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Cryptographic Algorithms Definition

What Is Public Key Cryptography (pkc)? - Definition From Techopedia

What Is Public Key Cryptography (pkc)? - Definition From Techopedia

Definition - What does Public Key Cryptography (PKC) mean? Public key cryptography (PKC) is an encryption technique that uses a paired public and private key (or asymmetric key) algorithm for secure data communication. A message sender uses a recipient's public key to encrypt a message. To decrypt the sender's message, only the recipient's private key may be used. The two types of PKC algorithms are RSA, which is an acronym related to this algorithm's inventors: Rivest, Shamir and Adelman and Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA). PKC encryption evolved to meet the growing secure communication demands of multiple sectors and industries, such as the military. PKC is also known as public key encyrption, asymmetric encryption, asymmetric cryptography, asymmetric cipher and asymmetric key encryption. Techopedia explains Public Key Cryptography (PKC) PKC is a cryptographic algorithm and cryptosystem component implemented by a variety of Internet standards, including Transport Layer Security (TLS), Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), GNU Privacy Guard (GPG), Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) websites. PKC facilitates secure communication through an insecure channel, which allows a message to be read by the intended recipient only. For example, A uses B's public key to encrypt a message to B, which can be decrypted using B's unique private key. PKC maintains email privacy and ensures communication security while messages are in transit or stored on mail servers. PKC is also a DSA component used to authenticate a private key verifiable by anyone with authorized public key access, which validates message origin and sender. Thus, PKC facilitates confidentiality, data integrity, authentication and nonrepudiation, which form key Information Assurance (IA) paramet Continue reading >>

Next Generation Encryption

Next Generation Encryption

Appendix A: Minimum Cryptography Recommendations Over the years, numerous cryptographic algorithms have been developed and used in many different protocols and functions. Cryptography is by no means static. Steady advances in computing and the science of cryptanalysis have made it necessary to adopt newer, stronger algorithms and larger key sizes. Older algorithms are supported in current products to ensure backward compatibility and interoperability. However, some older algorithms and key sizes no longer provide adequate protection from modern threats and should be replaced. This paper summarizes the security of cryptographic algorithms and parameters, gives concrete recommendations regarding which cryptography should be used and which cryptography should be replaced, and describes alternatives and mitigations. Recommendations for Cryptographic Algorithms The following table can help customers migrate from legacy ciphers to current or more secure ciphers. The table explains each cryptographic algorithm that is available, the operations that each algorithm supports, and whether an algorithm is Cisco's best recommendation. Customers should pay particular attention to algorithms designated asAvoidorLegacy. The status labels are explained following the table. Table 1. Recommendations for Cryptographic Algorithms Avoid:Algorithms that are marked asAvoiddo not provide adequate security against modern threats and should not be used to protect sensitive information. It is recommended that these algorithms be replaced with stronger algorithms. Legacy:Legacy algorithms provide a marginal but acceptable security level. They should be used only when no better alternatives are available, such as when interoperating with legacy equipment. It is recommended that these legacy algorit Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Cryptography

An Overview Of Cryptography

1998-2018 A much shorter version of this paper first appeared in Handbook on Local Area Networks (Auerbach, Sept. 1998). Since that time, this paper has taken on a life of its own... Does increased security provide comfort to paranoid people? Or does security provide some very basic protections that we are naive to believe that we don't need? During this time when the Internet provides essential communication between literally billions of people and is used as a tool for commerce, social interaction, and the exchange of an increasing amount of personal information, security has become a tremendously important issue for every user to deal with. There are many aspects to security and many applications, ranging from secure commerce and payments to private communications and protecting health care information. One essential aspect for secure communications is that of cryptography. But it is important to note that while cryptography is necessary for secure communications, it is not by itself sufficient. The reader is advised, then, that the topics covered here only describe the first of many steps necessary for better security in any number of situations. This paper has two major purposes. The first is to define some of the terms and concepts behind basic cryptographic methods, and to offer a way to compare the myriad cryptographic schemes in use today. The second is to provide some real examples of cryptography in use today. (See Section A.4 for some additional commentary on this...) DISCLAIMER: Several companies, products, and services are mentioned in this tutorial. Such mention is for example purposes only and, unless explicitly stated otherwise, should not be taken as a recommendation or endorsement by the author. Cryptography is the science of secret writing is an anc Continue reading >>

Consensus Cryptographic Algorithms

Consensus Cryptographic Algorithms

This document specifies conformance criteria for choices of cryptographic algorithms. Conformance with this document establishes that an implementation supports the community consensus for choice of cryptographic algorithms at the time of publication and that the implementation can interoperate with other implementations compliant with the specified criteria. This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-Drafts is at Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." This Internet-Draft will expire on September 18, 2014. Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the document authors. All rights reserved. This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal Provisions Relating to IETF Documents (in effect on the date of publication of this document. Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as described in the Simplified BSD License. Many IETF protocols may use of cryptographic algorithms to provide confidentiality, integrity, or non-repudiation. For the mechanisms to work properly, communicating parties must support the same cryptographic algorithm Continue reading >>

Definition Of Cryptography | What Is Cryptography ? Cryptography Meaning - The Economic Times

Definition Of Cryptography | What Is Cryptography ? Cryptography Meaning - The Economic Times

Definition: Cryptography is associated with the process of converting ordinary plain text into unintelligible text and vice-versa. It is a method of storing and transmitting data in a particular form so that only those for whom it is intended can read and process it. Cryptography not only protects data from theft or alteration, but can also be used for user authentication. Description: Earlier cryptography was effectively synonymous with encryption but nowadays cryptography is mainly based on mathematical theory and computer science practice. Confidentiality - Information cannot be understood by anyone Integrity - Information cannot be altered. Non-repudiation - Sender cannot deny his/her intentions in the transmission of the information at a later stage Authentication - Sender and receiver can confirm each Cryptography is used in many applications like banking transactions cards, computer passwords, and e- commerce transactions. Three types of cryptographic techniques used in general. Symmetric-key Cryptography: Both the sender and receiver share a single key. The sender uses this key to encrypt plaintext and send the cipher text to the receiver. On the other side the receiver applies the same key to decrypt the message and recover the plain text. Public-Key Cryptography: This is the most revolutionary concept in the last 300-400 years. In Public-Key Cryptography two related keys (public and private key) are used. Public key may be freely distributed, while its paired private key, remains a secret. The public key is used for encryption and for decryption private key is used. Hash Functions: No key is used in this algorithm. A fixed-length hash value is computed as per the plain text that makes it impossible for the contents of the plain text to be recovered. Hash func Continue reading >>

What Is Cryptography? - Definition From Whatis.com

What Is Cryptography? - Definition From Whatis.com

Cryptography is a method of storing and transmitting data in a particular form so that only those for whom it is intended can read and process it. Bringing development and IT ops together can help you address many app deployment challenges. Our expert guide highlights the benefits of a DevOps approach. Explore how you can successfully integrate your teams to improve collaboration, streamline testing, and more. This email address doesnt appear to be valid. This email address is already registered. Please login . You have exceeded the maximum character limit. Please provide a Corporate E-mail Address. By submitting my Email address I confirm that I have read and accepted the Terms of Use and Declaration of Consent. By submitting your personal information, you agree that TechTarget and its partners may contact you regarding relevant content, products and special offers. You also agree that your personal information may be transferred and processed in the United States, and that you have read and agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy . Cryptography is closely related to the disciplines of cryptology and cryptanalysis . Cryptography includes techniques such as microdots, merging words with images, and other ways to hide information in storage or transit. However, in today's computer-centric world, cryptography is most often associated with scrambling plaintext (ordinary text, sometimes referred to as cleartext) into ciphertext (a process called encryption ), then back again (known as decryption). Individuals who practice this field are known as cryptographers. Modern cryptography concerns itself with the following four objectives: 1) Confidentiality (the information cannot be understood by anyone for whom it was unintended) 2) Integrity (the information cannot be Continue reading >>

What Is Advanced Encryption Standard (aes)? - Definition From Whatis.com

What Is Advanced Encryption Standard (aes)? - Definition From Whatis.com

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) started development of AES in 1997 when it announced the need for a successor algorithm for the Data Encryption Standard (DES) , which was starting to become vulnerable to brute-force attacks . This new, advanced encryption algorithm would be unclassified and had to be "capable of protecting sensitive government information well into the next century," according to the NIST announcement of the process for development of an advanced encryption standard algorithm. It was intended to be easy to implement in hardware and software, as well as in restricted environments (for example, in a smart card ) and offer good defenses against various attack techniques. The selection process for this new symmetric key algorithm was fully open to public scrutiny and comment; this ensured a thorough, transparent analysis of the designs submitted. NIST specified the new advanced encryption standard algorithm must be a block cipher capable of handling 128 bit blocks, using keys sized at 128, 192, and 256 bits; other criteria for being chosen as the next advanced encryption standard algorithm included: Security: Competing algorithms were to be judged on their ability to resist attack, as compared to other submitted ciphers, though security strength was to be considered the most important factor in the competition. Cost: Intended to be released under a global, nonexclusive and royalty-free basis, the candidate algorithms were to be evaluated on computational and memory efficiency. Implementation: Algorithm and implementation characteristics to be evaluated included the flexibility of the algorithm; suitability of the algorithm to be implemented in hardware or software; and overall, relative simplicity of implementation. Fifteen compet Continue reading >>

What Is Cryptography?

What Is Cryptography?

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video From the course by University of Colorado System Classical Cryptosystems and Core Concepts Course 1 of 4 in the Specialization Introduction to Applied Cryptography Welcome to Introduction to Applied Cryptography. Cryptography is an essential component of cybersecurity. The need to protect sensitive information and ensure the integrity of industrial control processes has placed a premium on cybersecurity skills in todays information technology market. Demand for cybersecurity jobs is expected to rise 6 million globally by 2019, with a projected shortfall of 1.5 million, according to Symantec, the worlds largest security software vendor. According to Forbes, the cybersecurity market is expected to grow from $75 billion in 2015 to $170 billion by 2020. In this specialization, you will learn basic security issues in computer communications, classical cryptographic algorithms, symmetric-key cryptography, public-key cryptography, authentication, and digital signatures. These topics should prove especially useful to you if you are new to cybersecurity Course 1, Classical Cryptosystems, introduces you to basic concepts and terminology related to cryptography and cryptanalysis. It is recommended that you have a basic knowledge of computer science and basic math skills such as algebra and probability. In this module we present an introduction to cryptography, differentiate between codes and ciphers, describe cryptanalysis, and identify the guiding principles of modern cryptography. After completing this course you will be able to read material related to cryptographic systems, understanding the basic terminology and concepts. You will also have an appreciation for the h Continue reading >>

Performance Evaluation Of Cryptographic Algorithms Over Iot Platforms And Operating Systems

Performance Evaluation Of Cryptographic Algorithms Over Iot Platforms And Operating Systems

Performance Evaluation of Cryptographic Algorithms over IoT Platforms and Operating Systems Correspondence should be addressed to Geovandro C. C. F. Pereira Received 1 May 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 23 August 2017 Copyright 2017 Geovandro C. C. F. Pereira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The deployment of security services over Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) and IoT devices brings significant processing and energy consumption overheads. These overheads are mainly determined by algorithmic efficiency, quality of implementation, and operating system. Benchmarks of symmetric primitives exist in the literature for WSN platforms but they are mostly focused on single platforms or single operating systems. Moreover, they are not up to date with respect to implementations and/or operating systems versions which had significant progress. Herein, we provide time and energy benchmarks of reference implementations for different platforms and operating systems and analyze their impact. Moreover, we not only give the first benchmark results of symmetric cryptography for the Intel Edison IoT platform but also describe a methodology of how to measure energy consumption on that platform. The progressive growth of IoT applications has been broadening the spectrum of transmitted data, bringing an increasing demand of security services like data confidentiality, integrity, and source authentication. However, the attempt to employ security mechanisms that are typical of conventional networks is likely to cause undesirable effects due to hardware-related resource limitations. The most relevan Continue reading >>

Cryptography Defined/brief History

Cryptography Defined/brief History

If you want to keep information secret, you have two possible strategies: hide the existence of the information, or make the information unintelligible. Cryptography is the art and science of keeping information secure from unintended audiences, of encrypting it. Conversely, cryptanalysis is the art and science of breaking encoded data. The branch of mathematics encompassing both cryptography and cryptanalysis is cryptology. Modern cryptography uses sophisticated mathematical equations (algorithms) and secret keys to encrypt and decrypt data. Today, cryptography is used to provide secrecy and integrity to our data, and both authentication and anonymity to our communications. Cryptology was a public field in the United States until World War I, when the Army & Navy realized its value to national security and began working in secret. Through the early 1970s, cryptology was dominated by the government both because computers were very expensive and because the government released very little information. It returned to mainstream academic and scientific communities in a sort of cryptology renaissance when the computer revolution made computers more readily available and when demand for encryption increased due to fundamental changes in the ways America communicated. The increase in demand for cryptography was driven by industry interest (e.g., financial services required secure electronic transactions and businesses needed to secure trade secrets stored on computers), and individual interest (e.g., secure wireless communications). Digital communications were obvious candidates for encryption. Modern cryptographers emphasize that security should not depend on the secrecy of the encryption method (or algorithm), only the secrecy of the keys. The secret keys must not be revea Continue reading >>

Symmetric Vs. Asymmetric Encryption What Are Differences?

Symmetric Vs. Asymmetric Encryption What Are Differences?

Symmetric vs. Asymmetric Encryption What are differences? / SSL Information /Symmetric vs. Asymmetric Encryption What are differences? Information security has grown to be a colossal factor, especially with modern communication networks, leaving loopholes that could be leveraged to devastating effects. This article presents a discussion on two popular encryption schemes that can be used to tighten communication security in Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption. In principle, the best way to commence this discussion is to start from the basics first. Thus, we look at the definitions of algorithms and key cryptographic concepts and then dive into the core part of the discussion where we present a comparison of the two techniques. An algorithm is basically a procedure or a formula for solving a data snooping problem. An encryption algorithm is a set of mathematical procedure for performing encryption on data . Through the use of such an algorithm, information is made in the cipher text and requires the use of a key to transforming the data into its original form. This brings us to the concept of cryptography that has long been used in information security in communication systems. Cryptography is a method of using advanced mathematical principles in storing and transmitting data in a particular form so that only those whom it is intended can read and process it. Encryption is a key concept in cryptography It is a process whereby a message is encoded in a format that cannot be read or understood by an eavesdropper. The technique is old and was first used by Caesar to encrypt his messages using Caesar cipher. A plain text from a user can be encrypted to a ciphertext, then send through a communication channel and no eavesdropper can interfere with the plain text. When it reach Continue reading >>

Cryptography - Wikipedia

Cryptography - Wikipedia

"Secret code" redirects here. For the Aya Kamiki album, see Secret Code . "Cryptology" redirects here. For the David S. Ware album, see Cryptology (album) . Cryptography or cryptology (from Greek krypts, "hidden, secret"; and graphein, "writing", or - -logia , "study", respectively [1] ) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries . [2] More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages; [3] various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality , data integrity , authentication , and non-repudiation [4] are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics , computer science , electrical engineering , communication science , and physics . Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce , chip-based payment cards , digital currencies , computer passwords , and military communications . Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption , the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense . The originator of an encrypted message shared the decoding technique needed to recover the original information only with intended recipients, thereby precluding unwanted persons from doing the same. The cryptography literature often uses the name Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve (" eavesdropper ") for the adversary. [5] Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World WarI and the advent of computers in World WarII , the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cry Continue reading >>

3 Standards And Security Implications

3 Standards And Security Implications

The workshops third session focused on standards for cryptographic agility as well as the security implications for various levels and types of agility. Russ Housley described the process and perspective of the recent Request for Comments (RFC) 7696 guidelines from the Internet Engineering Task Force, and David McGrew drew on real-world experiences and data to highlight lessons learned and future directions. RFC 7696: GUIDELINES FOR CRYPTOGRAPHIC ALGORITHM AGILITY AND SELECTING MANDATORY-TO-IMPLEMENT ALGORITHMS Russ Housley, founder of Vigil Security, LLC, and past chair of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), presented on RFC 7696: Guidelines for Cryptographic Algorithm Agility and Selecting Mandatory-to-Implement Algorithms. RFC 7696, which is also known as Best Current Practices 201, was initiated by IAB under its Privacy and Security Program. After the early draft development and initial review and comment process, the project was transferred to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Security Area Advisory Group. Before publishing the document in November 2015, IETF shepherded it through a broader review process and achieved consensus. Suggested Citation:"3 Standards and Security Implications." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Cryptographic Agility and Interoperability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24636. The goal of RFC 7696 is simple to state but not so to achieve: to ensure that security protocols can migrate from one algorithm or suite of algorithms to a newer, stronger one when needed. Tackling this, Housley said, requires viewing the problem from two perspectives: that of the protocol designer and that of the protocol implementer. Protocol implementers need to be a Continue reading >>

Cwe - Cwe-325: Missing Required Cryptographic Step (3.1)

Cwe - Cwe-325: Missing Required Cryptographic Step (3.1)

The software does not implement a required step in a cryptographic algorithm, resulting in weaker encryption than advertised by that algorithm. Cryptographic implementations should follow the algorithms that define them exactly, otherwise encryption can be weaker than expected. The table(s) below shows the weaknesses and high level categories that are related to this weakness. These relationships are defined as ChildOf, ParentOf, MemberOf and give insight to similar items that may exist at higher and lower levels of abstraction. In addition, relationships such as PeerOf and CanAlsoBe are defined to show similar weaknesses that the user may want to explore. Relevant to the view "Research Concepts" (CWE-1000) This issue can be introduced when the requirements for the algorithm are not clearly stated. The listings below show possible areas for which the given weakness could appear. These may be for specific named Languages, Operating Systems, Architectures, Paradigms, Technologies, or a class of such platforms. The platform is listed along with how frequently the given weakness appears for that instance. Class: Language-Independent (Undetermined Prevalence) The table below specifies different individual consequences associated with the weakness. The Scope identifies the application security area that is violated, while the Impact describes the negative technical impact that arises if an adversary succeeds in exploiting this weakness. The Likelihood provides information about how likely the specific consequence is expected to be seen relative to the other consequences in the list. For example, there may be high likelihood that a weakness will be exploited to achieve a certain impact, but a low likelihood that it will be exploited to achieve a different impact. Continue reading >>

Guide To Cryptography

Guide To Cryptography

To ensure that cryptography is safely used to protect the confidentiality and integrity of sensitive user data. Initially confined to the realms of academia and the military, cryptography has become ubiquitous thanks to the Internet. Common every day uses of cryptography include mobile phones, passwords, SSL, smart cards, and DVDs. Cryptography has permeated everyday life, and is heavily used by many web applications. Cryptography (or crypto) is one of the more advanced topics of information security, and one whose understanding requires the most schooling and experience. It is difficult to get right because there are many approaches to encryption, each with advantages and disadvantages that need to be thoroughly understood by web solution architects and developers. In addition, serious cryptography research is typically based in advanced mathematics and number theory, providing a serious barrier to entry. The proper and accurate implementation of cryptography is extremely critical to its efficacy. A small mistake in configuration or coding will result in removing a large degree of the protection it affords and rending the crypto implementation useless against serious attacks. A good understanding of crypto is required to be able to discern between solid products and snake oil. The inherent complexity of crypto makes it easy to fall for fantastic claims from vendors about their product. Typically, these are a breakthrough in cryptography or unbreakable or provide "military grade" security. If a vendor says "trust us, we have had experts look at this, chances are they weren't experts! Cryptographic systems can provide one or more of the following four services. It is important to distinguish between these, as some algorithms are more suited to particular tasks, but not Continue reading >>

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