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Cryptographic Controls Policy

Cryptographic Controls

Cryptographic Controls

GTA Enterprise Policies, Standards, and Guidelines The State has a fiduciary duty and at times a legal responsibility to adequately protect non-public, sensitive, personnel, constituent and/or proprietary information for which it owns or has custodial responsibility. There are circumstances when the risk of compromise or exposure to sensitive state data is greater than acceptable by the data owner, or by law, and compensating security control measures are insufficient. When increased confidentiality, authenticity, integrity or non-repudiation of information is critical, the use of cryptographic controls may be warranted. Cryptography is a discipline that embodies principles, means and methods for providing several security services: confidentiality, data integrity, authentication and non-repudiation. This standard establishes the conditions and minimum requirements for implementing cryptographic controls in state information systems requiring them. SCOPE; ENFORCEMENT; AUTHORITY; EXCEPTIONS Enterprise Information Security Charter PS-08-005 Agencies shall use cryptographic controls where the security objectives of confidentiality, authentication, non-repudiation or data integrity is categorized MODERATE or higher; or when the risk of compromise or exposure is greater than acceptable by the business or data owner; or when required by policy, law, or regulation. Agencies shall select cryptographic technology based on the security objectives, applicable policies, laws, regulations and performance requirements. Cryptographic modules, algorithms, keys and implementations used for State information systems shall be compliant with FIPS 140-2 or its successors. Use of cryptographic implementations that are not at least FIPS security level 1 compliant or do not meet minimum secur Continue reading >>

Notice To Exporters No. 113 - Export Controls On Cryptographic Goods

Notice To Exporters No. 113 - Export Controls On Cryptographic Goods

Notice to Exporters No. 113 - Export Controls on Cryptographic Goods 1.1 The purpose of this Notice is to inform the exporting community of: proposed changes to Canada's export controls on cryptographic goods as a result of recent changes to the Wassenaar Arrangement Lists of controlled goods and technology; and the procedures that have been implemented to streamline the export permit process for cryptographic goods to make the process more transparent. 2.1 The export of cryptographic goods and technologies is controlled for the purposes set out in Section 3(d) of the Export and Import Permits Act (EIPA): "3(d) to implement an intergovernmental arrangement or commitment." 2.2 The Export Control List (ECL) includes the publication "A Guide to Canada's Export Controls" (Guide). The ECL contains the list of items subject to export controls. The ECL is a regulation made pursuant to the EIPA as a means of controlling the export of goods from Canada. Cryptographic goods and technologies are enumerated as Item 1150 - Information Security of the Guide. 2.3 These controls are applied in a manner consistent with Canadian laws, regulations, policies and with Canada's multilateral commitments. The export of cryptographic goods and technologies is administered by the Export Controls Division (EPE) of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT). 3.1 The proposed export control changes, which are expected to take effect in 1999, and identified in this Notice, are consistent with the Canadian Cryptography Policy announced by the Honourable John Manley, Minister of Industry Canada in October 1998. The changes do not alter the Canadian Cryptography Policy which allows Canadians to use, develop or import any strength of cryptographic product. These changes do not al Continue reading >>

Ict Institute | Information Security Cryptographic Controls Policy Example

Ict Institute | Information Security Cryptographic Controls Policy Example

Information security Cryptographic controls policy example Using cryptographic controls such as encryption can help with information security, but only if it is applied correctly. To make sure it is used in the right way, it is recommended by standards such as ISO 27002 have a data encryption policy. In this article we share the ICT Institute data encryption policy, that is based on several best practice policies. This policy contains practical guidelines for the use of cryptographic controls. It covers encryption of data (the most common use of cryptography) but also other uses such as digital signatures and hash functions. The use of encryption is highly recommended by informations security standards. ISO standard 27002 for instance lists it as a best practice. We therefore strongly recommend any company to encourage people to think about the use of cryptography and encryption. Adopting a policy and communicating it within the company is one of the best ways to get started. You can start by just adopting this document as your policy and recommending anyone to follow the recommendations in this article. Later on the information security team can decide to make additions or create a separate policy. Please note that using cryptography right can be challenging. It is a technically difficult topic with some hidden pitfalls. If you are not doing it right, using encryption or cryptography gives a falls sense of security. This falls sense of security actually introduces more risks. This is why companies must have some policy with basic rules to prevent common pitfalls. Link to ISO 27001, ISO 27002 and Security Verified ISO 27001 does not explicitly address cryptography, because it focuses on the process and not on specific controls and policies. Most people using ISO 27001 Continue reading >>

Information Security

Information Security

This policy is intended to establish the requirements for the application of encryption to data and equipment as a means of protecting the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the Universitys information assets. It also sets out any relevant standards which those controls must meet. 2.1 The policy covers the application of encryption to University Information Asset Equipment (see Definitions below) and/or information categorised as Classified (Confidential and Highly Confidential) under the Universitys Information Classification. 3 Relationship with existing policies This policy forms part of the Information Security Management Framework. It should be read in conjunction with the Information Security Policy and its supporting policies, specifically, the Information Classification and Handling Policy, the IT Security Baseline Controls Policy and the Remote and Mobile Working Information Security Policy. In order to mitigate the risk of disclosure or tampering with Classified Information through interception, loss or theft of data or equipment, the University shall deploy appropriate cryptographic security controls in conjunction with procedures that manage the associated encryption keys. Where valid business reasons exist, exceptions to this policy can be signed off by Heads of Schools/Departments/Colleges using the Exception Form. University Classified Information shall normally be created and stored within a University managed secured system, as per the Universitys Information Handling Procedures. However, when University Classified Information is transmitted outside such a secure system, it shall be encrypted in transit. Encryption in transit may include encrypting a file sent via email, encrypting a portable hard disk being used to transfer data or the use Continue reading >>

Cryptographic Controls Technical Reference

Cryptographic Controls Technical Reference

Cryptographic controls technical reference Applies to: System Center Configuration Manager (Current Branch) System Center Configuration Manager uses signing and encryption to help protect the management of the devices in the Configuration Manager hierarchy. With signing, if data has been altered in transit, it's discarded. Encryption helps prevent an attacker from reading the data by using a network protocol analyzer. The primary hashing algorithm that Configuration Manager uses for signing is SHA-256. When two Configuration Manager sites communicate with each other, they sign their communications with SHA-256. The primary encryption algorithm implemented in Configuration Manager is 3DES. This is used for storing data in the Configuration Manager database and for client HTTP communication. When you use client communication over HTTPS, you can configure your public key infrastructure (PKI) to use RSA certificates with the maximum hashing algorithms and key lengths that are documented in PKI certificate requirements for System Center Configuration Manager . For most cryptographic operations for Windows-based operating systems, Configuration Manager uses SHA-2, 3DES and AES, and RSA algorithms from the Windows CryptoAPI library rsaenh.dll. See information about recommended changes in response to SSL vulnerabilities in About SSL Vulnerabilities . Cryptographic controls for Configuration Manager operations Information in Configuration Manager can be signed and encrypted, whether or not you use PKI certificates with Configuration Manager. Client policy assignments are signed by the self-signed site server signing certificate to help prevent the security risk of a compromised management point sending policies that have been tampered with. This is important if you are using In Continue reading >>

Yahoo! Data Breach And Weak Cryptographic Controls

Yahoo! Data Breach And Weak Cryptographic Controls

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY BEFORE CONTINUING WITH REGISTRATION AND/OR ACTIVATION OF THE VENAFI CLOUD SERVICE (SERVICE). This is a legal agreement between the end user (You) and Venafi, Inc. ("Venafi" or our). BY ACCEPTING THIS AGREEMENT, EITHER BY CLICKING A BOX INDICATING YOUR ACCEPTANCE AND/OR ACTIVATING AND USING THE VENAFI CLOUD SERVICE FOR WHICH YOU HAVE REGISTERED, YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU ARE ENTERING INTO THIS AGREEMENT ON BEHALF OF A COMPANY OR OTHER LEGAL ENTITY, YOU REPRESENT THAT YOU HAVE THE AUTHORITY TO BIND SUCH ENTITY AND ITS AFFILIATES TO THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS, IN WHICH CASE THE TERMS "YOU" OR "YOUR" SHALL REFER TO SUCH ENTITY AND ITS AFFILIATES. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE SUCH AUTHORITY, OR IF YOU DO NOT AGREE WITH THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS, YOU MUST NOT ACCEPT THIS AGREEMENT AND MAY NOT USE THE SERVICE. You shall not access the Service if You are Our competitor or if you are acting as a representative or agent of a competitor, except with Our prior written consent. In addition, You shall not access the Service for purposes of monitoring its availability, performance or functionality, or for any other benchmarking or competitive purposes, and you shall not perform security vulnerability assessments or penetration tests without the express written consent of Venafi. This Agreement was last updated on April 12, 2017. It is effective between You and Venafi as of the date of Your accepting this Agreement. The Venafi Cloud Service includes two separate services that are operated by Venafi as software as a service, each of which is separately licensed pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Agreement and each of which is considered a Service under this Agreement: the Venafi Cloud Risk Assessment Service or the Venafi Cloud for DevOps S Continue reading >>

10 Tips For A Cryptographic Key Management System In The Banking Industry - A Penetration Testing Perspective

10 Tips For A Cryptographic Key Management System In The Banking Industry - A Penetration Testing Perspective

10 Tips for a Cryptographic Key Management System in the Banking Industry - a Penetration Testing Perspective This article discusses the shortcomings and learnings from penetration testing of cryptographic key management systems for banking organizations.An alarming increase in data breaches indicates that many organizations fail to implement proper security controls and policies. Banking and financial services are seen as a potential target for data hungry hackers. Cryptography ensures to provide efficient security control but it doesnt have any value unless the keys are properly protected.Cryptographic techniques use keys that are managed and protected throughout their life cycle by a key management system. Why run a Key Management System security assessment for banks? A key management system solution implemented at bank should be tested for vulnerabilities and risks, due to the highly sensitive data that banking applications deal with. It is recommended that the findings of the assessment should be first addressed before initial deployment of the key management system. Penetration testing is a sub-category of security assessment, which includes experts developing penetration scenarios for the system as a whole and then evaluates the risk of a successful attack. Since key management is the hardest part of cryptography, penetration testing and auditing of crypto systems in banks are vital for successful operation.The scope of penetration testing should include personnel, facilities, and procedures. 1. Documentation of a Key Management System Most of the security controls employed by Internet banking applications are dependent on cryptography, and therefore also dependent on secret keys. A key management system Security Policy should be written so that the people respo Continue reading >>

10 Cryptographic Controls

10 Cryptographic Controls

The policy approach toward cryptographic controls should be protected. If an unwelcome party has knowledge of the techniques and tools employed they have a better chance of breaching security. A policy owner should be identified for implementation and key management. Depending upon information classification and risk assessment, encryption used should be selected to match on the basis of type, strength and quality. Specialist advice should be sought in this area. Encryption should be considered for all types of removable media and those which transmit information internally and externally. Encryption policy should take into account the controls used to detect / remove malware. Cryptographic controls can be used to provide further information providing confidentiality, authenticity, non-repudiation and authentication. Key management policy requires a policy for the generation, storage, archiving, retrieving, distributing, retiring and destroying keys. Keys should be protect from modification, loss or misuse. Any equipment used should be physically protected as part of a risk assessment. Activation and deactivation dates for keys should be considered as part of the management function to reduce the risks mentioned above, again subject to a risk assessment.Where public keys are issued from an external supplier, a Service Level Agreement should be in place to cover the responsibilities of the provider. You may need to consider handling legal requests for keys from legal authorities. Continue reading >>

Iso/iec 27002 Code Of Practice

Iso/iec 27002 Code Of Practice

ISO/IEC 27002 is a popular, internationally-recognized standard of good practice for information security. ISO/IEC 27002s lineage stretches back more than 30 years to the precursors of BS 7799. Like governance and risk management, information security management is a broad topic with ramifications throughout all organizations. Information security, and hence ISO/IEC 27002, is relevant to all types of organization including commercial enterprises of all sizes (from one-man-bands up to multinational giants), not-for-profits, charities, government departments and quasi-autonomous bodies - in fact any organization that handles and depends on information. The specific information risk and control requirements may differ in detail but there is a lot of common ground, for instance most organizations need to address the information risks relating to their employees plus contractors, consultants and the external suppliers of information services. The standard is explicitly concerned with information security, meaning the security of all forms of information (e.g. computer data, documentation, knowledge and intellectual property) and not just IT/systems security or cybersecurity as is the fashion of the day. ISO/IEC 27001 formally defines the mandatory requirements for an Information Security Management System (ISMS). It uses ISO/IEC 27002 to indicate suitable information security controls within the ISMS, but since ISO/IEC 27002 is merely a code of practice/guideline rather than a certification standard, organizations are free to select and implement other controls, or indeed adopt alternative complete suites of information security controls as they see fit. ISO/IEC 27001 incorporates a summary (little more than the section titles in fact) of controls from ISO/IEC 27002 in Anne Continue reading >>

The Importance Of A Cryptographic Controls Policy

The Importance Of A Cryptographic Controls Policy

The Importance of a Cryptographic Controls Policy Essential elements of an FDE implementation are proper planning, management buy-in, and robust policies. You need to carefully think through FDE's management and policy components before you move forward with a project. Technology is just one element of a sound strategy for protecting your data with encryption. I strongly recommend that any organization using encryption haveand strictly enforcea Cryptographic Controls Policy to cover any use of such tools in the organization. Here are the key elements to consider: Where is encryption allowed and warranted? Encryption should be specifically disallowed unless approved by management. You dont want every two bit administrator encrypting files with personal PGP keys. You also dont want administrators or especially end users making encryption decisions unilaterally. That might not meet company standards' also, if users leave unexpectedly, you could be stuck with unrecoverable data. Encryption needs to be approved and implemented under a management structure. How will the encryption keys be stored and protected? Ive seen plenty of companies with USB crypto keys plugged into their PCs at all times, negating any protection (and introducing an avenue for theft). Hardware crypto keys shouldnt leave the premises (unless they're specifically designed for mobile or offsite use). Ideally, they should be properly secured at days end. All crypto keys should be stored safely and backed up just like any other critical data. Keep in mind that crypto keys often aren't stored in the usual places you would normally back up. Properly secure your backups so that they arent lost or stolen. Depending on the scheme and implementation, a single lost or stolen crypto key could require significant re Continue reading >>

Export Of Cryptography From The United States

Export Of Cryptography From The United States

Export of cryptography from the United States This article's lead section may be too long for the length of the article. Please help by moving some material from it into the body of the article. Please read the layout guide and lead section guidelines to ensure the section will still be inclusive of all essential details. Please discuss this issue on the article's talk page . Export-restricted RSA encryption source code printed on a T-shirt made the T-shirt an export-restricted munition, as a freedom of speech protest against U.S. encryption export restrictions ( Back side ). [1] Changes in the export law means that it is no longer illegal to export this T-shirt from the U.S., or for U.S. citizens to show it to foreigners. The export of cryptographic technology and devices from the United States was severely restricted by U.S. law until 1992, but was gradually eased until 2000; some restrictions still remain. Since World War II , many governments, including the U.S. and its NATO allies, have regulated the export of cryptography for national security reasons, and, as late as 1992, cryptography was on the U.S. Munitions List as an Auxiliary Military Equipment. [2] Due to the enormous impact of cryptanalysis in World War II , these governments saw the military value in denying current and potential enemies access to cryptographic systems. Since the U.S. and U.K. believed they had better cryptographic capabilities than others, their intelligence agencies tried to control all dissemination of the more effective crypto techniques. They also wished to monitor the diplomatic communications of other nations, including those emerging in the post-colonial period and whose position on Cold War issues was vital. [3] The First Amendment made controlling all use of cryptography insid Continue reading >>

Iso 27001 Cryptography Policy Checklist What To Include?

Iso 27001 Cryptography Policy Checklist What To Include?

How to use the cryptography according to ISO 27001 control A.10 Today, information travels constantly from one part of the world to another through email, online transactions, USB flash drives, and external hard drives. Outside the facilities of the organization, the information is in many places, such as ISP servers, routers, switches, external suppliers, carries and more, before arriving at its final destination. Have you ever thought that this information could be accessible to people outside your organization? Take care if you want to be protected from unauthorized access, you need to encrypt the information! To clarify who should do what, and how, a policy for the use of cryptographic controls can help you a lot. So, in order to keep the steering wheel in your hands cryptographic policy considers several points. Let me show you what to take care of while setting up the policy. Cryptographic controls should be used whenever it is necessary protect confidential information against unauthorized access. Cryptography is the science of writing in secret code, while the encryption is the specific mechanism to convert the information in a different code that is understandable to those who know the mechanism of encryption/decryption. Therefore, some examples where we could use cryptographic controls include: You have a device with confidential information (external hard drive, flash drive, laptop, etc.) and it goes outside the organization. You want to send an email with confidential information. You have a file server with a folder to which all employees have access, but one (or more) of the files contain confidential information. You have a public website that users can access by entering username/password (in this case, the password is sensitive information which, if no Continue reading >>

Regulation Of Cryptographic Controls In Iso 27001

Regulation Of Cryptographic Controls In Iso 27001

Regulation of cryptographic controls in ISO 27001 What does regulation of cryptographic controls in ISO 27001 mean? The standard talks of the use of cryptographic controls in accordance with relevant laws, legislation and regulations. But in reality, what does this mean? And how can we identify and define this for our ISMS? Firstly, it is important to understand that the regulation of cryptographic controls in ISO 27001 is viewed differently in various geographical regions across the globe. For instance, some countries may have certain restrictions on the use of cryptography, whereas others may prohibit its use altogether. For example, in France cryptographic controls may only be used under certain criteria i.e. for the use of authentication and integrity purposes. It is important that organisations understand where these restrictions are, especially if operating in those countries. In addition to the use of cryptographic controls in those countries, there are also restrictions on the import and export of computer hardware used to perform those functions. It is important to understand this where, for example, end to end encryption is to be used in all countries that the organisation operates. If this is not possible, then the organisations security policy to encrypt all traffic cannot be realized. Crypto import controls vary from country to country, as shown in this diagram from 2010 courtesy of Additional considerations such as regulatory requirements also need to be understood. For example, card holder data must be encrypted in transit and at rest at all times under the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS). This should be understood and data both in motion and at rest encrypted to fulfill these requirements. Understanding this forms part of understa Continue reading >>

G - The International Scope Of Cryptography Policy | Cryptography's Role In Securing The Information Society | The National Academies Press

G - The International Scope Of Cryptography Policy | Cryptography's Role In Securing The Information Society | The National Academies Press

G The International Scope of Cryptography Policy G.1 INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY POLICY Any U.S. cryptography policy must take into account a number of international dimensions, the most important of which is the fact that the United States today does not have unquestioned dominance in the economic, financial, technological, and political affairs of the world as it might have had at the end of World War II. Thus, the United States is not in a position to dictate how the rest of the world should regard cryptographic technology as it becomes more relevant to nonmilitary and nondiplomatic matters. A second critical consideration is the international scope of business, as described in Chapter 1. Increasingly, firms need to be able to communicate with their subsidiaries or affiliates across national boundaries, as well as with nonaffiliated partners in joint ventures or in strategic alliances. Whether multinational or not, U.S. firms will need to communicate with customers and suppliers on a worldwide basis. Foreign customers need to be able to pay U.S. vendors, and vice versa, in a way that respects different monetary systems; thus, financial transactions occur increasingly over international boundaries, resulting in a truly global banking and financial system. To the extent that these various types of communications must be secure, cryptography provides a very important tool for Suggested Citation:"G - The International Scope of Cryptography Policy." National Research Council. 1996. Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5131. ensuring such security.1 Thus, differing national policies on cryptography that lead to difficulties in international communications work against overall nati Continue reading >>

Oecd Guidelines For Cryptography Policy

Oecd Guidelines For Cryptography Policy

Return to > Information security and privacy The OECD Recommendation Concerning Guidelines for Cryptography Policy were adopted on 27 March 1997. Reviews conducted since their adoption concluded that they continue to be adequate to address the issues and purpose for which they were developed. Please note that the OECD Council Recommendation does not include the preface nor the report no background and issues. Cryptography is a discipline that embodies principles, means, and methods for the transformation of data in order to hide its information content, establish its authenticity, prevent its undetected modification, prevent its repudiation, and/or prevent its unauthorised use. It is one of the technological means to provide security for data on information and communications systems. Cryptography can be used to protect the confidentiality of data, such as financial or personal data, whether that data is in storage or in transit. Cryptography can also be used to verify the integrity of data by revealing whether data has been altered and identifying the person or device that sent it. These techniques are critical to the development and use of national and global information and communications networks and technologies, as well as the development of electronic commerce. In recent years OECD Member countries have undertaken to develop and implement policies and laws relating to cryptography; in many countries these are still in the process of being developed. Disparities in policy may create obstacles to the evolution of national and global information and communications networks and hinder the development of international trade. The governments of Member countries have recognised the need for an internationally co-ordinated approach to facilitate the smooth development o Continue reading >>

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