recorded on the ledger, it cannot be tampered with. 9 While originally used for currency-based transactions, blockchain technology is now on the radar of lawyers, including IP lawyers. 10 Blockchain allows IP creators to safely store their unregistered works in a secure ledger and timestamp them for later registration and protection. 11 By storing their information in a blockchain, they Continue reading >>

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