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Cryptologic Technician - Administrative Navy

Full Text Of

Full Text Of "cryptologic Technician Training Series"

DOC. D 207.208/2 ,C88/6/mod.i: NAVEDTRA A95-1 1-44-88 NEW EDITION Naval Education and September 1988 Training Manual Training Command 0507-LP-2 19-3800 (TRAMAN) Cryptologic Technician Training Series Module 11 CTM Organization and Administration DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The terms training manual (TRAMAN) and nonresident training course (NRTC) are now the terms used to describe Navy nonresident training program materials. Specifically, a TRAMAN in- cludes a rate training manual (RTM), officer text (OT), single subject training manual (SSTM), or modular single or multiple subject training manual (MODULE). An NRTC includes nonresident career course (NRCC), officer correspondence course (OCC), enlisted correspondence course (ECC), or combination thereof. UNJVIRSiTY AT Although the words "he," "him," and "his" are used sparingly in this manual to enhance communication, they are not intended to be gender driven nor to affront or dis- criminate against anyone reading this text. DIMKIHl HON STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DEPOSITORY. r APR 2 1989 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS i CRYPTOLOGIC TECHNICIAN TRAINING SERIES MODULE 1 1 CTM ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION NAVEDTRA A95-1 1-44-88 WITHDRAWN University of Illinois Library atU'-a-i laign I 1 < 1988 Edition Prepared by CTMC(SS) Milton Charles Georgo | i i i A \ \ ssss ssss ssss s ssssssssss ssss Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2013 PREFACE This Training Manual (TRAMAN) and Nonresident Training Course (NRTC) form a self-study package designed to enable you to prepare for advancement to Cryptologic Technician Maintenance Third Class (CTM3). Satisfactory completion of the NRTC is necessary for advancement to Petty Officer Third Class (P03 Continue reading >>

U.s. Navy Cryptologic Technician (ct) Rating Badge

U.s. Navy Cryptologic Technician (ct) Rating Badge

U.S. NAVY CRYPTOLOGIC TECHNICIAN (CT) RATING BADGE The rating of Cryptologic Technician (CT) came about as a recognition of changing technologies and subsequent modifications in rating duties. In 1948, the Communications Technician (CT) rating was established from several Specialist ratings: Cryptographers, Radio Intelligence, Technicians, and Radioman. With it came a host of Service Ratings, such as CT Administration (CTA), CT Interpretive (CTI), and CT Maintenance (CTM), to name a few. In 1976, the ratings name was changed to the current designation of Cryptologic Technician, but nearly all the Service Ratings were retained. In 2003, the rating was augmented when the Electronic Warfare (EW) rating was merged into it. As of 2016, the CT rating features five Service Ratings: Interpretive, Maintenance, Collection, Networks, and Technical. Similar to the Information Systems Technician (IT) rating, Sailors wishing to pursue a career path in the Cryptologic Technician (CT) rating must meet stringent security requirements due to the highly sensitive nature of the information and data with which they are entrusted. CT sailors, as well as their immediate family members, must be United States citizens. Because they must have continuous access to sensitive compartmentalized information, potential CTs are the subject of Single Scope Background Investigations, a process that is repeated every five years. Sailors considering apply for the CT Interpretive service rating need to be aware that duties could involve assignment aboard submarines, aircraft, and surface vessels, and applicants must affirm their willingness to serve in those capacities once they complete language-training school. (Note: Women are not assigned to submarines.) Continue reading >>

Calling All Cryptologic Technicians (cts) And Future Cts!

Calling All Cryptologic Technicians (cts) And Future Cts!

Home / Inside the Navy / Information Warfare / Calling All Cryptologic Technicians (CTs) and Future CTs! Calling All Cryptologic Technicians (CTs) and Future CTs! By Command Master Chief (IDW/SW) Jon R. Taylor Command Master Chief, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet If you enjoy the challenge of solving puzzles and breaking codes, the Navy has a game for you and, if you are looking, maybe a job and a career. Project Architeuthis is an online cryptology game, which began this week, runs for 18 days, and has puzzles for you to solve each day. The game comes courtesy of the Navy Recruiting Command and its advertising partner. As our friends at NRC said, [t]he challenge involves fictitious characters and social media profiles. The characters will interact with the Project Architeuthis Facebook Page through posts to add layers to the story and provide clues when participants are stuck on a puzzle. It is both fun and challenging; I encourage you to test your skills at . As a prior cryptologic technician collection master chief, the cryptologic technician rating has provided me with immensely gratifying work and the Navy has provided an amazing career over the past 28 years. CTs collect and analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages, maintain the state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intelligence, and defend and analyze networks. The CT community is full of amazing people and leaders. Cryptologic Technician 1st Class Patricia H. Madigan receives a Navy-Marine Corps commendation medal from Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark E. Ferguson III after winning the 2013 Navy Shore Sailor of the Year (SOY) competition at the Pentagon, April 18. The Navy Shore SOY program was e Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician

Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national andmultinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digitalrecording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air andspecial warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction Providing network target access tool development Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy andDepartment of Defense missions Cryptol Continue reading >>

Cticstudyguide | Navybmr.com

Cticstudyguide | Navybmr.com

February 2018 CTIC Reserve Exam Study Guide Consists of 195pages and 2,756questions and answers from the February 2018 CTIC Reserve Exam BIB! Instant PDF Download. Study guide may be printed. Study on tablets, phones, computers, or any other device that can be used to view a PDF. No software needs to be installed, no serial numbers must be inputted. Typically delivered to you within 10 business days for domestic orders via USPS Priority mail. Allow from 1-4 weeks for delivery to APO/FPO addresses. Tracking information can usually be accessed via PayPal within 5 business days after you place your order. You can spend nearly $100 at other sites for separate Rating and PMK study guides covering only the occupational standards which do not actually distinguish between paygrades and havent changed since the 1970s, or you can spend as little as $50 and get the study guide that covers both your Rating and PMK material and only the material that will be covered on your exam for this specific cycle. This guide is 195pages consisting of 2,756questions and answers from the current February 2018 CTIC Reserve exam bibliography. The exam is right around the corner so order today. Here is what the study guide consists of. COMNAVIDFORINST 1550.1,NAVY INFORMATION DOMINANCE FORCES LANGUAGE READINESS PROGRAM-No questions available DEPLOYABLE SECURITY TRAINER,OCTOBER 2012- AVAILABLE ON NIPRNET; CHAP 7-No questions available DOD 5105.21 VOL 2,SENSITIVE COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIVE SECURITY MANUAL: ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL SECURITY, VISITOR CONTROL, AND TECHNICAL SECURITY; ENCL 2-No questions available DOD 5105.21 VOL 3,SENSITIVE COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIVE SECURITY MANUAL: ADMINISTRATION OF PERSONNEL SECURITY, INDUSTRIAL SECURITY, AND SPECIAL ACTIVITIES; ENCL 2, Continue reading >>

What Can A Navy Ctt Do In The Civilian World?

What Can A Navy Ctt Do In The Civilian World?

What Can a Navy CTT Do in the Civilian World? Navy CTTs can find electronics, telecommunications and broadcast engineering work. 4 [Gun Rank] | What Is a Top Gun Rank in the Navy? Navy cryptologic technician technical, or CTT, sailors are trained to rapidly evaluate classified information and intelligence. The CTT career field or "rating" is one of the few in the Navy able to serve on ships, submarines, aircraft, ashore and with Navy special warfare units. CTT-trained Navy sailors generally work in highly classified environments and hold secret or top secret security clearances. There are also many different Navy CTT subspecialties and former CTTs find civilian employment in a wide variety of fields. Navy CTTs are enlisted sailors who have attended one of several different specific cryptologic intelligence training schools. Navy CTMs, or cryptologic technician, maintenance, are trained to perform preventive and corrective maintenance on electrical and electronic cryptology equipment. Interpretive CTTs use foreign language skills and advanced computer equipment to analyze the Navy's gathered intelligence as required. All Navy CTTs must be adaptable, possess above-average writing and speaking skills, be curious and resourceful and also have keen analytical abilities. According to the "Military.com" military skills translator, trained Navy CTMs possess electronic data security, keyboard typing and many other skills. Navy CTMs can work in civilian word processing and formatting, office equipment operation and maintenance and logistics support. Additionally, a Navy CTM could move into employment assisting with safety and occupational health programs maintained by a civilian employer. Military.com says equivalent civilian occupations include administrative support, radio fre Continue reading >>

Militaryvetspx.com - Cryptologic Technician Ct For Sale.

Militaryvetspx.com - Cryptologic Technician Ct For Sale.

This is the appropriate rating patch for US Navy personnel with the rating of Cryptologic Technician CT1, CT2, or CT3. Navy rates are only sold as first class rates and can be cut to second or third class. Cryptologic Technicians (CT) control the flow of messages and information. Their work depends on their special branch: CTAs or Administration Cryptologic Technicians perform administrative and clerical duties that control access to classified material. CTIs or Interpretive Cryptologic Technicians handle radiotelephone communications and foreign language translation. CTMs or Maintenance Cryptologic Technicians maintain electronic and electromechanical equipment. CTNs or Networking Cryptologic Technicians handle computer communication. CTRs or Collection Cryptologic Technicians handle all Morse code communications and operate radio direction-finding equipment. Finally, CTTs or Technical Cryptologic Technicians handle all communications by means other than Morse code and electronic countermeasures. The U.S. Navy Enlisted Left Sleeve Rating Patch is Swiss-Loomed on midnight navy-blue wool serge material. By tradition the Petty Officer 1st Class patch must be hemmed to the proper rank for Petty Officer 2nd Class and Petty Officer 3rd Class. If you need assistance ordering or would like to order by telephone please call us toll free at 1-800-864-5062 and one of our customer service representatives will assist you. Continue reading >>

The Cryptologic Technician Rating

The Cryptologic Technician Rating

U.S. Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association Todays Cryptologic Technician can trace his roots back to those enterprising Radiomen who taught themselves the Japanese Katakana code in the early to mid 1920s and established the first intercept station at Shanghai, China. A Navy rating is defined as an occupation that consists of specific skills and abilities. Each rating has its own specialty badge which is worn on the left sleeve by all qualified men and women in that field. In the Navy and Coast Guard, pay grades E-4 through E-9 fall within a rating and reflect a distinct level of achievement within the promotion pyramid. There are: During the summer of 1927, five Marines attended Katakana training in Shanghai. In September 1927, they were transferred to Peiping where, under the leadership of Chief Radioman (CRM) Dorman A. Chauncey, they established the second radio intercept station. The Marine detachment in Peiping performed the first known temporary deployment of Communications Intelligence personnel. Two Marine operators, along with Chief Chauncey, deployed aboard USS TRENTON (CL-11) 1 , and two additional Marine operators were deployed aboard USS MEMPHIS (CL-13) for the entire month of September 1928. Presumably this mission was to copy traffic from Japanese fleet exercises. The success of these early intercept operations led to the establishment of a permanent school on the roof of the Main Navy building on Constitution Avenue in Washington D.C. where especially qualified Radiomen were trained to intercept and analyze foreign radio communications. During the 12 year life of this school at least 176 (150 Navy and 26 Marine), enlisted radio operators received their training. The group became know as the On the Roof Gang (OTRG). Many of these graduates formed the nuc Continue reading >>

Navy Cryptologic Technician

Navy Cryptologic Technician

The original rating, Communications Technician, evolved in 1948 from the ratings of Specialist (Q) (Cryptographers), Specialist (Q) (Radio Intelligence), Specialist (Q) (Technicians), and Radioman. In 1976, the rating's name was changed to the present day, Cryptologic Technician. The Navy's computerized personnel system associates the rating name with an alphanumeric Navy Occupational Specialty (NOS) code. For NOS code(s) for CTM, B520; for CTI, B510, B511, B515, or B516; for CTN, B525; for CTR, B540; for CTT, B550. CTs perform a variety of duties worldwide at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands, aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines and Naval Special Warfare. Duties include performing collection, analysis and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, and video display terminals. The class "A" school durations and locations for each of the CT ratings can be found under the corresponding heading below. Cryptologic Technician - Maintenance (NOS B520) Effective October 1, 2011, Cryptologic Technician - Maintenance (CTM) has been made an active duty only program, and no longer available as a Navy Reserve rating. Cryptologic Technicians (Maintenance) perform preventive and corrective maintenance on electrical and electronic cryptologic and ancillary systems used for communications, analysis, monitoring, tracking, recognition and identification, electronic attack, and physical security. They install, test, troubleshoot, repair or replace cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems. CTMs configure, monitor, and evaluate Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician Jobs

Cryptologic Technician Jobs

The Centech Group, Inc. - 19 reviews - Texas Customer Service Technician. (CENTECH) is seeking a Client Systems Technician (CST). Air Force Cryptologic and Cyber Systems Division, Technical Operations and... AECOM - 3,181 reviews - Virginia Beach, VA 23452 (North Central area) Knowledge and experience with surface cryptologic SSEE systems. At least 4 years of experience working with EMW, EW, CW, IO and Navy Cryptologic systems.... ORSA Technologies LLC - San Diego, CA 92152 These systems serve to consolidate Command Control and Intelligence functions along with cryptologic, navigation, environmental, and logistic capabilities to... Navy Cryptologic Collection Technician. Navy cryptologic operators. Navy cryptologic training organizations. Navy cryptologic collection and analysis experience... Epsilon Systems Inc - California +1 location Navy Cryptologic Technician (Collection). Navy cryptologic operators. Navy cryptologic training organizations.... ManTech International Corporation - 1,153 reviews - Los Angeles, CA Must meet position and certification requirements outlined in DoD Directive 8570.01-M for Information Assurance Technician Level 2 and Information Assurance... Be the first to see new Cryptologic Technician jobs Also get an email with jobs recommended just for me We know salary is a key component of your decision whether or not to apply for a job. So when the hiring company hasnt provided a salary for a job, we look at salary data from related companies and locations to come up with a reasonable estimate for what you can expect. With over 450,000,000 salaries collected from other jobs and employees, we use one of the biggest salary databases in the world to inform these estimates. And because we are continually adding feedback from users like you, we are abl Continue reading >>

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician

Cryptologic Technician (CT) is a United States Navy enlisted rating or job specialty. The CT community performs a wide range of tasks in support of the national intelligence-gathering effort, with an emphasis on cryptology and signal intelligence related products. Most CT personnel are required to obtain and maintain security clearances. Due to the highly classified and secure work environment requiring very restricted access, it is not always possible to share resources with other commands, leading to their shipboard nickname, ' spooks '. Almost every detail surrounding the CT world from administration to operations to repair requires dedicated technicians with appropriate security clearances (this accounts for the many branches of the CT rating, i.e. CTI, CTM, CTN, CTR, CTT). The contribution of an individual CT will depend upon the branch or career area. Members of the CT community enjoy a wide range of career and training options. Once trained, a CT might serve ashore, afloat or in an airborne capacity. (It is rare, but some have earned all three, i.e. dolphins, wings and swords over the course of a career.) A CT can expect overseas assignments of lengthy duration. Administration (CTA) - Administrative and clerical duties that control access to classified material such as Special Security Officer (SSO) or Defense Courier Service (DCS). (No longer active.) Interpretive (CTI) - Foreign language radio/telephone communications translation and transcription Maintenance (CTM) - The installation, servicing and repair of electronic and electromechanical equipment Networks (CTN) - CTNs plan and execute computer network operations (CNO) actions/counter-actions in support of defending and exploiting computer network systems. (Formerly CTO) Collection (CTR) Voice/morse communi Continue reading >>

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Enlisted Rating (Job) Description and Qualification Factors CTOs perform a variety of duties associated with operating telecommunications systems that exist across the global communications spectrum. Advanced AIS networking and information management skills support the movement of huge volumes of data to operating forces ashore and afloat. The duties performed by CTOs include: providing telecommunications support to the fleet (air, surface, and shore); information processing using computer terminals observing all applicable security measures; administrative duties, which include maintaining files and updating communications publications via automated methods. controlling and operating communications systems and networks including satellite systems, network servers, patch panels, modems, routers, multiplexers and communications security devices; assuring signal quality and path integrity using test equipment such as protocol analyzers, distortion test sets, spectrum oscilloscopes and state-of-the-art signal analysis equipment. Must have normal hearing. Security Clearance , (TOP SECRET) Requirement (SSBI). Must be U.S. citizen. Notes: SSBI originated at RTC. Both the applicant and his/her immediate family members must be U.S. citizens. A waiver for U.S. citizenship requirement for immediate family may exist due to a compelling need. Only DONCAF may authorize this based on CT ECM's recommendation for severely undermanned CT branches. Moral turpitude offense(s) are generally disqualifying. Personal security screening interview will be conducted by a Naval Security Group Command special representative. Former members of the Peace Corps are not eligible. Must be a high schoo Continue reading >>

History Of Ct Rating And Cryptologic Officerdesignators

History Of Ct Rating And Cryptologic Officerdesignators

History of CT Rating and Cryptologic OfficerDesignators Todays Cryptologic Technician can trace their roots back to those enterprising Radiomen who taught themselves the JapaneseKatakana codein the early to mid-1920s and established the first intercept station at Shanghai, China. During the summer of 1927, five Marines attended Katakana training in Shanghai and in September 1927 were transferred to Peiping where, under the leadership of CRM Dorman A. Chauncey, established the second radio intercept station. The Marine detachment in Peiping performed the first known temporary deployment of Communications Intelligence personnel when two Marine operators, along with Chief Chauncey, deployed aboard the USS TRENTON (CL-11), and two additional Marine operators deployed aboard the USS MEMPHIS (CL-13) for the entire month of September 1928. Presumably this mission was to copy traffic from Japanese fleet exercises. The success of these early intercept operations led to the establishment of a permanent school on the roof of the Main Navy building on Constitution Avenue in Washington DC where especially qualified Radiomen were trained to intercept and analyze foreign radio communications. During the 12 year life of this school at least 176 (150 Navy and 26 Marine), enlisted radio operators received their training. The group became known as the On the Roof Gang (OTRG). Many of these graduates formed the nucleus of the communications intelligence operations in the Pacific at the beginning of World War II. The early ratings involved in the communications intelligence arena were what we now identify as general service ratings. Prior to World War II the majority of these ratings were Radioman and Yeoman. The need for qualified communications intelligence personnel greatly expanded dur Continue reading >>

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (cto)

Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Navy Cryptologic Technician - Communications (CTO) Enlisted Rating (Job) Description and Qualification Factors CTOs perform a variety of duties associated with operating telecommunications systems that exist across the global communications spectrum. Advanced AIS networking and information management skills support the movement of huge volumes of data to operating forces ashore and afloat. The duties performed by CTOs include: providing telecommunications support to the fleet (air, surface, and shore); information processing using computer terminals observing all applicable security measures; administrative duties, which include maintaining files and updating communications publications via automated methods. controlling and operating communications systems and networks including satellite systems, network servers, patch panels, modems, routers, multiplexers and communications security devices; assuring signal quality and path integrity using test equipment such as protocol analyzers, distortion test sets, spectrum oscilloscopes and state-of-the-art signal analysis equipment. Must have normal hearing. Security Clearance , (TOP SECRET) Requirement (SSBI). Must be U.S. citizen. Notes: SSBI originated at RTC. Both the applicant and his/her immediate family members must be U.S. citizens. A waiver for U.S. citizenship requirement for immediate family may exist due to a compelling need. Only DONCAF may authorize this based on CT ECM's recommendation for severely undermanned CT branches. Moral turpitude offense(s) are generally disqualifying. Personal security screening interview will be conducted by a Naval Security Group Command special representative. Former members of the Peace Corps are not eligible. Must be a high schoo Continue reading >>

Navy Mos Cta | Mosdb

Navy Mos Cta | Mosdb

Performs general office duties in an administrative office. NOTE: Many of the duties required for this rating involve highly classified materials, equipment, and activities; therefore, not all the competencies and knowledge associated with the rating were evaluated. E4-E6; Able to perform the duties required for E1-E3; Types messages, correspondence, directives, and reports; operates office equipment; files correspondence and directives; types at 30 words per minute; types at 40 words per minute; drafts correspondence. E7-E9; Able to perform the duties required for E4-E6; Supervises the daily operation of an administration office; establishes work priorities and assigns work; ensures timely and accurate submission of reports; evaluates administrative reports and outgoing correspondence. Perform technology-based administrative functions using software applications within a global information environment; perform personnel and physical security duties for the Naval Security Group and Intelligence communities both ashore and afloat; perform manpower management functions; maintain accountability of highly Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI), operate Information Systems (IS) equipment and current software applications; perform Joint duty as a Department of Defense (DOD) courier with the Defense Courier Service; perform in a Full-Time Support (FTS) capacity for the Naval Security Group Cryptologic Reserve Program. 1N336 MOS Air Force African Cryptologic Linguist Apprentice 1N356 MOS Air Force African Cryptologic Linguist Apprentice 1N376 MOS Air Force African Cryptologic Linguist Apprentice 1N396 MOS Air Force African Cryptologic Linguist Apprentice 1N3X6 MOS Air Force African Cryptologic Linguist Apprentice 1A831 MOS Air Force Airborne Cryptologic Language Analyst 1A8 Continue reading >>

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