CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Is Bitcoin Used For Human Trafficking

Crime And Cryptocurrency: How Local Criminals Use Bitcoin Illegally

Crime And Cryptocurrency: How Local Criminals Use Bitcoin Illegally

Law enforcement is concerned that virtual currencies like bitcoin already known to be used for illegal transactions, including sex and drug trafficking will play an even bigger crime role as more investors use it as their preferred payment choice. Digital or virtual currency, often referred to as cryptocurrency, is not regulated by any central authority or government. Although local entrepreneurs say cryptocurrency has many legitimate uses, the speed and relative secrecy of the transactions have also been known to attract criminals. Unsavory characters in our society often utilize cryptocurrency, said Natalie Dunlevey, president of National Processing Solutions, a credit card processing and data security company in Dayton. RELATED: Bitcoin surges in popularity: Commons questions answered for you Some criminals use bitcoin because users can open a wallet to send and receive bitcoin without giving a name or identity. There is no bank or central authority, like a government, to control this information. Bitcoin also became a popular method for making payments when a computer system is taken over by ransomware. It is utilized by some very unsavory people in our society and there is no regulation, Dunlevey said. The fact that there is none is very worrisome. Bitcoin ATM. (Photo: Kara Driscoll/daytondailynews.com) Bitcoin is not completely anonymous and transactions can be traced by police through bitcoin trading websites. Other untraceable cryptocurrencies, like Monero, are becoming popular for dark web uses including drug trafficking and human trafficking, said Jad Mubaslat, Wright State University graduate student and founder of BitQuick.co, a bitcoin trading platform. The record of all bitcoin exchanges and transactions are recorded on what is called the blockchain, whic Continue reading >>

New Ai Follows Bitcoin To Track Illegal Sex Trafficking On Backpage | Inverse

New Ai Follows Bitcoin To Track Illegal Sex Trafficking On Backpage | Inverse

Artificial intelligence has a long way to go before it resembles anything human , but in the meantime, scientists are already getting A.I. to do a lot for humans right now. Researchers are using A.I. to track bitcoin being used in illegal sex trafficking. The internet has facilitated a lot of methods that traffickers can take advantage of, Rebecca Portnoff, an A.I. researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, told New Scientist . They can easily reach big audiences and generate a lot of content without having to reveal themselves. Thats why Portnoff and her colleagues developed a new tool which uses machine learning to identify payment patterns in illicit ads on Backpage.com a site commonly used to host online ads for sex work. The revolution will not be televised. It'll be sent to your inbox by us. The new system follows peculiar or repeated bitcoin transactions that are likely used in sex trafficking, and gives authorities a heads up of which chains of payments could be signs of crimes. Every transaction on Backpage uses bitcoin (credit card companies stopped allowing Backpage to use their services in 2015), and each transaction is publicly logged. Someone just has to trace the transaction to the associated bitcoin wallet and connect that to a pattern of similar ads. Although Backpage is used to list a lot of different classified ads, its also a very big source of sex trafficking. As far back as 2012, the site hosted more than 70 percent online sex ads being listed in the U.S. We look at cost of the ad and the timestamp, then connect the ad to a specific person or group, said Portnoff. This means the police then have a pretty good candidate for further investigation. The tool has the potential for slashing the amount of time and resources investigators must Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Fuels The Human Trafficking Market

Bitcoin Fuels The Human Trafficking Market

Bitcoin is the newest and arguably most popular digital currency to hit the Internet. Not tied to any government or backed by any international bank, this digital currency can be used to purchase goods and services online. Bitcoins are untraceable digital currency, which is appealing to human traffickers, drug pushers and arms dealers who operate in the illicit markets. The global illicit flow of goods, guns, people, and natural resources is estimated at approximately $650 billion and the large majority of the illicit economy is conducted online. Bitcoins allow traffickers to anonymously buy and sell women and girls for sex without the fear of legal repercussions. Despite its unsavory role as a conduit for illicit markets like human and arms dealing, bitcoin is becoming an increasingly legitimate form of currencystores in major international cities now accept the currency as legal tender. The first Bitcoin Brothel recently opened up in the United Kingdom, claiming that they turned to bitcoin as a currency when their clients were having problems with the lack of anonymity caused by credit cards. Bitcoins are used to pay for everything from drugs to sexual services and users willingly accept the highly volatile currency exchange rate for the concealment of their illegal transaction. The lack of transparency in bitcoin interactions has helped exploit the growing illicit markets and provided a challenge for law enforcement when trying to rescue sex trafficking victims and prosecute traffickers. Drug cartels can easily launder money and human sex traffickers operate in near obscurity through online bitcoin transactions. To combat this problem Thomson Reuters and the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC) created the Digital Economy Task Force , to add Continue reading >>

 : Bitcoin

: Bitcoin

: Bitcoin Evgenij Novoilov 0 Bitcoin , BTC , Silk road , Tor , , , , Bitcoin . . Bitcoin . . Bitcoin, , . , , - Bitcoin. ? -, , , . , , , , , . . , , 700 4 4 27 12 . . : , , $5 $7 , 2006 $32 ; , $6 $8 ; $19 $60 . - , $150 . 2010 2016 . , , , , , , . , , , , , , , , . , Bitcoin . , 20% , , , . , , , , . . , , , , - , . , , , . , . , , , . . , , . - , , , , , , , , , . . . , , . , , . , , . , 175 . , . , , , , , , . Bitcoin , , . , Bitcoin, , . . . , , . . , , 2011 , 12% , , 17 , - . - . - , . , , - . Bitcoin, - - . Bitcoin , , Bitcoin, . , , - - BTC , , . , . , , - . 1. -: , () 2. , , () 3. GLOBAL REPORT ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS, UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME 4. World Drug Report 2017, UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Continue reading >>

Vatican Address To Highlight Bitcoin Use In Slave Trade

Vatican Address To Highlight Bitcoin Use In Slave Trade

Vatican Address to Highlight Bitcoin Use in Slave Trade Nov 5, 2017 at 06:30 UTC|UpdatedNov 6, 2017 at 11:04 UTC The Vatican is soon to host an address on how bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are being used in the modern-day slave trade. To be held today at the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences (PASS) in the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church, the talk by Bank of Montreal senior manager Joseph Mari is to provide an overview of the role cryptocurrencies play in money laundering, while highlighting the potential of blockchain to help the unbanked. The second of a three-day long event, itself part of an even larger effort led by Pope Francis to eradicate slavery entirely by 2020, the address is expected to be given to an audience including the Vatican secretary of state, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, and other senior church leaders. Since the Pope was named the leader of the Roman Catholic Church in 2013, he has made slavery a top priority of the church, helping inspire the recent PASS efforts, according to an internal document provided to CoinDesk. In addition to today's address on blockchain, the group has held other workshops, seminars and plenary meetings culminating in the organization's "core" recommendation to resettle slaves where they are found, if they so choose, rather than repatriate them. Speaking in an exclusive interview with CoinDesk, Mari detailed the purpose of his particular address, and the potential bigger picture role it could play in fighting against what the International Labour Organization estimates is a $150 billion forced labor industry. "Blockchain and cryptocurrency needs to be on their radar, it needs to be recognized as something that is current, is being utilized and the quicker the learning curve is surmounted, the quicker we can Continue reading >>

Police Say Human Traffickers Are Turning To Bitcoin

Police Say Human Traffickers Are Turning To Bitcoin

Police Say Human Traffickers are Turning to Bitcoin Jeff Francis October 15, 2017 1:00 pm Police in Jamaica say that human traffickers are increasingly turning to Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in order to hide the money trail and avoid law enforcement. We live in a world of progress and are surrounded by the miracles of modern technology. Food is grown in areas that were once barren, and we can communicate with people on the other side of the world in an instant. Yet for all our continuing march towards a better world, there is still quite a bit of ugliness to be found. Case in point is the continued existence of human trafficking, which is estimated to be a $150 billion USD industry worldwide. Trying to fight this scourge is hard enough, to begin with, but police in Jamaica say that its getting harder as human traffickers are increasingly using Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to evade detection. The statistics for human trafficking are shocking. Its estimated that over 45 million men, women, and children are affected by this modern day slavery. This slavery takes many forms: sexual exploitation, organ harvesting, forced marriages, labor, murder, and even forced abortions for stem cell harvesting. Its enough to make the hairs on your head stand up. Jamaica is taking human trafficking seriously, especially in light that they were on an international watch list for the horrendous practice. The country has managed to remove itself from the list after recently rescuing more than 70 victims and convicting four human traffickers. At the Anti-Money Laundering/Counter-Financing of Terrorism Conference in New Kingston, law enforcement stressed the need to hit human traffickers in the pocketbook but that such actions are getting more difficult. Using Bitcoin and Other Cr Continue reading >>

Banks Turn To Bitcoin Tracking In Fight Against Human Trafficking - Coindesk

Banks Turn To Bitcoin Tracking In Fight Against Human Trafficking - Coindesk

Banks Turn to Bitcoin Tracking in Fight Against Human Trafficking A shift occurred in the summer of 2015 that sent modern-day slavers flocking to bitcoin. Following pressure from Illinois law enforcement, Visa and MasterCard ceased doing business with BackPage, an online classified ads service that has been accused of beinga thinly veiled front for prostitution and human trafficking. Assome positioned the move as the kind of " moral policing " for which bitcoin was a perfect workaround, the decision had an unintended side effect that may have actually helped make the job of modern day slave traders even easier. The tried-and-true investigative techniques that had been until that moment employed by law enforcement and banks to help prevent human trafficking were largely rendered null and void as the pedlars of human cargo embraced bitcoin. Then, in December 2015, a victim of human trafficking and sexual slavery, Timea Nagy, addressed a room filled with financial executives from some of the largest banks in Canada and made a pleafor help. At the meeting, organised by thefounder of social enterprise startup Timea's Cause as part of its process oftraining law enforcement and others to identify human trafficking victims, Nagymade a call to the room filled with financial executives, asking them to modernize the way they track the financial transactions that power human trafficking. "In the olden days, we could track the traffickers purchasing sexual ads for victims. But because of bitcoin, you can't see where the money comes from and where it goes. So it's really, really hard for investigators to actually follow the money, specifically in human trafficking." The result of her plea was instant, and continues to bear fruit at some of the largest financial intuitions in Canada. Continue reading >>

Lawmakers Worry Digital Currency Helping Human Traffickers Avoid Detection

Lawmakers Worry Digital Currency Helping Human Traffickers Avoid Detection

Lawmakers worry digital currency helping human traffickers avoid detection By Kaitlin Milliken - 01/31/18 07:50 AM EST Lawmakers at aTuesdayhearing discussed ways to crack down on human traffickers who are using new financial tools to avoid detection. The House Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations heard from witnesses on the increasing use of cryptocurrencies and encrypted communications, including on smartphones, that make it harder for authorities to catch traffickers. The lifeblood of human trafficking is the ability to transfer money, said Rep. Ann Wagner Ann Louise Wagner House Republicans prepare to battle for leadership slots Congress can act to prevent genocide and atrocities Overnight Tech: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica controversy | Senate passes sex trafficking bill | EU pushes new tax on tech | YouTube toughens rules on gun videos MORE (R-Mo.). While money has historically been transmitted using remittance services and funnel accounts, the use of prepaid cards and cryptocurrency create an unforeseen challenge for financial regulators. The means and methodology by which compensation is being received is changing, said Rep. Al Green Alexander (Al) N. Green Pelosi: Impeachment push a gift to GOP Pelosi pushes back against Steyers impeachment push Dems see Mueller firing as a red line on impeachment MORE (D-Texas), the subcommittee's top Democrat. People have the ability with cryptocurrency of transferring [money] without the trail we are customarily looking for, so we have to change our strategy. Human trafficking generates an estimated $150 billion per year, according to the International Labor Organization, with commercial sexual exploitation accounting for $99 billion of that total. But law enforcement and finan Continue reading >>

In A Step Toward Fighting Human Trafficking, Sex Ads Are Linked To Bitcoin Data

In A Step Toward Fighting Human Trafficking, Sex Ads Are Linked To Bitcoin Data

In a step toward fighting human trafficking, sex ads are linked to Bitcoin data A UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate has developed the first automated techniques to identify adult ads tied to human trafficking rings by linking the ads to public information from Bitcoin the primary payment method for online sex ads. The study is a first step toward developing a suite of freely available tools to help police and non-profit institutions use Bitcoin data to identify victims of sexual exploitation online. Websites for online classified ads selling sex are widely used by human traffickers, but law enforcement efforts to trace and disband human trafficking rings are hindered by the pseudonymous nature of adult ads, the tendency of ring leaders to employ multiple phone numbers and email addresses to avoid detection and the difficulty in determining which online ads reflect willing participants in the sex trade and which reflect victims forced into prostitution. The study is a first step toward developing a suite of freely available tools to help police and non-profit institutions overcome these challenges and identify victims of sexual exploitation on websites such as Backpage and Craigslist, where ads for human trafficking are often found. The technology weve built finds connections between ads, said Rebecca Portnoff , a UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate in computer science, who developed the tools as part of her dissertation. Is the pimp behind that post for Backpage also behind this post in Craigslist? Is he the same man who keeps receiving Bitcoin for trafficked girls? Questions like these are answerable only through more sophisticated technological tools exactly what weve built in this work that link ads together using payment mechanisms and the language in the ads themselves. Portnof Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Blockchain Analysis Could Fight Sex Trafficking: Uc Berkeley Phd Research

Bitcoin Blockchain Analysis Could Fight Sex Trafficking: Uc Berkeley Phd Research

Bitcoin Blockchain Analysis Could Fight Sex Trafficking: UC Berkeley PhD Research Blockchain analysis has been used by a UC Berkeley PhD candidate to identify sex trafficking rings, through the linking of Bitcoin payments made for online adult advertisements. Blockchain analysis has been used by a UC Berkeley PhD candidate to identify sex trafficking rings, through the linking of Bitcoin payments made for online adult advertisements. Could automation and Blockchain analysis help law enforcers crack down on human traffickers? Human traffickers often reach their customers through advertisements in sources like Craigslist and Backpage.com . The research uses two tools - analyzing the writing style (stylometry) and Blockchain analysis to try and identify human trafficking rings. Machine learning is used to identify adult ads with similar writing styles, which could indicate that they are likely to come from a single source - a trafficking ring. American Express stopped processing payment for Backpage in 2014, while other credit card processors like Visa and Mastercard stopped in 2015, leaving Bitcoin as the only viable source of payment. Blockchain analysis is used to link payments made for various ads, again indicating a single source. Demasking these Bitcoin addresses would, however, require enforcement officials taking up additional investigation. The problem with the above method is that it is useful only as long as the traffickers pay from the same wallet and do not attempt to cover their tracks. Bitcoin mixers can easily obfuscate the Blockchain train and prevent linking of transactions. We can expect traffickers to be extra careful and take additional precautions, now that this research has been published. Moreover, the possibility of false positives is also high. B Continue reading >>

Researchers Say Bitcoin Data Could Help Spot Sex Traffickers

Researchers Say Bitcoin Data Could Help Spot Sex Traffickers

Researchers Say Bitcoin Data Could Help Spot Sex Traffickers Bitcoin transactions could help find links between sexual ads, but advocates caution such investigations might harm voluntary sex workers. Bitcoin is often described as an anonymous way to pay online, but a group of researchers says that data revealed through the cryptocurrency might help track down sex traffickers. In a paper presented last month at the Association for Computing Machinerys annual conference on knowledge discovery and data mining, researchers analyzed sex-related ads placed on the controversial classified listings site Backpage. They sought to locate groups of ads placed on the site by the same person, which they say could help investigators spot behavior that points to human trafficking and sex slavery. Such a tool would allow officers to confidently use timing and location information to distinguish between ads posted by women voluntarily in this industry versus those by women and children forcibly tracked, they write. For example, groups of adsposted by the same ownerthat advertise multiple different women across multiple different states at a high ad output rate, is a strong indicator of trafficking. One technique, using statistical analysis to compare the actual texts of different ads, proved to have a high success rate at finding postings apparently by the same group, says coauthor Rebecca S. Portnoff , a graduate student in computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. To validate whether their algorithms were, in fact, finding ads written by the same people, they looked for postings featuring common email addresses or phone numbers. Thats a technique often used by law enforcement and other investigators looking for sex or labor trafficking rings. Portnoff says it has lim Continue reading >>

Ai Uses Bitcoin Trail To Find And Help Sex-trafficking Victims

Ai Uses Bitcoin Trail To Find And Help Sex-trafficking Victims

AI uses bitcoin trail to find and help sex-trafficking victims After Kubiiki Prides 13-year-old daughter disappeared , it took 270 days for her mother to find her. When she did, it was as an escort available to be rented out on an online classified web site. Her daughter had been drugged and beaten into compliance by a sex trafficker. To find her, Pride had to trawl through hundreds of advertisements on Backpage.com, a site that in 2012, the last date for which stats are available, was hosting more than 70 per cent of the US market for online sex ads. When it comes to identifying signs of human trafficking in online sex adverts, the task for police is often no easier. Thousands of sex-related classifieds are posted every week. Some are legal posts. Other people, like Prides daughter, are forced to do it. Working out which ads involve foul play is a laborious task. However, the task is being automated using a strange alliance of artificial intelligence and bitcoin . Learn about the future of AI: Join DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis at New Scientist Live The internet has facilitated a lot of methods that traffickers can take advantage of. They can easily reach big audiences and generate a lot of content without having to reveal themselves, says Rebecca Portnoff at the University of California, Berkeley. But a new tool developed by Portnoff and her colleagues can ferret traffickers out. It uses machine learning to spot common patterns in suspicious ads , and then uses publicly available information from the payment method used to pay for them bitcoin to help identify who placed them. The tool will help not only the investigation and intervention of potential traffickers, but also to support prosecution efforts in an arena where money moves with rapidity across financial i Continue reading >>

Follow The Bitcoin To Find Victims Of Human Trafficking

Follow The Bitcoin To Find Victims Of Human Trafficking

Follow the Bitcoin to Find Victims of Human Trafficking New Machine Learning Algorithms Will Trace Authors of Exploitative Advertising BROOKLYN, New York A team of university researchers has devised the first automated techniques to identify ads potentially tied to human trafficking rings and link them to public information from Bitcoin the primary payment method for online sex ads. This is the first step toward developing a suite of freely available tools to help police and nonprofit institutions identify victims of sexual exploitation, explained the computer scientists from the New York University Tandon School of Engineering; University of California, Berkeley; and University of California, San Diego. Human trafficking is a widespread social problem, with an estimated 4.5 million people forced into sexual exploitation, according to the International Labor Organization. In 2016, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimated that 1 in 6 endangered runaways reported to the group were probably sex-trafficking victims. The Internet has enabled and emboldened human traffickers to advertise sexual services. Law enforcement efforts to trace and disband human trafficking rings are often confounded by the pseudonymous nature of adult ads and the tendency of ring leaders to employ multiple phone numbers and email addresses to avoid detection. Adding to the difficulty: Determining which online ads reflect willing participants in the sex trade and which reflect victims forced into prostitution. The research teams approach relies on two novel machine learning algorithms. The first is rooted in stylometry, or the analysis of an individuals writing style to identify authorship. Stylometry can confirm authorship with high confidence, and in the case of online traf Continue reading >>

Bitcoin And Artificial Intelligence Can Help Fight Sex Trafficking | Fortune

Bitcoin And Artificial Intelligence Can Help Fight Sex Trafficking | Fortune

Computer science researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed new tools to identify sex trafficking rings, making them easier for law enforcement to target and prosecute. Those efforts have been stymied, according to the researchers report , by the vast quantity of ads for sex posted to websites like Backpage.com, only a portion of which may point to human trafficking or sex slavery. Screening thousands of new ads every day can also take a mental toll on human workers. The new technique, developed by a team including PhD candidate Rebecca S. Portnoff, combines two distinct approaches to solving that problem. First, the team created a machine-learning filter that finds stylistic similarities between ads for sex services posted to sites like Backpage.com. That makes it easier to distinguish between women voluntarily engaging in sex work, and those being forced into it by criminal organizations posting multiple ads. The second technique goes even deeper. Because Backpage is the most used portal for advertising sex services, credit card processors like Visa refused to service the site starting in 2015. That left Bitcoin as the preferred means of paying for ads. The Berkeley researchers took advantage of Bitcoins public blockchain a record of all transactions to identify payments for sex ads originating with the same Bitcoin user, again providing evidence of a larger organization and likelihood of trafficking. Continue reading >>

Human Traffickers Could Be Identified Through Their Bitcoin Transactions

Human Traffickers Could Be Identified Through Their Bitcoin Transactions

Human traffickers could be identified through their Bitcoin transactions US researchers have collaborated to develop two machine learning algorithms which could help law enforcement identify human trafficking rings advertising exploitative sexual services online through analysis of linguistic style and linking adverts to Bitcoin transactions. Human trafficking is a devastating international problem which affects every country in the world. According to the International Labour Organisation, an estimated 21 million people are living as slaves, of which 4.5 million are sex slaves. Criminal groups profiting from sexual exploitation can make the most of the lack of regulation online to place semi-anonymous adverts for sexual services. This veil of anonymity causes a headache for law enforcement services attempting to identify these groups, which often hide behind many different contact details in order to avoid being tracked down. There are hundreds of thousands of these ads placed every year, and any technique that can surface commonalities between ads and potentially shed light on the owners is a big boost for those working to curb exploitation, said Professor Damon McCoy, a New York University assistant professor of computer science and engineering. Researchers from the University of California-Berkeley, New York University and the University of California-San Diego collaborated on a project to develop two free machine learning tools to help police and non-profit groups identify victims of human trafficking hidden behind adult adverts. The first algorithm is based on stylometry: the in-depth analysis of linguistic style to identify authors across multiple texts, which are often anonymous or fraudulent. When applied to online sex adverts, this tool can identify a single Continue reading >>

More in bitcoin