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Exsulcoin | Blockchain Technology For Refugees

Exsulcoin | Blockchain Technology For Refugees

Send email request to [email protected] and include your full name and copy of your ID (picture is fine). You will receive an agreement in response. Review it, sign it, and send it back. Attached to the agreement will be banking information, as well as an Ether wallet address. You can choose to send ETH to our wallet address, or fiat currency to our bank. We will confirm your wallet details with you and send your XUL tokens directly to you. James Song is the founder and CEO of FaircapX, a startup focused on solving Myanmars biggest challenges. His work at Faircap Partners led him to develop local software engineering teams in an effort to build Myanmars technology sector, and those experiences have evolved into what is now FaircapX, ExsulCoin, and ExsulChain. James currently leads the team with his deep technical knowledge and substantial experience working with refugees in the United States, Myanmar, Bangladesh, and Uganda. As an attorney with expertise in blockchain, smart contracts, and cyber security, Cat leverages her unique skillset to help innovate technology that is compliant across the many jurisdictions where refugees live and work. Laura has over 10 years of experience as a software engineer and consultant. She brings deep fintech knowledge to the ExsulCoin team, having led several bank projects as software architect and team leader. Dario Bravo has been a software engineer for the last 15 years and brings broad practical understanding to his craft, having worked in several industries, including finance, media, banking, and gaming. Coco is a graphic designer and illustrator from Bangkok, Thailand, and is responsible for creating many of the beloved animated characters the Exsul app uses in its childrens content. In addition to creating beautiful thin Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Technology Is Helping Syrian Refugees

How Blockchain Technology Is Helping Syrian Refugees

28/11/2017 8:01 PM AEDT | Updated 28/11/2017 8:01 PM AEDT How Blockchain Technology Is Helping Syrian Refugees This camp in the heart of the Jordanian desert is home to displaced people, and a world first tech initiative. Azraq Refugee Camp is a 15 kilometre-wide sea of corrugated aluminium houses in the heart of the vast Jordanian desert. The people that live there are detained by the barbed wire that surrounds the entire complex which is located an hour and a half from the country's capital city, Amman. The people who live in the camp have escaped the horrors of the Syrian Civil War and reside there indefinitely. The knowledge that life as it was has been destroyed is coupled with the overwhelming uncertainty of when normality might return. From within the strange environment of the camp and the indistinct future, lies a bastion of normalcy for these people -- the supermarket. In the refugee camp the supermarket is much more than a place to shop or purchase food though: Here it is a vital fibre in the social fabric of a makeshift community. Regardless of whether shoppers go to buy one tiny thing or to spend a while weaving through the isles, the supermarket is a hub for human interaction -- a place to talk and to share stories. It's unbelievable to think then, that a place that is so remote and isolated could be home to a world first initiative involving the emerging Blockchain technology . The Building Blocks Project is the brain child of Houman Haddad, Regional CBT Advisor for United Nations World Food Programme (WFP). The project aims to make cash-based transactions between the WFP and the beneficiary faster, cheaper and more secure. Prior to the project's launch at the Azraq Refugee Camp in Jordan in May 2017 , it was first trialled in Pakistan and also in King A Continue reading >>

Microsoft, Accenture Help Un With Refugee Global Id System | Fortune

Microsoft, Accenture Help Un With Refugee Global Id System | Fortune

Americans can show all sorts of documents, such as Social Security cards and diplomas, to show who they are. But for those from countries torn apart by war or political chaos, its much harder to prove their identities. Thats why a new software tool, unveiled on Monday at the United Nations, is a big deal. It will let millions of refugees and other without documents whip out a phone or other device to quickly show who they are and where they came from. The tool, developed in part by Microsoft and Accenture, combines biometric data (like a fingerprint or an iris scan) and a new form of record-keeping technology, known as the blockchain, to create a permanent identity. In practice, this means someone arriving at a border crossing could prove he or she had come from a refugee camp and qualify for aid. Or a displaced person in a new country could use the ID system to call up his or her school records. The tool doesnt have a name yet since its at the prototype stage but will get one soon. Approximately one-sixth of the worlds population cannot participate in cultural, political, economic and social life because they lack the most basic information: documented proof of their existence. Establishing identity is critical to accessing a wide range of activities, including education, healthcare, voting, banking, mobile communications, housing, and family and childcare benefits, Accenture explained in a news release. The companies have been working on the new system since last year, and unveiled the prototype at a summit in New York called United Nations ID2020 . Here is a picture that shows how the system looks on the phone of a user: Digital ID is a basic human right, David Treat, a managing director at Accenture, tells Fortune. He likens the new ID technology to the Internet-na Continue reading >>

Use Blockchain To Educate And Empower Refugees, Says Exsulcoin Ceo

Use Blockchain To Educate And Empower Refugees, Says Exsulcoin Ceo

Use blockchain to educate and empower refugees, says ExsulCoin CEO LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - For millions of refugees living in makeshift camps, access to education, jobs and financial support is an uphill struggle. Developers of a new blockchain platform are hoping to change that. James Song, chief executive and founder of ExsulCoin, holds up a bracelet made by Rohingya women refugees, in London, Britain, April 27, 2018. The startup is trying to empower and educate refugees using blockchain technology. Thomson Reuters Foundation/Serena Chaudhry The startup ExsulCoin aims to help refugees build digital identities by using blockchain technology to establish records of their educational and professional histories, making it easier for employers to screen and hire them. The blockchain-based platform also includes apps for education and vocational training. The biggest problem for refugees is education, said Chief executive and founder James Song. And even if its not basic education, it would be integrated-related education. Song said training can give refugees in camps job skills to help them make a living, while apps can also provide those who are resettled with information - on laws, for example - to help them integrate into their new surroundings. ExsulCoin tested an app last year with 10 women in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh, which houses many of the over 800,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled persecution in Myanmar. The women completed a business training module through the education app, learning how to make bracelets with Myanmar jade and market them using social media. The plan is to sell the bracelets commercially, Song said, after scaling up production and teaching other women the skills. ExsulCoin will assist in shipping the product, he adde Continue reading >>

Inside The Jordan Refugee Camp That Runs On Blockchain

Inside The Jordan Refugee Camp That Runs On Blockchain

Inside the Jordan refugee camp that runs on blockchain Syrian refugees could regain legal identities that were lost when they fled their homes. A few times a month, Bassam pushes a shopping cart through the aisles of a grocery store stocked with bags of rice, a small selection of fresh vegetables, and other staples. Today hes wearing a black sweater tucked into denim jeans, which are themselves tucked into calf-high boots caked in mud. The Tazweed Supermarket, where hes shopping, is on the periphery of a 75,000-person refugee camp in the semi-arid Jordanian steppe, six and a half miles from the Syrian border. Computer scientists have found the longest straight line you could sail without hitting land At the checkout counter, a cashier tallies the total, but Bassam doesnt pay with cash or a credit card. Instead he lifts his head to a black box and gazes into the mirror and camera at its center. A moment later, an image of Bassams eye flashes on the cashiers screen. Bassam collects his receiptwhich reads EyePay and World Food Programme Building Blocks across the topand walks out into the noonday chaos of the Zaatari refugee camp. This story is part of our May/June 2018 Issue Though Bassam may not know it, his visit to the supermarket involves one of the first uses of blockchain for humanitarian aid. By letting a machine scan his iris, he confirmed his identity on a traditional United Nations database, queried a family account kept on a variant of the Ethereum blockchain by the World Food Programme (WFP), and settled his bill without opening his wallet. (Left) Bassam gets his eye scanned to pay at the markets checkout. (Right) A mural at the Zaatari camp. Started in early 2017, Building Blocks, as the program is known, helps the WFP distribute cash-for-food aid to over 10 Continue reading >>

Blockchain's Brand New World Is Being Built By Refugees | Wired

Blockchain's Brand New World Is Being Built By Refugees | Wired

How Refugees Are Helping Create Blockchain's Brand New World Without legal proof of your existence , you cant do many things. You cant vote, and you cant drive. You cant start a bank account, or access government services. Good luck getting into a bar. According to the World Bank, more than a billion people have no way to prove their identity. The un-verified include refugees, trafficked children, the homeless, and other people who slip through society without developing many institutional affiliations. The problem feeds on itself: the longer a person goes without associations, the harder it is provide enough of a record to create them. But as bitcoins popularity swells, a small group of cryptocurrency enthusiasts and social entrepreneurs is trying to put the cryptographic ledger that underpins the novel currency to work in service of the vulnerable. They see promise in using blockchain technology to create an immutable record, one that has the added side effect of making financial transactions cheaper and more efficient. Though best known for underpinning volatile cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin and Ethereum, blockchain technology has a number of qualities which make it appealing for record-keeping. A distributed ledger doesnt depend on a central authority to verify its existence, or to facilitate transactions within it, which makes it less vulnerable to tampering. By using applications that are built on the chain, individuals may be able to build up records over time, use those records across borders as a form of identityessentially creating the trust they need to interact with the world, without depending on a centralized authority, like a government or a bank, to vouch for them. The longer a person goes without associations, the harder it is tocreate a record For no Continue reading >>

Blockchain Firm Gives Refugees Aid And Identity

Blockchain Firm Gives Refugees Aid And Identity

Blockchain firm gives refugees aid and identity AID Tech co-founders CEO Joseph Thompson and chief operating officer Niall Dennehy Blockchain firm gives refugees aid and identity Some of the most innovative developments in financial tech are coming out of the developing world, where populations denied for decades the type of access to banking services that others enjoyed are finding new ways of handling money and transacting commerce. Blockchain firm gives refugees aid and identity Some of the most innovative developments in financial tech are coming out of the developing world, where populations denied for decades the type of access to banking services that others enjoyed are finding new ways of handling money and transacting commerce. Some of the most innovative developments in financial tech are coming out of the developing world, where populations denied for decades the type of access to banking services that others enjoyed are finding new ways of handling money and transacting commerce. Irish fintech companies are increasingly tapping into this innovation. Aid Tech is a startup that is looking at new ways of making the sometimes controversial charity sector more transparent The company has just recently completed a funding round with some prominent US, European and Asian venture capitalists and private investors to raise $2m (1.6m). A formal announcement will be made in the coming weeks. It is also an example of a fintech company brought into being by the former staff of one of the big Irish-based tech multinationals, a dynamic that is seen as a key advantage for the growth of the sector in Ireland. Aid Tech's co-founders, Niall Dennehy and Joseph Thompson, met while working for Ericsson in Dun Laoghaire as technical consultants, travelling to other Ericsson sites Continue reading >>

Microsoft And Accenture Develop Blockchain Id System For Refugees

Microsoft And Accenture Develop Blockchain Id System For Refugees

Microsoft and Accenture develop blockchain ID system for refugees The blockchain system would provide refugees with the ability to present their IDs via an app on their smartphones when required to access basic services such as education and healthcare. Accenture and Microsoft have developed a digital identity prototype using blockchain technology as part of a humanitarian project to provide legal ID to more than 1.1 billion people around the world, including 7 million refugees, by 2020. The prototype -- revealed this week at the second summit of ID2020, a public-private consortium promoting the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goal of providing legal ID for everyone -- combines a person's biometric information such as their fingerprint or retina scan with blockchain, the record-keeping technology that underpins cryptocurrencies, to create a legal identity. When operational, the tool will provide refugees with the ability to present their IDs via an app on their smartphones at border crossings to prove they're coming from a refugee camp and qualify for aid. The app will also enable displaced individuals to share their identities when required to access basic services such as education and healthcare. "Approximately one-sixth of the world's population cannot participate in cultural, political, economic, and social life because they lack the most basic information: Documented proof of their existence," Accenture said in an announcement. "Establishing identity is critical to accessing a wide range of activities, including education, healthcare, voting, banking, mobile communications, housing, and family and childcare benefits." The prototype does not store personally identifiable information on a centralised system; rather, it inter-operates with existing ident Continue reading >>

Finland Solves Refugee Identity With Blockchain Debit Cards

Finland Solves Refugee Identity With Blockchain Debit Cards

Finland Solves Refugee Identity with Blockchain Debit Cards Blockchain-enabled debit cards are the solution Finland has found to documenting its incoming refugees. Finland has said it has solved the problem of refugee identity, using the Blockchain to record data of new residents. As part of its commitment to support asylum seekers, Finland is providing arrivals with a prepaid debit card instead of cash, and linking the identity of cardholders to the Blockchain. As Technology Review reports , quoting Finnish Immigration Service director Jouko Salonen, the issue of strongly authenticated identity is no longer a problem. We have found a way to solve that, he told the publication. The cards are the product of local startup MONI, and function more like a bank account replacement than a simple payment device. In issuing them, Finnish authorities are able to track both spending and identity with the added benefit that the Blockchain data is immutable. Our purpose has always been financial inclusion, and especially to help people in developing countries, MONI CEO Antti Pennanen added. A cross-Europe effort to solve the problem of refugee identity is currently a topic of debate for the European Parliament. A task force is looking into the options for using the Ethereum Blockchain to alleviate the problem, with the latest information showing an allocation of 850,000 ($1 mln) for 2017 having been half spent. [...] EU governments in partnerships with other countries and organizations (e.g. NGOs) need innovative solutions to manage increasing flows of migrants and their temporary stay in different countries, the organization commented last month. Continue reading >>

An Ethereum Blockchain Is Restoring The Identity Of Syrian Refugees

An Ethereum Blockchain Is Restoring The Identity Of Syrian Refugees

An Ethereum Blockchain Is Restoring the Identity of Syrian Refugees This sounds like the type of social impact that the blockchain pioneers were talking about when they designed the technology. Just as Syria has gotten the worlds attention for a suspected horrific chemical attack on its citizens, refugees who have fled the war-torn nation for refuge in bordering Jordan have stumbled upon a humanitarian program using cutting-edge blockchain technology to keep their data private. Its dubbed Building Blocks, and its been developed by the UNs World Food Programme (WFP) alongside some industry partners. The story is told by MIT Technology Review, which spotlights the Azraq Refugee camp comprised of tens of thousands of fleeing Syrians who have made a Jordanian settlement home just miles from the Syrian border where they left their fear-filled lives behind. The refugees are part of a projectinvolving a private fork of the Ethereum blockchain in whichthey redeem their WFP-provided assistance for daily transactions at retailers with blockchain technology and their personal data is being kept secure. For example, the MIT Tech story gives the example of one refugee who visits the local Jordanian supermarket, where he pays for his transaction basically by providing a selfie with the camera at checkout. Its called EyePay because the image of his eyes identify him. The benefits are both social and economic, the impact of which could shape the lives of generations to come. From a humanitarian perspective, these individuals who have left everything behind in their war-torn nations are being given a chance to rebuild their lives. The crisis has left these refugees out in the cold when it comes to entering the workforce or perhaps even investing, where with know-your-customer and ident Continue reading >>

Bitnation Emergency Response -

Bitnation Emergency Response -

Bitnation Refugee Emergency Response (BRER) is a Humanitarian Aid Project of Bitnation to facilitate and provide Emergency Services and Humanitarian Aid to refugees during the European Refugee Crisis of September 2015. Our objective is to utilize Blockchain technology to authenticate and validate identification through a Blockchain Emergency ID (BE-ID) , provide dispute resolution as needed, and otherwise provide and locate needed services to refugees. Bitnation seeks to ease the burden of Receiving States during this crisis by assisting in providing secure transactions and transitional tools required to meet the current needs of refugees, and provide economic and political solutions to refugees within the Receiving State with secure, established Open Source Blockchain technology. Bitnation seeks peaceful, diplomatic co-operation with Receiving States to help avert this crisis by extending Humanitarian Aid to the Stateless and refugees within Receiving States in harmony with the principles enshrined in the UN Charter, the 1951 Refugee Convention, the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons, the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. It has also sought to establish relations with the UNHCR, OHCHR and UNPO to determine methods of collaborative co-operation and to assist in maintaining the Public International Order and to protect refugees as our capacity allows. Continue reading >>

World Food Programme's Ethereum-based Blockchain For Syrian Refugees In Jordan Quartz

World Food Programme's Ethereum-based Blockchain For Syrian Refugees In Jordan Quartz

The United Nations agency in charge of food aidoften billed as the largest aid organization in the worldis betting that an ethereum-based blockchain technology could be the key to delivering aid efficiently to refugees while slashing the costs of doing so. The agency, known as the World Food Programme (WFP), is the rare example of an organization that has delivered tangible results from its blockchain experimentsunlike the big banks that have experimented with the technology for years. The WFP says it has transferred $1.4 million in food vouchers to 10,500 Syrian refugees in Jordan since May, and it plans to expand. We need to bring the project from the current capacity to many, many, more, says Houman Haddad, the WFP executive leading the project. By that I mean 1 million transactions per day. Haddad, in Mexico to speak at the Ethereum Foundations annual developer conference, hopes to expand the UN project, called Building Blocks, from providing payment vouchers for one camp to providing vouchers for four camps, covering 100,000 people, by next January. He hopes to attract developers and partners to the UN project from his conference appearance, organized by the foundation, which acts as a steward for the technical development of the ethereum protocol. The WFP currently distributes food vouchers within Jordans refugee camps via supermarkets located in the camps. The cashiers are equipped not with cash registers, but with iris scanners, which both identify the customer and settle their entitlement payments by verifying the data with various UN databases. Building Blocks replaced the payment part with a ledger that records the transactions on a private version of ethereum that it developed. For the beneficiary, nothing has changed, Haddad says. The major benefit to the Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Is Kickstarting The Financial Lives Of Refugees

How Blockchain Is Kickstarting The Financial Lives Of Refugees

How Blockchain Is Kickstarting the Financial Lives of Refugees Finlands digital money system for asylum seekers shows what blockchain technology can offer the unbanked. For a refugee in a new country, identityat least in the official sensecan be among the hardest things to recover. And without an official ID it is nearly impossible to advance in society. Finland, which like many European nations has recently seen a large influx of asylum seekers, is using a cryptographic ledger called blockchain to help them get on their feet faster. For two years the Finnish Immigration Service has been giving asylum seekers who dont have bank accounts prepaid Mastercards instead of the traditional cash disbursements, and today the program has several thousand active cardholders. Developed by the Helsinki-based startup MONI , the card is also linked to a unique digital identity stored on a blockchain, the same technology that underpins the digital currency Bitcoin. Can a booming crypto-currency really compete with conventional cash? Bitcoin has demonstrated how blockchain technology can be used to transmit value between individuals without the need for corporate middlemen. Core to the technology is a software protocol that creates a permanent record of every single Bitcoin transaction. Anyone can access this record, called the blockchain, by downloading the Bitcoin software. Computers running the software all over the world maintain the blockchain, and use it to verify new transactions (see What Bitcoin Is, and Why It Matters ). Blockchains are seen as a promising avenue for opening new financial opportunities to people who dont have access to modern financial services. Besides eliminating the need for a traditional financial institution to mediate transactions, they provide a means f Continue reading >>

George Soros Announces Blockchain Plans To Solve Refugee Crisis At Davos

George Soros Announces Blockchain Plans To Solve Refugee Crisis At Davos

George Soros Announces Blockchain Plans to Solve Refugee Crisis at Davos Speaking at World Economic Forum in Davos, Hungarian-American billionaire George Soros suggested that he has discovered a new way to solve the global migrant scenario using the blockchain technology. Connecting the Dots: Saros and Blockchain Technology Not a long ago, Soros partnered with Mastercard to help refugees and migrants worldwide to raise their economic and social rank. During a Q&A session at Davos, Soros said: Blockchain technology can be put to positive use. And we use it actually in helping migrants to communicate with their families and to keep their money safe and to carry it with them. To put his comments in context, the billionaires Open Society Foundation, a philanthropic organization pledged to worldwide democracy, awarded $100,000 to the Center for Human Rights Science at Carnegie Mellon University. The educational institution is looking into blockchain technology to use for keeping records of human rights violation. Recently, the European investor also said that migrants are often forced into lives of despair in their host communities because they cannot gain access to financial, healthcare and government services. In the first week of 2018, Quantum Fund, also managed by George Soros, had exercised its right to buy $100 million worth of Overstock equity. Of the $100 million, $20 million will venture the blockchain property rights joint venture, DeSoto Inc. Blockchain technology would help migrants by furnishing a secure storage of their fiat assets by converting them into digital form. However, the investment mogul repudiated the value of cryptocurrency, thus joining the ranks of Warren Buffett and JP Morgan. According to Soros, cryptocurrency is mainly used for tax evasion. C Continue reading >>

United Nations Sends Aid To 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain

United Nations Sends Aid To 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain

United Nations Sends Aid to 10,000 Syrian Refugees Using Ethereum Blockchain Jun 13, 2017 at 10:00 UTC|UpdatedJun 14, 2017 at 11:16 UTC One of the largest-ever implementations of the ethereum blockchain for a charitable causehasjust concluded a successful trial. Completed on 31st May, the project run by the United Nation's World Food Programme (WFP) was designed to direct resources to thousands of Syrian refugees by giving them cryptocurrency-based vouchers that could be redeemed in participating markets. As revealed exclusively to CoinDesk, the platform was successfully used to record and authenticate transfers for about 10,000 individuals. The platform was implemented by Parity Technologies, a startup led by ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood, and blockchain big data firm Datarella. Alexandra Alden, a WFP innovation accelerator consultant who helped oversee the implementation, told CoinDesk: "All funds received by the refuges from WFP were specifically used to purchase food items such as olive oil, pasta and lentils." The WFP is now in the process of gathering more detailed analytics, such asexactly how many transactions were conducted. As reported by CoinDesk in early May,the WFP intendsto expand the project to include 100,000 individualsin Jordan as soon as August. If that goesaccording to plan, the effortis set to grow to serve theentire Jordanian refugee population by the end of 2018. NowAlden has confirmed to CoinDesk that the agency eventuallyhopes to implement the service beyond the borders of Jordan. "The plan is to expand the project pilot firstly across Jordan, but we are also evaluating use cases and potential applications in other regions." Currently, the agency is in talks with partners in the humanitarian and private sectors who can help it with its goal of Continue reading >>

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