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Cryptography News 2017

2017's Crypto (r)evolution Was Just The Beginning - Coindesk

2017's Crypto (r)evolution Was Just The Beginning - Coindesk

Bobby Cho is head of global trading at Cumberland, where he oversees one of the largest cryptocurrency and digital asset trading operations. The following article is an exclusive contribution to CoinDesks 2017 in Review . When we kicked off this year, bitcoin had just topped $1,000 for the first time in three years. It was a signal to the market, but cryptocurrency still lacked serious interest from mainstream banks and institutional investors. Today, were looking at a very different market and, as one of the largest liquidity providers in the space, Cumberland has had a front row seat to the evolution or revolution, depending on your perspective. Over the last several years, anyone who was following cryptocurrency or involved at all in the markets alluded that Wall Street was coming. This was the year we actually saw this start to happen, driven by the new ventures, burgeoning demand and market maturation that generally accompany a rapid run up in price. We saw a shift from getting familiar with cryptocurrencies to putting real dollars to work a shift from education to action that was evident throughout the activity we saw in the crypto markets. Bitcoin and other top cryptocurrencies saw their valuations grew consistently over the first half of the year and, as we entered the back half of the year, prices reached all-time highs over and over again, with year-over-year market cap figures growing over 4,000%. The end-of-the-year headlines are telling the story of volatility (those of us who have been in these markets for some time know that volatility defines them and, indeed, all nascent markets), but the fact remains weve seen prices up 1500% this year. And demand to invest real, new money has followed. Realizing that bitcoin is here to stay, CME , CBOE and Nasdaq all Continue reading >>

Global $943.7 Million Quantum Cryptography Market 2017-2022 By Component, Application, Organization Size, And Vertical - Researchandmarkets.com

Global $943.7 Million Quantum Cryptography Market 2017-2022 By Component, Application, Organization Size, And Vertical - Researchandmarkets.com

DUBLIN--( BUSINESS WIRE )--The "Quantum Cryptography Market by Component (Hardware and Services), Application (Network Security, Database Encryption, Application Security), Organization Size, Vertical and Region - Global Forecast to 2022" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. The global quantum cryptography market size is forecast to grow from USD 285.7 Million in 2017 to USD 943.7 Million by 2022, at a CAGR of 27%. The quantum cryptography market is witnessing a growing incident of cyber-attacks and increasing data security and privacy concerns. Furthermore, the rising adoption of cloud storage and computing technologies, and evolving next-generation wireless networks are driving the adoption of reliable quantum cryptography solutions and services. The quantum cryptography server segment expected to hold the largest market size during the forecast period as servers are mainly used for data encryption and help maintain data secrecy. Moreover, they provide high-quality encryption, key generation, and distribution. In addition, it also offers security to point-to-point backbone and storage networks for long-term data protection. It also enables real-time data processing and data throughput, and consistently low latency across all packet sizes for optimum performance. The application type segment is categorized into database security, application security, and network security. The vertical segment is categorized into BFSI, telecom and IT, government and defense, healthcare and life sciences, and consumer good and retail. The study measures and evaluates the major offerings and key strategies of the major market vendors, including ID Quantique (Switzerland), MagiQ Technologies (US), Nucrypt (US), Infineon Technologies (Germany), Qutools (Germany), Qu Continue reading >>

High-speed Quantum Encryption May Help Secure The Future Internet

High-speed Quantum Encryption May Help Secure The Future Internet

High-speed quantum encryption may help secure the future internet Depiction of the proposed system in a metropolitan city where quantum-secure information is transferred between two quantum nodes. Credit: Agheal Abedzahdeh (Duke University) Recent advances in quantum computers may soon give hackers access to machines powerful enough to crack even the toughest of standard internet security codes. With these codes broken, all of our online datafrom medical records to bank transactionscould be vulnerable to attack. To fight back against the future threat, researchers are wielding the same strange properties that drive quantum computers to create theoretically hack-proof forms of quantum data encryption. And now, these quantum encryption techniques may be one step closer to wide-scale use thanks to a new system developed by scientists at Duke University, The Ohio State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their system is capable of creating and distributing encryption codes at megabit-per-second rates, which is five to 10 times faster than existing methods and on par with current internet speeds when running several systems in parallel. The researchers demonstrate that the technique is secure from common attacks, even in the face of equipment flaws that could open up leaks. "We are now likely to have a functioning quantum computer that might be able to start breaking the existing cryptographic codes in the near future," said Daniel Gauthier, a professor of physics at The Ohio State University. "We really need to be thinking hard now of different techniques that we could use for trying to secure the internet." The results appear online Nov. 24 in Science Advances. To a hacker, our online purchases, bank transactions and medical records all look like gibberish due t Continue reading >>

Millions Of High-security Crypto Keys Crippled By Newly Discovered Flaw

Millions Of High-security Crypto Keys Crippled By Newly Discovered Flaw

Millions of high-security crypto keys crippled by newly discovered flaw Factorization weakness lets attackers impersonate key holders and decrypt their data. by Dan Goodin - Oct 16, 2017 11:00 am UTC A crippling flaw in a widely used code library has fatally undermined the security of millions of encryption keys used in some of the highest-stakes settings, including national identity cards, software- and application-signing, and trusted platform modules protecting government and corporate computers. The weakness allows attackers to calculate the private portion of any vulnerable key using nothing more than the corresponding public portion. Hackers can then use the private key to impersonate key owners, decrypt sensitive data, sneak malicious code into digitally signed software, and bypass protections that prevent accessing or tampering with stolen PCs. The five-year-old flaw is also troubling because it's located in code that complies with two internationally recognized security certification standards that are binding on many governments, contractors, and companies around the world. The code library was developed by German chipmaker Infineon and has been generating weak keys since 2012 at the latest. The flaw is the one Estonia's government obliquely referred to last month when it warned that 750,000 digital IDs issued since 2014 were vulnerable to attack . Estonian officials said they were closing the ID card public key database to prevent abuse. On Monday, officials posted this update . Last week, Microsoft , Google , and Infineon all warned how the weakness can impair the protections built into TPM products that ironically enough are designed to give an additional measure of security to high-targeted individuals and organizations. "In public key cryptography, a fun Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Christmas Special: 2017 Was Wild Ride, Eventful 2018 Seems Likely

Bitcoin Christmas Special: 2017 Was Wild Ride, Eventful 2018 Seems Likely

Bitcoin Christmas Special: 2017 Was Wild Ride, Eventful 2018 Seems Likely Christmas of 2017 will forever be remembered by crypto enthusiasts for the extreme market volatility displayed by Bitcoin and other digital currencies. The festive season is in full swing and those who celebrate Christmas have enjoyed turkey dinners, presents under the tree and long Christmas specials on TV. But for many of us involved in the world of cryptocurrencies, this has been one Christmas Special we will never forget. November was an extraordinary month, as Bitcoinsmashed barrier after barrier on its way to the $11,000 mark . Despite multiple corrections, time after time , the virtual currency bounced back from volatile swings in price. Some called it a bubble , others said is was just the tip of the iceberg , but no one predicted the wild ride Bitcoin would endure in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Last month the price of Bitcoin reacted strongly to the news that the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) and Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) were planning to launch Bitcoin futures - which eventually led to a massive bull run. Both mainstream exchanges successfully launched their new offerings and in both instances the price of Bitcoin reacted favourably, although the CME launch a week after CBOE had far less of an affect on the price of Bitcoin. The general sentiment ahead of the futures launch was that mainstream financial institutions openly trading on the Bitcoin market would cause a greater stream of money to flow into Bitcoin, raising the price. Indeed, that is exactly what happened - for a time. But not long after Bitcoin hit the meteoric $20,000 mark , the market underwent a massive correction, sinking down to just under $11,000 on Friday, December 22 . It wasnt just Bitcoin th Continue reading >>

Quantum Cryptography Passes Another Critical Test | Wired

Quantum Cryptography Passes Another Critical Test | Wired

Physicists, Lasers, and an Airplane: Taking Aim at Quantum Cryptography On a clear night last September, at a little Ontario airport, two pilots, two scientists, and an engineer took off in a small plane. They'd pulled the left-side door off its hinges, and a telescope poked out of the portalnot at the night sky, but at the ground below. The team was about to play a very difficult, very windy game of catch. A couple miles away, their colleagues gathered in a trailer to lob the tiny baseballs: infrared photons, beamed from a laser that tracked the plane along its mile-high trajectory. In the craft cruising above, physics graduate student Chris Pugh and the others pivoted their telescope to catch the photons, one by one. On their best run, they caught over 800,000 photons in just a few minutes, but it wasn't easy. Out of every 10,000 photons they sent, wed get one, says Pugh, who studies at the University of Waterloo. One to a hundred of them. The point of this high-altitude game was to test a technology known as quantum cryptography. For decades, experts have claimed that if executed properly, quantum cryptography will be more secure than any encryption technique used today. They also say it will be one of the lines of defense when quantum computers crack every existing algorithm. But it's hard to pull off; quantum cryptography requires precise control of individual photons over a long distance. Pugh's group was the first to successfully test the technology from ground to airplane. It works like this: The sender transmits carefully prepared photons, over optical fiber or through the air, to a recipient. The recipient reads the photons like Morse code, with physical signals corresponding to a letter or a number. Instead of listening for long and short beeps, Pugh and his Continue reading >>

Are You Crypto-agile?

Are You Crypto-agile?

A recent spate of successful attacks against our most popular and trusted cryptographic algorithms has me hoping that all companies understand the importance of crypto-agility. Use commas to separate multiple email addresses Countdown to the GDPR deadline: Are you ready? | Salted Hash Ep 28 Our world relies on secure digital cryptography. Secure doesnt mean unbreakable forever. No serious cryptographer will ever declare a cryptographic anything unbreakable. In fact, cryptographers always assume that every cryptographic algorithm will eventually be broken. The best pronouncement you can hope for from a crypto expert is that breaking it is non-trivial, meaning that no apparent, easy to accomplish attacks are known. All cryptographic algorithms fall over time, and this has been more true and consistent than the highly respected Moores Law , which drives computing evolution. [ Email encryption review: HPE/Voltage Secure Email vs. Virtru Pro vs. Inky vs. Zix Gateway vs, Symantec Email Security.cloud | Get the latest from CSO by signing up for our newsletters . ] The recent flood of huge crypto breaks has been staggering. It seems like one after the other, and thats just in the last few months. Thats why organizations need to be crypto-agile, expecting to transition from one encryption standard to another at a moments notice. Thats the world we live in. Crypto-agility has been a development concept within the crypto community for a long time. Even the widely used x.509 digital certificate standard (released in 1988) was created with crypto-agility in mind. You can use any conforming cipher to create asymmetric keys and certificates. You just have to indicate which one is being used (and how long the associated key) early on in the certificate so the consumers can read and us Continue reading >>

Cryptography | Nist

Cryptography | Nist

NIST Report on Blockchain Technology Aims to Go Beyond the Hype Beguiling, baffling or boththats blockchain. Aiming to clarify the subject for the benefit of companies and other... NIST Announces Encryption Standard Finalists You can think of it as the Olympics of information scrambling. One of the most important competitions in the history of... NIST Announces Candidates For New Data Scrambling Standard Candidates for a new information scrambling code for the 21st century made their debut at an international cryptography... registration is at maximum capacity. we can no longer accept registration. NIST has initiated a process to solicit, evaluate, and standardize one or more... Cagdas Calik, Meltem Sonmez Turan, Rene C. Peralta The multiplicative complexity of a Boolean function is the minimum number of AND gates that are necessary and sufficient to implement the function over the... Dustin Moody, Larry Feldman, Gregory A. Witte In recent years, there has been a substantial amount of research on quantum computers - machines that exploit quantum mechanical phenomena to solve... David A. Cooper, Andrew R. Regenscheid, Murugiah P. Souppaya A wide range of software products (also known as code)--including firmware, operating systems, mobile applications, and application container images--must be... Meltem Sonmez Turan, Elaine B. Barker, John M. Kelsey, Kerry A. McKay, Mary L. Baish, Mike Boyle This Recommendation specifies the design principles and requirements for the entropy sources used by Random Bit Generators, and the tests for the validation of... Continue reading >>

Cryptography | Mit News

Cryptography | Mit News

Cryptographic system could enable crowdsourced genomics, with volunteers contributing information to privacy-protected databases. New isotope-detection method could prove compliance but avoid divulging secrets. A tool that would provide a secure foundation for any cryptographic system may be close at hand. Calculating encryption schemes theoretical security guarantees eases comparison, improvement. MIT hosts the first of three conferences on privacy policy For 65 years, most information-theoretic analyses of cryptographic systems have made a mathematical assumption that turns out to be wrong. A new algorithm solves a major problem with homomorphic encryption, which would let Web servers process data without decrypting it. MIT researchers show how to secure widely used encryption schemes against attackers who have intercepted examples of successful decryption. Interactive proofs mathematical games that underlie much modern cryptography work even if players try to use quantum information to cheat. Awards recognize a diverse range of technologies Savvy hackers can steal a computers secrets by timing its data storage transactions or measuring its power use. New research shows how to stop them. A new twist on pioneering work done by MIT cryptographers almost 30 years ago could lead to better ways of structuring contracts. A switch that lets one photon alter the quantum state of another could point the way to both practical quantum computers and a quantum Internet. Public-key system has worked and made Internet commerce feasible, but new systems are ready in case flaws are found. A new system for ensuring accurate election tallies, which MIT researchers helped to develop, passed its first real-world test last Tuesday. Continue reading >>

Quantum Crypto Upstart Quintessencelabs Hopes To Cut The Cord

Quantum Crypto Upstart Quintessencelabs Hopes To Cut The Cord

Quantum crypto upstart QuintessenceLabs hopes to cut the cord Canberra tips dollars into free-space next-gen comms development effort With AU$3.26m from Australia's government, quantum crypto outfit QuintessenceLabs has set to work getting the fibre out of its diet, and instead running quantum key exchange over free space. While there have been scientific demonstrations of quantum exchanges both terrestrially and between earth and satellites, QuintessenceLabs' project is towards product development its objective is to deliver up technologies and proof-of-concept data, to make the technology ready for commercialisation. The company's CTO John Leiseboer explained to The Register: The intent of the project is to take the technology that we have been working with and take some of the new research we're applying to improve capability and bring that to a point where it is ready to be productised and commercialised, The outcome won't be a product, but a technology that is ready for productisation. Quantum key distribution (QKD) uses quantum states to swap encryption keys between two parties. This provides a tamper-proof, eavesdropper-proof channel for the key exchange: any third party (say, a man-in-the-middle) degrades the quantum channel and the key exchange therefore fails. Once the two ends of the transaction have swapped keys, they use traditional encryption on conventional communication networks (which have much higher bandwidth than the QKD system). The grant to develop free-space QKD comes from the Department of Defence's Defence Innovation Hub, and once complete, the resulting systems will be deployed in Defence and other sensitive government networks. The company is one of several already offering (QKD) systems that operate over fibre networks, so Vulture South aske Continue reading >>

Cryptography News, Research And Analysis The Conversation Page 1

Cryptography News, Research And Analysis The Conversation Page 1

Crypto cash is catnip for criminals and a huge challenge to law enforcement so it's time to bring in a tough, jurisdiction-busting regulatory body. Who should be allowed inside? PopTika/Shutterstock.com Scholars dig in to the debate on whether police should be able to defeat or circumvent encryption systems. Are Australian police doing enough with the data they have? REUTERS/Phil Noble Michael Wilson , Queensland University of Technology and Monique Mann , Queensland University of Technology Many Australians are unaware of current police and intelligence powers when it comes to accessing our data. Embedded medical devices will continue to be vulnerable to cybersecurity threats. The pacemaker depicted is not made by Abbotts. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch James H. Hamlyn-Harris , Swinburne University of Technology Pacemakers are Internet of Things devices for the human body, but they're still not particularly secure. Keith Martin , Royal Holloway and Kenny Paterson , Royal Holloway Apple's design decisions don't please everyone, but in the iPhone the company created something truly revolutionary that has lasted. How secure are you? Rawpixel.com via shutterstock.com The first line of cyberdefense is having a good password. What does research say about what that actually means? How can investigators get into digital files? Sherlock Holmes and computer via shutterstock.com The technical consensus is clear: Adding 'backdoors' to encryption algorithms weakens everyone's security. So what are the police and intelligence agencies to do? What if the person flipping the coin cheats? Coin and hand via shutterstock.com How random is your randomness, and why does itmatter? David Zuckerman , University of Texas at Austin and Eshan Chattopadhyay , Institute for Advanced Study A new way to g Continue reading >>

Good News On The Privacy Front: No More Eu Demands For Crypto Backdoors

Good News On The Privacy Front: No More Eu Demands For Crypto Backdoors

Good news on the privacy front: no more EU demands for crypto backdoors Governments all around the world hate encryption. Unless they are being incredibly cunning by pretending they cant break strong encryption when they can, this seems to be because crypto really does keep messages and data safe from prying governmental eyes. Banning strong encryption is clearly a non-starter even the most clueless politician knows by now that e-commerce would collapse without it. As a result, the favorite approach has been the backdoor that magical weakness that somehow is only available to those operating lawfully, and not criminals or hostile governments. Thats despite the fact that every top security expert has explained that it is simply not possible to add backdoors to encryption while retaining the protection it is meant to offer. It finally seems that the message is getting through in the European Union, at least. Announcing a range of new measures to boost security in the EU, the Commissioner responsible for this area, Julian King, is reported by Politico.eu as saying: We are not in favor of so-called backdoors that is, systemic vulnerabilities What were trying to do today is move beyond the sometimes sterile debate of backdoors [versus] no backdoors Thats confirmed by a comment in the latest EU report on building an effective and genuine Security Union, where we read: the Commission is proposing a range of measures to support Member State authorities, without prohibiting, limiting or weakening encryption. Instead, King said that the European Commission would be offering EU law enforcement and judicial authorities a set of techniques, technical support and financial support to help them obtain information from encrypted sources. A fact sheet provides a few more details. The E Continue reading >>

Encryption News -- Sciencedaily

Encryption News -- Sciencedaily

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! The Digital Doctor's Visit: Enormous Potential Benefits With Equally Big Risk May 14, 2018 One out of at least 10 patients records doctors' visits, usually on a cell phone; Apple recently released a new Health Records feature built into the Health app as part of iOS 11.3. No longer a ... read more May 11, 2018 Chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and ... read more View all the latest top news in the health sciences, View all the latest top news in the physical sciences & technology, View all the latest top news in the environmental sciences, View all the latest top news in the social sciences & education, Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader: Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions? About This Site | Staff | Reviews | Contribute | Advertise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Policy | Terms of Use Copyright 2018 ScienceDaily or by other parties, where indicated. All rights controlled by their respective owners. Content on this website is for information only. It is not intended to provide medical or other professional advice. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of ScienceDaily, its staff, its contributors, or its partners. Financial support for ScienceDaily comes from advertisements and referral programs, where indicated. Continue reading >>

Genome Analysis With Near-complete Privacy Possible

Genome Analysis With Near-complete Privacy Possible

Genome analysis with near-complete privacy possible Stanford researchers used cryptography to cloak irrelevant genetic information in individuals genomes while revealing disease-associated mutations. They say the technique could vastly improve patient privacy. It is now possible to scour complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes without revealing any genetic information not directly associated with the inquiry, say Stanford University researchers. This genome cloaking technique, devised by biologists, computer scientists and cryptographers at the university, ameliorates many concerns about genomic privacy and potential discrimination based on an individuals genome sequence. Using the technique, the researchers were able to identify the responsible gene mutations in groups of patients with four rare diseases; pinpoint the likely culprit of a genetic disease in a baby by comparing his DNA with that of his parents; and determine which out of hundreds of patients at two individual medical centers with similar symptoms also shared gene mutations. They did this all while keeping 97 percent or more of the participants unique genetic information completely hidden from anyone other than the individuals themselves. We now have the tools in hand to make certain that genomic discrimination doesnt happen, said Gill Bejerano , PhD,associate professor of developmental biology, of pediatrics and of computer science. There are ways to simultaneously share and protect this information. Now we can perform powerful genetic analyses while also completely protecting our participants privacy. Bejerano shares senior authorship of the research, which was published Aug. 18 in Science , with Dan Boneh , PhD, professor of computer science and of electrical engineering. G Continue reading >>

Despite 2018 Bear Market, Top Crypto Markets Have Outperformed Fang Stocks Since 2017

Despite 2018 Bear Market, Top Crypto Markets Have Outperformed Fang Stocks Since 2017

Despite 2018 Bear Market, Top Crypto Markets Have Outperformed FANG Stocks Since 2017 Despite the 2018 cryptocurrency bear trend renewing gleeful predictions of bitcoins demise from mainstream financial analysts, the leading crypto markets have dramatically outperformed the FANG (Facebook, Apple, Netflix, and Google) stocks since the start of 2017. Also Read: Linkedin Names Blockchain Developer Top Emerging US Job of 2018 FANG Stocks Up Between 25% and 115% Since Start of 2017 As with the cryptocurrency markets, the FANG stocks broke into new record highs during early 2017, leading to a multi-month bull trend driven by accelerated momentum. However, in spite of currently posting year-to-date losses between 75% and 90%, the leading cryptocurrency markets have significantly outperformed the FANG stocks since the start of 2017. At the start of 2017, AAPL (Apple) was trading for approximately $115. After rallying throughout 2017, APPL continued to set record highs during 2018 before going parabolic in the third quarter following a breakout above $1 trillion in market cap. Since establishing an all-time high above $230 at the start of October, APPL has aggressively retraced roughly 30% back to currently trade for approximately $165, resulting in the stock having gained approximately 43% since January 2017. Of the FANG stocks, FB (Facebook) has seen the greatest price volatility in price over the past two years. Trading for approximately $115 at the start of January 2017, FB saw 12 months of predominantly bullish action before producing a roughly 23% retracement from a then-record high of $195 down to $150 during the first quarter of 2018. The second and third quarters of 2018 saw FB rally to post a record high of nearly $220, before suffering a violent 40% crash to establis Continue reading >>

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