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Do Cryptologic Linguists Get Deployed

10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand

10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Cossairt teaches English to Afghan Security Guard members in Kunar Province, Afghanistan. 10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand Only those who have gone through the rigors of the Defense Language Institute will appreciate the myths, legends, and realities of Monty. The Defense Language Institute or simply DLI to the many Department of Defense service members and civilians who have gone through foreign language training is renowned for being one of the most prestigious and rigorous language schools in the entire world. Every year, thousands attempt to make it through the exhaustive 26 to 64-week courses, which consist of five days a week of in-class foreign language study that lasts seven hours a day plus two to three hours of homework per night. The formidable 98% native speaker instructor cadre teach over two dozen languages at the Defense Language Institute, and due to the extreme difficulty of the programs, student pass rates are dismal. Most military, veterans, and intelligence community members know exactly what DLI is, and can probably even tell you about the infamously high washout rates , the intensely long training, and the squirrelly jobs linguists get into after they graduate. However, the following list is a collection of things that you probably wont appreciate unless youve experienced the Defense Language Institute in full force. Here are 10 things only those who have attended will understand. 1. You remember the familiar call of the sea lions in the morning. No matter if youre down on Soldiers Field, or up at Belas Hall dining facility, the guttural cries from angsty sea lions can be heard with an uncanny distinctness. 2. You have heard about the firehose concept countless times. As soon as you stepped off that bus Continue reading >>

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3X1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations Davis-Monthan Air Force Base boneyard in Arizona.Stocktrek Images / Getty Images The chart below shows authorized assignment location for this AFSC (job). It includes locations for routine assignments, only. It does not show the locations for any possible special duty assignments which may be available for this particular job. A "3" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "3" skill-level trainees. This is usually a brand-new graduate from an Air Force technical school, usually in the rank of Amn (E-1) through A1C (E-3). A "5" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "5-Skill Level" trained technicians. These are individuals who have passed their On-the-Job training requirements, and been advanced from the 3-Skill Level to the 5-Skill Level. Usually in the ranks of A1C (E-3) through Sra (E-4). A "7" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for the "7-Skill Level" (Supervisor). These are usually personnel in the ranks of SSgt (E-5), TSgt (E-6), and MSgt (E-7). A "9" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for senior enlisted managers, usually SMSgt's (E-8) or CMSgt's (E-9). Specific information about particular Air Force Bases can be found in our subject area for Bases & Units . 1N3X2F (Haitian - Creole Language) Authorizations Continue reading >>

How To Get A Job With The Cia

How To Get A Job With The Cia

Future Cryptologic Linguist needs a lil' help with a few questions...? Well I just recently got the word that I am booked to be a Crypto Linguist. I got a 116 on my DLAB and am leaving for BMT on February 2. I was gonna be an Airborne Linguist but apparently i was too short for their requirements. You need to be 64 inches to be one and i was 63.5. I cant believe half an inch made such a difference with my life. So now I'm stuck with being on the ground, but i still have a few loose ends i want to clear up in my head: 1. What other differences are there between ground and airborne beside the obvious places you'll be working at? 2. What languages would i expect to receive with my grade on the DLAB and the times we are in today? 4. How much more money does an airborne get from a ground? 5. Does being an airborne linguist have any different significance to my future career as an airman? Would it help me get a few more privileges than a ground linguist? 6. How are the work hours in airborne linguists? 7. Is it true that you get deployed more as an airborne linguist? 8. Is it also true that ground linguists have better language training? 9. Is it also true that airborne linguists have a (hypothetically speaking) higher rank than a ground linguist? 10. What are the pro's and con's of both? 11. What was so important in a plane that me being half an inch too short would make me lose my chance being airborne? 12. Are there any really chances of me getting into the CIA? And specifically to the seasoned linguists out there: 13. What have you experienced being in that job albeit airborne or linguist? 14. Any opportunities you get the chance to experience just by being a linguist? 15. Any special jobs you can apply for in the military that most people cant get? 16. What can you do w Continue reading >>

Usaf Airborne Linguist Or Ground Linguist? (af, National Guard, Training, Stationed) - Military Life And Issues -relocation, Families, Vets, Bases, Army, Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard, Va Loans - City-data Forum

Usaf Airborne Linguist Or Ground Linguist? (af, National Guard, Training, Stationed) - Military Life And Issues -relocation, Families, Vets, Bases, Army, Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard, Va Loans - City-data Forum

USAF Airborne Linguist or ground linguist? (AF, National Guard, training, stationed) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search I just want to hear some opinions between airborne or ground. I'm literally just about to flip a coin on it. You are enlisting? List BOTH and see what happens... Former 1A8X1 here that started off her career as a ground linguist. I retired 4 years ago to give you a reference point. I spent about 18 years of my career flying and I loved it. The good and bad of being an airborne linguist is you can spend a lot of your time deploying depending upon your language and where you get stationed. If you are a flyer there are more training requirements you have to accomplish in order to do your job since it involves getting on an aircraft. You can also have some extremely long work days. My longest flight was a little over 19 hours and that is just the time spent on the jet and doesn't take into account pre and post mission duties. The other thing to consider about flying is you are much more restricted medically. You have a head cold you have to go to the doctor for medication, no over the counter drugs and you're not flying until you go back to the doc to get cleared. There are more requirements and rules to be a flyer than to be a ground linguist. The other thing is the training pipeline to actually do your job is longer as well. I loved my job and the people I worked with and deployed with were my crew and my family. There is much more big AF involvement in your personal lif Continue reading >>

How Often To Army Cryptologic Linguists Deploy?

How Often To Army Cryptologic Linguists Deploy?

How often to army cryptologic linguists deploy? I would like to be a Russian crypto linguist. I know I may or may not be able to choose the language I want to learn. If I did learn any language other than... show more I would like to be a Russian crypto linguist. I know I may or may not be able to choose the language I want to learn. If I did learn any language other than Arabic, how often would I be deployed? If I did have to learn Arabic how often would I be deployed? Also, if I do get deployed would it be as long as other MOS's (a year or more)? as a linguist of any kind you will be placed in a support unit of some kind, and you will deploy with whatever larger unit you support. So whenever or however they go is when you'll go. Granted, if you speak Arabic, you'll look good for going to Iraq, because it isn't as common in Afghan. y-anyway, it's ALSO possible that regardless of your job you'll be placed in some office position where you won't be doing your job at all, esp. as a Russian linguist, and you'll STILL just deploy whenever the unit you're with deploys. Unless you end up at Fort Meade, Fort Gordon or Scoffield Barracks in Hawaii, where you'll be working in a NSA office doing Crypto work all the time, and you'll be much less likely to deploy. and yes, you will deploy as long as whatever unit you're with is deployed. You will be unlikely to deploy as an individual or as one of several people who only do what you do. Continue reading >>

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3X1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations The chart below shows authorized assignment location for this AFSC (job). It includes locations for routine assignments, only. It does not show the locations for any possible special duty assignments which may be available for this particular job. A "3" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "3" skill-level trainees. This is usually a brand-new graduate from an Air Force technical school, usually in the rank of Amn (E-1) through A1C (E-3). A "5" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "5-Skill Level" trained technicians. These are individuals who have passed their On-the-Job training requirements, and been advanced from the 3-Skill Level to the 5-Skill Level. Usually in the ranks of A1C (E-3) through Sra (E-4). A "7" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for the "7-Skill Level" (Supervisor). These are usually personnel in the ranks of SSgt (E-5), TSgt (E-6), and MSgt (E-7). A "9" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for senior enlisted managers, usually SMSgt's (E-8) or CMSgt's (E-9). Specific information about particular Air Force Bases can be found in our subject area for Bases & Units . 1N3X2F (Haitian - Creole Language) Authorizations Continue reading >>

Foreign Language | National Guard Jobs: On Your Guard

Foreign Language | National Guard Jobs: On Your Guard

On Your Guard is wrapping up its look at STEM, or Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, careers offered by the Army National Guard. These jobs require problem solving skills and the ability to think critically. They are also typically high paying careers that are in demand in the civilian workforce. Heres why that last point is so important: the vast majority of Guard Soldiers serve part-time. As a result, many Soldiers capitalize on their skills training and the Guards education benefits to go to college and build successful full-time civilian careers. This week, well take a look at Math careers, which cover jobs in the military intelligence arena. Staff Sergeant (SSG) Anthony Goindoo started his military career in the active duty Army as a 35P Cryptologic Linguist. He has since transitioned to 35N Signals Intelligence Analyst Military Occupational Specialty (MOS), but can do either job because the two are so closely related. In fact, he says, the only difference between the two intelligence jobs is that 35P involves the language element. In both jobs, Soldiers use databases to acquire information, he says. They analyze that information and put it in an easy-to-present packet to provide to, essentially our customers which are brigade and battalion-level staff. In a deployment situation, SSG Goindoo explains, all the different intelligence sections, such as human, imagery and signals intelligence, come together and give whats called an intel summary. With that, he says, You have generally a complete picture of certain situations. After 5 years in the Army, including a deployment to Iraq, SSG Goindoo decided totransition to part-time military service in the Florida Army National Guard to start a civilian career. Plus, he could live at home in Florida and be with h Continue reading >>

What Is Daily Life As A Cryptologic Linguist In The Air Force? - Quora

What Is Daily Life As A Cryptologic Linguist In The Air Force? - Quora

What is daily life as a cryptologic linguist in the Air Force? Answered Oct 25, 2017 Author has 237 answers and 41.4k answer views I can't give personal insight into a 'day in the life' because, although I flew many missions with them, I wasn't personally a linguist. I was one of the guys that operated and maintained the computers and other mission equipment, what was called an AMT (Airborne Maintenance Technician). I can tell you that some of the information provided here is incorrect. All jobs have at least some periods of boredom, but being a linguist was not a boring job. You don't sit around listening to many hours of foreign conversation hoping something interesting would be said. Linguists are among the first people that are deployed to hot spots around the world. The RC-135 that I flew on with linguists was almost always the first US asset to be deployed, because it gave a real-time tactical awareness that was simply not available through any other means. Not all linguists are airborne linguists though, so you'd need to speak with one of them to get insight into those assignments. Even airborne linguists performed detailed analysis of collected data on the ground. You really need to speak with one of them to get a good idea of a 'day in the life' of their job. There are groups of current and former linguists on the internet that should be able to answer your questions. I don't know all of them, but here's a link to a group of folks from one of my former units that should at least be able to point you in the right direction if they can't give you answers themselves. Answered Jan 26, 2017 Upvoted by Chuck Nissley , former Sergeant at U.S. Air Force (1972-1976) Hello. A cryptologic linguist is primarily responsible for identifying foreign communications using sign Continue reading >>

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

Airborne linguists translate intelligence data in the air. Linguists in the U.S. Air Force may work on the ground or in the air. Those that are air-based are commonly called airborne linguists, although the Air Forces formal title for this job is airborne cryptologic. This refers to the linguists role in translating secret or coded intelligence communications. Working as part of aircrews, airborne linguists use their foreign language skills and complex technical systems to find, translate and analyze communications and signals in the air. This sensitive role requires top-level security clearance and various types of specialty training. Due to its level of classification, the Air Force does not release in-depth details of the techniques and equipment used in the job. The primary responsibility of airborne linguists is to translate and analyze foreign language communications and to provide signal intelligence support during flights or missions. They use signals intelligence systems, such as radio receivers and recording systems, to tune into specified frequencies so that they can find communications and listen to them. They evaluate broadcasts and then translate and transcribe key signals to report and document their findings. The aim is to find communications that have a military or intelligence use for long-term data gathering or on missions. On missions, linguists intercept signals to provide threat-warning support and rescue and recovery help for other aircraft and/or ground forces. In addition to operating linguistic signals systems and equipment, airborne linguists have technical and operational responsibilities. Linguists are not just translators, but are part of the aircrew. They help manage mission activities and maintain operational logs and records. Like any o Continue reading >>

Any Cryptologists/linguists On Board?

Any Cryptologists/linguists On Board?

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. What's was/is your typcial day like (abroad and at home) as far as time spent doing your job? I heard that abroad (Korea), you spend a lot of time in the air, 12-14 hour days. I would like to find as much information as possible about what it is like being a cryptologist. Do you enjoy the work, or is tedious and boring? My boss did Electronic Warfare for the AF in the air. For every 1 hour in the air, they had 3 hours of prep or debrief time. Wanna listen for intel? Here's an exercise, strap on some headphones and tune your radio to a unused radio frequency for about 4 hours....then roll the dial across the frequency band and again stop on an unused band. There are various areas you can end up doing cryptanalysis and likewise for a linguist jobs. The IQ and the life expectancy of the average American recently passed each other going in opposite directions. I guess it is not too exciting, nor too hard. Do they serve margaritas on those flights? I would like to get in contact with a current or former cryptologist to ask non-sensitive questions about the job, and what is expected. It would be a great help for me in making a career decision. The IQ and the life expectancy of the average American recently passed each other going in opposite directions. I would like to get in contact with a current or former cryptologist to ask non-sensitive questions about the job, and what is expected. It would be a great help for me in making a career decision. Good luck getting any answers they are typically very security con Continue reading >>

What's A Cryptologic Linguist?

What's A Cryptologic Linguist?

A cryptologic linguist is primarily responsible for identifying foreign communications using signals equipment. Their role is crucial as the nations defense depends largely on information that comes from foreign languages. Identifying and analyzing foreign communications Recognize changes in transmission modes and tip the appropriate authority Provide translation expertise to analysts Provide transcriptions and translations from foreign communications Those who want to serve must first take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, a series of tests that helps you better understand your strengths and identify which Army jobs are best for you. Job training for a cryptologic analyst requires 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training and three to 52 weeks of Advanced Individual Training with on-the-job instruction. Part of this time is spent in the classroom and in the field.Soldiers who arent fluent in a foreign language will attend training at the Defense Language Institute for six to 18 months prior to attending Advanced Individual Training. Some of the skills youll learn are: Identifying foreign communications from an assigned geographic area Analyzing foreign communications to support missions Procedures for handling classified information and preparing reports Interest in speech, communications and foreign languages Good at working with people as a member of a team Skilled Technical (ST) : 91 - Learn more about the ASVAB Total compensation includes housing, medical, food, special pay, and vacation time. Learn more about total compensation. In the Army, qualified students can earn full-tuition, merit-based scholarships, allowances for books and fees, plus an annual stipend for living expenses. Learn more about education benefits The skills you learn will help prepare y Continue reading >>

Marine Linguist Named Best In Dod

Marine Linguist Named Best In Dod

Marine Corps Base Hawaii -- Breaking past language barriers is a challenge, but its one Sgt. Miguel Iles meets every day.Iles, an Asia-Pacific cryptologic linguist with 3rd Radio Battalion, prevailed among his armed services colleagues and was recently named the Department of Defenses Language Professional of the Year. He is a non-native speaker of Mandarin Chinese and became proficient in Korean through DoD training.The program at the Defense Language Institute is great, said Iles, a native of Grand Rapids, Mich. I went from knowing just kimchi and hello in Korean to being able to understand newspaper articles and television news.Iles gained proficiency in Korean after less than two years of training and deployed for eight months during the last fiscal year. Hes served as a translator during joint efforts of the Ulchi-Freedom Guardian exercises and alongside Republic of Korea and U.S. Army service members processing intelligence reports. From the time we got there, we hit the ground running, said Sgt. Kenneth Nienhuser, who is another Asian-Pacific cryptologic linguist with 3rd Radio Bn. who deployed with Iles in 2012. He completed every bit of training he needed to do and every time he could go up for advancement, he did. Within the short amount of time he was there, he accomplished quite a bit. His language skills are vital to processing and analyzing collected intelligence information, said Capt. Devin Phillabaum, Alpha Company commander, 3rd Radio Bn. Phillabaum said it was both Iles significant contribution to intelligence and his high proficiency scores in two challenging languages that set him apart from others.The fact that he learned Korean in 18 months, and Chinese largely through immersion, is a testament to his work ethic, he said. He enjoys and embraces c Continue reading >>

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

(This feature is part of the " Through Airmen's Eyes " series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.) Seven deployments in five years is a feat not many Airmen can claim. Serving as a career enlisted aviator on the RC-135 Rivet Joint, Staff Sgt. Chris has spent nearly 735 days deployed flying more than 2,000 hours with more than 400 combat sorties. The Nashville, Tenn., native joined the military in 2006, following in the footsteps of his grandfather, who was an Army artilleryman during the Korean War. After two years of technical training as a linguist, he was assigned to his first operational flying squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. Since the beginning of his operational career, Chris said, "I haven't stopped deploying." And he couldn't be closer to the truth, as he recently served a tour here at the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing. While deployed, it was not uncommon for Chris to fly daily operational sorties over extended periods of time. The enlisted aviator flew and deployed often because of his unique ability as a linguist on the RC-135 Rivet Joint. Unlike many career fields, linguists are unique in the fact that their job on the Rivet Joint can only be accomplished while deployed. For this reason, Airmen like him continuously rotate in and out of the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. "Having a chance to do our job and knowing that it matters, makes the deployments easier to manage," Chris said. "It's extremely rewarding to know that we're providing support to our ground troops that helps ensure their safety and successful completion of their mission." Linguist's unique capabilities allow them to directly support coalition forces by providing an airborne scout, increasing their situational awareness a Continue reading >>

Lost In Translation: How The Army Wastes Linguists Like Me

Lost In Translation: How The Army Wastes Linguists Like Me

Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me It's no secret that the U.S. Army has a language barrier to overcome in Iraq and Afghanistan. A decade of war has led an English-constrained military to seek all kinds of quick fixes, from translator gadgets to private contractors something Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lamented this week. But more galling is the fact that the few soldiers who do speak Arabic, Pashto and Dari are still being wasted, even in the war zones where they're needed the most. I know because I was one of them. The Army spends years and hundreds of thousands of dollars training each of its foreign-language speakers. At the same time, it uses costly contractors to work the same jobs for which its own linguists have trained. In Iraq and Afghanistan, private-sector linguists are largely replacing their military counterparts rather than augmenting their numbers, an expensive redundancy. In the fall of 2006, I enlisted in the Army as a cryptologic linguist, one of the soldiers who translate foreign communications. A year of college Arabic hadn't been enough to persuade intelligence-agency recruiters of my James Bond potential. Spook agencies assured me during a string of polite job-fair letdowns that the military was the place to start getting real-world experience. So off I went to boot camp. More than two years of training followed, both in Arabic and the specific intelligence duties I'd need to perform in-country. In March 2009, I stepped off a Blackhawk at Forward Operating Base Delta, a large base near al-Kut in southeastern Iraq. I figured I'd be translating captured Arabic communications to alert combat troops of dange Continue reading >>

What Is It Like To Be A Linguist In The U.s. Military? What Branch Is The Best For A Linguist? - Quora

What Is It Like To Be A Linguist In The U.s. Military? What Branch Is The Best For A Linguist? - Quora

Answered Jan 17, 2017 Author has 693 answers and 7.5m answer views I entered the Army to be an Airborne Infantryman a Paratrooper. It met all my expectations. But in my 4th year I decided I would try out for the Interpreter/Translator MOS. The year was 1984 and we were still in the middle of Cold War I. Im a 1st generation American, as my parents both came to America from Poland. I spoke Polish at home growing up. In fact, I was in kindergarten before I learned English. My entire extended family spoke Polish and I lived in the Polish section of Buffalo, NY. You could basically get by without ever needing to speak English. I spoke it my whole life. The first step to apply for a translator job was to put on a set of headphones and write various answers to spoken questions. I got a miserable 68% correct, even though after the test, I felt I did very well. But I failed the first step. That was the end of my translator career. Bottom line is you have to know your stuff really, really well. You have to know the exact dialect that they need. Your punctuation and grammar has to be spot on. And evidently, in my situation at least, you have to be more experienced than simply having spoken it your entire life! So hopefully, youre at the top of your class and very confident in your abilities. And hopefully you know the exact dialects that they need. Make sure you get these types of answers before you sign any years of your life away, or you may sign up for translation then find out you dont cut the mustard and be reassigned as something totally at the discretion and needs of the US military. Answered Jan 17, 2017 Author has 1.9k answers and 587.8k answer views My brother was a Russian language interpreter (intercept analyst) for the Air Force; I worked in a security intensive fiel Continue reading >>

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