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Mathematics Of Modern Cryptography Explored At Program For Women And Mathematics 2018

Mathematics Of Modern Cryptography Explored At Program For Women And Mathematics 2018

Home / News /Mathematics of Modern Cryptography Explored at Program for Women and Mathematics 2018 Mathematics of Modern Cryptography Explored at Program for Women and Mathematics 2018 IAS outreach program celebrates twenty-fifth year Participants in the 2017 Program for Women and Mathematics attend a review session. Toni Bluher, senior subject matter expert in cryptography at the National Security Agency, and Kristin Lauter, principal researcher and research manager forthecryptography group at Microsoft Research, will give lecture courses on cryptography as part of the 2018 Program for Women and Mathematics , which will take place May 1925 at the Institute for Advanced Study. Now in its twenty-fifth year, the outreach program brings together research mathematicians and undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral women for intensive residential mentoring in mathematics. This years program, which will focus on the mathematics of modern cryptography, is supported by the Institute as well as generous grants from Lisa Simonyi, the National Science Foundation, and Princeton University. Designed to further the mathematics education of talented scholars from undergraduate through postdoctoral levels, as well as to address issues of gender imbalance in the field, the Program for Women and Mathematics involves lectures and seminars, as well as mentoring, conversations about peer relations, an introduction to career opportunities in and out of academia, and professional development. The program will feature Bluhers introductory lecture course Mathematics in Cryptography, which will address the evolutionary nature of cryptography and the central role of mathematics, along with topics including substitution ciphers and how to defeat them, World War II cryptography, symmetric cryptog Continue reading >>

2018 Was The Reality Check. 2019 Starts The Crypto Comeback

2018 Was The Reality Check. 2019 Starts The Crypto Comeback

2018 Was the Reality Check. 2019 Starts the Crypto Comeback Micah Winkelspecht is CEO and founder of Gem, a crypto portfolio app company based in Los Angeles. The following is an exclusive contribution to CoinDesks 2018 Year in Review . If 2017 was the year of irrational exuberance, 2018 became the year of reality checks when the market sputtered and crashed. I predict that this year will see a return back to first principles as we rethink many of our assumptions about how this is all supposed to go down. The truth is, we just dont know yet. I also believe that 2019 will see the return of bitcoin dominance, although it may take a major world market downturn to spur it on. As the global markets deflate, that will also bring down the price of bitcoin and keep them low because the deflation will cause investors to move out of perceived risky investments into more stable investments, and bitcoin is currently still considered a very risky investment. But when governments begin to do helicopter drops of freshly printed money to try to recover their failing economies, thats when bitcoin will begin to be seen as something more akin to gold. The crazy bull market of 2017 and early 2018 and the glorification of initial coin offerings (ICOs) had such a disorienting effect. We had a great migration away from the principles and values of a decentralized economy to a get-rich-quick scheme across the board. I believe that ICOs are actually very promising when done right. The most exciting and powerful thing we have learned from the success of Bitcoin is that crypto has the unique ability to align all stakeholders (users and investors alike) around a common mission through shared incentives and direct participation. Crypto makes users feel invested in the success of a project, and it Continue reading >>

12 Big Encryption Trends That Will Keep Data More Secure

12 Big Encryption Trends That Will Keep Data More Secure

12 big encryption trends that will keep data more secure As cybercriminals become more sophisticated, it becomes easier for them to circumvent security measures and access sensitive personal data. While businesses and consumers are ultimately responsible for protecting themselves and following best practices, developers are on the frontlines of the ever-evolving cyber security battle, as theyre the ones building the solutions that keep data encrypted and secured. So what does the future of encryption technology look like? YEC members weighed in on this question: Developers are constantly challenged to stay ahead of the game particularly when it comes to protecting users security. Whats your prediction for thenextbig idea in encryption technology? Today, we encrypt data as it travels over the internet and when it is at rest on a storage device. But we have to decrypt data to use or analyze it, creating a potential security vulnerability. Homomorphic encryption is a new idea that solves that problem, allowing users to process data without decrypting it. With homomorphic encryption, we process encrypted data and produce encrypted results. Vik Patel , Future Hosting Hardware-based disk encryption will continue to grow and bypass whole disk encryption software products. With this type of encryption, after a key has been given, the entire contents of a volume encrypts it after it is used. This doesnt protect against network attacks via emails or websites, but it does protect data when a laptop or device is lost or stolen and a key is required to decrypt it. Blair Thomas , eMerchantBroker The biggest problem we face with data security is not whether or not data is encrypted, its that we use the same code as the attackers. Thenextbig idea in security is moving target defense. Continue reading >>

Top 5 Best Encryption Software Tools Of 2018

Top 5 Best Encryption Software Tools Of 2018

Top 5 best encryption software tools of 2018 Top 5 best encryption software tools of 2018 Encryption is a vital piece of the security puzzle Finding the best encryption software for your needs, whether you're a business or home user, is essential, as hackers are becoming ever more adept at stealing your private information. Encryption tools encode data so that it can only be unlocked with a certain key, making it harder for third-parties to gain access. This means that only people who have access to that key can also access the data, making encryption software an essential tool for keeping data safe. These encryption tools can be used to protect data such as email addresses, customer transactions and passwords, and other crucial information which you really cant afford to potentially expose. Many companies are also using encryption software to ensure internal online conversations and emails are kept private. So which are the best encryption tools? Read on for our pick of the very best tools for keeping your data safe. Platforms: Windows, macOS, Linux | Resources covered: Encryption and brute-force attack protection | Cloud-based: No | Integrations: No | Free trial: N/A VeraCrypt is one of the most popular security tools, providing you with enterprise-grade encryption for important data. The system is quite easy to use, and all it really does is add encrypted passwords to your data and partitions. All you have to do is give the tool a few details about your data, such as volume size, location and specified hashing algorithms and then the program does its thing. Whats also nifty about VeraCrypt is that its immune to brute-force attacks, so you never have to worry about hackers decrypting your passwords and other sensitive data. The basic version of the software is comple Continue reading >>

Nist Now Accepting Lightweight Cryptographic Algorithm Nominations

Nist Now Accepting Lightweight Cryptographic Algorithm Nominations

NIST Now Accepting Lightweight Cryptographic Algorithm Nominations NIST has initiated a process to solicit, evaluate, and standardize lightweight cryptographic algorithms that are suitable for use in constrained environments where the performance of current NIST cryptographic standards is not acceptable. In recent years, there has been increased demand for cryptographic standards that are tailored for constrained devices. NIST has decided to create a portfolio of lightweight cryptographic algorithms, designed for limited use in applications and environments where cryptographic operations are performed by constrained devices that are unable to use existing NIST standards. Candidate algorithm nominations may be submitted until February 25, 2019. Complete instructions for submitting candidate packagesincluding minimal acceptability requirementsare available on the Lightweight Cryptography project page on CSRC (below). Lightweight Cryptography Project and Submission Details: Continue reading >>

Post-quantum Cryptography: A Ten-year Market And Technology Forecast, 2018-2028 - Researchandmarkets.com

Post-quantum Cryptography: A Ten-year Market And Technology Forecast, 2018-2028 - Researchandmarkets.com

DUBLIN--( BUSINESS WIRE )--The "Post-Quantum Cryptography: A Ten-Year Market and Technology Forecast" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. This report identifies the PQC opportunities that will emerge in how the market roadmap for PQC will evolve over the coming decade. The market for post-quantum cryptography (PQC) already generates revenue and will expand as quantum computers capable of breaking common public key encryption schemes with Shor's algorithm become more widely deployed. For now, post-quantum cryptography finds its market in critical long-lived data such as plans for aircraft and medical databases that need to survive well into the era of powerful quantum computers. Some IT managers are already aware of the quantum threat and are applying PQC selectively using interim standards and technologies. Many more individuals with purchasing authority are expected to buy into PQC over the next five years as they come to understand quantum threats and quantum computer era gets closer. The addressable market for PQC is can be measured in the billions of units - encryption is hidden everywhere in both hardware and software - and adoption will also accelerate as PQC algorithms are finalized in the NIST selection process. E.1 Post-quantum cryptography - Future requirements for the entire digital infrastructure E.2 Uses of public key cryptography E.3 Revenue opportunities for post-quantum cryptography E.5 Seven firms to watch in the post-quantum cryptography space Quantum security threats: The bottom line Chapter Two: Post-Quantum Encryption Technology and Products 2.1 Security vulnerabilities for existing public key encryption created by quantum computers 2.1.2 When will a solution be needed? A timetable for the quantum computer threat 2.1.3 Time Continue reading >>

Ibm Warns Of Instant Breaking Of Encryption By Quantum Computers: 'move Your Data Today'

Ibm Warns Of Instant Breaking Of Encryption By Quantum Computers: 'move Your Data Today'

IBM warns of instant breaking of encryption by quantum computers: 'Move your data today' Welcome to the future transparency of today as quantum computers reveal all currently encrypted secrets -- a viable scenario within just a few years. Quantum computers will be able to instantly break the encryption of sensitive data protected by today's strongest security, warns the head of IBM Research . GDPR in real life: Fear, uncertainty, and doubt This could happen in a little more than five years because of advances in quantum computer technologies. "Anyone that wants to make sure that their data is protected for longer than 10 years should move to alternate forms of encryption now," said Arvind Krishna, director of IBM Research . Krishna was speaking at a meeting of The Churchill Club in San Francisco on a panel (above, second from right) discussing quantum computers in business. The panel, which included Kam Moler, a professor of Physics at Stanford University, as well as Bob Stolte, a managing director at JPMorgan, was moderated by journalist Martin Giles (first from left). Quantum computers can solve some types of problems near-instantaneously compared with billions of years of processing using conventional computers. Moler said people might feel safe because they have done everything they are supposed to do to secure their existing data -- but quantum computing will break it. "I do think that's scary," she said. Read also: Jewelry consortium to use IBM blockchain technology It has been known since the 1980s that quantum computers would be great at factoring large numbers, which is the foundation of public key cryptography. But building large enough quantum computers was not possible then. Advances in novel materials and in low-temperature physics have led to many breakth Continue reading >>

Quantum Computers Will Break The Encryption That Protects The Internet - Future-proofing The Internet

Quantum Computers Will Break The Encryption That Protects The Internet - Future-proofing The Internet

Factorising numbers into their constituent primes may sound esoteric, but the one-way nature of the problemand of some other, closely related mathematical tasksis the foundation on which much modern encryption rests. Such encryption has plenty of uses. It defends state secrets, and the corporate sort. It protects financial flows and medical records. And it makes the $2trn e-commerce industry possible. Without it, credit-card details, bank transfers, emails and the like would zip around the internet unprotected, for anyone so minded to see or steal. Nobody, however, is certain that the foundation of all this is sound. Though mathematicians have found no quick way to solve the prime-factors problem, neither have they proved that there isnt one. In theory, any of the worlds millions of professional or amateur mathematicians could have a stroke of inspiration tomorrow and publish a formula that unravels internet cryptographyand most internet commerce with it. In fact, something like this has already happened. In 1994 Peter Shor, a mathematician then working at Bell Laboratories, in America, came up with a quick and efficient way to find a numbers prime factors. The only catch was that for large numbers his methoddubbed Shors algorithmneeds a quantum computer to work. Quantum computers rely on the famous weirdness of quantum mechanics to perform certain sorts of calculation far faster than any conceivable classical machine. Their fundamental unit is the qubit, a quantum analogue of the ones and zeros that classical machines manipulate. By exploiting the quantum-mechanical phenomena of superposition and entanglement, quantum computers can perform some forms of mathematicsthough only somefar faster than any conceivable classical machine, no matter how beefy. When Dr Shor made Continue reading >>

The Rise Of Crypto In Higher Education

The Rise Of Crypto In Higher Education

Coinbase regularly engages with students and universities across the country as part of recruiting efforts. We partnered with Qriously to ask students directly about their thoughts on crypto and blockchain and in this report, we outline findings on the growing roster of crypto and blockchain courses amid a steady rise in student interest. 42 percent of the worlds top 50 universities now offer at least one course on crypto or blockchain Students from a range of majors are interested in crypto and blockchain courses and universities are adding courses across a variety of departments Original Coinbase research includes a Qriously survey of 675 U.S. students, a comprehensive review of courses at 50 international universities, and interviews with professors and students When David Yermack, the finance department chair at New York University Stern School of Business, first offered his course on blockchain and financial services in 2014, 35 students signed up, eight fewer than the schools typical elective. By spring 2018, the number of enrolled students climbed to 230, forcing Stern to move the class to its largest auditorium. This academic year, Yermack will teach the blockchain course both semesters to meet interest from students. Yermack says he first developed the class because he was interested in bitcoin and how quickly interest in the cryptocurrency was growing. But other reasons soon emerged, notably demand from companies for people who understood cryptocurrency-related issues. Now, he sees his class as a way to give students the skills theyll need for jobs in the future. A process is well underway that will lead to the migration of most financial data to blockchain-based organizations, he says. Students will benefit greatly by studying this area. Similar scenes are p Continue reading >>

Cryptography | Mit News

Cryptography | Mit News

Cryptographic system could enable crowdsourced genomics, with volunteers contributing information to privacy-protected databases. New isotope-detection method could prove compliance but avoid divulging secrets. A tool that would provide a secure foundation for any cryptographic system may be close at hand. Calculating encryption schemes theoretical security guarantees eases comparison, improvement. MIT hosts the first of three conferences on privacy policy For 65 years, most information-theoretic analyses of cryptographic systems have made a mathematical assumption that turns out to be wrong. A new algorithm solves a major problem with homomorphic encryption, which would let Web servers process data without decrypting it. MIT researchers show how to secure widely used encryption schemes against attackers who have intercepted examples of successful decryption. Interactive proofs mathematical games that underlie much modern cryptography work even if players try to use quantum information to cheat. Awards recognize a diverse range of technologies Savvy hackers can steal a computers secrets by timing its data storage transactions or measuring its power use. New research shows how to stop them. A new twist on pioneering work done by MIT cryptographers almost 30 years ago could lead to better ways of structuring contracts. A switch that lets one photon alter the quantum state of another could point the way to both practical quantum computers and a quantum Internet. Public-key system has worked and made Internet commerce feasible, but new systems are ready in case flaws are found. A new system for ensuring accurate election tallies, which MIT researchers helped to develop, passed its first real-world test last Tuesday. Continue reading >>

City-crippling Ransomware, Crypto Hijackings, And More: Our 2018 Mid-year Cybersecurity Update

City-crippling Ransomware, Crypto Hijackings, And More: Our 2018 Mid-year Cybersecurity Update

City-crippling ransomware, crypto hijackings, and more: our 2018 mid-year cybersecurity update So far this year, some of our January predictions have been spot-on. But we also failed to foresee one very big, looming threat. In early January, we predicted some of the biggest cyberthreats the world would encounter in 2018 . Almost halfway through the year, it seemed like a good time to revisit that forecast and see how its playing out. DeepMinds new AI just beat top human pro-gamers at Starcraft II for the first time One of my predictions was that wed see more huge data breaches,and that hypothesis was proved pretty quickly. In March, exercise- and diet-tracking app MyFitnessPal said it had suffered one of the biggest breaches in history : hackers stole the usernames, e-mail addresses, and passwords associated with some 150 million accounts. That made the breach even larger in terms of sheer numbers than the massive Equifax hack of 2017. The only silver lining was that many of the passwords were protected by strong encryption, which seems to have limited fallout from the attack. Then theres the Facebook imbroglio with Cambridge Analytica, which blew up the same month. Some 87 million users of the social network had their data shared without their knowledge or consent. Strictly speaking, this wasnt a hack. But I think it merits a (dis)honorable mention here because had the social network put tighter controls in place, it could have spotted the unauthorized use of the data faster and stopped it. I also predicted even bolder efforts to steal computer processing power for cryptocurrency mining, and we dug into this risk in more detail later in January (see Forget viruses or spywareyour biggest cyberthreat is greedy currency miners ). In the past few months, weve seen mining- Continue reading >>

Nist Issues First Call For Lightweight Cryptography To Protect Small Electronics

Nist Issues First Call For Lightweight Cryptography To Protect Small Electronics

NIST Issues First Call for Lightweight Cryptography to Protect Small Electronics Cryptography experts at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are kicking off an effort to protect the data created by innumerable tiny networked devices such as those in the internet of things (IoT), which will need a new class of cryptographic defenses against cyberattacks. Creating these defenses is the goal of NISTs lightweight cryptography initiative, which aims to develop cryptographic algorithm standards that can work within the confines of a simple electronic device. Many of the sensors, actuators and other micromachines that will function as eyes, ears and hands in IoT networks will work on scant electrical power and use circuitry far more limited than the chips found in even the simplest cell phone. Similar small electronics exist in the keyless entry fobs to newer-model cars and the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags used to locate boxes in vast warehouses. All of these gadgets are inexpensive to make and will fit nearly anywhere, but common encryption methods may demand more electronic resources than they possess. Today, NIST is launching an effort to create worthy solutions to the problem of securing data in this sort of constrained environment. As an initial step, it seeks assistance in developing requirements and guidelines for these solutions. The Draft Submission Requirements and Evaluation Criteria for the Lightweight Cryptography Standardization Process is the first draft of this request, written with the software development community in mind and aimed at ensuring that the formal requestslated for release later this springwill produce the sort of encryption algorithms that developers agree will help. The draft document is available now on the Continue reading >>

The Race Is On To Protect Data From The Next Leap In Computers. And China Has The Lead.

The Race Is On To Protect Data From The Next Leap In Computers. And China Has The Lead.

Technology |The Race Is On to Protect Data From the Next Leap in Computers. And China Has the Lead. The Race Is On to Protect Data From the Next Leap in Computers. And China Has the Lead. Eric Hay of Quantum Xchange, which is building a quantum encryption link between Manhattan and Newark. Another start-up exploring quantum encryption is Qubitekk.CreditCreditAn Rong Xu for The New York Times SAN FRANCISCO The worlds leading technology companies, from Google to Alibaba in China, are racing to build the first quantum computer, a machine that would be far more powerful than todays computers. This device could break the encryption that protects digital information, putting at risk everything from the billions of dollars spent on e-commerce to national secrets stored in government databases. An answer? Encryption that relies on the same concepts from the world of physics. Just as some scientists are working on quantum computers, others are working on quantum security techniques that could thwart the code-breaking abilities of these machines of the future. It is a race with national security implications , and while building quantum computers is still anyones game, China has a clear lead in quantum encryption. As it has with other cutting-edge technologies, like artificial intelligence, the Chinese government has made different kinds of quantum research a priority. China has a very deliberate strategy to own this technology, said Duncan Earl, a former researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who is president and chief technology officer of Qubitekk, a company that is exploring quantum encryption. If we think we can wait five or 10 years before jumping on this technology, it is going to be too late. Fiber-optic cables supporting Quantum Xchanges encryption services at 60 H Continue reading >>

Tech Xplore - Nanoscale Cryptography Method Gains Robustness From Stiction

Tech Xplore - Nanoscale Cryptography Method Gains Robustness From Stiction

Nanoscale cryptography method gains robustness from stiction (a) The 0 state and (b) the 1 state correspond to the silicon nanowire touching either gate 1 or gate 2, respectively. (c) 13 PUF arrays consisting of 48 bits each. The randomness of the data originates from the random variations that occur during fabrication and cause the nanowire to randomly bend toward one of the two gates due to stiction. Credit: Hwang et al. 2017 American Chemical Society Most of the cryptographic methods that keep important data secure use complex encryption software, and as a result, consume large amounts of power. As more and more electronic devices are being connected to the internet, there is a growing need for alternative low-power security methods, and this is often done by basing the security on hardware rather than software. One of the most promising approaches to hardware-based, low-power security is to derive cryptographic keys from the randomness that inherently and uncontrollably emerges during the fabrication process of nanoscale devices. These methods, called "physical unclonable functions" (PUFs), convert the random variations in the physical devices into the binary states of "0" and "1" to create unique, random cryptographic keys. These keys can then be used to encrypt data into cipher text, as well as decrypt it back into plain text, in a process that remains secure as long as the key remains private. However, one of the biggest challenges facing PUF technology is its vulnerability to harsh environments. Since the physical randomness that forms the basis of the key usually arises from variations in electrical characteristics, and electrical characteristics are affected by external factors such as high temperatures and radiation, these devices often do not preserve their Continue reading >>

Encryption News -- Sciencedaily

Encryption News -- Sciencedaily

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! The Digital Doctor's Visit: Enormous Potential Benefits With Equally Big Risk May 14, 2018 One out of at least 10 patients records doctors' visits, usually on a cell phone; Apple recently released a new Health Records feature built into the Health app as part of iOS 11.3. No longer a ... read more May 11, 2018 Chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and ... read more View all the latest top news in the health sciences, View all the latest top news in the physical sciences & technology, View all the latest top news in the environmental sciences, View all the latest top news in the social sciences & education, Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader: Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions? About This Site | Staff | Reviews | Contribute | Advertise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Policy | Terms of Use Copyright 2018 ScienceDaily or by other parties, where indicated. All rights controlled by their respective owners. Content on this website is for information only. It is not intended to provide medical or other professional advice. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of ScienceDaily, its staff, its contributors, or its partners. Financial support for ScienceDaily comes from advertisements and referral programs, where indicated. Continue reading >>

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