CryptoCoinsInfoClub.com

Interesting Bitcoin Transaction

Github - Kristovatlas/interesting-bitcoin-data: Interesting Data Artifacts From The Bitcoin Blockchain, Useful To Testers And Researchers.

Github - Kristovatlas/interesting-bitcoin-data: Interesting Data Artifacts From The Bitcoin Blockchain, Useful To Testers And Researchers.

Interesting data artifacts from the Bitcoin blockchain, useful to testers and researchers. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download GitHub Desktop and try again. If nothing happens, download Xcode and try again. If nothing happens, download the GitHub extension for Visual Studio and try again. Interesting data artifacts from the Bitcoin blockchain, useful to QA/security testers, developers, and researchers. Prior to the BIP 30 fix, transactions could have duplicate hashes/IDs. There are 2 pairs: (appears in blocks at height 91812 and 91842) (appears in blocks at height 91722 and 91880) (One of Satoshi's addresses) (Only used to receive Coinbase rewards) (Large txs, lots of outputs) (Lots of large txs with lots of inputs) (Used in XSS transaction) (Used in SIGHASH_SINGLE forking transaction) Block Height 0 (Genesis Block): Block Height 546 (First block to create TXOs and spend them within same block): Block Height 210000 (First block after first reward halving): Block Height 124724 (First block that does not create the full block reward): Block Height 164243 (First block that does not create the full block reward due to missing fees): When possible, please link to blockchain explorers for data artifacts you have added, such as transaction IDs and addresses. For Bitcoin addresses, you should include at least one explorer link that contains a QR code for addresses. Contributions may be submitted as pull requests to the Master branch or GitHub issues. Continue reading >>

10 Interesting Facts About Bitcoin That You Must Know

10 Interesting Facts About Bitcoin That You Must Know

10 Interesting Facts About Bitcoin That You Must Know With the exponential rise in the price of bitcoin, this cryptocurrency is generating tons of interest among people. By now, many people have heard of bitcoin and its gaining acceptance. So, in that line, here are some interesting bitcoin facts that you must know. Give them a read and share it with your friends and family: 1. Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, is still a mystery figure Satoshi Nakamoto is the name used by the person who designed bitcoin but theres still doubt about the real identity. Over the years, many people have been linked with the same, including Nick Szabo, Dorian Nakamoto, Hal Finney, Craig Steven Wright, and others. Some people consider Nakamoto might be a team of people. As of May 2017, Nakamoto is believed to own about 1 million bitcoins with a worth of more than $2 billion. You mightve heard about bitcoin mining, the process using which bitcoins are generated digitally. So, does this mean there could be an infinite number of bitcoins? Thats not the case. A pre-defined schedule has limited the number of bitcoins. They are slowly approaching a total of 21 million and the mining process is getting harder with each passing day. 3. Its impossible to know the sender/receiver details Bitcoin addresses are a long string of 34 alphanumeric characters. Using that address, its impossible to tell the recipient. Probably, this is the reason why most of the illegal transactions are carried out using bitcoins. To protect the privacy even further, most wallet programs assign the users a portfolio ID, which is also used as a username. 4. Pizza was the first thing (good) purchased using bitcoin After the first bitcoin transaction took place between Satoshi and Hal Finney in 2009, the first recorded purchas Continue reading >>

An Interesting View Into Bitcoin Exchange Transactions

An Interesting View Into Bitcoin Exchange Transactions

An interesting view into bitcoin exchange transactions In awrite-up this weekbyTim Swanson, Director of Market Research at R3CEV , he publishedsome eye opening information into how bitcoin transactions flow from bitcoin exchanges using blockchain intelligence software Chainalysis . Chainalysis is one of a handful of companies in the bitcoin space that are focusing on analysis of bitcoin and blockchain data and tracking, mining as much information as possible whileconnecting the dots. Using this data and working with Chainalysis, Swanson took agranular lookinto specific transaction corridors and movements between miners, exchanges, darknet markets, payment processors, and coin mixers. In reviewing the data, there were several bitcoin exchanges that were tracked including Bitfinex , Bitstamp , BTCC , BTC-e , Circle , Coinbase , Huobi , itBit , Kraken , LocalBitcoins , OKCoin , and Xapo .All the exchanges were included in the data but only the identities of BTC-e and LocalBitcoins were revealedin the charts and data. The chart below is a backwards looking view into transaction flows between exchanges, for example you can see BTC-e and LocalBitcoins clearly and the other exchanges are unidentified. The thickness of the bands signifies the volume of transactions. The data and charts are for the 2015 year. Chainalysis clustering algorithm for this data was intended to isolate sub-economies, and not see each individual trades (hops), so the number of hops between exchanges are removed and you end up with the start and finish of a transaction, and a smooth chord that shows you where the transaction began and ended; which is supposed to give you a better idea of the sub-economy that bitcoin has. For example, in this chart below you can see LocalBitcoins isolated with different Continue reading >>

Bitcoin's Segwit Impact: Transaction Fees Begin To Tumble | Btcmanager

Bitcoin's Segwit Impact: Transaction Fees Begin To Tumble | Btcmanager

SegWit was implemented by CoinGate on December 23, 2017. The digital currency payment gateway has listed seven key reasons for their SegWit adoption, which are summarized as follows: It allows four times as many transactions per block, Transaction malleability is significantly improved , Eases the upgradeability to the Lightning Network , Signature-hashing is made more efficient, The playing field of Bitcoin mining is leveled out, as miners can no longer use AsicBoost covertly. As well as CoinGate, the popular peer-to-peer bitcoin exchange LocalBitcoins.com announced on Twitter that it had implemented SegWit on January 2, 2018. As a large marketplace spanning various countries, this should help to further increase the number of transactions between SegWit-supported addresses, along with popular wallet service BTC.com announcing their support . Although officially introduced in August of 2017, it was not until the first week of January 2018 that SegWit became more widely adopted. The slow start , although prolonging Bitcoins snags, was necessary in order for many wallets to facilitate the adoption of the change. It is understood by experts that once SegWit becomes more widely used, Bitcoin will move closer to utilizing the two to four megabytes worth of transactions for every ten minutes that it is currently able to support. While SegWit implementation remains slow, Bitcoin averages close to 1.1MB , which illustrates the slow speeds that users are currently experiencing. The SegWit protocol is compatible with older versions of Bitcoin, as well as supporting future growth and upgrades of the system. At this stage, it appears that SegWit will remain a key aspect of the Bitcoin blockchain network for the foreseeable future, with a wider embrace required to ensure transacti Continue reading >>

Blockchain - When Was The First Non-coinbase Transaction? - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

Blockchain - When Was The First Non-coinbase Transaction? - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

When was the first non-coinbase transaction? I don't recall the block number, but I'm pretty sure it was Satoshi sending Gavin 25 BTC. I think it was after block 70,000. lurf jurv May 11 '13 at 15:00 It seems Hal received the first set of BTC in block 170, but it would be interesting to find out who spent what and when during the first 100k blocks Charles Hoskinson May 11 '13 at 17:23 The first non-coinbase transaction in the chain is in block 170 . Not sure what you would consider a 'real' versus a 'test' transaction, but given that there is an entirely separate blockchain for test transactions I'd consider it as real as any other. A transaction used for actual commerces versus a transfer of wealth to encourage use of bitcoins at a later date. Charles Hoskinson May 11 '13 at 17:21 Impossible to know, unless you can track down the owners of all the early transactions and ask them. slashingweapon Jul 18 '13 at 21:48 Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged blockchain history or ask your own question . site design / logo 2018 Stack Exchange Inc; user contributions licensed under cc by-sa 3.0 with attribution required . rev2018.3.30.29681 Explain your problem out loud. Speak naturally. you can just explain your problem anyway! Whenever youre stuck, rubber ducking is a powerful method for solving even the most difficult problems. Insights are often found by simply describing the problem aloud. The duck is sorry to hear that, but it understands. Continue reading >>

Cryptocurrency Exchanges Look To Speed Up Bitcoin Transactions

Cryptocurrency Exchanges Look To Speed Up Bitcoin Transactions

The Coinbase cryptocurrency exchange application seen on the screen of an iPhone. Two of the biggest cryptocurrency exchanges are aiming to make bitcoin transactions faster and cheaper with a new software update announced this week. Both Coinbase and Bitfinex said they are adopting a software called SegWit, which bitcoin bulls and one exchange say should lower fees by as much as 20 percent while speeding up transactions. "The most noticeable changes in the short term should be more efficiency when transacting," said Alex Sunnarborg, founding partner at crypto hedge fund Tetras Capital. "SegWit adoption is undoubtedly positive for bitcoin as it greatly impacts transaction fees, speed, and future tech possibilities, all areas in which alternative crypto assets like Bitcoin Cash and Ethereum compete with and often criticize bitcoin on." Bitcoin enthusiasts have split over the best way to improve the cryptocurrency network's efficiency. An upgrade called SegWit2x was called off in the fall after it lost widespread support. Meanwhile, bitcoin transaction fees soared well above $20 in the last few months and confirmation times could take longer than a day. Some users were so frustrated with fees, and unable to compromise on blockchain size increases, that they "forked" bitcoin, and created bitcoin cash this summer. The software Segregated Witness, or SegWit, slightly increases the block size. As the number of transactions that fit into each block goes up, transactions get faster. SegWit went live in August as Bitcoin's skyrocketing popularity led to some slowdowns on the network. Bitfinex, which facilitates about 38 percent of all U.S. dollar-bitcoin trading volume according to CryptoCompare, announced the software roll-out on Tuesday. "We are delighted that through this imp Continue reading >>

3 Most Interesting Bitcoin Transactions In The History Of Bitcoin

3 Most Interesting Bitcoin Transactions In The History Of Bitcoin

Every day there are more than 200,000+ Bitcoin transactions recorded on the Blockchain. Until now, over 240,000,000 Bitcoin transactions have been recorded on the Blockchain. Amongst these transactions, there are numerous interesting and unusual transactions which have amazed the users of Bitcoin. Lets take a look! Mysterious Single Transaction of $149 Million Dollars Worth of Bitcoin Apparently, there was a single transaction which contained 194,993 bitcoins in the fall of 2013. This amount was valued at over $149 million USD at the time of the transaction. Until today, this transaction is considered as the largest Bitcoin transaction ever conducted in the history of the currency. The transaction amazed many Bitcoin users and speculations around the transaction began to grow. Some say that it is Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin, transferring his funds whilst others say that it is more likely to be a mining company or business. No additional news or information has ever been obtained and the transaction still remains a big mystery 2 Boxes of Pizzas for worth $25 Million Dollars Today May 22ndis known as the Bitcoin Pizza Day between the users of Bitcoin. This date can be traced back to the year 2010, as a user on the BitcoinTalk forum named Laszlo created a thread requesting people to order two pizzas for him. In exchange, he offered 10,000 bitcoins. The task was simple. Order the pizzas as specified, pay in advance for him, and have them delivered to his address. Within a few minutes, one user volunteered to give him the benefit of the doubt and ordered the pizzas as requested. He received 10,000 bitcoins (worth $25 USD at the time of transaction) and ever since, this incident has been celebrated by the users of Bitcoin. Today, 10,000 bitcoins are well worth o Continue reading >>

Comments On Daily Chart: How Do Bitcoin Transactions Work? | The Economist

Comments On Daily Chart: How Do Bitcoin Transactions Work? | The Economist

Reader comments are listed below. Comments are currently closed and new comments are no longer being accepted. So who does one pay and what does one get in terms of value after paying? The success of bitcoin is going to depend on how well people can communicate it in a simple and understandable way. For most it is just too difficult to comprehend, very much like the early internet. Check out our new app to predict the future of bitcoin: . Submit your prediction today! Does anyone remember the gold rush or tulip mania. Oh! bitcoins is the new computing fad perhaps to increase the sale of computers. Agreed, its gaining acceptance but fundamentally the integrity of the system has to be preserved or it is worthless "form" of currency. Miners make money through transactions by provding computing resources. The limit of these transactions is the time to provide the "clue" or code. Question is could bitcoin miners survive a "deluge" in demand? Could bitcoins compete with T-Bills if time was of essence. These are space/time questions that have to be answered. Another question is about the "persistency" of final currency. Again is T-Bill the mother of bitcoins. Its interesting bitcoins are becoming the new replaceable gold standard and does not require bulky gold coins. Will this fad be the new gold standard. Already several country regimes/ have started to show displeasure. Time will tell, to join the bitcoin revolution or no. However for now bitcoin operaters seem to be unfazed by its demand. 1. Bitcoin as a currency is part of the network which is the sum of the computers of all the participants who have the software installed on their PC's. 2. They all have the same copy of the database which is called the blockchain because it is recorded in blocks of new transactions ever Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Are Pretty Low Right Now: Here's Why

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Are Pretty Low Right Now: Here's Why

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Are Pretty Low Right Now: Here's Why The relatively high transaction fees on the Bitcoin network were a major topic of conversation last year, but these fees have been plummeting so far in 2018. According to data from CoinMetrics , bitcoin miners are now collecting less than a third of the value they were collecting in fees at one point in December 2017. So whats causing this decline in the costs of on-chain transactions? Is it as simple as declining demand leading to a lower price? Are there other factors at play? Lets take a closer look. In 2017, the congestion on the Bitcoin blockchain led to a bidding war over block space, especially as speculative interest in bitcoin continued to rise over the course of the year. According to CoinMetrics , bitcoin transaction fees started 2017 at an average of $0.30, but they eventually peaked at over $40 in December. As the price tripled during a month-long stretch from mid-November to mid-December, those who were purchasing bitcoin for the first time simply did not care about how much they were paying in on-chain transaction fees. This chart from CoinMetrics shows the bitcoin price and average transaction fee. As the speculative frenzy around the bitcoin asset has calmed a bit in 2018, the number of transactions broadcast to the Bitcoin network has also declined. According to data from Blockchain , the number of transactions added to the mempool per second has declined by nearly 50 percent from the December highs. The number of transactions added to the mempool per second is at the same levels as May 2016. Data via Blockchain.info. Its possible that bitcoin fees are now lower simply because the FOMO around getting some bitcoin before the price goes to the moon has subsided, leading to a decline in demand Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Keep Doubling Nearly Every Three Months

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Keep Doubling Nearly Every Three Months

Bitcoin Transaction Fees Keep Doubling Nearly Every Three Months Bitcoin transaction fees remain a big problem in the cryptocurrency world. It seems there is no real short-term solution to resolve this problem whatsoever. Some network upgrades are in development, but they might take months or even years to come to market. An interesting chart shows how the Bitcoin fees have doubled nearly every three months. These numbers are based on the median average fee, mind you. Bitcoin has a serious problem which only becomes more apparent over time. Spending a lot of money as a transaction fee is never a fun experience. Unfortunately, it has also become the new normal in the world of Bitcoin over the past year and a half. Combined with network congestion, it is evident the worlds leading cryptocurrency has issues to sort out. That is always easier said than done, though. Even the introduction of SegWit has done virtually nothing to address the fees problem. A recent chart shows how the Bitcoin transaction costs are evolving over time. Since April of 2016, things have certainly gotten out of hand quite a bit. Both on the high and low side of the spectrum, worrisome increases can be noted. The higher fees have doubled almost 10 times in the past 24 months. That is very worrisome and it seems there is little improvement in sight. Granted, not everyone pays high Bitcoin transaction costs, or at least, we can only hope that is the case. Unfortunately, the lower median fee is also increasing. It has doubled every three months since June of 2016, which is rather worrisome. Although a lot of people dont mind waiting hours for network confirmations, its still a disturbing development. Everyone assumed Bitcoin would remain a cheaper alternative to send money around the world. Right now, Continue reading >>

How Do Bitcoin Transactions Work? - Coindesk

How Do Bitcoin Transactions Work? - Coindesk

Bitcoin transactions are sent from and to electronic bitcoin wallets , and are digitally signed for security. Everyone on the network knows about a transaction, and the history of a transaction can be traced back to the point where the bitcoins were produced. Holding onto bitcoins is great if you’re a speculator waiting for the price to go up, but the whole point of this currency is to spend it, right? So, when spending bitcoins, how do transactions work? There are no bitcoins, only records of bitcoin transactions Here’s the funny thing about bitcoins: they don’t exist anywhere, even on a hard drive. We talk about someone having bitcoins, but when you look at a particular bitcoin address, there are no digital bitcoins held in it, in the same way that you might hold pounds or dollars in a bank account. You cannot point to a physical object, or even a digital file, and say “this is a bitcoin”. Instead, there are only records of transactions between different addresses, with balances that increase and decrease. Every transaction that ever took place is stored in a vast public ledger called the block chain. If you want to work out the balance of any bitcoin address, the information isn’t held at that address; you must reconstruct it by looking at the blockchain. If Alice sends some bitcoins to Bob, that transaction will have three pieces of information: An input. This is a record of which bitcoin address was used to send the bitcoins to Alice in the first place (she received them from her friend, Eve). An amount. This is the amount of bitcoins that Alice is sending to Bob. An output. This is Bob's bitcoin address. To send bitcoins, you need two things: a bitcoin address and a private key. A bitcoin address is generated randomly, and is simply a sequence of lett Continue reading >>

50 Amazing Facts About Bitcoin That Will Blow Your Mind

50 Amazing Facts About Bitcoin That Will Blow Your Mind

50 Amazing Facts About Bitcoin That Will Blow Your Mind Bitcoinis acryptocurrency, adigital assetdesigned to work as amedium of exchangethat usescryptography to control its creation and management,rather than relying on central authorities. Bitcoin has been around since November 2008 but its networkhas existed since January 2009, where the first block of bitcoins (worth 50 bitcoins) was issued to the purported creator of Bit Coins, Satoshi Nakamoto. Bitcoinplay.net has come up with an insane list of facts about Bitcoins and here are the most amazing ones: Satoshi Nakamoto is a fictitiousname of the Bitcoin creator or creators. Nakamoto is believed to own around 1 million Bitcoins worth $2 Billion. No single entity or government has control over the Bitcoin currency. There is a finite number of bitcoins, 21,000,000. 1% of the Bitcoin community controls 99% of the worlds wealth. Since March 2015, Bitcoin transaction fees are up by 1289%. 69% of all banks in the world are experimenting with permissionedblockchains. Bitcoin value has multiplied 879,999 times from 2010 to 2017. 64% of Bitcoins have never been used and might never be used. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) owns 1.5% of the worlds Bitcoins. Around 5% of the Bitcoin economy is active on Silk Road online black market. The worlds largest Bitcoin exchange MT Gox crashed in 2014 and prices fell by 40%. Potential annual savings for banks utilizing blockchain technology is $8-12 million. Only 807 people worldwide have ever declared Bitcoin income for tax purposes. There are 7 Bitcoin debit cards for businesses and individuals. The first big Bitcoin acquisition was worth $11.5 million for 126,315 Bitcoins. This is known as the SatohiDice. A person by the name Nakowa won 11,000 Bitcoins worth $1.3M back in 201 Continue reading >>

194,993 Btc Transaction Worth $147 Million Sparks Mystery And Speculation

194,993 Btc Transaction Worth $147 Million Sparks Mystery And Speculation

194,993 BTC transaction worth $147 Million sparks mystery and speculation Nov 23, 2013 at 00:05 UTC|UpdatedSep 10, 2014 at 13:43 UTC UPDATE 25th November, 12:16 GMT: We contacted Bitstamp CEO Nejc Kodri to ask whether there was any truth in the rumour that the transaction was made by his company, but he declined to comment. Bitcoin internet hangouts were buzzing today after noticing someone had shifted 194,993 BTC (over $147m on CoinDesk's BPI) in one transaction. The transaction, tagged "Shit Load of Money!" by its mystery originator*, appeared on Blockchain.info early in the evening of 22nd November. It is one of the largest transactions in bitcoin's history, by far the largest under bitcoin's recent high prices, and represents 1.6% of all bitcoins now in circulation. (*Correction: as pointed out in the comments below, the tag was attached to the receiving address and not by the originator.) Bitcoin's distributed nature ensures all transactions are visible on the public record, though users are identified only by 30+ character addresses (and any tags they choose to add). If the address is not already known and the user does not identify themselves in an obvious way, they remain anonymous without analysis or detective work. Unsurprisingly, a transaction of that size has prompted the bitcoin community to do some analysis and detective work. The transaction involved a large number of sending addresses, with some of them from blocks mined in February 2010 or even earlier, prompting excited speculation they might be from Satoshi Nakamoto , bitcoin's absent (and likely pseudonymous) founder. Or was it Richard Branson, who caused his own digital currency frenzy today by announcing his company Virgin Galactic would accept payment in bitcoin? Satoshi Nakamoto is unlikely to r Continue reading >>

A Single Bitcoin Transaction Now Consumes As Much Electricity As Your House Does In A Week

A Single Bitcoin Transaction Now Consumes As Much Electricity As Your House Does In A Week

A Single Bitcoin Transaction Now Consumes as Much Electricity as Your House Does in a Week As Bitcoin rises so does its exorbitant energy usage. The cryptocurrency has some explaining to do when it comes to energy consumption. The epic rise of Bitcoin in the past week saw the cryptocurrency surpass $7000 in value. Along with the windfall is a soaring increase in electricity consumption as more and more users are gathering online to mine for currency. Miners add new sets of transaction blocks around every ten minutes, the process of building a valid block is largely based on completing a puzzle through trial and error, meaning miners make many attempts every second to try and find the right value for a component called a nonce. All this effort per second is called a hash rate, and that is expressed in Gigahash per second. It is estimated that with the current prices, miners would use over 24 terawatt-hours of electricity annually. The same amount of power used by a country of over 100 million people. To put the energy consumed by the Bitcoin network into perspective, we can compare it to another payment system like VISA for example. Even though the available information on VISAs energy consumption is limited, we can establish that the data centers that process VISAs transactions consume energy equal to that of 50,000 U.S. households. We also know VISA processed 82.3 billion transactions in 2016. With the help of these numbers, it is possible to compare both networks and show that Bitcoin is extremely more energy intensive per transaction than VISA, describes cryptocurrency analyst Alex de Vries aka Digiconomist, as reported by VICEs Motherboard. Miner average about 215 kilowatt-hours (KWh) used for each transaction, and there are 300,000 transactions per day. A typical Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Puzzle: Price Is Up But Transaction Volume Isn't | Fortune

Bitcoin Puzzle: Price Is Up But Transaction Volume Isn't | Fortune

Earlier this year, when Bitcoins price fell by more than 60% from its record close, a less-noticed Bitcoin figure also plunged: the number of daily transactions. There are many explanations for the fall-off in trading, from software- to news-related. Whats less understood is why the level hasnt recovered as Bitcoins price made a 50% comeback since Feb. 5. Thats left some investors wondering whether the cryptocurrency is waning in popularity. The average number of trades recorded daily has roughly dropped in half from the December highs and touched its lowest in two years last month, even as Bitcoin became a household name and roared back above $10,000. The transaction data may be bad news for Bitcoin bulls, according to Charles Morris, chief investment officer of Newscape Capital Group in London, who invests in cryptocurrencies. Trading and purchases on the Bitcoin network, which can be measured by metrics like transaction volume, is indicative of price direction, he said. We had a hype-cycle and now its cooling down, Morris, whos working on a project that will facilitate price discovery in various cryptocurrencies, said by phone from London. We just may be entering a bear market for Bitcoin. Transactions plunged from a seven-day average of almost 400,000 in mid-December to about 200,000 this week, according to research firm Blockchain.info. The last time it was this low, the currency traded below $500. Transactions waiting to be officially recognized by the Bitcoin network dropped from a seven-day average of 130 million bytes in early January to about 35 million now. Average transaction confirmation times have tumbled though that may be in part because the technology that underlies Bitcoin has already been adapted to address some of these delays. For example, a softwa Continue reading >>

More in bitcoin