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Cryptologic Technician - Administrative Navy

Working As A Interpreter At U.s. Navy: Employee Reviews | Indeed.com

Working As A Interpreter At U.s. Navy: Employee Reviews | Indeed.com

Cryptologic Technician Interpretive(Former Employee) Great Lakes, IL July 20, 2017 I didn't leave the Navy in the best of terms but I will always value my time in service. I came from a family with a lot of military background and the values instilled in my parents definitely transferred to their parenting styles. I always loved the stability and structure provided by the military. I learned so much, from professional bearing to Mandarin. The hardest part of the job was always being on call. Occasionally I wished that as a lower enlisted I had more a voice in management but thats just how it goes. Great opportunity for building a foundation for the future Cryptologic Technician Interpretive, Second Class(Current Employee) Wahiaw, HI March 25, 2016 Serving in the U.S. Navy has been a pleasure, and an experience I wouldn't trade for anything. Getting the opportunity to learn another language and culture in a fast-paced environment isn't something that many people get to do. Working in a role that allows you to develop yourself personally and professionally is also very rare in any workforce. The big plus is the ability to further yourself even more after you separate from the military with the GI Bill and VA benefits, and that's something that I'm truly thankful for! Challenging and exciting, with plenty of learning opportunites. Cryptologic Technician Interpreter(Former Employee) NSA/CSS Texas August 9, 2013 Daily operations consisted of database analysis, reporting and collaborative projects to analyze and predict items of intelligence and interest to national customers. All levels of management cooperated to ensure the job was completed to the highest standard at or before scheduled deadlines. Veteran personnel and those in training worked side by side to ensure all p Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician (CT) is a United States Navy enlisted rating or job specialty. The CT community performs a wide range of tasks in support of the national intelligence-gathering effort, with an emphasis on cryptology and signal intelligence related products. Most CT personnel are required to obtain and maintain security clearances. Due to the highly classified and secure work environment requiring very restricted access, it is not always possible to share resources with other commands, leading to their shipboard nickname, ' spooks '. Almost every detail surrounding the CT world from administration to operations to repair requires dedicated technicians with appropriate security clearances (this accounts for the many branches of the CT rating, i.e. CTI, CTM, CTN, CTR, CTT). The contribution of an individual CT will depend upon the branch or career area. Members of the CT community enjoy a wide range of career and training options. Once trained, a CT might serve ashore, afloat or in an airborne capacity. (It is rare, but some have earned all three, i.e. dolphins, wings and swords over the course of a career.) A CT can expect overseas assignments of lengthy duration. Administration (CTA) - Administrative and clerical duties that control access to classified material such as Special Security Officer (SSO) or Defense Courier Service (DCS). (No longer active.) Interpretive (CTI) - Foreign language radio/telephone communications translation and transcription Maintenance (CTM) - The installation, servicing and repair of electronic and electromechanical equipment Networks (CTN) - CTNs plan and execute computer network operations (CNO) actions/counter-actions in support of defending and exploiting computer network systems. (Formerly CTO) Collection (CTR) Voice/morse communi Continue reading >>

Militaryvetspx.com - Cryptologic Technician Ct For Sale.

Militaryvetspx.com - Cryptologic Technician Ct For Sale.

This is the appropriate rating patch for US Navy personnel with the rating of Cryptologic Technician CT1, CT2, or CT3. Navy rates are only sold as first class rates and can be cut to second or third class. Cryptologic Technicians (CT) control the flow of messages and information. Their work depends on their special branch: CTAs or Administration Cryptologic Technicians perform administrative and clerical duties that control access to classified material. CTIs or Interpretive Cryptologic Technicians handle radiotelephone communications and foreign language translation. CTMs or Maintenance Cryptologic Technicians maintain electronic and electromechanical equipment. CTNs or Networking Cryptologic Technicians handle computer communication. CTRs or Collection Cryptologic Technicians handle all Morse code communications and operate radio direction-finding equipment. Finally, CTTs or Technical Cryptologic Technicians handle all communications by means other than Morse code and electronic countermeasures. The U.S. Navy Enlisted Left Sleeve Rating Patch is Swiss-Loomed on midnight navy-blue wool serge material. By tradition the Petty Officer 1st Class patch must be hemmed to the proper rank for Petty Officer 2nd Class and Petty Officer 3rd Class. If you need assistance ordering or would like to order by telephone please call us toll free at 1-800-864-5062 and one of our customer service representatives will assist you. Continue reading >>

Final Cta 'a' School Graduation Marks End Of Era

Final Cta 'a' School Graduation Marks End Of Era

Final CTA 'A' School Graduation Marks End of Era Story Number: NNS051027-15Release Date: 10/27/2005 2:13:00 PM By Darlene Goodwin, Center for Information Dominance Public Affairs PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) -- Members of the Navy's Cryptologic Technician Administrative (CTA) rating commemorated the end of an era Oct. 12, with the graduation ceremony for the final Cryptologic Technician Administrative "A" school class, held at the Center for Information Dominance (CID) Corry Station here. The planned merger of the CTA rating with the Yeoman rating sealed the fate of the 'A' school course, which has been taught at Corry Station since 1969. Cryptologic Technician Administrative Seaman Recruits Tyquan Vereen and Kyle Perkins, both graduating with honors, and class leader Cryptologic Technician Administrative Seaman Apprentice Christopher Jefferies, were the last three CTAs to complete the course, led by instructor Cryptologic Technician Administrative 1st Class (SW) Colin Oates. Current and former members of the CTA rating attended the ceremony, including retired Chief Warrant Officer Doug Jones, CID's special security officer, a 1974 CTA "A" school grad. "At that time, we did everything on manual typewriters and multi-colored carbon paper," he said. "I came back to Corry in 1987 as an instructor and we put computers online with dot matrix printers. In 1999, I was the course division officer. We went from a work force of thousands to a work force of hundreds as a result of automation." Increasing technology since that time has now led to the planned ratings merger. Although the date for the merger has not been set, CTAs will now attend the YN "A" school in Meridian, Miss. Master Chief Cryptologic Technician Administrative(SW) Gerald Burgess, CTA Five Vector Model manager, is cur Continue reading >>

Cticstudyguide | Navybmr.com

Cticstudyguide | Navybmr.com

February 2018 CTIC Reserve Exam Study Guide Consists of 195pages and 2,756questions and answers from the February 2018 CTIC Reserve Exam BIB! Instant PDF Download. Study guide may be printed. Study on tablets, phones, computers, or any other device that can be used to view a PDF. No software needs to be installed, no serial numbers must be inputted. Typically delivered to you within 10 business days for domestic orders via USPS Priority mail. Allow from 1-4 weeks for delivery to APO/FPO addresses. Tracking information can usually be accessed via PayPal within 5 business days after you place your order. You can spend nearly $100 at other sites for separate Rating and PMK study guides covering only the occupational standards which do not actually distinguish between paygrades and havent changed since the 1970s, or you can spend as little as $50 and get the study guide that covers both your Rating and PMK material and only the material that will be covered on your exam for this specific cycle. This guide is 195pages consisting of 2,756questions and answers from the current February 2018 CTIC Reserve exam bibliography. The exam is right around the corner so order today. Here is what the study guide consists of. COMNAVIDFORINST 1550.1,NAVY INFORMATION DOMINANCE FORCES LANGUAGE READINESS PROGRAM-No questions available DEPLOYABLE SECURITY TRAINER,OCTOBER 2012- AVAILABLE ON NIPRNET; CHAP 7-No questions available DOD 5105.21 VOL 2,SENSITIVE COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIVE SECURITY MANUAL: ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL SECURITY, VISITOR CONTROL, AND TECHNICAL SECURITY; ENCL 2-No questions available DOD 5105.21 VOL 3,SENSITIVE COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIVE SECURITY MANUAL: ADMINISTRATION OF PERSONNEL SECURITY, INDUSTRIAL SECURITY, AND SPECIAL ACTIVITIES; ENCL 2, Continue reading >>

Navy Cryptologic Technician

Navy Cryptologic Technician

The original rating, Communications Technician, evolved in 1948 from the ratings of Specialist (Q) (Cryptographers), Specialist (Q) (Radio Intelligence), Specialist (Q) (Technicians), and Radioman. In 1976, the rating's name was changed to the present day, Cryptologic Technician. The Navy's computerized personnel system associates the rating name with an alphanumeric Navy Occupational Specialty (NOS) code. For NOS code(s) for CTM, B520; for CTI, B510, B511, B515, or B516; for CTN, B525; for CTR, B540; for CTT, B550. CTs perform a variety of duties worldwide at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands, aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines and Naval Special Warfare. Duties include performing collection, analysis and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, and video display terminals. The class "A" school durations and locations for each of the CT ratings can be found under the corresponding heading below. Cryptologic Technician - Maintenance (NOS B520) Effective October 1, 2011, Cryptologic Technician - Maintenance (CTM) has been made an active duty only program, and no longer available as a Navy Reserve rating. Cryptologic Technicians (Maintenance) perform preventive and corrective maintenance on electrical and electronic cryptologic and ancillary systems used for communications, analysis, monitoring, tracking, recognition and identification, electronic attack, and physical security. They install, test, troubleshoot, repair or replace cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems. CTMs configure, monitor, and evaluate Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare Continue reading >>

U.s. Navy Cryptologic Technician (ct) Rating Badge

U.s. Navy Cryptologic Technician (ct) Rating Badge

U.S. NAVY CRYPTOLOGIC TECHNICIAN (CT) RATING BADGE The rating of Cryptologic Technician (CT) came about as a recognition of changing technologies and subsequent modifications in rating duties. In 1948, the Communications Technician (CT) rating was established from several Specialist ratings: Cryptographers, Radio Intelligence, Technicians, and Radioman. With it came a host of Service Ratings, such as CT Administration (CTA), CT Interpretive (CTI), and CT Maintenance (CTM), to name a few. In 1976, the ratings name was changed to the current designation of Cryptologic Technician, but nearly all the Service Ratings were retained. In 2003, the rating was augmented when the Electronic Warfare (EW) rating was merged into it. As of 2016, the CT rating features five Service Ratings: Interpretive, Maintenance, Collection, Networks, and Technical. Similar to the Information Systems Technician (IT) rating, Sailors wishing to pursue a career path in the Cryptologic Technician (CT) rating must meet stringent security requirements due to the highly sensitive nature of the information and data with which they are entrusted. CT sailors, as well as their immediate family members, must be United States citizens. Because they must have continuous access to sensitive compartmentalized information, potential CTs are the subject of Single Scope Background Investigations, a process that is repeated every five years. Sailors considering apply for the CT Interpretive service rating need to be aware that duties could involve assignment aboard submarines, aircraft, and surface vessels, and applicants must affirm their willingness to serve in those capacities once they complete language-training school. (Note: Women are not assigned to submarines.) Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician Civilian Jobs

Cryptologic Technician Civilian Jobs

Navy cryptologic technician veterans have experience working with computers and different cryptologic communications equipment in areas such as signals monitoring, repair and interception. Discover careers that are a good fit for navy veterans in this field. Computers and related types of cryptologic equipment are used in the practice of secure communications, which are vital to military security. Navy cryptologic veterans worked with these systems in a number of capacities. Below are careers for navy veterans with cryptologic technician experience. Experience with state-of-the-art electronic equipment Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians Hands-on equipment experience and signal interception Specialized training in languages and experience monitoring communications Radio, Cellular, and Tower Equipment Installers and Repairers Experience installing electronic and networking equipment $62,190 (electrical and electronics engineering technicians) 2% (electrical and electronics engineering technicians) Background in working with complex systems in flight, on the ground, and at sea Find schools that offer these popular programs Civilian Careers for Navy Cryptologic Technician Veterans Navy cryptologic technician veterans have experience using and maintaining vital communication systems on a daily basis. Their expertise in languages, maintenance and repair, as well as set up and installation, may offer a variety of opportunities in the civilian workforce. Navy cryptologic technician -maintenance (CTM) veterans may find this an interesting career choice. Their experience with a variety of systems, in setting them up, testing, repairing, and installing equipment may allow them to be successful in this field. Audio and video equipment technicians work with a variety of eq Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician

Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national andmultinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digitalrecording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air andspecial warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction Providing network target access tool development Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy andDepartment of Defense missions Cryptol Continue reading >>

History Of Ct Rating And Cryptologic Officerdesignators

History Of Ct Rating And Cryptologic Officerdesignators

History of CT Rating and Cryptologic OfficerDesignators Todays Cryptologic Technician can trace their roots back to those enterprising Radiomen who taught themselves the JapaneseKatakana codein the early to mid-1920s and established the first intercept station at Shanghai, China. During the summer of 1927, five Marines attended Katakana training in Shanghai and in September 1927 were transferred to Peiping where, under the leadership of CRM Dorman A. Chauncey, established the second radio intercept station. The Marine detachment in Peiping performed the first known temporary deployment of Communications Intelligence personnel when two Marine operators, along with Chief Chauncey, deployed aboard the USS TRENTON (CL-11), and two additional Marine operators deployed aboard the USS MEMPHIS (CL-13) for the entire month of September 1928. Presumably this mission was to copy traffic from Japanese fleet exercises. The success of these early intercept operations led to the establishment of a permanent school on the roof of the Main Navy building on Constitution Avenue in Washington DC where especially qualified Radiomen were trained to intercept and analyze foreign radio communications. During the 12 year life of this school at least 176 (150 Navy and 26 Marine), enlisted radio operators received their training. The group became known as the On the Roof Gang (OTRG). Many of these graduates formed the nucleus of the communications intelligence operations in the Pacific at the beginning of World War II. The early ratings involved in the communications intelligence arena were what we now identify as general service ratings. Prior to World War II the majority of these ratings were Radioman and Yeoman. The need for qualified communications intelligence personnel greatly expanded dur Continue reading >>

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Enlisted Rating (Job) Description and Qualification Factors CTOs perform a variety of duties associated with operating telecommunications systems that exist across the global communications spectrum. Advanced AIS networking and information management skills support the movement of huge volumes of data to operating forces ashore and afloat. The duties performed by CTOs include: providing telecommunications support to the fleet (air, surface, and shore); information processing using computer terminals observing all applicable security measures; administrative duties, which include maintaining files and updating communications publications via automated methods. controlling and operating communications systems and networks including satellite systems, network servers, patch panels, modems, routers, multiplexers and communications security devices; assuring signal quality and path integrity using test equipment such as protocol analyzers, distortion test sets, spectrum oscilloscopes and state-of-the-art signal analysis equipment. Must have normal hearing. Security Clearance , (TOP SECRET) Requirement (SSBI). Must be U.S. citizen. Notes: SSBI originated at RTC. Both the applicant and his/her immediate family members must be U.S. citizens. A waiver for U.S. citizenship requirement for immediate family may exist due to a compelling need. Only DONCAF may authorize this based on CT ECM's recommendation for severely undermanned CT branches. Moral turpitude offense(s) are generally disqualifying. Personal security screening interview will be conducted by a Naval Security Group Command special representative. Former members of the Peace Corps are not eligible. Must be a high schoo Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician

Revolvy Trivia Quizzes Revolvy Lists Revolvy Topics Cryptologic Technician (CT) is a United States Navy enlisted rating or job specialty. The CT community performs a wide range of tasks in support of the national intelligence-gathering effort, with an emphasis on cryptology and signal intelligence related products. Most CT personnel are required to obtain and maintain security clearances. Due to the highly classified and secure work environment requiring very restricted access, it is not always possible to share resources with other commands, leading to their shipboard nickname, " spooks ". Almost every detail surrounding the CT world from administration to operations to repair requires dedicated technicians with appropriate security clearances (this accounts for the many branches of the CT rating, i.e. CTI, CTM, CTN, CTR, CTT). The contribution of an individual CT will depend upon the branch or career area. Members of the CT community enjoy a wide range of career and training options. Once trained, a CT might serve ashore, afloat, or in an airborne capacity. Some CT sailors can expect overseas assignments of lengthy duration and some may never travel overseas. Administration (CTA) - Administrative and clerical duties that control access to classified material such as Special Security Officer (SSO) or Defense Courier Service (DCS). (No longer active.) Interpretive (CTI) - Interpretive are the Navy's linguists . They specialize in analysis of adversary developments, radiotelephone communications, and preparation of statistical studies and technical reports requiring knowledge of a foreign language .[1] Maintenance (CTM) - the installation, configuration, diagnosis, and repair of state-of-the-art electronic, computer, and network hardware and software systems.[2] Network Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician Administration, Yeoman Ratings To Merge

Cryptologic Technician Administration, Yeoman Ratings To Merge

Cryptologic Technician Administration, Yeoman Ratings to Merge Story Number: NNS070510-07Release Date: 5/10/2007 1:06:00 PM By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Trevor Andersen, Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Mullen has approved the merger between the cryptologic technician administrative (CTA) rating and the yeoman (YN) rating. The conversion from CTA to YN will officially begin Oct. 1 according to NAVADMIN 118. "It's [the merger is] going to take a smaller rating and combine it with a larger rating and it will give those Sailors a better opportunity for advancement," said Master Chief Yeoman (SW/AW) Michael Harris, the enlisted community manager for administrative ratings. Harris added that Sailors who were not previously able to go to sea to get their warfare designators will now have the opportunity to do so. The merger will also open up detailing possibilities. "Before the merger, YNs couldn't fill some of the CTA billets and a CTA could not fill some of the YN billets. Both are administrative jobs. Now both can fill the other's billets," he said. Though Sailors will not need to take any personal action, they can start planning now. "Sailors in the CTA, YN community can start negotiating with their detailers to take those assignments to advance their careers," he said. CTAs who do not wish to become YNs can submit a conversion package to cross-rate into other communities. For more information, read the NAVADMIN at www.npc.navy.mil. For more news from Navy Personnel Command Navy, visit www.news.navy.mil/local/npc/. Continue reading >>

U.s. Navy Enlisted Rating Structure

U.s. Navy Enlisted Rating Structure

The U.S. Navy announced on 29 September 2016 the historic naval rating system will be scuttled and replaced with a Navy Occupational Specialty Code (NOS). Following a cry from the Fleet and former Navy personnel the move was suspended by the CNO on 21 December 2016. The rating system will not be sunk but altered. News here . The U.S. Navy rating structure is confusing to most peopleoutside the organization. A brief overview of Navy enlisted rate and ratings follows. Two similar sounding terms are used to describe Navyenlisted status - rate and rating. Rate equates to military pay gradeand rating is one's occupational specialty. Petty officer third class (PO3) is a rate. Boatswain Mate is a rating. Used in combination, Boatswain Mate Third Class (BM3), defines both the rate, petty officer third class, and rating Boatswain Mate. Pay grade constitutes a numberingsystem from junior to senior, and is linear across all five branches of the U.S.military. The lowest military enlisted pay grade is E-1 and thehighest E-9 in the Army as well as the Navy. Officer pay gradesinclude W-1 through W-5 for warrant officers and O-1 through O-10 forofficers. Enlisted personnel may be promoted from enlisted towarrant officer status and in some cases directly to officer status. Inexample, this writer served as an E-1 through E-7, W-1 through W-4, andO-2 through O-6, sixteen different pay grades in a four decadecareer. Rate, such as First ClassPetty Officer, describes the Navy enlisted pay grade E-6.Officers do not have rates but are said to have rank. Lieutenant(rank) describes a Naval officer of pay grade O-3.The officer'soccupational specialty is described in a numerical code. A Navy rating is defined as anoccupation that consists of specific skills and abilities. Eachrating has its own s Continue reading >>

What Can A Navy Ctt Do In The Civilian World?

What Can A Navy Ctt Do In The Civilian World?

What Can a Navy CTT Do in the Civilian World? Navy CTTs can find electronics, telecommunications and broadcast engineering work. 4 [Gun Rank] | What Is a Top Gun Rank in the Navy? Navy cryptologic technician technical, or CTT, sailors are trained to rapidly evaluate classified information and intelligence. The CTT career field or "rating" is one of the few in the Navy able to serve on ships, submarines, aircraft, ashore and with Navy special warfare units. CTT-trained Navy sailors generally work in highly classified environments and hold secret or top secret security clearances. There are also many different Navy CTT subspecialties and former CTTs find civilian employment in a wide variety of fields. Navy CTTs are enlisted sailors who have attended one of several different specific cryptologic intelligence training schools. Navy CTMs, or cryptologic technician, maintenance, are trained to perform preventive and corrective maintenance on electrical and electronic cryptology equipment. Interpretive CTTs use foreign language skills and advanced computer equipment to analyze the Navy's gathered intelligence as required. All Navy CTTs must be adaptable, possess above-average writing and speaking skills, be curious and resourceful and also have keen analytical abilities. According to the "Military.com" military skills translator, trained Navy CTMs possess electronic data security, keyboard typing and many other skills. Navy CTMs can work in civilian word processing and formatting, office equipment operation and maintenance and logistics support. Additionally, a Navy CTM could move into employment assisting with safety and occupational health programs maintained by a civilian employer. Military.com says equivalent civilian occupations include administrative support, radio fre Continue reading >>

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