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Pybitcointools Multisig Tutorial

Pybitcointools Multisig Tutorial

There has been a large amount of interest in multisignature transaction technology in the past year, especially with the recent announcement of CryptoCorp. If you want to play with multisig technology yourself on the command line, here are the gritty details of how to do it. First, run sudo pip install bitcoin to install the Python Bitcoin library. Then, to generate the three private keys, run the following:> k1=`pybtctool random_key`> k2=`pybtctool random_key`> k3=`pybtctool random_key`> p1=`pybtctool privtopub $k1`> p2=`pybtctool privtopub $k2`> p3=`pybtctool privtopub $k3`You now have.... You Can Now Control Your Bitcoin Private Keys On Coinbase: Introducing Multisig Vault Coinbase Vault, first revealed a few months ago, has now implemented a multisig feature that has been demanded far and wide by Coinbase's international customer base. In one fell swoop, Coinbase has set themselves apart from their competitor, Circle, in a big way. Today, Coinbase announced their Multisig Vault, which allows users to control their own private keys on Coinbase. This means that even in the event of Coinbase's untimely demise, bitcoins "stored" in the Coinbase multisig vault would still be accessible to the user. Users would be able to use open source tools, like this one, to.... Crypto-Forex 101 Tutorial Gets Right To It With No BS It's no wonder why so many aspiring cryptocurrency day traders are getting taken to the cleaners, given the fact that there's precious little truly reliable (i.e. quality) information on this very topic. Leave it to the CryptoForex Team over at WallStreetCrypto.net to stand and deliver with the Crypto-Forex 101 Tutorial, above and beyond the call of duty: No commercial agenda, No signing up for anything, And no product pitches. Crypto-Forex 101 is indisput Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Pypi

Bitcoin Pypi

Make and publish a transaction all in a single command line instruction Includes non-bitcoin-specific conversion and JSON utilities Not a full node, has no idea what blocks are Relies on centralized service (blockchain.info) for blockchain operations, although operations do have backups (eligius, blockr.io) ### Example usage (best way to learn :) ): > from bitcoin import *> priv = sha256(some big long brainwallet password)> priv57c617d9b4e1f7af6ec97ca2ff57e94a28279a7eedd4d12a99fa11170e94f5a4> pub = privtopub(priv)> pub0420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9> addr = pubtoaddr(pub)> addr1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6> h = history(addr)> h[{output: u97f7c7d8ac85e40c255f8a763b6cd9a68f3a94d2e93e8bfa08f977b92e55465e:0, value: 50000, address: u1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6}, {output: u4cc806bb04f730c445c60b3e0f4f44b54769a1c196ca37d8d4002135e4abd171:1, value: 50000, address: u1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6}]> outs = [{value: 90000, address: 16iw1MQ1sy1DtRPYw3ao1bCamoyBJtRB4t}]> tx = mktx(h,outs)> tx01000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f7970000000000ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0f3e0bc645c430f704bb06c84c0100000000ffffffff01905f0100000000001976a9143ec6c3ed8dfc3ceabcc1cbdb0c5aef4e2d02873c88ac00000000> tx2 = sign(tx,0,priv)> tx201000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f797000000008b483045022100dd29d89a28451febb990fb1dafa21245b105140083ced315ebcdea187572b3990220713f2e554f384d29d7abfedf39f0eb92afba0ef46f374e49d43a728a0ff6046e01410420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0 Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Transactions, Technically (part 2)

Bitcoin Transactions, Technically (part 2)

Bitcoin transactions, technically (Part 2) In our previous post we introduced bitcoin transactions byusing the metaphor of safes and coins, in order to develop anintuitive sense of the concept. Here we will investigate bitcointransactions from a more technical standpoint using the Python bitcoinlibrary pybitcointools , by exploring the transaction datastructures directly. As an example we will be using a real transaction which we selectedrandomly from the blockchain. The transaction can be viewed here: The reader is encouraged to look at the transaction above andcross-check the information there with what we investigate below. Here we go over some preliminaries. As we discussed in our previouspost, a bitcoin private key is any number between 0 and . From a private key we can derivea public key which is used to verify that a message has beensigned by the private key. If we hash the public key by first using SHA256 and then RIPEMD160 we obtain whats known as theHash160 of the public key. This hash can then be written in aformat called Base58Check to get the address. This format usesbase 58 together with some checksums for validation reasons. Here isan example in Python: >>> import pybitcointools>>> privkey = pybitcointools.random_key()>>> privkey'34030ce14e32ac982419b3683af3b59d64a29cc93798cf479d610af49d425d13'>>> pubkey = pybitcointools.privtopub(privkey)>>> pubkey'04ce0ed35340803b0c21f2f7f5d5ab9d687e5fa95a79471c9b5c9d97a0bb170eac1045230cc51d13b85a5f64feb80f8fc19358a396797926e3f89d49066b1abc07'>>> h160 = pybitcointools.hash160(pubkey.decode('hex'))>>> h160'1558c7cd9825447a31990ff964f347bb2dbfe9be'>>> addr = pybitcointools.hex_to_b58check(h160)>>> addr'12wsYc4B9c9JeREqstLZXNWa3n4i42M5jg' When we describe the amount of funds to send in the low-level protocolwe always use Continue reading >>

Random - Which Randomization Method Is Better? - Stack Overflow

Random - Which Randomization Method Is Better? - Stack Overflow

pybitcointools ( ) generates a bitcoin private key using the following function (in main.py: ): import hashlibdef random_key(): entropy = random_string(32) \ + str(random.randrange(2**256)) \ + str(int(time.time() * 1000000)) return sha256(entropy) in other places I saw a simpler implementation: which do you think is better. you have exactly what the first one is there ( SHA256 with random range of numbers followed by time.time *1000000) the second one is done through the OS specifics. for windows its msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ L_Church Mar 13 at 14:34 @L_Church I'm not sure what you mean by "you have exactly what the first one is there" IamTheWalrus Mar 13 at 15:02 just research into what both of them do and what others say what the better is. the first one uses SHA256 encryption hash while the second one uses the OS method for cryptography. the method windows uses is what i linked (probably, google is your friend tl;dr) L_Church Mar 13 at 15:14 @L_Church I read that os.urandom() is supposed to be good enough for cryptography, as long the OS is doing a good job.. as we know in the case of Java.SecureRandom android implementation it failed in 2013. I also read (and understand) that hashing does not in fact improve randomness, so I am not clear why SHA256 is used at all. Despite my googling efforts I am still in the dark and will appreciate further insights. IamTheWalrus Mar 13 at 15:23 /dev/urandom is cryptographically secure enough for virtually anything, at least when Debian or Oracle or somebody hasn't introduced a bug. The rest looks like needless complexity designed to make laypeople think there is some randomness. There may or may not actually be. Michael Hampton Mar 13 at 18:20 Continue reading >>

Python/13651/pybitcointools/bitcoin/main.py

Python/13651/pybitcointools/bitcoin/main.py

#!/usr/bin/pythonfrom .py2specials import *from .py3specials import *import binasciiimport hashlibimport reimport sysimport osimport base64import timeimport randomimport hmacfrom bitcoin.ripemd import *# Elliptic curve parameters (secp256k1)P = 2**256 - 2**32 - 977N = 115792089237316195423570985008687907852837564279074904382605163141518161494337A = 0B = 7Gx = 55066263022277343669578718895168534326250603453777594175500187360389116729240Gy = 32670510020758816978083085130507043184471273380659243275938904335757337482424G = (Gx, Gy)def change_curve(p, n, a, b, gx, gy): global P, N, A, B, Gx, Gy, G P, N, A, B, Gx, Gy = p, n, a, b, gx, gy G = (Gx, Gy)def getG(): return G# Extended Euclidean Algorithmdef inv(a, n): if a == 0: return 0 lm, hm = 1, 0 low, high = a % n, n while low > 1: r = high//low nm, new = hm-lm*r, high-low*r lm, low, hm, high = nm, new, lm, low return lm % n# JSON access (for pybtctool convenience)def access(obj, prop): if isinstance(obj, dict): if prop in obj: return obj[prop] elif '.' in prop: return obj[float(prop)] else: return obj[int(prop)] else: return obj[int(prop)]def multiaccess(obj, prop): return [access(o, prop) for o in obj]def slice(obj, start=0, end=2**200): return obj[int(start):int(end)]def count(obj): return len(obj)_sum = sumdef sum(obj): return _sum(obj)def isinf(p): return p[0] == 0 and p[1] == 0def to_jacobian(p): o = (p[0], p[1], 1) return odef jacobian_double(p): if not p[1]: return (0, 0, 0) ysq = (p[1] ** 2) % P S = (4 * p[0] * ysq) % P M = (3 * p[0] ** 2 + A * p[2] ** 4) % P nx = (M**2 - 2 * S) % P ny = (M * (S - nx) - 8 * ysq ** 2) % P nz = (2 * p[1] * p[2]) % P return (nx, ny, nz)def jacobian_add(p, q): if not p[1]: return q if not q[1]: return p U1 = (p[0] * q[2] ** 2) % P U2 = (q[0] * p[2] ** 2) % P S1 = (p[1] * q[2] ** 3) % P Continue reading >>

On Components Of The Ethereum Pre-sale File & Encryption

On Components Of The Ethereum Pre-sale File & Encryption

So your bkp is the sha3 of your seed plus essentially the number "2" (number "1" was used for your btcpriv to differentiate it from your ethpriv) encoded in hex. The bkp is a backup obviously. But its not a backup of your password. Its a backup of your seed. print "Your seed is:", getseed(b['withwallet'],w['bkp'],b['ethaddr']) def recover_bkp_pw(bkp,pw):return getseed(bkp['withpw'],pw,bkp['ethaddr'])...."withpw": aes.encryptData(pbkdf2(pw),seed).encode('hex'), def recover_bkp_wallet(bkp,wallet):return getseed(bkp['withwallet'],wallet['bkp'],bkp['ethaddr'])..."withwallet": aes.encryptData(pbkdf2(wallet['bkp']),seed).encode('hex'), how does all this stuff tie together & is there a way to bruteforce a presale file with hashcat if you've forgotten the password and you've already tried walletrecoveryservices.com? Haha. I know how it all fits together but I don't really understand it. It's all encryption and really complex math and stuff like that. In the most basic sense: you take 2 pieces of information, hash something, combine them, do something else, take the first X bytes, and you've got yourself a keyset. To decrypt it, you do the opposite. From 40 you can't get back to 80/2. It could be any number of combinations, like 160/4 or 200/5. However, if you know the second number is 2, you also know the first number is 80. It's the only possible one. (if we're using positive integers...shhh...this is an ELI5). In the same sense.... your seed + your password + (COMPLICATED MATH) = your encrypted seed encrypted seed + password + (OPPOSITE COMPLICATED MATH) = your seed. The "seed" in the presale file is essentially your private key. It's actually the sha3[1] of your seed: ethpriv = sha3(seed)). If you get your seed, you can get your private key easily w/o any add'l information. Continue reading >>

Python Bitcoin Tutorial For Beginners

Python Bitcoin Tutorial For Beginners

, - , online A simple introduction tutorial to get started with the pybitcointools Python library. do pip install bitcoin and then you can use the import bitcoin does not work for me NameError: name 'random_key' is not defined Is this for real? I just joined 2 days ago, and my account balance has already ballooned to a staggering $2500 !!! All you guys should try this bitcoin code at here What worked for me (on LInux Mint) $sudo pip3 install bitcoins $python3 >>import bitcoins Nice video, I am just starting to learn python, and knowing that it links nicely with the blockchain sounds wonderful. I'm planning on creating my own coin for both Scrypt and SHA-256 this is a very good tutorial how to use Python Nice tutorial! What is your favorite programming language? I saw your tutorials about NodeJS and Python. yo man is it alright i use a text editor of my own like sublime text BEERUS SAMA yes, just run your code in a command line. +Michael Edwards Thanks for your support! Yesterday, I QUIT my job...and today, Im at a pool party in Vegas! Life is CRAZYYYY. And its all thanks to the Bitcoin Code. THANK YOU *4BitcoinMoney. Com* hi guys.... please help how to convert pubkey to privkey at python??? please help.. Thanks... Can I make my own bitcoin wallet application ? how can i install pybitcointools, if using anaconda package installation for python development? after doing successful "pip install pybitcointools" Console gives error "ModuleNotFoundError" +Rahul Patil sorry I left out a step you have to do pip install bitcoin as well "Worked" copied bitcoin folder from bitcoin-1.1.42.tar.gz to Anaconda's Lib path. worked. :) try pip install bitcoin is the fix for anyone who is experiencing no module found error Hey, how do you do this if you have a mac? I cannot get to a comma Continue reading >>

+55 Minutes In Generating Dictionary For 194gb

+55 Minutes In Generating Dictionary For 194gb

+55 minutes in Generating Dictionary for 194GB I'm a newbie (so excuse for any mistake I can generate) :-) I need to recover my ethereum wallet password. I remember the password structure, the words and the combinations but not the way I used all togheter; so I created a 194GB dictionary and turned on a AWS machine with tesla K80. Installed cudaHash on Amazon Linux and nVidia is OK and any test is ok...or at least it seems to be to my eyes; then I benchmarked cudaHashcat64.bin and it is ok. ./cudaHashcat64.bin -m 5000 -a 0 wallet.hash /dictionary/verybigwordlist.txt I'm pretty sure I have made everything correct but I was not able to understand why I'm waiting (now) 55 minutes for "Generating dictionary stats for /dictionary/verybigwordlist.txt: 20537007704 bytes (1.00%), 347517734 words, 347517730 keyspace". I'd like to know if I did something wrong or everything is ok: just this ! Also ff some one has documentation that explain this, please point to me so I can understand by my own. Have you looked into hashcat's rules and masks? You may be able to significantly reduced the size of your wordlist, in exchange for faster coverage of your likely password space. For example, if your wordlist is doing things like appending numbers, toggling case, leet-ifying words, etc. then see the rules/ subdirectory for rule lists that you could use to do this instead. Also, it looks like you're using cudaHashcat, which has been superseded (now it's all just hashcat, and needs OpenCL). You'll probably want to upgrade to the most current release (3.40) and install an OpenCL runtime. Have you looked into hashcat's rules and masks? You may be able to significantly reduced the size of your wordlist, in exchange for faster coverage of your likely password space. For example, if your wordlis Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Info And News

Bitcoin Info And News

There has been a large amount of interest in multisignature transaction technology in the past year, especially with the recent announcement of CryptoCorp . If you want to play with multisig technology yourself on the command line, here are the gritty details of how to do it. First, run sudo pip install bitcoin to install the Python Bitcoin library. Then, to generate the three private keys, run the following: > k1=`pybtctool random_key`> k2=`pybtctool random_key`> k3=`pybtctool random_key`> p1=`pybtctool privtopub $k1`> p2=`pybtctool privtopub $k2`> p3=`pybtctool privtopub $k3` You now have three private keys and three public keys; run echo $k1, echo $p3, etc to see these values in the raw form. Now, we make the multisig script and address: > script=`pybtctool mk_multisig_script $p1 $p2 $p3 2 3`> address=`pybtctool scriptaddr $script` > echo $script5241045f4af45e3a7a86393c4ab9540cca382d46f10345b3ffcbb058089788550d167b7c079870d00da9728f8589fa5bbe0a8d62eadd56d37f3be6bc8145fe9a27437b4104509394eade56d900e90146e4bdf14f567b845ab0da986476253fe438f12032a248bbf2c16d28409b2961b3a3f797832ad195a8cef96589371271e2df6195cf804104ef6c434a854996e63cf650c0ba813993e90eef564bc78ad14768de51ac6b1bb00c5fe3381a923567162e8821e86ee28fbe4a25325f59cf6ede87c15d5af2881e53ae> echo $address3DDifvXMEQBEvn7dVR1wF5RXveA5MxEXek Due to randomness, your values will be different, but of the same general form. Notice the 3 at the start of the address. Now, send some BTC to your address, and run the following to make sure you actually received the funds. > pybtctool unspent $address[{"output": "9e123938b7625ef7807f31ad61c3b818484fed93eb951d981abd83413005080f:0", "value": 20000}] Now, we can make the transaction, sending the funds to the Methuselah Foundation s donation address: > tx=`pybtctool mktx 9e123938b76 Continue reading >>

Bitcoin 1.1.42 : Python Package Index

Bitcoin 1.1.42 : Python Package Index

Make and publish a transaction all in a single command line instruction Includes non-bitcoin-specific conversion and JSON utilities Not a full node, has no idea what blocks are Relies on centralized service (blockchain.info) for blockchain operations, although operations do have backups (eligius, blockr.io) ### Example usage (best way to learn :) ): > from bitcoin import *> priv = sha256(some big long brainwallet password)> priv57c617d9b4e1f7af6ec97ca2ff57e94a28279a7eedd4d12a99fa11170e94f5a4> pub = privtopub(priv)> pub0420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9> addr = pubtoaddr(pub)> addr1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6> h = history(addr)> h[{output: u97f7c7d8ac85e40c255f8a763b6cd9a68f3a94d2e93e8bfa08f977b92e55465e:0, value: 50000, address: u1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6}, {output: u4cc806bb04f730c445c60b3e0f4f44b54769a1c196ca37d8d4002135e4abd171:1, value: 50000, address: u1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6}]> outs = [{value: 90000, address: 16iw1MQ1sy1DtRPYw3ao1bCamoyBJtRB4t}]> tx = mktx(h,outs)> tx01000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f7970000000000ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0f3e0bc645c430f704bb06c84c0100000000ffffffff01905f0100000000001976a9143ec6c3ed8dfc3ceabcc1cbdb0c5aef4e2d02873c88ac00000000> tx2 = sign(tx,0,priv)> tx201000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f797000000008b483045022100dd29d89a28451febb990fb1dafa21245b105140083ced315ebcdea187572b3990220713f2e554f384d29d7abfedf39f0eb92afba0ef46f374e49d43a728a0ff6046e01410420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0 Continue reading >>

Bye Bye Vbuterin/pybitcointools@f768fd8 Github

Bye Bye Vbuterin/[email protected] Github

-Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy -of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal -in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights -to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell -copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is -furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions: -The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in -all copies or substantial portions of the Software. -THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR -IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, -FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE -AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER -LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, -OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN -The -s option lets you read arguments from the command line - @vub: pybtctool sha256 'some big long brainwallet password' | pybtctool -s privtoaddr | pybtctool -s history - [{'output': u'97f7c7d8ac85e40c255f8a763b6cd9a68f3a94d2e93e8bfa08f977b92e55465e:0', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}, {'output': u'4cc806bb04f730c445c60b3e0f4f44b54769a1c196ca37d8d4002135e4abd171:1', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}] - @vub: pybtctool random_electrum_seed | pybtctool -s electrum_privkey 0 0 - 593240c2205e7b7b5d7c13393b7c9553497854b75c7470b76aeca50cd4a894d7 -The -b option lets you read binary data as an argument - @vub: pybtctool sha256 123 | pybtctool -s changebase 16 256 | pybtctool -b changebase 256 16 - a665a45920 Continue reading >>

Pybitcointools Bitcoin

Pybitcointools Bitcoin

import pybitcointools as bitcoin # learn more: valid_private_key = Falsewhile not valid_private_key: private_key = bitcoin.random_key() decoded_private_key = bitcoin.decode_privkey(private_key, 'hex') valid_private_key = 0 < decoded_private_key < bitcoin.N# print "Private Key (hex) is: ", private_keyprint "Private Key (decimal) is: ", decoded_private_key# Wallet Import Format (Base58) wif_encoded_private_key = bitcoin.encode_privkey(decoded_private_key, 'wif')print "Private Key (WIF) is: ", wif_encoded_private_keycompressd_private_key = private_key + '01'print "Private Key Compressed (hex) is: ", compressd_private_key# WIFwif_compressed_private_key = bitcoin.encode_privkey( bitcoin.decode_privkey(compressd_private_key, 'hex'), 'wif')print "Private Key (WIF-Compressed) is: ", wif_compressed_private_key# public_key = bitcoin.fast_multiply(bitcoin.G, decoded_private_key)print "Public Key (hex) is: ", public_keyhex_encoded_public_key = bitcoin.encode_pubkey(public_key, 'hex')print "Public Key (hex) is: ", hex_encoded_public_key# (public_key_x, public_key_y) = public_keyif(public_key_y % 2) == 0: compressed_prefix = '02'else: compressed_prefix = '03'hex_compressed_public_key = compressed_prefix + bitcoin.encode(public_key_x, 16)print "Compressed Public Key (hex) is: ", hex_compressed_public_key# print "Bitcoin Address (b58check) is:", bitcoin.pubkey_to_address(public_key)# print "Compressed Bitcoin Address (Base58Check) is :", \ bitcoin.pubkey_to_address(hex_compressed_public_key) Continue reading >>

Python Bitcoin Tutorial For Beginners

Python Bitcoin Tutorial For Beginners

My Book: A simple introduction tutorial to get started with the pybitcointools Python library. Yesterday, I QUIT my job...and today, Im at a pool party in Vegas! Life is CRAZYYYY. And its all thanks to the Bitcoin Code. THANK YOU 4BitcoinMoney. Com Jonathas Da Silva Gusmo:Quer dinheiro entre aqui aprender a usar entre aqui Is there any telegram group for Blockchain dapps and python? yo man is it alright i use a text editor of my own like sublime text Hey, I stay at San Diego. Maybe we can meet and talk? Nice tutorial! What is your favorite programming language? I saw your tutorials about NodeJS and Python. Thank you very much thats the awesome video. good info. try pip install bitcoin is the fix for anyone who is experiencing no module found error hi guys.... please help how to convert pubkey to privkey at python??? please help.. Thanks... You think you are filthy rich? Show me!1BM1nqQxa2yJt6WPAogxrEftUX9kPuMMiiThanks Hey, how do you do this if you have a mac? I cannot get to a command center Thanks for this video. I'm trying to figure out how to make a multisig transaction actually work with pybitcointools... whenever I try... I get an error when it is pushed to blockchain.info/pushtx... "OP_CHECKMULTISIG(VERIFY) with non-null nulldummy:"Looking deeper, it seems to be due to a change in Bitcoin... are you aware of a way to make this work? I need to create my own wallet using python, can you make a video on that? it will help me alot!Thank You. pip install pybitcointools successfully installedcreated following file:from bitcoin import *priv = random_key()print (priv)then saved as youtubetutorial.pyhit f5go this:>>> RESTART: C:/Users/Warlock/AppData/Local/Programs/Python/Python35-32/youtubetutorial.py Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:/Users/Warlock/AppData/Loc Continue reading >>

Wizardofozzie/pybitcointools

Wizardofozzie/pybitcointools

Introducing the Tidelift Subscription . Professional-quality security updates and maintenance for the open source projects you depend on. Pybitcointools, Python library for Bitcoin signatures and transactions Functions have a simple interface, inputting and outputting in standard formats Many functions can be taken out and used individually Transaction deserialization format almost compatible with BitcoinJS Make and publish a transaction all in a single command line instruction Includes non-bitcoin-specific conversion and JSON utilities Not a full node, has no idea what blocks are Relies on centralized service (blockchain.info) for blockchain operations, although operations do have backups (eligius, blockr.io) > from bitcoin import *> priv = sha256('some big long brainwallet password')> priv'57c617d9b4e1f7af6ec97ca2ff57e94a28279a7eedd4d12a99fa11170e94f5a4'> pub = privtopub(priv)> pub'0420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9'> addr = pubtoaddr(pub)> addr'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'> h = history(addr)> h[{'output': u'97f7c7d8ac85e40c255f8a763b6cd9a68f3a94d2e93e8bfa08f977b92e55465e:0', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}, {'output': u'4cc806bb04f730c445c60b3e0f4f44b54769a1c196ca37d8d4002135e4abd171:1', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}]> outs = [{'value': 90000, 'address': '16iw1MQ1sy1DtRPYw3ao1bCamoyBJtRB4t'}]> tx = mktx(h,outs)> tx'01000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f7970000000000ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0f3e0bc645c430f704bb06c84c0100000000ffffffff01905f0100000000001976a9143ec6c3ed8dfc3ceabcc1cbdb0c5aef4e2d02873c88ac00000000'> tx2 = sign(tx,0,priv)> tx2'0100 Continue reading >>

Pybitcointools, Python Library For Bitcoin Signatures And Transactions

Pybitcointools, Python Library For Bitcoin Signatures And Transactions

Make and publish a transaction all in a single command line instruction Includes non-bitcoin-specific conversion and JSON utilities Not a full node, has no idea what blocks are Relies on centralized service (blockchain.info) for blockchain operations, although operations do have backups (eligius, blockr.io) > from bitcoin import *> priv = sha256('some big long brainwallet password')> priv'57c617d9b4e1f7af6ec97ca2ff57e94a28279a7eedd4d12a99fa11170e94f5a4'> pub = privtopub(priv)> pub'0420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9'> addr = pubtoaddr(pub)> addr'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'> h = history(addr)> h[{'output': u'97f7c7d8ac85e40c255f8a763b6cd9a68f3a94d2e93e8bfa08f977b92e55465e:0', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}, {'output': u'4cc806bb04f730c445c60b3e0f4f44b54769a1c196ca37d8d4002135e4abd171:1', 'value': 50000, 'address': u'1CQLd3bhw4EzaURHbKCwM5YZbUQfA4ReY6'}]> outs = [{'value': 90000, 'address': '16iw1MQ1sy1DtRPYw3ao1bCamoyBJtRB4t'}]> tx = mktx(h,outs)> tx'01000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f7970000000000ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0f3e0bc645c430f704bb06c84c0100000000ffffffff01905f0100000000001976a9143ec6c3ed8dfc3ceabcc1cbdb0c5aef4e2d02873c88ac00000000'> tx2 = sign(tx,0,priv)> tx2'01000000025e46552eb977f908fa8b3ee9d2943a8fa6d96c3b768a5f250ce485acd8c7f797000000008b483045022100dd29d89a28451febb990fb1dafa21245b105140083ced315ebcdea187572b3990220713f2e554f384d29d7abfedf39f0eb92afba0ef46f374e49d43a728a0ff6046e01410420f34c2786b4bae593e22596631b025f3ff46e200fc1d4b52ef49bbdc2ed00b26c584b7e32523fb01be2294a1f8a5eb0cf71a203cc034ced46ea92a8df16c6e9ffffffff71d1abe4352100d4d837ca96c1a16947b5444f0f3e0bc Continue reading >>

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