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Do Cryptologic Linguists Get Deployed

10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand

10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Cossairt teaches English to Afghan Security Guard members in Kunar Province, Afghanistan. 10 Things Only Military Linguists Will Understand Only those who have gone through the rigors of the Defense Language Institute will appreciate the myths, legends, and realities of Monty. The Defense Language Institute or simply DLI to the many Department of Defense service members and civilians who have gone through foreign language training is renowned for being one of the most prestigious and rigorous language schools in the entire world. Every year, thousands attempt to make it through the exhaustive 26 to 64-week courses, which consist of five days a week of in-class foreign language study that lasts seven hours a day plus two to three hours of homework per night. The formidable 98% native speaker instructor cadre teach over two dozen languages at the Defense Language Institute, and due to the extreme difficulty of the programs, student pass rates are dismal. Most military, veterans, and intelligence community members know exactly what DLI is, and can probably even tell you about the infamously high washout rates , the intensely long training, and the squirrelly jobs linguists get into after they graduate. However, the following list is a collection of things that you probably wont appreciate unless youve experienced the Defense Language Institute in full force. Here are 10 things only those who have attended will understand. 1. You remember the familiar call of the sea lions in the morning. No matter if youre down on Soldiers Field, or up at Belas Hall dining facility, the guttural cries from angsty sea lions can be heard with an uncanny distinctness. 2. You have heard about the firehose concept countless times. As soon as you stepped off that bus Continue reading >>

What's A Cryptologic Linguist?

What's A Cryptologic Linguist?

A cryptologic linguist is primarily responsible for identifying foreign communications using signals equipment. Their role is crucial as the nations defense depends largely on information that comes from foreign languages. Identifying and analyzing foreign communications Recognize changes in transmission modes and tip the appropriate authority Provide translation expertise to analysts Provide transcriptions and translations from foreign communications Those who want to serve must first take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, a series of tests that helps you better understand your strengths and identify which Army jobs are best for you. Job training for a cryptologic analyst requires 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training and three to 52 weeks of Advanced Individual Training with on-the-job instruction. Part of this time is spent in the classroom and in the field.Soldiers who arent fluent in a foreign language will attend training at the Defense Language Institute for six to 18 months prior to attending Advanced Individual Training. Some of the skills youll learn are: Identifying foreign communications from an assigned geographic area Analyzing foreign communications to support missions Procedures for handling classified information and preparing reports Interest in speech, communications and foreign languages Good at working with people as a member of a team Skilled Technical (ST) : 91 - Learn more about the ASVAB Total compensation includes housing, medical, food, special pay, and vacation time. Learn more about total compensation. In the Army, qualified students can earn full-tuition, merit-based scholarships, allowances for books and fees, plus an annual stipend for living expenses. Learn more about education benefits The skills you learn will help prepare y Continue reading >>

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

Airborne linguists translate intelligence data in the air. 4 [Air Force] | What Are Good Air Force Jobs If I Want to Travel? Linguists in the U.S. Air Force may work on the ground or in the air. Those that are air-based are commonly called airborne linguists, although the Air Forces formal title for this job is airborne cryptologic. This refers to the linguists role in translating secret or coded intelligence communications. Working as part of aircrews, airborne linguists use their foreign language skills and complex technical systems to find, translate and analyze communications and signals in the air. This sensitive role requires top-level security clearance and various types of specialty training. Due to its level of classification, the Air Force does not release in-depth details of the techniques and equipment used in the job. The primary responsibility of airborne linguists is to translate and analyze foreign language communications and to provide signal intelligence support during flights or missions. They use signals intelligence systems, such as radio receivers and recording systems, to tune into specified frequencies so that they can find communications and listen to them. They evaluate broadcasts and then translate and transcribe key signals to report and document their findings. The aim is to find communications that have a military or intelligence use for long-term data gathering or on missions. On missions, linguists intercept signals to provide threat-warning support and rescue and recovery help for other aircraft and/or ground forces. In addition to operating linguistic signals systems and equipment, airborne linguists have technical and operational responsibilities. Linguists are not just translators, but are part of the aircrew. They help manage missio Continue reading >>

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

(This feature is part of the " Through Airmen's Eyes " series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.) Seven deployments in five years is a feat not many Airmen can claim. Serving as a career enlisted aviator on the RC-135 Rivet Joint, Staff Sgt. Chris has spent nearly 735 days deployed flying more than 2,000 hours with more than 400 combat sorties. The Nashville, Tenn., native joined the military in 2006, following in the footsteps of his grandfather, who was an Army artilleryman during the Korean War. After two years of technical training as a linguist, he was assigned to his first operational flying squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. Since the beginning of his operational career, Chris said, "I haven't stopped deploying." And he couldn't be closer to the truth, as he recently served a tour here at the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing. While deployed, it was not uncommon for Chris to fly daily operational sorties over extended periods of time. The enlisted aviator flew and deployed often because of his unique ability as a linguist on the RC-135 Rivet Joint. Unlike many career fields, linguists are unique in the fact that their job on the Rivet Joint can only be accomplished while deployed. For this reason, Airmen like him continuously rotate in and out of the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. "Having a chance to do our job and knowing that it matters, makes the deployments easier to manage," Chris said. "It's extremely rewarding to know that we're providing support to our ground troops that helps ensure their safety and successful completion of their mission." Linguist's unique capabilities allow them to directly support coalition forces by providing an airborne scout, increasing their situational awareness a Continue reading >>

20 Best Cryptologic Linguist Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simply Hired

20 Best Cryptologic Linguist Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simply Hired

Linguist Intelligence Analyst. Linguist cannot begin work on contract without a fully adjudicated security clearance.... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. CACI is hiring military-trained Arabic Cryptologic Linguists in Fort Meade, MD. A linguist is distinguished by their combined foreign language proficiency,... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. Leidos is currently seeking an Arabic Linguist. Experience deployed as a linguist supporting contingency operations,.... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. Scientific Linguist - Entry to Experienced Level National Security Agency - Fort Meade, MD Duties of a Scientific Linguist include:. Applicants with limited or no cryptologic language analysis experience will be hired into the Language Analysis... Are you an experienced linguist proficient in Chinese (Mandarin) and Korean? Bring your knowledge of US Intelligence Community, military, cryptologic, and law... Please note that Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Linguist (mid-level)

Cryptologic Linguist (mid-level)

Must have a minimum of four (4) years of transcription, translation or other language-related cryptologic experience and an Associate's Degree or 2 additional years of related experience. Performance at Level 3 in listeningOR reading as defined by the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) or Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT) is required. Must have excellent command of the English language knowledge and ability to produce translations independently. Must have demonstrated superior and professional competency in their previous assignments and positions. Position requires a TS/SCI with polygraph security clearance. Transcribes and/or translates source material, both printed and audio, provides analysis and reporting of translated foreign language source material, and quality control of junior linguists. Typically works as part of or may lead a team of linguists supporting operations CONUS or OCONUS. Must be a U. S. citizen and able to obtain a customer granted security clearance. Must possess ILR level 3 proficiency inreading or listening of thetarget foreign language, typically a 3/3, 3/2, or 2/3on the DLPT. Translates intermediate to advanced level printed materials including technical manuals and foreign language periodicals into good grammatical English. Transcribes and translates foreign language audio files into good grammatical English. Prepares and updates databases of translated source material. Operates customer furnished monitor/recording equipment. Scans intercepted data and determines as pertinent or non-pertinent to mission requirements. Participates in analytical meetings or conferences when applicable. Drafts product reports. Provides quality control of junior linguist transcribed and translated material. CACI employs a diverse range of talent to cr Continue reading >>

Lost In Translation: How The Army Wastes Linguists Like Me

Lost In Translation: How The Army Wastes Linguists Like Me

Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me Lost in Translation: How the Army Wastes Linguists Like Me It's no secret that the U.S. Army has a language barrier to overcome in Iraq and Afghanistan. A decade of war has led an English-constrained military to seek all kinds of quick fixes, from translator gadgets to private contractors something Defense Secretary Leon Panetta lamented this week. But more galling is the fact that the few soldiers who do speak Arabic, Pashto and Dari are still being wasted, even in the war zones where they're needed the most. I know because I was one of them. The Army spends years and hundreds of thousands of dollars training each of its foreign-language speakers. At the same time, it uses costly contractors to work the same jobs for which its own linguists have trained. In Iraq and Afghanistan, private-sector linguists are largely replacing their military counterparts rather than augmenting their numbers, an expensive redundancy. In the fall of 2006, I enlisted in the Army as a cryptologic linguist, one of the soldiers who translate foreign communications. A year of college Arabic hadn't been enough to persuade intelligence-agency recruiters of my James Bond potential. Spook agencies assured me during a string of polite job-fair letdowns that the military was the place to start getting real-world experience. So off I went to boot camp. More than two years of training followed, both in Arabic and the specific intelligence duties I'd need to perform in-country. In March 2009, I stepped off a Blackhawk at Forward Operating Base Delta, a large base near al-Kut in southeastern Iraq. I figured I'd be translating captured Arabic communications to alert combat troops of dange Continue reading >>

Anybody Here A Current Or Former 35p Cryptologic Linguist

Anybody Here A Current Or Former 35p Cryptologic Linguist

anybody here a current or former 35P cryptologic linguist leveling kit, Cooper 255/80R17 tires on 4Runner rims, Leer cap, Ovtuned (not yet working), K&N filter, TRD catback, Riderite air bags my son is interested in this field and I was looking to find out more about it. this is Army related as that is the branch he is looking at. one question that comes to mind is where you end(ed) up after DLI school completed? is it a state side deployment or do you end up nearer to the area of the world you are linguistically trained in? That is an intel MOS so you're unlikely to gain any information on it here. Try the forums at this website: for questions about various Army MOS. o0oSHADOWo0o Just Lurking in the Darkness BHLM with amber LED "eyebrow" strips and Angry Red Eyes, Black Depo Tail lights, Knight Rider Hood Scoop Mod, Amber Grill Backlighting, Amber Lamin-X Fog light film, Fog Lights Anytime Mod, Black T-Rex Grill Inserts, Red interior LED lighting, Go Rhino 5" Oval Nerf Bars, Modified side mirror turn signals, Drill-less license plate relocation bracket. OEM Bed mat. Weather Tech floor mats. Probably not the response you had in mind, but I've been know to be a "cunning linguist" from time to time. Hey, my brother is a crypto linguist. Albeit Air Force, but it seems that the Air Force and Army tend to work in similar locations (e.g. he is stationed at an Army base). Location is dependent on which language your son is assigned. (deployments can be rare depending on the mission/language) DLI is also dependent on the language assigned. The courses at DLI can vary from several months to a year and a half (haven't heard of many longer than that). Also the time spent at DLI is contingent upon the student passing the language course and being proficient in said language skills Continue reading >>

Working As A Cryptologic Linguist At U.s. Army: 56 Reviews | Indeed.com

Working As A Cryptologic Linguist At U.s. Army: 56 Reviews | Indeed.com

Cryptologic Linguist(Former Employee) Fort Hood, TX December 28, 2017 Success in the Army depends entirely on 1. your job and 2. your unit. Some units are excellent, with great leadership, training, and opportunities to grow professionally. Some units are toxic and make your life miserable for no good reason. Some jobs (MOS's) are excellent, fun to do, meaningful, and allow upward mobility. Some are the opposite and promotion is nearly impossible or you don't do the job you signed up for at all. If you choose to join the U.S. Army, choose wisely. And take charge of your choices, seek out those desirable assignments to make your career the most enjoyable. lots of paid time off, 4-day weekends, military discounts in town, see exotic places, comprehensive healthcare at no cost Was this review helpful? Yes4 No Report Military Intelligence / Cryptologic Linguist(Former Employee) United States, Germany November 27, 2017 I had a specific purpose when I joined. I was at a low point and needed help getting back on my feet. The army promised me exceptional training, educational benefits, and an opportunity for travel. I got everything I wanted, but I was also ready to move on with my life when my contract ended. The army is not for everyone, but I would certainly do it again because I am a completely different person now, much better off than before I joined. Great job security and benefits with ok pay Cryptologic Linguist(Former Employee) Fort Bragg, NC August 26, 2017 Army life can be demanding and stressful but is a good way to learn values and skills needed to be successful in life. Getting up early, you will start with fitness training and then go into what can often be a busy day of training or hard work. Other days you'll find yourself mopping the same floor several times Continue reading >>

Native-born Iraqis Become U.s. Army Cryptologic Linguists

Native-born Iraqis Become U.s. Army Cryptologic Linguists

Spc. Salam poses in Iraq, where he served as an Arabic linguist before he became a U.S. naturalized citizen. Salam, a U.S. Army Soldier assigned to the 163rd Military Intelligence Battalion, 504th Military Intelligence Brigade, now works as a cryptologic linguist. FORT HOOD, Texas (Oct. 6, 2015) -- Gazing out a window at 35,000 feet flying over American airspace for the first time, Salam, a native-born Iraqi, was amazed at how much green was prevalent on the ground below. The experience left him overjoyed. "It was like something is new, like when you're opening up a gift," he said. Having served as an Arabic linguist supporting coalition forces in Iraq, Salam had never left his home nation, but was given an opportunity to better his life in the United States. Arriving in Seattle in October 2008, Salam began a journey to become a U.S. naturalized citizen, and joined the U.S. Army in June 2014. Today, he is Spc. Salam, a Soldier in the 163rd Military Intelligence Battalion, 504th Military Intelligence Brigade, on Fort Hood, Texas, where he serves as a 35P - cryptologic linguist. The specialist asked that his full name not be released for security reasons. For Salam and another native-born Iraqi, who served as a coalition forces' interpreter, Sgt. Yaseen, who works as a cryptologic linguist in the 163rd Military Intelligence Battalion, the prospect to transform their lives to U.S. Soldiers was unquestionable. Sgt. Yaseen also asked that his full name not be released due to security concerns. Although the two were raised in different provinces of Iraq, they shared a common upbringing and early life of struggle. Yaseen was raised about 80 miles south of Baghdad, and said he spent the majority of his life in his hometown. A childhood in Iraq meant relying on whatever was nea Continue reading >>

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

What Does An Airborne Linguist Do?

Airborne linguists translate intelligence data in the air. Linguists in the U.S. Air Force may work on the ground or in the air. Those that are air-based are commonly called airborne linguists, although the Air Forces formal title for this job is airborne cryptologic. This refers to the linguists role in translating secret or coded intelligence communications. Working as part of aircrews, airborne linguists use their foreign language skills and complex technical systems to find, translate and analyze communications and signals in the air. This sensitive role requires top-level security clearance and various types of specialty training. Due to its level of classification, the Air Force does not release in-depth details of the techniques and equipment used in the job. The primary responsibility of airborne linguists is to translate and analyze foreign language communications and to provide signal intelligence support during flights or missions. They use signals intelligence systems, such as radio receivers and recording systems, to tune into specified frequencies so that they can find communications and listen to them. They evaluate broadcasts and then translate and transcribe key signals to report and document their findings. The aim is to find communications that have a military or intelligence use for long-term data gathering or on missions. On missions, linguists intercept signals to provide threat-warning support and rescue and recovery help for other aircraft and/or ground forces. In addition to operating linguistic signals systems and equipment, airborne linguists have technical and operational responsibilities. Linguists are not just translators, but are part of the aircrew. They help manage mission activities and maintain operational logs and records. Like any o Continue reading >>

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3x1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations

1n3X1 - Cryptologic Linguist - Assignment Locations Davis-Monthan Air Force Base boneyard in Arizona.Stocktrek Images / Getty Images The chart below shows authorized assignment location for this AFSC (job). It includes locations for routine assignments, only. It does not show the locations for any possible special duty assignments which may be available for this particular job. A "3" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "3" skill-level trainees. This is usually a brand-new graduate from an Air Force technical school, usually in the rank of Amn (E-1) through A1C (E-3). A "5" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for "5-Skill Level" trained technicians. These are individuals who have passed their On-the-Job training requirements, and been advanced from the 3-Skill Level to the 5-Skill Level. Usually in the ranks of A1C (E-3) through Sra (E-4). A "7" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for the "7-Skill Level" (Supervisor). These are usually personnel in the ranks of SSgt (E-5), TSgt (E-6), and MSgt (E-7). A "9" in the "Skill Level" column indicates authorized positions for senior enlisted managers, usually SMSgt's (E-8) or CMSgt's (E-9). Specific information about particular Air Force Bases can be found in our subject area for Bases & Units . 1N3X2F (Haitian - Creole Language) Authorizations Continue reading >>

Air Force Linguist: Salary, Education Requirements And Career Info

Air Force Linguist: Salary, Education Requirements And Career Info

Air Force Linguist: Salary, Education Requirements and Career Info Learn about the education and preparation needed to become an Air Force linguist. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about the necessary education, job duties, and starting salary information to find out if this is the career for you. Air force linguists work in interpretation and translation for the air force. To become an air force linguist, one must complete basic training to join the air force, demonstrate aptitude in a language, and then is trained in a language, translation, and using communication equipment. Air Force linguists, also known as cryptologic linguists, are enlisted soldiers whose work involves obtaining and understanding foreign intelligence in its native language. These men and women are often stationed abroad and are responsible for keeping the military abreast of information learned from foreign communications. Salary Information for Air Force Linguists Although Air Force salaries are based on rank and years of service, in 2016 an enlisted Air Force linguist could expect to earn at least $18,802 per year for the first two years of service, without any additional education, prior service, or advancement. In addition to salary, enlisted airmen (as the military refers to recruits of both sexes) can earn money towards their education through a variety of scholarships and bills, including the Montgomery GI Bill. The Air Force provides insurance and living expense benefits and offers the potential for bonuses. Education Requirements for Air Force Linguists Air Force linguists are required to have earned a high school diploma or General Educational Development (GED) certificate with 15 college credits. They must have also completed the eight and a half weeks of basic Continue reading >>

Foreign Language | National Guard Jobs: On Your Guard

Foreign Language | National Guard Jobs: On Your Guard

On Your Guard is wrapping up its look at STEM, or Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, careers offered by the Army National Guard. These jobs require problem solving skills and the ability to think critically. They are also typically high paying careers that are in demand in the civilian workforce. Heres why that last point is so important: the vast majority of Guard Soldiers serve part-time. As a result, many Soldiers capitalize on their skills training and the Guards education benefits to go to college and build successful full-time civilian careers. This week, well take a look at Math careers, which cover jobs in the military intelligence arena. Staff Sergeant (SSG) Anthony Goindoo started his military career in the active duty Army as a 35P Cryptologic Linguist. He has since transitioned to 35N Signals Intelligence Analyst Military Occupational Specialty (MOS), but can do either job because the two are so closely related. In fact, he says, the only difference between the two intelligence jobs is that 35P involves the language element. In both jobs, Soldiers use databases to acquire information, he says. They analyze that information and put it in an easy-to-present packet to provide to, essentially our customers which are brigade and battalion-level staff. In a deployment situation, SSG Goindoo explains, all the different intelligence sections, such as human, imagery and signals intelligence, come together and give whats called an intel summary. With that, he says, You have generally a complete picture of certain situations. After 5 years in the Army, including a deployment to Iraq, SSG Goindoo decided totransition to part-time military service in the Florida Army National Guard to start a civilian career. Plus, he could live at home in Florida and be with h Continue reading >>

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

Through Airmen's Eyes: Linguist Shoulders Seven Deployments In Five Years

(This feature is part of the " Through Airmen's Eyes " series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.) Seven deployments in five years is a feat not many Airmen can claim. Serving as a career enlisted aviator on the RC-135 Rivet Joint, Staff Sgt. Chris has spent nearly 735 days deployed flying more than 2,000 hours with more than 400 combat sorties. The Nashville, Tenn., native joined the military in 2006, following in the footsteps of his grandfather, who was an Army artilleryman during the Korean War. After two years of technical training as a linguist, he was assigned to his first operational flying squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. Since the beginning of his operational career, Chris said, "I haven't stopped deploying." And he couldn't be closer to the truth, as he recently served a tour here at the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing. While deployed, it was not uncommon for Chris to fly daily operational sorties over extended periods of time. The enlisted aviator flew and deployed often because of his unique ability as a linguist on the RC-135 Rivet Joint. Unlike many career fields, linguists are unique in the fact that their job on the Rivet Joint can only be accomplished while deployed. For this reason, Airmen like him continuously rotate in and out of the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. "Having a chance to do our job and knowing that it matters, makes the deployments easier to manage," Chris said. "It's extremely rewarding to know that we're providing support to our ground troops that helps ensure their safety and successful completion of their mission." Linguist's unique capabilities allow them to directly support coalition forces by providing an airborne scout, increasing their situational awareness a Continue reading >>

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