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World Food Program Ethereum

Fighting Hunger With Blockchain

Fighting Hunger With Blockchain

As millions continue to be affected by conflict and natural disasters, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) has recognised the potential of blockchain as a tool that can help feed the hungry. Every year, WFP assists over 80 million people in 80 countries, making it the largest humanitarian organisation in the world. Their cash-based transfer operations provide money to people to buy food in local markets, and in turn, utilise banks to process transactions. Already 93 cents of every dollar received goes directly to the hands of those in need, and blockchain is helping take donors money even further. In 2016, WFP launched an Innovation Accelerator that allowed them to better identify, support and scale new innovations. One of their projects is Building Blocks , which uses blockchain technology to make the transfer of cash assistance faster, cheaper and more secure. The blockchain allows the WFP to account for balances without the need for a third-party financial service provider to act as an intermediary. Many people are under the illusion that non-profit organisations shy away from innovation, but Building Blocks has taken the latest in blockchain technology to those who need financial innovation the most. Using Parity Ethereum , they were able to quickly deploy a private and secure blockchain in late 2016 for their testing phase. Previously, the World Food Programme would first provide local banks and financial service providers with the funds and beneficiary information upfront. When refugees would purchase food from their local grocery stores, the bank would validate these transactions and then settle with the retailers at the end of every month. After taking their fees, the banks would then provide a summary of account balances to WFP. The new system starts by providin Continue reading >>

Building Blocks | Wfp Innovation

Building Blocks | Wfp Innovation

WFP is taking first steps toharness blockchain technologyto enhance our ability to provide effective, efficient assistance to the people we serve and save millions of dollars. As part of its Building Blocks pilot, WFP is trialling blockchain as a means of making cash transfers more efficient, transparent and secure. Cash transfers, through vouchers or pre-paid debit cards, allow people to purchase their own food locally and are an effective way to empower them to make their own purchasing decisions to relieve hunger. Cash transfers are an increasingly important means of providing assistance, with the number of people receiving WFP cash transfers growing steadily in recent years, from 3 million people in 2010 to 9.3 million in 2015. Blockchain is a digital ledger technology used as a trusted way to track the ownership of assets without the need for a central authority, which could speed up transactions while lowering the chance of fraud or data mismanagement. Crucially, its peer-to-peer nature removes the need for verification from costly intermediaries such as banks or other institutions. By harnessing the power of the blockchain, WFP aims to reduce payment costs associated with cash transfers, better protect beneficiary data, control financial risks, and set up assistance operations more rapidly in the wake of emergencies. In January 2017, WFP initiated a proof of concept to confirm basic assumptions around the capabilities of blockchain in authenticating and registering transactions in Sindh province, Pakistan. Taking lessons learned, WFP built and implemented a more robust blocokchain system in refugee camps in Jordan. As ofJanuary 2018, more than 100,000 people residing in camps redeemtheir WFP-provided assistance through the blockchain-based system. Thanks to the Continue reading >>

United Nations Sends Aid To 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain

United Nations Sends Aid To 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain

United Nations Sends Aid to 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain Jun 13, 2017 at 10:00 UTC|UpdatedJun 14, 2017 at 11:16 UTC One of the largest-ever implementations of the ethereum blockchain for a charitable causehasjust concluded a successful trial. Completed on 31st May, the project run by the United Nation's World Food Programme (WFP) was designed to direct resources to thousands of Syrian refugees by giving them cryptocurrency-based vouchers that could be redeemed in participating markets. As revealed exclusively to CoinDesk, the platform was successfully used to record and authenticate transfers for about 10,000 individuals. The platform was implemented by Parity Technologies, a startup led by ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood, and blockchain big data firm Datarella. Alexandra Alden, a WFP innovation accelerator consultant who helped oversee the implementation, told CoinDesk: "All funds received by the refuges from WFP were specifically used to purchase food items such as olive oil, pasta and lentils." The WFP is now in the process of gathering more detailed analytics, such asexactly how many transactions were conducted. As reported by CoinDesk in early May,the WFP intendsto expand the project to include 100,000 individualsin Jordan as soon as August. If that goesaccording to plan, the effortis set to grow to serve theentire Jordanian refugee population by the end of 2018. NowAlden has confirmed to CoinDesk that the agency eventuallyhopes to implement the service beyond the borders of Jordan. "The plan is to expand the project pilot firstly across Jordan, but we are also evaluating use cases and potential applications in other regions." Currently, the agency is in talks with partners in the humanitarian and private sectors who can help it with its goal of Continue reading >>

Inside The Jordan Refugee Camp That Runs On Blockchain

Inside The Jordan Refugee Camp That Runs On Blockchain

Inside the Jordan refugee camp that runs on blockchain Syrian refugees could regain legal identities that were lost when they fled their homes. A few times a month, Bassam pushes a shopping cart through the aisles of a grocery store stocked with bags of rice, a small selection of fresh vegetables, and other staples. Today hes wearing a black sweater tucked into denim jeans, which are themselves tucked into calf-high boots caked in mud. The Tazweed Supermarket, where hes shopping, is on the periphery of a 75,000-person refugee camp in the semi-arid Jordanian steppe, six and a half miles from the Syrian border. Computer scientists have found the longest straight line you could sail without hitting land At the checkout counter, a cashier tallies the total, but Bassam doesnt pay with cash or a credit card. Instead he lifts his head to a black box and gazes into the mirror and camera at its center. A moment later, an image of Bassams eye flashes on the cashiers screen. Bassam collects his receiptwhich reads EyePay and World Food Programme Building Blocks across the topand walks out into the noonday chaos of the Zaatari refugee camp. This story is part of our May/June 2018 Issue Though Bassam may not know it, his visit to the supermarket involves one of the first uses of blockchain for humanitarian aid. By letting a machine scan his iris, he confirmed his identity on a traditional United Nations database, queried a family account kept on a variant of the Ethereum blockchain by the World Food Programme (WFP), and settled his bill without opening his wallet. (Left) Bassam gets his eye scanned to pay at the markets checkout. (Right) A mural at the Zaatari camp. Started in early 2017, Building Blocks, as the program is known, helps the WFP distribute cash-for-food aid to over 10 Continue reading >>

Can Blockchain Help Feed Thehungry?

Can Blockchain Help Feed Thehungry?

Why the World Food Program wants to build a blockchain aid ecosystem. Photo from a woman refugree in Jordan, by WFP/Shaza Moghraby. In the Azraq refugee camp in Jordan, Syrian refugees queue in supermarkets where cashiers are equipped with iris scanners. Once identified using biometric registration data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), they can spend food vouchers provided by the UN World Food Program (WFP). Food voucher transactions for 100,000 refugees in Jordan are now recorded on the WFPs Ethereum-based blockchain, a system called Building Blocks . By the end of 2018, WFPs Director of Innovation and Change Management Robert Opp hopes that Building Blocks will serve 500,000 people WFPs entire caseload in Jordan. Why should the most vulnerable people in the world wait for technology to trickledown? If that works well it becomes the beginning of a blockchain ecosystem that can underpin the humanitarian system as a whole, said Opp. Why should the most vulnerable people in the world wait for technology to trickle down? Robert Opp, Director of Innovation and Change Management, UN World FoodProgram. A soft-spoken Canadian, Opp s job is to develop tech-based solutions to help end hunger by 2030. In a world where inequality is rising and global disasters cost twice as much in 2017 as in 2016 , this is a tall order. One in nine people globally or 815 million in total go to bed hungry due to conflict, natural disasters, or extreme poverty. WFP feeds 80 million of those people in 80 countries around the world. With an annual budget of US $6.8 billion , its the worlds largest humanitarian agency, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve long-term food security and nutrition. Most of WFPs budget is spent on Continue reading >>

Un's World Food Programme Builds On Ethereum Blockchain Cash Transfers

Un's World Food Programme Builds On Ethereum Blockchain Cash Transfers

Join our community of 10 000 traders on Hacked.com for just $39 per month. The United Nations World Food Programme is expanding its Ethereum-based blockchain payments system to avoid the transfer fees incurred via the traditional banking system. Over a year ago in January 2017, the World Food Programme (WFP) successfully tested Building Blocks, an early experiment that enabled the transfer of WFP food and cash on a public Ethereum blockchain through a smartphone app, to vulnerable families in Pakistan. Blockchain technology, most famously associated with the crypto-currency Bitcoin, offers unique opportunities for humanitarian agencies to provide the best-possible assistance to vulnerable people around the world, the WFP said at the time. Within months, the WFP ran a full pilot in the Jordanian refugee camp of Azraq to successfully facilitate cash transfers for over 10,000 Syrian refugees on its blockchain payments platform. The pilot alone is said to save the agency $150,000 a month while eliminating a staggering 98% of bank-related transfer fees, according to Munich WFP innovation lab chief Bernhard Kowatsch. Beyond money transfers, the implementation of blockchain technology enabled Syrian refugees to buy food from local retailers using a biometric scan of their eye wherein each transaction is recorded on a blockchain. The use of cash, bank cards or paper vouchers is rendered obsolete as refugees neednt share any sensitive data with banks or mobile operators. Instead, refugees benefit from greater security and privacy through an immutable, secure blockchain. Now, the UN agency feeding over 100 million people across 80 countries is expanding its Ethereum-based blockchain platform after estimating savings of millions of dollars in bank transfer fees by utilizing decen Continue reading >>

The World Food Programmes Much-publicised Blockchain Has One Participant I.e., Its A Database | Attack Of The 50 Foot Blockchain

The World Food Programmes Much-publicised Blockchain Has One Participant I.e., Its A Database | Attack Of The 50 Foot Blockchain

Tags: datarella , devcon , ethereum , houman haddad , joon ian wong , parity , robert opp , world food programme The World Food Programme is a branch of the United Nations Development Group that helps food security for 80 million people worldwide, particularly in conflict-torn areas. WFP blogged in March 2017: What is blockchain and how is it connected to fightinghunger? about managing cash disbursements in Pakistan: The first, successful test at field level of WFPs blockchain innovation called Building Blocks was carried out in January deep in the heart of Sindh province, Pakistan. As vulnerable families received WFP food and cash assistance, the transactions were authenticated and recorded on a public blockchain through a smartphone interface. Transaction reports generated were then used to match the disbursements with entitlements. Using the lessons learned in this first phase in Pakistan, WFP is now running a full-scale pilot in Azraq refugee camp in Jordan. At present, more than 10,000 Syrian refugees redeem their cash transfers on the blockchain-based system. The WFP page on Building Blocks talks about this Ethereum instance (which was private, not public). The first two paragraphs are a fairly standard series of hypothetical Bitcoin promises with the buzzword changed to blockchain, before promising various unspecified cost savings for their cash-based assistance programme. WFP is currently piloting a larger, more robust version of the blockchain system in Azraq Refugee camp in Jordan. Currently, more than 10,000 Syrian refugees redeem their WFP provided assistance on the blockchain-based system. As a result of this pilot, WFP will have a full, in-house record of every transaction that occurs at a particular retailer, ensuring greater security and privacy for our Continue reading >>

Belgium Contributes To World Food Programme Blockchain Project

Belgium Contributes To World Food Programme Blockchain Project

Belgium Contributes To World Food Programme Blockchain Project The government of Belgium has made a financial contribution to a project which uses Blockchain technology to distribute funds to refugees in Jordan. The government of Belgium is making a contribution of 2 mln to promote a Blockchain project by the World Food Programme (WFP), the WFP announced April 19. The contribution will reportedly allow the United Nations (UN) to use Blockchain technology to fight against hunger in impoverished areas. The Building Blocks project is piloted with other agencies in the UN and has been implemented to make WFP cash transfers to refugees more efficient and transparent. Over 100,000 Syrian refugees in camps in Jordan have benefited from the project, using donations provided by donors to get food and other crucial resources. The project was presented at the Leveraging Innovation for Humanitarian Action in New York. Commenting on Belgiums contribution to the initiative, the countrys Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Development Cooperation, Alexander De Croo, said: Innovation saves lives. This year, more than 128 mln people across the world will need humanitarian assistance and protection. This is triple the number of three years ago. Only by finding better ways to deliver aid more efficiently will we close the gap between requirements and aid delivery on the ground. Belgium lauds the efforts of WFP to come up with innovative solutions to save more lives and help more people in need. In May last year, the UN announced its plans to use Ethereum Blockchain technology to ensure refugees in Jordan have access to food rations by distributing coupons which would be used in place of the local currency. The technology had already been tested by the WFP in Pakistan with more than 10 Continue reading >>

Blockchain's Brand New World Is Being Built By Refugees | Wired

Blockchain's Brand New World Is Being Built By Refugees | Wired

How Refugees Are Helping Create Blockchain's Brand New World Without legal proof of your existence , you cant do many things. You cant vote, and you cant drive. You cant start a bank account, or access government services. Good luck getting into a bar. According to the World Bank, more than a billion people have no way to prove their identity. The un-verified include refugees, trafficked children, the homeless, and other people who slip through society without developing many institutional affiliations. The problem feeds on itself: the longer a person goes without associations, the harder it is provide enough of a record to create them. But as bitcoins popularity swells, a small group of cryptocurrency enthusiasts and social entrepreneurs is trying to put the cryptographic ledger that underpins the novel currency to work in service of the vulnerable. They see promise in using blockchain technology to create an immutable record, one that has the added side effect of making financial transactions cheaper and more efficient. Though best known for underpinning volatile cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin and Ethereum, blockchain technology has a number of qualities which make it appealing for record-keeping. A distributed ledger doesnt depend on a central authority to verify its existence, or to facilitate transactions within it, which makes it less vulnerable to tampering. By using applications that are built on the chain, individuals may be able to build up records over time, use those records across borders as a form of identityessentially creating the trust they need to interact with the world, without depending on a centralized authority, like a government or a bank, to vouch for them. The longer a person goes without associations, the harder it is tocreate a record For no Continue reading >>

Devery & United Nations World Food Programme Use Blockchain To Ensure The Safe Delivery Of Food To Children In Northafrica

Devery & United Nations World Food Programme Use Blockchain To Ensure The Safe Delivery Of Food To Children In Northafrica

Devery & United Nations World Food Programme use Blockchain to ensure the safe delivery of food to children in NorthAfrica Were proud to announce weve been working with the United Nations World Food Programme and the Tunisian Ministry of Education to ensure the safe delivery of food to 400,000 school children in North Africa using blockchain technology. The Tunisian Government in conjunction with the United Nations World Food Programme operates a school meal programme designed to offer one fresh meal a day to underprivileged students in its primary and secondary educational system. In seeking to improve the system and to track the quality of the meals provided, the government was eager for an innovative solution to solve the problems they have currently been facing in their supply chain. We travelled there in February and spent the month visiting different locations around Tunisia; scoping and planning out possible implementation plans on the ground.This was a surreal experience for myself and the team as the trip was spent meeting with a numerous stakeholders to the project from various jurisdictions. UN World Food Programme in-construction greenhouse. The implementation will involve an initial roll out to a scheme to feed 1500 primary school kids, with the goal of ultimately rolling out to the scheme to all 400,000 Tunisian school children currently receiving food assistance once successfully trialled. Signing with the Ministry of Education in conjunction with the United Nations World Food Programme on our lastday. Towards the end of the trip we provided our proposal in conjunction with the World Food Programme to the Ministry which addressed their problems they faced in food delivery and procurement. After multiple revisions, rewrites, and numerous meetings we signe Continue reading >>

Un Wfp Is Leveraging Blockchain Technology To Track School Lunches

Un Wfp Is Leveraging Blockchain Technology To Track School Lunches

UN WFP Is Leveraging Blockchain Technology To Track School Lunches The World Food Programme is exploring an Ethereum-based blockchain solution to track school meals for primary school students in Tunisia. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is working with the Tunisian Ministry of Education and Devery , an open-source protocol for verification services built on the Ethereum blockchain, to track food safety for school lunches that will be distributed to 1,500 primary school students in Tunisia. The WFP is one of the largest humanitarian organizations dedicated to addressing food security and hunger across the globe. Its " Zero Hunger " initiative, launched in 2015, set forth an ambitious goal of eradicating hunger on Earth by 2030. The WFP has previously utilized Ethereum to explore how blockchain technology can be used to streamline payments and deter misappropriation of funds as well as distribute food entitlements to Syrian refugees in Jordan. The organization hopes to build upon those experiences to bolster the Tunisian government's existing school meals initiative. Tunisia's school meals program was instituted at all public primary schools across the country in 2014 and was designed to "provide improved access to education for children from the poorest households." Four years into the program, Ethereum start-up Devery has been brought on board to use its open-source validation protocol. The goal is to provide transparency that will ensure not only that each student receives a meal but that those meals are fresh . According to The Sociable , WFP head of office for Tunisia and Morocco Maria Lukyanova said: "This project is allowing us to explore how supporting innovation, through the introduction of solutions based on blockchain technology, can contribute t Continue reading >>

Banks Replaced With Blockchain At International Food Program

Banks Replaced With Blockchain At International Food Program

Bloomberg the Company & Its Products Bloomberg Anywhere Remote LoginBloomberg Anywhere Login Bloomberg Terminal Demo Request Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Banks Replaced With Blockchain at International Food Program UN organization tests digital wallets built on Ethereum Technology that underlies bitcoin cuts bank transfer costs International officials are discovering they can sometimes avoid bank fees by replacing currency transfers with the technology at the heart of Bitcoin. The World Food Programme is expanding its blockchain-payments system, said Robert Opp, a director of the United Nations effort that feeds as many as 100 million people across 80 countries. The agency expects to cut millions of dollars in bank transfer fees by switching to distributed ledgers based on Ethereums digital-currency network, he said. We felt we could replace the services offered by banks with blockchain, said Opp, who manages innovations that help WFP better spend its annual $6 billion budget. Blockchain helps promote collaboration by providing enormous amounts of data. The adoption of the distributed-ledger technology shows how companies that need to make money transfers, register sales or even tally votes are picking and choosing among innovations of the Bitcoin revolution, many times choosing not to use the digital coins associated with them. Digital registries hosted on a worldwide network of computers are being tested in many Continue reading >>

World Food Programme's Ethereum-based Blockchain For Syrian Refugees In Jordan Quartz

World Food Programme's Ethereum-based Blockchain For Syrian Refugees In Jordan Quartz

The United Nations agency in charge of food aidoften billed as the largest aid organization in the worldis betting that an ethereum-based blockchain technology could be the key to delivering aid efficiently to refugees while slashing the costs of doing so. The agency, known as the World Food Programme (WFP), is the rare example of an organization that has delivered tangible results from its blockchain experimentsunlike the big banks that have experimented with the technology for years. The WFP says it has transferred $1.4 million in food vouchers to 10,500 Syrian refugees in Jordan since May, and it plans to expand. We need to bring the project from the current capacity to many, many, more, says Houman Haddad, the WFP executive leading the project. By that I mean 1 million transactions per day. Haddad, in Mexico to speak at the Ethereum Foundations annual developer conference, hopes to expand the UN project, called Building Blocks, from providing payment vouchers for one camp to providing vouchers for four camps, covering 100,000 people, by next January. He hopes to attract developers and partners to the UN project from his conference appearance, organized by the foundation, which acts as a steward for the technical development of the ethereum protocol. The WFP currently distributes food vouchers within Jordans refugee camps via supermarkets located in the camps. The cashiers are equipped not with cash registers, but with iris scanners, which both identify the customer and settle their entitlement payments by verifying the data with various UN databases. Building Blocks replaced the payment part with a ledger that records the transactions on a private version of ethereum that it developed. For the beneficiary, nothing has changed, Haddad says. The major benefit to the Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Is Helping Tackle Global Inequality

How Blockchain Is Helping Tackle Global Inequality

How blockchain is helping tackle global inequality Cryptocurrency is the topic of the day but what is really interesting is the technology behind the mania blockchain. The decentralized and secure digital ledger of transactions is starting to be applied in a number of surprising ways, from allowing musicians to sell music directly to fans, or even addressing voter fraud. Next on the blockchain hit list is world inequality. The World Food Programme (WFP) has been using an ethereum-based blockchain technology to help refugees of the Syrian civil war, millions of who have been forced abroad. In the Azraq refugee camp in Jordan, 10,000 people receive food from entitlements recorded on a blockchain-based computing platform. The WFP pilot, known as Building Blocks, aims to reduce operational costs, protect data, control risk, and allow for rapid response in case of emergency. Using data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the project employs biometric technology for authentication purposes, allowing refugees to purchase food at the camps supermarkets with a scan of their eye. The major benefit of having blockchain behind the biometric process is a reduction in payments to financial services firms, while beneficiaries experience increased privacy and accounts can be reconciled in quicker time as the WFP has access to the payment network. If blockchain is applied to several aid agencies at a time, a greater picture of refugees needs would be built up and they at the same time would have greater control over managing their information and understanding resources at their disposal. It is a concept gaining traction in the world of financial aid. Fund management platform Disberse is using blockchain to trace funds through the whole chain from donor to b Continue reading >>

Wfp Un Blockchain

Wfp Un Blockchain

The United Nations World Food Programme uses the Ethereum Blockchain to transfer vouchers based on cryptocurrencies to refugees in Syria. The platform was able to transfer cryptocurrency vouchers to a total of 10,000 people. It was done through another platform that was created by Parity Technologies. Parity Technologies is a startup company led by Ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood . Funds that were sent to the refugees were specifically used for buying food. With the success of this project, the World Food Programme (WFP) plans to extend the project even further to cover 100,000 people in Jordan by late 2018. With this, the UN is planning more Blockchain technology-related projects that can help them move aid to disaster-stricken countries even faster. Read more. The United Nations (UN) is in the final stages ofwhat could be one of the most epic blockchainprojects of all time. After successfully using the ethereum blockchain to transmit Pakistani rupees to 100 people earlier this year, the UNs World Food Program (WFP) is arranging extra security to ensure it safely executes the next stage of itswork. A pilot test, scheduled to begin in Jordan on 1st May, will see the WFP sending an unspecified number of dinars to more than 10,000 recipients in need of financial support and extra food, with the goal of expanding the number of recipients to 500,000 people by2018. Read more . Continue reading >>

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