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3 Web Giants That Could Be Decentralized On A Blockchain

3 Web Giants That Could Be Decentralized On A Blockchain

3 Web Giants That Could Be Decentralized on a Blockchain Jan 13, 2018 at 11:30 UTC|UpdatedJan 15, 2018 at 09:00 UTC The web has taken over our lives, and with that, online enterprises have grown into huge monoliths of power. Yet, while tech giants give us access to the stuff we like - music, movies, shopping - blockchain enthusiasts think an individual's web experience could be greatly improved by decentralization. If the web's giants decentralize, the web itself will become a wildly different place - it's hard to even wrap your head around, just like it would have been impossible to imagine meme culture in 1999. Today, a site and its database are one entity. In the decentralized version, the database doesn't belong to its creators; it belongs to its community, and that community can build lots of different business models on top of the database. Think of it like this: if the web had been decentralized from the beginning, you could have made your first social media profile on Friendster in 2003. Then, when MySpace came along, you wouldn't need to create a new profile, you'd just give MySpace permission to access the one you had already made for Friendster. Same thing for Facebook. Obviously, each new site would add new features and ways of interacting, but users would not have needed to start over, lose friends from other sites or the content created on prior platforms. Are those advantages strong enough to upendthe Dot-Com era's familiar incumbents? Entrepreneurs and the various investors who have committed capital - whether that be in the form of traditional venture capital, or perhaps more common in the space today, through initial coin offerings (ICOs) - have made their bets that it is. And with ICOs providing not only a new fundraising mechanism for these blockcha Continue reading >>

Youtube Star Phil Defranco Wants A Cryptocurrency To Pay You - Cnet

Youtube Star Phil Defranco Wants A Cryptocurrency To Pay You - Cnet

Props payouts are based on a formula that evaluates how valuable your contribution is: A stream with thousands of viewers will work out to more Props than you'll earn from a live-video chat with friends in a virtual living room. You can convert Props to dollars, you can use them to send virtual gifts on Rize, or you can hold onto them if you believe they'll rise in value. Props is one of the latest cryptocurrencies to crop up after the massive attention garnered by the likes of bitcoin and Ethereum, and another example of how their foundational technology -- blockchain -- is poised to change your life. Blockchain is a technology designed to hard-wire trust and security into transactions . But the irony of blockchain and cryptocurrency is that they're so unfamiliar and confusing to the average person, they've created a breeding ground for scams and mistrust. DeFranco's advocacy for Props, for example, brings him adjacent to the dubious realm of celebrity cryptocurrency endorsements. Bitcoin: Big in investing, but still lousy for buying a sandwich Socialite Paris Hilton and boxer Floyd Mayweather, for instance, have hyped cryptocurrencies to their large followings. "I'm gonna make a $hit t$n of money on August 26th," Mayweather said on his Instagram account in July, four months before the Securities and Exchange Commission issued a warning to token-touting celebs. If stars don't detail how they're benefiting from a token offering, they could be breaking the law, the agency said. DeFranco isn't exactly tweeting about the $hit ton of l00t he's going to score with Props. "I'm talking about this because it's something that I believe in," he said. "I actually plan on using it. It's not a cash grab for me." DeFranco, whose news commentary channel on YouTube has 6 million subsc Continue reading >>

Blockchain Is Useful For A Lot More Than Justbitcoin

Blockchain Is Useful For A Lot More Than Justbitcoin

Blockchain is useful for a lot more than justBitcoin The distributed nature of blockchain networks make them useful for many applications. Shutterstock Blockchain is useful for a lot more than justBitcoin Principal Researcher in Software Systems, Data61 Mark Staples is a Conjoint Associate Professor at UNSW. CSIRO provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation AU. Data61 provides funding as a member of The Conversation AU. Blockchain technology is not just useful for creating digital currencies such as Bitcoin or developing new financial technologies . Blockchains can be used for a wide variety of applications, such as tracking ownership or the provenance of documents, digital assets, physical assets or voting rights. Blockchain technology was popularised by the Bitcoin digital currency system. But, essentially, a blockchain is just a special kind of database. The Bitcoin blockchain stores cryptographically signed records of financial transfers, but blockchain systems can store any kind of data. Blockchains can also store and run computer code called smart contracts. What makes a blockchain system special is that it doesnt run on just one computer like a regular database. Rather, many distributed processing nodes collaborate to run it. There can be a full copy of the database on every node, and the system encourages all those nodes to establish a consensus about its contents. This boosts our confidence in the database and its contents. Its difficult, if not impossible, to meddle with the database without others finding out and correcting it. The global consensus among the nodes about the integrity and contents of the distributed database is why its often called a distributed ledger. In our society, we normally rely on trusted third parties, such as lawyers, Continue reading >>

Library Credits Explained: Viral Content On The Blockchain

Library Credits Explained: Viral Content On The Blockchain

Library Credits Explained: Viral Content on the Blockchain The Library Credits project aims to use blockchain to solve problems of copyright and ownership of digitized content The Library Credits project strives to be the YouTube and Netflix of the blockchain. The specialized network both carries and sells content for its native Library Credit tokens. The Library Credits blockchain project claims to solve the problem of content censorship and centralized control. Its content is divided and distributed over the network, and cannot be censored, shut down or limited for some geographic areas. There will be a total of one billion Library Credits. Currently, only around 68 million tokens are in circulation, which puts the LBC token around position 88 on CoinMarketCap. The token is supposedly used to pay for content and there is an additional payment system to avoid loading the main blockchain with payments. But since the Library Credits software is still in beta, and there is limited content compared to the current services available, the token is mostly used as a speculative asset. It had its run in the summer of 2017, almost reaching $1, but fell to the current positions around 20 cents. At one point, the market cap of LBC tokens was about 1/4 that of Ethereum. The LBC token is traded mostly on Bittrex and Poloniex, with a very thin slice of trading against the Chinese Yuan. So there is little effect of the panic that spread on the markets. But this also means that this token may be pumped or pushed artificially by whales, as it trades against Bitcoin. One source of value, if the project takes off, would be Library Credit names. These are unique account and content handles that may steer users to one producer. The project creators expect competition for the best names. Th Continue reading >>

The Solution To Youtubes Payments Problem Is A Brand-new Cryptocurrency

The Solution To Youtubes Payments Problem Is A Brand-new Cryptocurrency

This startup promises to solve YouTubes massive demonetization problems and get content creators paid. Tired of YouTubes terrible payouts? So are major stars on the platform. Controversial Singapore YouTuber Amos Yee , famous for insulting late PM Lee Kuan Yew, recently told his followers to support him on Patreon. Now more than 50 percent of the current videos on my channel have been demonetized, and because future videos of mine will obviously deal with controversial political subjects and [have] vulgar language, theres a very high chance that more than 50 percent of my videos will continue to be demonetized and I wont make money [off] them. Hes not alone. Several high-profile YouTubers, including Philip DeFranco, have called out YouTubes rampant demonetization problem. Vimeo has emerged as a solid alternative to YouTube. The company claims that their platform has grown 80% this year alone. YouTubers have seemingly backed Vimeos philosophy of charging for content instead of relying on advertising. According to former CEO Kerry Trainor, When it comes to monetizing that viewing experience, its about allowing and empowering creators to actually charge for content instead of relying on a purely mass advertising-based model. With YouTubers sick of constantly seeing their videos demonetized, one start-up claims to have the solution: blockchain technology. Earlier this year, The Times published a story that set off a firestorm. Advertisements from top advertisers, including the UK government, Verizon, and AT&T, appeared in extremist and hate-filled videos on YouTube. Major companies, including Johnson & Johnson, Nissan, and Toyota, immediately pulled out from the platform. According to the World Federation of Advertisers, many have yet to return . To solve the problem, YouT Continue reading >>

Dtube: Steemit User Builds Foundations Of A Decentralized Youtube

Dtube: Steemit User Builds Foundations Of A Decentralized Youtube

DTube, the foundation for a decentralized YouTube, is built upon the STEEM blockchain. STEEM was selected for numerous reasons, detailed in the August 11 announcement post made on Steemit by the user @heimindanger . Containing similar features like its bigger brother that the video sharing website is based off, DTube is an in-browser application that allows content creators to earn rewards for their uploads. Steemit is a project that launched in March 2016, a blockchain-based social media platform. The platform was to the likes of a decentralized Reddit, with users being able to share posts or links to anything. Interesting content naturally made its way to the top, and users could tip the original author as well. The first of the reasons why DTube was built on top of Steemit was speed; block times on the STEEM blockchain are around three seconds. There are no transactions fees, and there is no barrier of entry, as even users not owning STEEM can participate. The built-in reward-earning mechanisms of the STEEM cryptocurrency also facilitate the social aspect that DTube is trying to manifest; rewarding users for uploading content. One flaw of YouTube is that videos are sometimes taken down and the owners of YouTube channels are demonetized by the company . A decentralized version incorporating blockchain technology could stamp out such censorship, given it can gain enough critical mass. With DTube, the video files themselves are stored on using the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) protocol. Decentralized as well, the IPFS protocol uses the same Distributed Hash Tables that is the backbone of BitTorrent. IPFS was used over Torrent due to convenience and efficiency that cant be offered within a web browser: IPFS is a younger, open-source, and actively developed protocol. Continue reading >>

Video Streamers Have More Options With These New Blockchain Startups

Video Streamers Have More Options With These New Blockchain Startups

Video Streamers Have More Options with These New Blockchain Startups Innovative technology companies are leveraging blockchain technology to build next-generation business models and Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) for video streaming, a multibillion-dollar industry that continues to grow. According to data revealed by Theta Labs, one of the companies covered below, the video content and streaming market accounts for 67 percent of current internet traffic and could reach 82 percent by 2020. The new players promise to decentralize global video streaming, while at the same time making it more efficient. According to Jeremy Kauffman, co-founder and CEO of the blockchain-based content distribution platform LBRY , blockchain technology could transform the monetization of online content by altering the way that creators get paid, and eventually challenge YouTube . The LBRY protocol allows creators to publish online, making their content discoverable with a small payment in LBRYs own cryptocurrency token. Viewers pay creators in LBRY tokens to see their work. [Blockchain technology] allows us to build technology thats owned by the users rather than any one party, Kauffman said . Thats the problem that blockchain [technology] solves. Kauffman explained that under the LBRY model, creators are paid without an intermediary taking an inappropriately large cut. Since LBRY is a protocol, the company cant control what gets discovered. Kauffman said that LBRY recruited 4,000 YouTubers in specifically targeted demographics, several of which have 500,000 or more subscribers, which seems a good first step toward challenging YouTube in its own turf. YouTubes co-founder Steve Chen himself, as well as Justin Kan, co-founder of Twitch, are among the advisors of Theta Labs , a subsidiary of Continue reading >>

Blockchain Explained In 4videos

Blockchain Explained In 4videos

Get a better understanding of Blockchain with thesevideos Two years ago, the hack to get an investment in your startup was to shout: We are using the Blockchain! The Blockchain was the magic term that nobody understood, but had the label of the next big thing. That is why investors were investing like mad into companies that said they are using it. If only one of those startups hit the jackpot, the investors would become (more) insanely rich. Scroll down to check the four selected videos that explain Blockchain Technology. Now two years later, we see big companies like ING executing pilots with Blockchain as a way to store contracts. Accenture and the United Nations have created a solution that will register the refugees of the world inside of a Blockchain. I know almost nothing about the Blockchain technology and want to get some feeling about what is going on. For almost three years after the introduction of the Blockchain as a new technology in the bleeding edge tech startups, the registration of people, housing and companies were promised to be open via the Blockchain. But it is still not here. What is this Blockchain and will it really be a revolution? Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here are a few videos that explain the complex technology in a way everybody can understand. I have selected these videos in such a way that you can watch them one-by-one and have a clear understanding at the end. There is some overlap between the videos but that will help getting a better understanding. Understand the Blockchain in Two Minutes (IFTF2m25) This video by Institute for the Future (IFTF) is Clear, Fast and gives a great insight on what the Blockchain technology is. The real value of bitcoin and crypto currency technology The Blockchain explained (DutchChain 6m1 Continue reading >>

Can Blockchain Challenge Content Platform Giants' Facebook & Youtube Domination?

Can Blockchain Challenge Content Platform Giants' Facebook & Youtube Domination?

Can Blockchain Challenge Content Platform Giants' Facebook & YouTube Domination? {{article.article.images.featured.caption}} Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. The author is a Forbes contributor. The opinions expressed are those of the writer. This story appears in the {{article.article.magazine.pretty_date}} issue of {{article.article.magazine.pubName}}. Subscribe While the world is full of Internet millionaires who made their fortunes on social media, many talented artists and content creators are still struggling to monetize their content. Competition is fierce and one has to be creative enough to offer something catchy, unique and savvy enough to wow the insatiable audiences. The latter appears to be all the more necessary as platforms hosting these global audiences are making monetization opportunities more difficult. Take YouTube for example. The site has over 1 billion users worldwide. Since it introduced monetization through Content ID, the company has paid content creators $2 billion as of 2016. Recently, however, the company has faced criticism for raising the bar on monetization requiring channels to reach 10,000 lifetime views before ads can be enabled. Against this backdrop new blockchain platforms are emerging in an effort to end the hegemony of a few giants. The question remains, can they succeed against the Goliaths in the space? I well recall an International eXcellence event from a few years ago hosted at the McLaren Showroom in Londons Knightsbridge by Viscount Yves de Contades, where among the luxury sports cars displayed, a throng of angel investors and the champagne and canaps, start-up presentations included a musician who was clearly frustrated by the woeful level of royalties he and others were receiving from incumbent pla Continue reading >>

The Blockchain Explained

The Blockchain Explained

"The more we divulge things we know about them, the more theyll shift and change." bit.ly/2z3j0X1 The blockchain. Everyones talking about it. But what is it, how does it work, and whats it for? We get it: Ads arent what youre here for. But ads help us keep the lights on. So, add us to your ad blockers whitelist or pay $1 per week for an ad-free version of WIRED. Either way, you are supporting our journalism. Wed really appreciate it. Continue reading >>

Sacem Boss Talks Youtube, Blockchain And User-centric Streaming Royalties

Sacem Boss Talks Youtube, Blockchain And User-centric Streaming Royalties

SACEM boss talks YouTube, blockchain and user-centric streaming royalties Tags: blockchain europe legal SACEM safe harbour user-centric YouTube At a recent event organised by collecting society PRS for Music, MEP Mary Honeyball noted that the debate around copyright reform and the value gap has split the European Parliament like never before . We have had some heated discussions which doesnt usually happen in the European Parliament, she said. It is two very opposing points of view which so far have proved irreconcilable. Is that worrying? Jean-Nol Tronc, CEO of French authors rights society SACEM, thinks that such a clear division is actually a sign of progress from the music industrys point of view. Why? Tronc suggests that until recently, the industry felt that the Parliament was not listening to its lobbying for copyright reform at all. If more MEPs are now backing the industrys calls for modernisation of safe-harbour laws, he sees that as a step forward. Honestly, to have the European Parliament divided on this subject is a major progress, because in 2012, when there was a vote at the European Parliament on an act whose purpose was to be more efficient at fighting piracy, 90% of the members of the European Parliament voted against it , he tells Music Ally. So from that moment to the situation we are in now, honestly there has been a major improvement A lot of MEPs in countries like Italy, Germany and France do strongly support the European Commission revision that we need, to change the regulatory landscape to make platforms pay more to creators, publishers and producers. Tronc claims that SACEM played a key role in getting the issue of the value gap (between consumption of music on platforms like YouTube and the royalties that generates for rightsholders and crea Continue reading >>

Watch All Six Episodes Of The Series Trust Disrupted: Bitcoin And The Blockchain

Watch All Six Episodes Of The Series Trust Disrupted: Bitcoin And The Blockchain

Lets have a little compassion for (some of) the trolls Our latest video seriesexplores the world of bitcoin and the blockchain, and you can now watch all six episodes on YouTube and TechCrunch.com . The series features Nathaniel Popper, a New York Times reporter and the author of the book on which the series is based, along with severalbitcoin developers, influencers and scholars tracing the history of bitcoin and analyzing its future. Episode 1seeks to explain the blockchain, the technology that allows bitcoins to be transferred between entities, and the motives behind its creators. The episode also examines the platforms future and how it will be received by governments and big banks, the very institutions its creators were trying to sidestep or even overturn. Episode 2 explores bitcoin mining and the role that miners have in governing the system. Episode 3 dives into bitcoins identity and how it must choose what it wants to be. Episode 4 investigates the rise of blockchain. Episode 5 looks at Ethereum and its possible implications as well as the effects of a hack on its Decentralized Autonomous Organization. Episode 6 explores the battle between the open blockchain (Silicon Valley) and the closed blockchain (Wall Street). Continue reading >>

Blockchain 101, 101, And 101: Repetition Education D. Dickerson Medium

Blockchain 101, 101, And 101: Repetition Education D. Dickerson Medium

Blockchain & Digital Currency fellow @WomenforWomen. Strategy consultant. Scientist. Junior entomologist. Sometimes straightedge. Blockchain 101, 101, and 101: Repetition Education Understanding blockchain and the world of possibilities stemming from this [insert buzzword here] technology is an ongoing task when operating in this space. When first jumping in, deciding where to start can be more than daunting. More often than not, reading one Introduction to Blockchain or Blockchain 101 article will not provide the level of understanding you may be looking to achieve. To build out your understanding of blockchain and eventually have the information click, reading numerous articles from various authors, with different perspectives, and in different media formats, will help you build your own picture of blockchain. While everyones go-to resources for understanding blockchain will be different, below are a few that I found to be the most useful (and a couple extras specific to security / cybersecurity). Regardless of what information and sources you find the most helpful, reading, reading, and reading again is the most powerful way to truly develop a comprehensive understanding blockchain. Bottom line take Blockchain 101, and take it again and again until you feel comfortable to take the next step to Blockchain 102". 1. Satoshi Nakamotos 2009 Bitcoin blockchain white paper, building on former distributed ledger technologies (DLT) and digital currency, while solving the double spend problem and integrating incentives based on behavioral economics. This paper is the origin of the Bitcoin blockchain popular today: 2. Simple and popular introductions to blockchain: e. 8. More detailed, technical explanation of the Bitcoin protocol: 9. Cryptoassets: The Innovative Investors Gui Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About Blockchain, Explained Simply

All You Need To Know About Blockchain, Explained Simply

All you need to know about blockchain, explained simply It's a crowd-managed distributed secure database. Does that help? Many people know it as the technology behind Bitcoin, but blockchains potential uses extend far beyond digital currencies. Its admirers include Bill Gates and Richard Branson , and banks and insurers are falling over one another to be the first to work out how to use it. So what exactly is blockchain, and why are Wall Street and Silicon Valley so excited about it? Currently, most people use a trusted middleman such as a bank to make a transaction. But blockchain allows consumers and suppliers to connect directly, removing the need for a third party. Using cryptography to keep exchanges secure, blockchain provides a decentralized database, or digital ledger, of transactions that everyone on the network can see. This network is essentially a chain of computers that must all approve an exchange before it can be verified and recorded. In the case of Bitcoin, blockchain stores the details of every transaction of the digital currency, and the technology stops the same Bitcoin being spent more than once. The technology can work for almost every type of transaction involving value, including money, goods and property. Its potential uses are almost limitless: from collecting taxes to enabling migrants to send money back to family in countries where banking is difficult. Blockchain could also help to reduce fraud because every transaction would be recorded and distributed on a public ledger for anyone to see. In theory, if blockchain goes mainstream, anyone with access to the internet would be able to use it to make transactions. Currently only a very small proportion of global GDP (around 0.025%, or $20 billion) is held in the blockchain, according to a surv Continue reading >>

The Blockchain Explained To Web Developers, Part 1: The Theory

The Blockchain Explained To Web Developers, Part 1: The Theory

The Blockchain Explained to Web Developers, Part 1: The Theory The blockchain is the new hot technology. If you haven't heard about it, you probably know Bitcoin. Well, the blockchain is the underlying technology that powers Bitcoin. Experts say the blockchain will cause a revolution similar to what Internet provoked. But what is it really, and how can it be used to build apps today? This post is the first in a series of three, explaining the blockchain phenomenon to web developers. We'll discuss the theory, show actual code, and share our learnings, based on a real world project. To begin, let's try to understand what blockchains really are. Although the blockchain was created to support Bitcoin , the blockchain concept can be defined regardless of the Bitcoin ecosystem. The literature usually defines a blockchain as follows: A blockchain is a ledger of facts, replicated across several computers assembled in a peer-to-peer network. Facts can be anything from monetary transactions to content signature. Members of the network are anonymous individuals called nodes. All communication inside the network takes advantage of cryptography to securely identify the sender and the receiver. When a node wants to add a fact to the ledger, a consensus forms in the network to determine where this fact should appear in the ledger; this consensus is called a block. I don't know about you, but after reading these definitions, I still had troubles figuring out what this is all about. Let's get a bit deeper. Decentralized peer-to-peer networks aren't new. Napster and BitTorrent are P2P networks. Instead of exchanging movies, members of the blockchain network exchange facts. Then what's the real deal about blockchains? P2P networks, like other distributed systems, have to solve a very dif Continue reading >>

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