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Kraken | Buy, Sell And Margin Trade Bitcoin (btc) And Ethereum (eth) - Api

Kraken | Buy, Sell And Margin Trade Bitcoin (btc) And Ethereum (eth) - Api

NOTE: All API URLs should use the domain api.kraken.com. Public methods can use either GET or POST. Private methods must use POST and be set up as follows: API-Key = API keyAPI-Sign = Message signature using HMAC-SHA512 of (URI path + SHA256(nonce + POST data)) and base64 decoded secret API key nonce = always increasing unsigned 64 bit integerotp = two-factor password (if two-factor enabled, otherwise not required) Note: There is no way to reset the nonce to a lower value so be sure to use a nonce generation method that won't generatenumbers less than the previous nonce. A persistent counter or the current time in hundredths of a second precision or higher is suggested.Too many requests with nonces below the last valid nonce (EAPI:Invalid nonce) can result in temporary bans. Note: Sometimes requests can arrive out of order or NTP can cause your clock to rewind, resulting in nonce issues. If you encounter this issue, you can change the nonce window in your account API settings page. The amount to set it to depends upon how you increment the nonce. Depending on your connectivity, a setting that would accomodate 3-15 seconds of network issues is suggested. API calls that require currency assets can be referenced using their ISO4217-A3 names in the case of ISO registered names, their 3 letter commonly used names in the case of unregistered names, or their X-ISO4217-A3 code (see . Responses are JSON encoded in the form of: error = array of error messages in the format of: :[:] severity code can be E for error or W for warningresult = result of API call (may not be present if errors occur) Note: Care should be taken when handling any numbers represented as strings, as these may overflow standard Continue reading >>

Blockchain App With Ruby

Blockchain App With Ruby

At the end of 2017, the world got mad about cryptocurrencies. The value of Bitcoin (BTC) or Ether (ETH) multiplied and reached an astronomical amount of money. People who had never invested, now compulsively bought and traded coins or tokens in the exchange. But for me the biggest discovery related to cryptocurrencies is blockchain technology on which Bitcoins, Ether and other ones depend, a technology which could change our finances, politics (eg. voting), and of course, IT systems. Blockchain allows us to create applications which do not depend on the centralized resource. This tutorial shows how to work with blockchain using Ruby and how to create a decentralized application based on Ruby on Rails. It doesnt cover deep knowledge of blockchain, only a basic introduction that helps to understand how it works and how to design dApp architecture. Before we start implementing our application we need to understand the differences between a common, centralized application and designing a blockchain-based system. In a standard case, the main part is a server which holds the code of the app and connects to a database which stores all necessary information. User interacts with the application via UI which is a part of (or strictly connected with) the server. In a decentralized app, we dont have server side because we dont want to store any data on unsafe servers. The code is stored in a blockchain and users connect directly to it via UI, so all actions, like creating and signing transaction should be executed client side. The interface only allows calls with smart contract methods. The client-side application needs to know the address of smart contract in blockchain. Ok so why does this tutorial show how to connect blockchain with Ruby on Rails? Didnt I just mention that dece Continue reading >>

Chicagoruby: Downtown - A Rubyist's Journey Into Ethereum

Chicagoruby: Downtown - A Rubyist's Journey Into Ethereum

ChicagoRuby: Downtown - A Rubyist's Journey into Ethereum While Bitcoin is the world's most popular cryptocurrency, Ethereum ( ) is on the rise. One of Ethereum's most compelling innovations is providing a Turing-complete programming language on top its blockchain. It's programmable money! This talk will introduce the fundamentals of Ethereum, and and then demonstrate how to program in Solidity, the most popular programming language that runs on top of Ethereum's virtual machine. Dave Hoover ( ) started learning Ruby in 2002, and using it in earnest in 2005 when Rails hit the scene. Dave was a partner at Obtiva, a Chicago-based, Ruby-focused dev shop that was acquired by Groupon in 2011. While at Obtiva, Dave used Ruby to build the first version ofmadmimi.com ( ), as well as making some early contributions at Groupon. He published Apprenticeship Patterns in 2010, a guide for people wanting to improve themselves as software developers. In 2012, Dave joined Dev Bootcamp, and founded the Chicago location in 2013. Nowadays, Dave has returned to his roots, and is a freelance software developer. His primary focus is building software on Ethereum as a member of the team at ConsenSys ( ). He mainly works from his family's home in Wheaton. After most downtown meetings we head over to Elephant & Castle (185 N. Wabash) for refreshments & fellowship. Join us for a few minutes if you have time. Please use your real name when you RSVP for downtown ChicagoRuby meetings. Reason: We are required to give a list of all attendees to the security desk prior to the meeting. If the name on your ID doesn't the match the name on the RSVP list, then Aon security will not let you in the building. Sorry for the inconvenience, but those are the rules of the Aon Building. Curious about IoT? Master Continue reading >>

The Changelog #287: Truffle Framework And Decentralized Ethereum Apps | News And Podcasts For Developers | Changelog

The Changelog #287: Truffle Framework And Decentralized Ethereum Apps | News And Podcasts For Developers | Changelog

Truffle framework and decentralized Ethereum apps Tim Coulter joined the show to talk about Truffle a development environment, testing framework, and asset pipeline for Ethereum. We talked with Tim about how he got into Ethereum and dapp development, Solidity vs JavaScript, smart contract testing, EthPM which is like npm but for Ethereum, Why decentralization? Why dapps? Basically, why rebuild the internet? And last but not least - who's using Truffle and what have they built with it? Rollbar Our error monitoring partner. Rollbar provides real-time error monitoring, alerting, and analytics to help us resolve production errors in minutes. To start deploying with confidence - head to rollbar.com/changelog Linode Our cloud server of choice. Deploy a fast, efficient, native SSD cloud server for only $5/month. Get 4 months free using the code changelog2018. Start your server - head to linode.com/changelog Gliffy Get 25% off 1 year of Gliffy in Confluence or Jira. Transform how your team communicates, share and collaborate with anyone, integrated directly in Atlassian's Confluence and Jira. Head to gliffy.com/changelog Fastly Our bandwidth partner. Fastly powers fast, secure, and scalable digital experiences. Move beyond your content delivery network to their powerful edge cloud platform. Learn more at fastly.com . So Truffle is called an "Ethereum Swiss Army knife." We're gonna dive into all of the details of Truffle, Tim, and we're gonna have you explain it soup to nuts to us... But let's get to know you a little bit and understand your relationship with the Ethereum ecosystem and how you got into this game in the first place, and how you became the Truffle developer. Can you tell us that story? Yeah, sure. The short version of it is when the Bitcoin boom hit in 2013 when Continue reading >>

Github - Se3000/ruby-eth: Gem For Creating And Signing Ethereum Transactions.

Github - Se3000/ruby-eth: Gem For Creating And Signing Ethereum Transactions.

Gem for creating and signing Ethereum transactions. A simple library to build and sign Ethereum transactions. Allows separataion of key and node management. Sign transactions and handle keys anywhere you can run ruby, boradcast transactions through any node. Add this line to your application's Gemfile: Create a new public/private key and get its address: key = Eth::Key.newkey.private_hexkey.public_hexkey.address # EIP55 checksummed address decrypted_key = Eth::Key.decrypt File.read('./some/path.json'), 'p455w0rD' You can also encrypt your keys for use with other ethereum libraries: encrypted_key_info = Eth::Key.encrypt key, 'p455w0rD' tx = Eth::Tx.new({ data: hex_data, gas_limit: 21_000, gas_price: 3_141_592, nonce: 1, to: key2.address, value: 1_000_000_000_000,}) Get the raw transaction with tx.hex, and broadcast it through any Ethereum node. Or, just get the TXID with tx.hash. Or add a checksum to an existing address: Eth::Utils.format_address "0x4bc787699093f11316e819b5692be04a712c4e69" # => "0x4bc787699093f11316e819B5692be04A712C4E69" In order to prevent replay attacks, you must specify which Ethereum chain your transactions are created for. See EIP 155 for more detail. Eth.configure do |config| config.chain_id = 1 # nil by default, meaning valid on any chainend Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at . Tests are encouraged. First install the Ethereum common tests : The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License . Continue reading >>

A Rubyist's Journey Into Ethereum - Chicagoruby

A Rubyist's Journey Into Ethereum - Chicagoruby

A Rubyist's Journey into Ethereum by Dave Hoover Recorded June 07, 2016 at ChicagoRuby: Downtown While Bitcoin is the worlds most popular cryptocurrency, Ethereum is on the rise. One of Ethereums most compelling innovations is providing a Turing-complete programming language on top its blockchain. Its programmable money! This talk will introduce the fundamentals of Ethereum, and and then demonstrate how to program in Solidity, the most popular programming language that runs on top of Ethereums virtual machine. Details . Dave Hoover started learning Ruby in 2002, and was using it in earnest in 2005 when Rails hit the scene. Dave was a partner at Obtiva, a Chicago-based, Ruby-focused dev shop that was acquired by Groupon in 2011. While at Obtiva, Dave used Ruby to build the first version of madmimi.com, as well as make some early contributions at Groupon. He published Apprenticeship Patterns in 2010, a guide for people wanting to improve themselves as software developers. In 2012, Dave joined Dev Bootcamp, and founded the Chicago location in 2013. Nowadays, Dave has returned to his roots and is a freelance software developer. His primary focus is building software on Ethereum as a member of the team at ConsenSys. He mainly works from his familys home in Wheaton. Continue reading >>

Ethereum Programming For Web Developers: Atutorial

Ethereum Programming For Web Developers: Atutorial

Ethereum programming for web developers: atutorial by Jon Evans, CTO, HappyFunCorp ([email protected]) Hello, fellow web developer! If youre reading this, youre probably interested in blockchains, smart contracts, etc., as someone who actually wants to write some smart-contract code. Im going to walk you through setting up, writing, and deploying a smart contract to a real live Ethereum blockchain, and then interacting with that contract in a browser via a web service. Im not going to explain Blockchains 101 or Ethereum 101: there are many other places to go for that. But its probably worth discussing Ethereum at a very high level from a developers perspective. You dont need to care about mining or Proof-of-Work vs. Proof-of-Stake, or anything like that. But you should know that Ethereum is a decentralized virtual machine that runs on many nodes scattered around the world, and so-called smart contracts are code which runs (along with data which is stored) within that virtual machine, i.e. on every single node. This is obviously hugely inefficient, but it has advantages; everyone in the world can rely on this code/data, because no central service or system can tamper with it; and anyone can submit code/data to this machine without the registering or asking permission. They do, however, need to pay. Every line of code and byte of storage in Ethereum has a price. Ethereum, like Bitcoin, has a native currency, called ether; this is the same Ether currency that is traded on exchanges like Coinbase. When used to pay for Ethereum computing/storage, it is called gas. For any given smart contract, gas has a limit and a price. This is pretty confusing at first, but dont worry, youll wrap your head around it eventually, and anyway this tutorial uses free fake money on a so-cal Continue reading >>

How To Create A Smart Contract On Ethereum [tutorial]

How To Create A Smart Contract On Ethereum [tutorial]

Solidity is the smart contract language on Ethereum. Its a general-purpose programming language developed on top of the EVM. Just like other object-oriented languages, Solidity uses a class (contract) and methods that define it. Theoretically, Solidity allows you to perform arbitrary computations, but its main purpose is to send and receive digital tokens as well as store states. In terms of syntax, Solidity was influenced by JavaScript, C++, and Python so experienced programmers can understand its syntax easily. To write an Ethereum smart contract properly, you should carefully read the documentation to learn more about Solidity and how to program with it. On the Ethereum blockchain, each smart contract is processed by one miner and the result of this operation is a block thats added to the Ethereum blockchain. Miners must be rewarded for their efforts, so executing any smart contract on the EVM requires a fixed payment called gas. You should specify the amount of gas you want to spend for executing any smart contract you create. The more complicated the smart contract, the more gas it requires. Getting started with an Ethereum smart contract Time to get down to work and build a smart contract! Weve decided to develop a basic Ethereum smart contract for a blockchain-based marketplace, but youre welcome to come up with your own ideas for smart contracts. To implement an Ethereum smart contract for a blockchain marketplace, you need the following toolkit: Node.js A JavaScript runtime environment for server-side programming. You need Node.js for testing the functionality of your Ethereum smart contract and ensuring its proper and secure operation. Along with Node.js, you should install a package manager such as Yarn . Truffle A popular Ethereum development framework that Continue reading >>

Ruby - Ethereum And Rails Tutorials - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Ruby - Ethereum And Rails Tutorials - Ethereum Stack Exchange

I am looking for some kind of walk through or tutorial about how to use ethereum with an ruby on rails application? Have you had a look at the existing ruby integrations yet? ethereum-ruby , ruby-ethereum and rails-eth-api ? Also, does this answer your question? Rando Apr 9 '16 at 10:23 You can find so many tools for using ruby to access the Ethereum Blockchain. You have for example (like 5chdn said in a comment): this are certainly some useful links, but not really a tutorial on how to create a frontend / sql & eth backend symbiosed application. I have questions like: Where and how to host your geth client, how to read/write from/to it with a controller and how to present data in the view(and/or send input fields data to geth). Is it secure or is it practical at all? etc.... xpnimi Apr 17 '16 at 10:12 If you know about js, Truffle is what you are looking for arodriguezdonaire Apr 17 '16 at 10:29 I know js, but I'm more familiar to write in a conventional db with rails. Is truffle for frameworks like Meteor / AngualrJS / backbone etc? or is it compatible with rails? xpnimi Apr 17 '16 at 11:36 I think Truffle is a framework. It runs in node btw arodriguezdonaire Apr 17 '16 at 11:39 There is also the ethereum-tx gem. It is intended for keeping the signing and building of transactions separate from the full node. You could host your full node on the same server, but you don't need to. For a lot of Ethereum applications, you only need to be able to read the blockchain and send transactions. Depending on the frequency with which you need to do this, you could run your own node, or maybe get away with using a block explorer 's API. If you already have private keys with ether you can import them, or generate new keys to send Ethereum(see Ethereum::Key class). Once you have so Continue reading >>

Github - Ethworks/ethereum.rb: Ethereum Library For The Ruby Language

Github - Ethworks/ethereum.rb: Ethereum Library For The Ruby Language

If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download Xcode and try again. If nothing happens, download the GitHub extension for Visual Studio and try again. The goal of ethereum.rb is to make interacting with ethereum blockchain from ruby as fast and easy as possible (but not easier!). As we changed our technological stack away from ruby and we are not using ethereum.rb anymore. The gem suffered from neglect. We are looking for person/people who would like to take over developing and maintaining. Ideally, someone who uses it and who already worked with code quite a bit.If you are interested send an email to [email protected] . Deploy and interact with contracts on the blockchain Contract - ruby object mapping to solidity contract Compile Solidity contracts with solc compiler from ruby Make direct json rpc calls to node from ruby application Before installing gem make sure you meet all prerequisites , especially that you have: Before you run a program check that the node is running and accounts you want to spend from are unlocked. To install gem simply add this line to your application's Gemfile: You can create contract from solidity source and deploy it to the blockchain, with following code: contract = Ethereum::Contract.create(file: "greeter.sol")address = contract.deploy_and_wait("Hello from ethereum.rb!") Deployment may take up to couple of minutes. Once deployed you can start interacting with contract, e.g. calling it's methods: contract.call.greet # => "Hello from ethereum.rb!" You can see example contract greeter here . If you want to complie multiple contracts at once, you can create new instances using newly declared ruby clasess: Ethereum::Contract.create(file: "myco Continue reading >>

The Authoritative Guide To Blockchain Development

The Authoritative Guide To Blockchain Development

Entrepreneur. @Airbnb, @earndotcom alum. Instructor @Outco. Writer. Effective Altruist. Blockchainist. Former poker pro. The authoritative guide to blockchain development Cryptocurrencies, ICOs, magic internet money its all so damn exciting, and you, the eager developer, want to get in on the madness. Where do you start? Im glad youre excited about this space. I am too. But youll probably find its unclear where to begin. Blockchain is moving at breakneck speed, but theres no clear onramp to learning this stuff. Since I left Airbnb to work full-time on blockchain, many people have reached out to me asking how to get into the blockchain space full-time. Consider this my authoritative (and inevitably incomplete) guide on how to get into blockchain engineering. Why should you learn blockchain development? Why should you learn blockchain development? Before I answer that question, let me first note: blockchain is a massively overvalued space right now. These prices are unsustainable, and a crash is definitely coming. This has all happened before, and will probably happen again. But if you work long-term in this space, youll learn to shrug off prices. In the words of Emin Gun Sirer prices are the least interesting part of cryptocurrencies. These are massively important technologies, and they are going to irrevocably change the world. If youre unsure, I cant tell you whether or not you should jump in. But I can tell you five reasons that convinced me to take the leap: Bitcoin was invented 10 years ago, but the rate of innovation has only reached a fever pitch in the last couple of years, especially with the launch of Ethereum in 2015. Most of the new companies and ideas in this space have been built on top of Ethereum, which is still very immature. Even if you start now, you Continue reading >>

Apply For Freelance Ethereum Jobs On Codementorx - Mar 2018

Apply For Freelance Ethereum Jobs On Codementorx - Mar 2018

Ethereum developer needed to launch an ICO for a crytocurrency investment fund A crytocurrency investment fund company is looking for a blockchain developer to launching a token and ICO on the Ethereum Network. They wish to launch the ICO on October 1st. Ethereum Solidity/Smart Contract developer needed Client is looking for a back-end developer with knowledge and experience in Ethereum Solidity and blockchain/smart contracts. Blockchain developer with smart contract knowledge blockchain project with smart contract use case (1 month, full time with potential for on-going full time) building a prototype for clients platform building a smart contract between two parties enabled by blockchain tech need good working knowledge of smart contracts, blockchain and ethereum as a developer Solidity/Ethereum developer familiar with smart contracts wanted to help a blockchain based application with smart contracts on ethereum Client is a blockchain based application with smart contracts on ethereum Looking for a developer with knowledge of Solidity, Smart Contracts, Ethereum, JavaScript Want to see more freelance Ethereum jobs? CodementorX is an exclusive network where world-class Ethereum developers can be hired for contractor positions or large freelance projects We carefully screen our clients from all over the world, so you can rest assured that you're working with the best. Work on Ethereum jobs that interest you and make an impact. We have exciting projects from a variety of industries. We handle all the logistics, including paperwork and invoicing, so you can focus on what you do best. Get the compensation you deserveFor each Ethereum job you complete, earn Continue reading >>

Ruby(ethereum)

Ruby(ethereum)

More than 1 year has passed since last update. ruby Ethereum ethereum.rb Ethereum () ethereum.rbGethJSON RPC APIAdapter Library---rpcRPC geth --networkid "10" --nodiscover --datadir "/some/directory/eth_private_net" --rpc --rpcapi="db,eth,net,web3" console 2>> /some/directory/eth_private_net/geth_err.log Ethereum SolidityJavascriptWeb1 ethereum.rbaccessor method pragma solidity ^0.4.2;contract SingleNumRegister { uint storedData; function set(uint x) public { storedData = x; } function get() public constant returns (uint retVal) { return storedData; }} (gethdeploygethminer.start()) contract = Ethereum::Contract.create(file: 'single_num_register.sol', client: client)address = contract.deploy_and_wait() Ethereum::Contract.create contract.transact_and_wait.hogehoge or contract.call.hogehogeCall transact_and_waitcall # fileaddressaddressclientHTTPClient# contractcontract = Ethereum::Contract.create(file: "single_num_register.sol", address: address, client: client)# contract.transact_and_wait.set(10)# puts contract.call.get() Ethereum railsActiveRecordRDBrailsWeb Continue reading >>

Dive Into Ethereum Development. Part 3: User Application

Dive Into Ethereum Development. Part 3: User Application

Weve been building web applications for years. Now we make our first steps in the world of blockchain and we want to share this journey with you. Dive into Ethereum Development. Part 3: User Application In our previous articles ( part 1 and part 2 ), we described how to use decentralized applications based on smart contracts, if you do not mind acting as a node. However, the fewer extra actions the user has to perform, the better. Unfortunately, due to the fact, that in order to work with smart contracts the client has to sign transactions with a private key, it is impossible to get rid of additional actions completely. In this article, we will take a look at two approaches. The first one is a full-fledged decentralized application (DApp) on javascript using the Web3.js library and MetaMask plugin. The second one is a similar application, but uses Ruby on Rails API and Ethereum.rb gem to access the blockchain. To show the work of a real DApp, we will examine an application inspired by an official example . Instead of Democracy with a voting option and execution of custom transactions, we will create a simplified contract Charity. In this contract anyone can make an offer to distribute currency (Ether), the participants vote, and, upon the expiration of the deadline, the offer is either fulfilled or not, depending on the result of the voting. In this case, we are not after the logic of a smart contract. We rather aim to show different ways of interaction of a user and the blockchain. First, we will have a closer look at the tools we are going to use and then move to the application itself. This is a plugin for the Chrome browser. It is expected to become available for Firefox as well, but now you can only use it with Chrome. You can download it here . This plugin allows Continue reading >>

Guidance For Ruby Developers?

Guidance For Ruby Developers?

Most of the tools for developing Ethereum DApps is in JavaScript and Solidity. You can write some Ruby programs that talk to your geth/eth node via HTTP JSONRPC or IPC JSONRPC (for account controls) to do some simple queries on the blockchain for example: #!/usr/bin/env rubyrequire 'jsonrpc-client'require "active_support"require "active_support/core_ext"connection = JSONRPC::Client.new("= connection.eth_getBlockByNumber('latest', true)transaction = connection.eth_getTransactionByHash('0x7435A501BA8BF0B6F98A35D24034FC38D6F44E1EEC8A2DAEEC9A666C04245483') You can also send transactions through this interface but you will need to properly encode your transaction to call functions and send the required data. This would require figuring out the encoding process. It's basically a combination of figuring out the function signature which is the sha3 hash of: function(paramtype1,paramtype2) along with the hex encoded versions of the required data. connection.eth_sendTransaction({to: contractAddress, from: connection.eth_coinbase["result"], code: encodedData})(returns the transaction ID) You can then query the results by reading either the contract storage which can be decoded by reversing your encoding function. With this knowledge you can actually create a DSL that can read the JSON ABI and generate Ruby classes that when instantiated into objects can be used to call your Ethereum contracts. This is actually how it's done by JavaScript based DApps but they get the benefit of being abstracted away from the function call encoding process by the web3.js library. I actually had started on similar libraries for Elixir and Ruby which I will pick back up when I have some spare time. It would be cool to have a Ruby based interface to Ethereum as this would pave the way for interop with Continue reading >>

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