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Blockchain Human Trafficking

Un Agencies Turn To Blockchain In Fight Against Child Trafficking

Un Agencies Turn To Blockchain In Fight Against Child Trafficking

UN Agencies Turn to Blockchain In Fight Against Child Trafficking Nov 13, 2017 at 10:00 UTC|UpdatedNov 13, 2017 at 10:06 UTC The United Nations has partnered with the World Identity Network (WIN)to develop a blockchain identity pilot aimed to help curb child trafficking. Announced during theHumanitarian Blockchain SummitinNew Yorkon Friday, the pilot involves participation from theUnited Nations Office for Project Services(UNOPS) and theUnited Nations Office of Information and Communications Technology(UN-OICT), a press release indicates. Storing digital identities on a blockchain , the release states, provides a "significantly higher chance of catching traffickers." Additionally, securing identity data on animmutable ledger will make trafficking attempts "more traceable and preventable." According toDr.Mariana Dahan, co-founder and CEO of WIN, "invisible" children under the age of five and who do not possess a birth certificate are at "risk" and can fall into the hands of child traffickers. These children are often missed by social programs offered by governments or development agencies. "Several developing countries are actively looking at more efficient ways to prevent child trafficking. Identification is always at the heart of the solution." Child trafficking uses fake identification documents to transport young people across borders for eventual forced participation in serious illicit activities including the sex trade, the illegal human organ trade, and others. Yannick Glemarec, UN women deputy executive director said, "Child trafficking is one of the greatest human rights abuses." Blockchain, she continued, would be a "potentially powerful" technology to address the problem and potentially save "millions of children." In a move to foster the pilot, the partners Continue reading >>

Un Will Use Blockchain Ids To Fight Child Trafficking

Un Will Use Blockchain Ids To Fight Child Trafficking

UN Will Use Blockchain IDs To Fight Child Trafficking Wang Bangyin, a local farmer, holds his rescued son after the pair were reunited at Guiyang Welfare Centre for Children in Guiyang, Guizhou province, China, Oct. 29, 2009. Wang's son was among 60 children seeking parents after police freed them from human traffickers. Photo: Reuters/China Daily Bitcoin lovers arent the only global community pioneering blockchain technology. The United Nations is also expanding its distributed ledger pilots from humanitarian aid and food programs for refugees in the Middle East to a high-tech identity system aimed at curbing child trafficking. Young children without birth certificates can be especially vulnerable to traffickers. So the U.N. is partnering with the World Identity Network to create a sort of blockchain-based ID system for undocumented children. The U.N. estimates almost half of all children under five dont have a birth certificate. — Unite Ideas (@UN_UniteIdeas) November 10, 2017 "Several developing countries are actively looking at more efficient ways to prevent child trafficking. Identification is always at the heart of the solution," WIN CEO Mariana Dahan said in a press release . The pilot will kick off in Moldova, one of Europes hotbeds of human trafficking . The International Organization for Migration centre in Moldova helped shelter more than 166 child victims from 2001 to 2008, in addition to thousands of adults who fell prey to of human traffickers. Growing up as a poor child in Moldova and having found myself in the street at a very young age, I know firsthand what it means to be defenseless, to be hungry, to be exposed to risks, Dahan wrote in a Facebook post . Together we can help the government of Moldova in addressing one of the greatest crimes agai Continue reading >>

Microsoft Believes Blockchain Tech Could Help Fight Human Trafficking, Child Exploitation

Microsoft Believes Blockchain Tech Could Help Fight Human Trafficking, Child Exploitation

Microsoft believes blockchain tech could help fight human trafficking, child exploitation Microsoft is partnering with ConsenSys and Blockstack Labs to build an open source, blockchain-based identity system to help provide legal identification for people around the world. On Wednesday, Microsoft announced that it was joining forces with Blockstack Labs and ConsenSys to develop an open source, blockchain-based identity system that could help better protect people who don't have access to legal identification. According to Microsoft's blog post announcing the project, the announcement was made in light of the ID2020 Summit on Identity, and as part of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). They are hoping to rally developers around the world to contribute and to spark a conversation on the potential impact of a blockchain-based identity. SEE: Encryption Policy Template (Tech Pro Research) The ID2020 forum brings together top thinkers in the tech community to work on tackling major social issues with the power of technology. To shed some light on the magnitude of the issue of legal identification, Microsoft provided the following data points: 1.5B people are without proper identification, that's one-fifth of the world's population. One in three children under the age of five does not officially exist because their birth has not been recorded. Cumulatively, 230M children under the age of five have no birth certificate; this number is growing. 50M children, the size of the UK, are born without legal identity each year. The issue of legal identification is often taken for granted in countries such as the US and the UK, but it isn't always easy to obtain in every country. People without proper identification are more vulnerable to crimes such as human trafficking, prost Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Help End Modern Day Slavery In Asia's Exploitative Seafood Industry

How Blockchain Could Help End Modern Day Slavery In Asia's Exploitative Seafood Industry

How Blockchain Could Help End Modern Day Slavery In Asia's Exploitative Seafood Industry Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. Eventually, there will be nowhere to hide for fish poachers, human traffickers and unscrupulous middlemen. Workers help to unload fish from a boat at the port in Songkhla. Around 100 people have been arrested by authorities in a recent crackdown on abuses involving Thailand's multi-billion dollar seafood industry. (Paula Bronstein/ Getty Images ) According to a recent Global Slavery Index report, seafood companies arefailing toprevent forced labor and outright slaveryin their supply chains. There are some 300,000 forced-laborers in the Thai fishing industry alone. Many of these people are migrant workers, mostly from Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. In 2015, Nestl--the worldslargest food company--commissioned an audit of its own Thai seafood supply chains. The audit was outsourced to Verite , an NGO, and resulted in alandmark report that documented systemic labor abuses across theseafood industry, in Thailand and beyond. Since the Verite report, however, investigative reporting by The Guardian has revealed that human trafficking and labor abuses continue, virtually unabated. Human traffickers across Southeast Asia continue to operate, mostly unhindered, with the support of unscrupulous middlemen, subcontractors and labor brokers. But, could digital technology put a stop to these abuses? Blockchain technology is being deployed by civil society groups to make supply chains fully transparent , therebyachieving end-to-end traceability. It isa secure, decentralized, distributed digital ledger that stores relevant data regarding any kind of transactional history. Its a shared, transparent database thats verifiable by all parties--and it Continue reading >>

Digital Id On The Blockchain & Human Trafficking

Digital Id On The Blockchain & Human Trafficking

Digital ID on the Blockchain & Human Trafficking Treeq Alsika detention centre in Tripoli. (Photo fromcnn.com) Blockchain-enabled identities could reduce human trafficking by making it more difficult for traffickers to fake identifications and subject people to horrid treatment. Slavery and human trafficking is not new around the world and functions as its own economy in developed countries and emerging markets. Recently, a video (warning: graphic) surfaced of an alleged human auction in Libya and shed light on this issue. The countrys economic, political and social realities have deteriorated since the 2011 Libyan Revolution , creating an ideal environment for human traffickers. There are a few reasons uncovered for why human traffickers are able to smuggle people: (1) political instability, (2) vulnerable migrants fleeing the country and (3) weakened borders. Human traffickers prey on migrants fleeing through Libya, typically from the Horn of Africa, who do not have funds or paperwork to cross the border legally. Traffickers promise new identification, jobs and lives in European countries, which people accept at an unknowingly inhumane price. Those people are sold as slaves to the highest, or lowest, bidders children, men and women are sold into inhumane conditions for as little as USD $400 each. Twenty million children in Sub-Saharan Africa do not have a birth certificate, and 50% of persons in the region do not have proof of their own identities . Human traffickers offer to create fake identities in order to move migrants past the port at their destination country. Networks of traffickers sneak past the Libyan coast guard, who do not have nearly enough resources to stop them. Victims are then placed in a rubber boat that may or may not make it to its European desti Continue reading >>

Ending Modern Day Slavery With Blockchain Tech

Ending Modern Day Slavery With Blockchain Tech

Ending Modern Day Slavery With Blockchain Tech Before Wall Street became the world leading financial centre, it was a slave market. In 1711, the New York City Common Council declared the Lower Manhattan city as the first official market for the sale and rental of African and Indian slaves. The trade is said to have happened at the corner of Wall and Pearl Streets, which was part of the slave-based Dutch settlement founded as New Amsterdam in 1624. It was not until 1762 that the slave auctions were stopped. Slavery was later abolished in 1865 through the 13thamendment passed by Congress.Fast forward to a few months ago, CNN aired a story about migrants being auctioned off into slavery in Libya. Following the story, a lot has been unearthed and the world is now waking up to the realities of modern-day slavery. Human trafficking is not only a menace in Africa and the Middle East but also in other parts of the globe. A report by the Global Slavery Index estimates that 45.8m people are enslaved in some form of modern slavery in the world today. The report shows that 58% of those living in slavery are in mainly five countries namely India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Uzbekistan. Up until recently, there wasnt really an all-encompassing solution to this complex atrocity, mainly because the majority of those affected by slavery lack the identity, credit, and access to justice that would bring their experience to the public. This is despite the explosive growth of digital communication channels in the recent years. However, with blockchain technology , there may be an actionable solution. The distributed public ledger technology is making it possible to assign an identity to those prone to human trafficking and also track and prevent activities that increase the demand for Continue reading >>

Federal Regulators Should Trust Progress, Avoid Blockchain Red Tape

Federal Regulators Should Trust Progress, Avoid Blockchain Red Tape

Federal regulators should trust progress, avoid blockchain red tape By Wolf von Laer and Fred Roeder, opinion contributors 02/23/18 03:00 PM EST The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill Despite the unbelievable price surging of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin over the past year, these technologies and its investors flexed their resilience. Although its famous for creating a new class of millionaires, blockchain technology provides many services beyond cryptocurrencies such as identification, verification, immutable databases and much more. Since blockchain is an infant technology, it will see even more hiccups on its journey to becoming a mature and widely-adopted technology. Unfortunately, regulators such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) have begun scrutinizing the legality of cryptocurrency exchanges and initial coin offerings (ICOs) at the expense of innovation. If their scrutiny breeds paternalistic regulation, it will jeopardize the United States leadership in digital technology and finance. As with any technology, blockchain can be used for good or bad. Technology itself is neutral and therefore leaves humans to determine its uses. Thus, cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin don't only enable political and human rights activists in countries like Venezuela by providing an avenue for funding , but also can facilitate the financing of terrible crimes such as human trafficking. Nevertheless, the potential of blockchain technology can lead humanity to a more prosperous and inclusive society by providing services like immutable property registries in developing countries, ensuring data safety including the ownership of medical records, and provide easier access to lending. Its necessary to acknowledge that with every ne Continue reading >>

Beyond Bitcoin: 4 Surprising Uses For Blockchain

Beyond Bitcoin: 4 Surprising Uses For Blockchain

Beyond bitcoin: 4 surprising uses for blockchain Djimon Hounsou and Leonardo DiCaprio starred in the 2007 movie "Blood Diamond". Blockchain technology offers a way to track the provenance of diamonds, including those mined in conflict zones. Blockchain was created as the system for running bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Big banks and corporate giants are racing to make the technology work for them in the belief that it will cut costs and transform the way the world does business. Finance is only the start, though. Blockchain is also being put to work on a handful of the worlds toughest problems. Think: human trafficking, conflict diamonds and land rights. How is this possible? Blockchain is a decentralized database shared among a network of computers, all of which must approve an exchange before it can be recorded. Theres no need for a trusted intermediary like a bank because the information is held securely and transparently on a digital ledger for all users on the network to see. The implications for society could be huge : blockchain may have been developed as a system for payments, but its admirers believe it has almost endless applications, from making online music sharing fairer to empowering people through registering land. Heres a look at a few of blockchains more unconventional uses: One fifth of the worlds population an estimated 1.5 billion people do not have an official document to prove their identity. Most of them live in Asia and Africa and a disproportionate number are women and children, the World Bank says. Without legal identification, these people are invisible to society, and that makes them vulnerable to trafficking, prostitution and exploitation. Microsoft has announced it is working with partners on a secure identity system that uses blockc Continue reading >>

Blockchain For Humanity Global Challenge

Blockchain For Humanity Global Challenge

Blockchain for Humanity Global Challenge This is a Global challenge at United Nations Unite Ideas . You can find a link to submission form at the bottom of this page. The World Identity Network (WIN), the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), and the United Nations Office of Information and Communications Technology (UN-OICT) are partnering to launch a pilot initiative that will use the blockchain technology to help combat child trafficking in Moldova. A first in the world, this project is part of a broader effort titled Blockchain For Humanity, announced during the Blockchain Humanitarian Summit in New York, on November 10, 2017. Still the poorest country in Europe, Moldova has been trying to stop child trafficking for decades. The Government of Moldova is an official partner in this Global Challenge, believing that this breakthrough technology can be leveraged beyond commercial applications, for the social good. The Global Challenge will result in a detailed concept and project design that could be further enhanced and used by the Government of Moldova for project implementation. However, the concept should be scalable and applicable to other contexts as well, including other countries around the world, where the prevalence of child trafficking is high. Be offered the opportunity to have an advisory role in the further development of the submitted solution. Be featured at the United Nations Press, the Unite Ideas platform and more broadly in press and social media. Be offered the opportunity to pitch the solution for potential investment from WINand other interested organizations. *Please note that the winner of the Global Challenge is not automatically guaranteed award of contract for project implementation, nor investment or grants from potential dono Continue reading >>

Backpage And Bitcoin: Uncovering Human Traffickers

Backpage And Bitcoin: Uncovering Human Traffickers

Backpage and Bitcoin: Uncovering Human Traffickers Rebecca S. Portnoff (UC Berkeley);Danny Yuxing Huang (UC San Diego);Periwinkle Doerfler (NYU);Sadia Afroz (ICSI);Damon McCoy (NYU) Sites for online classified ads selling sex are widely used by human traffickers to support their pernicious business. The sheer quantity of ads makes manual exploration and analysis unscalable. In addition, discerning whether an ad is advertising a trafficked victim or a independent sex worker is a very difficult task. Very little concrete ground truth (i.e., ads definitively known to be posted by a trafficker) exists in this space. In this work, we develop tools and techniques that can be used separately and in conjunction to group sex ads by their true owner (and not the claimed author in the ad). Specifically, we develop a machine learning classifier that uses stylometry to distinguish between ads posted by the same vs. different authors with 96% accuracy. We also design a linking technique that takes advantage of leakages from the Bitcoin mempool, blockchain and sex ad site, to link a subset of sex ads to Bitcoin public wallets and transactions. Finally, we demonstrate via a 4-week proof of concept using Backpage as the sex ad site, how an analyst can use these automated approaches to potentially find human traffickers. Continue reading >>

Moldova Eyes Blockchain To End Child Trafficking

Moldova Eyes Blockchain To End Child Trafficking

November 15, 2017 / 5:25 PM / in 6 months Moldova eyes blockchain to end child trafficking LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Moldova, Europes poorest country, is looking to use blockchain, the digital tool behind the cryptocurrency bitcoin, to stamp out child trafficking with help from United Nations experts, a government official said on Wednesday. Digital identification experts from the U.N. Office for Project Services (UNOPS) and other agencies were in Chisinau this week to discuss possible ways of using the technology to protect children from exploitation. Every year, hundreds of women and girls as young as 13 are trafficked from Moldova to Russia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and other nations, mainly to work as sex slaves, according to international watchdogs. This is a pressing issue and we are eager to find efficient solutions to help us address it, Mihail Beregoi, state secretary for the Moldovas Ministry of Internal Affairs, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation via email. Moldova was put on the United States watch list of countries that are not doing enough to fight human trafficking earlier this year. Children living in rural areas are particularly at risk of trafficking as they often hold no identification, something that makes them invisible to authorities and easier for traffickers to smuggle across borders on fake documents, experts say. Blockchain could be used to give them paperless identification documents based on biometric data, such as fingerprints or facial scans, which would be impossible to fake, said Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, UNOPS special adviser for blockchain. If we want to set up a reliable identity management system it has to be based on something immutable, he said by phone from New York ahead of traveling to Chisinau. An estimated 40 mi Continue reading >>

Thomson Reuters To Host Public-private Partnership Forums To Address Aml, Human Trafficking, Blockchain And More

Thomson Reuters To Host Public-private Partnership Forums To Address Aml, Human Trafficking, Blockchain And More

Thomson Reuters to Host Public-Private Partnership Forums to Address AML, Human Trafficking, Blockchain and More Public-private partnerships often referred to as P3 are increasingly cited as a favored approach to confront broad-ranging issues including anti-money laundering, threat prevention, human trafficking and more. Not only is Thomson Reuters proud to partner with the public sector, but it is in a unique position to build bridges between the private and public sectors to facilitate ongoing conversations on these issues and provide expertise and technology to help solve these issues. Beginning in March, Thomson Reuters will host the 2018 Public-Private Partnership Forum series, gathering domain experts, customers and more for a day of discussion and networking. The first event will be held in New York City on Wednesday, March 7 at the Westin New York at Times Square. To attend, please register using the links below: Corporate Investigator Professionals: Government Professionals: The second and third events in the P3 series will be held on Tuesday, April 24 at The Ritz-Carlton in Charlotte, N.C. and Thursday, April 26, at The Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection in Washington, D.C respectively. Registration for these events will be released soon. Speakers at the New York P3 event include Peter Vincent, senior legal counsel with Thomson Reuters Special Services and Dennis Lormel, CEO of DML Associates, and a preeminent speaker on anti-money laundering and fraud, as well as other financial and technology experts. From our work with the non-profit sector on digital currency , to human trafficking in the digital age, and support of law enforcement and beyond, the value of public-private partnerships is not a new proposition for Thomson Reuters, said Vincent. We look f Continue reading >>

Sex, Money Laundering And Blockchain: 11 States Look At Fintech

Sex, Money Laundering And Blockchain: 11 States Look At Fintech

Sex, Money Laundering and Blockchain: 11 States Look at FinTech At least 11 states introduced laws in January to regulate cryptocurrencies and blockchain. When Nebraska State legislator Carol Blood started thinking about cryptocurrencies and blockchain, she focused on sex trafficking and money laundering. During two significant events held in Omaha the NCAA College World Series and the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting law enforcement reported that sex trafficking had increased in the state. These are high-profile events that draw a lot of people, she said. When she became a legislator, she wrote a law that would punish wrongdoing when using virtual currencies. Illinois Releases Its First Official Government Report on Blockchain Blockchain: Is it a Transformative Tech for Government? Four Blockchain Bills Introduced in New York State Assembly Even before the bitcoin value run-up in the fall, states were slowly recognizing that virtual currencies and the cybersecurity potential of blockchain technologies could enhance economic development for states looking to grow. They also recognized that the swift growth of cryptocurrencies might also drive criminality within their states. In January, 11 states introduced bills that would regulate or encourage the growth of financial tech (fintech). One of those legislators was Sen. Blood, who found herself concerned that crime could grow in her state, but she was also excited about the possibilities for fintech to attract companies and jobs. You might think Nebraska is a rural state where sex trafficking would be anathema, but you would be wrong. Every month, at least 900 individuals are trafficked, often multiple times this according to the Nebraska Human Trafficking Initiative . As a member of the Bellevue City Council and a boar Continue reading >>

Ai Uses Bitcoin Trail To Find And Help Sex-trafficking Victims

Ai Uses Bitcoin Trail To Find And Help Sex-trafficking Victims

AI uses bitcoin trail to find and help sex-trafficking victims After Kubiiki Prides 13-year-old daughter disappeared , it took 270 days for her mother to find her. When she did, it was as an escort available to be rented out on an online classified web site. Her daughter had been drugged and beaten into compliance by a sex trafficker. To find her, Pride had to trawl through hundreds of advertisements on Backpage.com, a site that in 2012, the last date for which stats are available, was hosting more than 70 per cent of the US market for online sex ads. When it comes to identifying signs of human trafficking in online sex adverts, the task for police is often no easier. Thousands of sex-related classifieds are posted every week. Some are legal posts. Other people, like Prides daughter, are forced to do it. Working out which ads involve foul play is a laborious task. However, the task is being automated using a strange alliance of artificial intelligence and bitcoin . Learn about the future of AI: Join DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis at New Scientist Live The internet has facilitated a lot of methods that traffickers can take advantage of. They can easily reach big audiences and generate a lot of content without having to reveal themselves, says Rebecca Portnoff at the University of California, Berkeley. But a new tool developed by Portnoff and her colleagues can ferret traffickers out. It uses machine learning to spot common patterns in suspicious ads , and then uses publicly available information from the payment method used to pay for them bitcoin to help identify who placed them. The tool will help not only the investigation and intervention of potential traffickers, but also to support prosecution efforts in an arena where money moves with rapidity across financial i Continue reading >>

Building Blockchain-based Identity Systems To Combat Child Trafficking In Moldova

Building Blockchain-based Identity Systems To Combat Child Trafficking In Moldova

Building Blockchain-based Identity Systems to Combat Child Trafficking in Moldova - ConsenSys wins "Blockchain for Humanity" Global Challenge, a competition organized by the World Identity Network (WIN) in conjunction with several United Nations agencies. - The blockchain solutions designed in collaboration with multiple stakeholders are aimed to help the government of Moldova. BROOKLYN, N.Y., March 13, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- ConsenSys and World Identity Network (WIN) agreed today to partner toward the design and implementation of the first-ever pilot project that uses blockchain technology to help combat child trafficking in Moldova. This pilot project is part of a broader initiative announced by the World Identity Network (WIN) and organized in collaboration with the United Nations Office of Information and Communications Technology (UN-OICT), the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), and the government of Moldova. According to United Nations statistics, nearly 230 million of the world's children under the age of five have never been recorded. The vast majority of them live in the poorest countries, such as Moldova. Undocumented children and minors are easy prey for human traffickers, who often use fake identification documents to transport them across borders. Once trafficked, these children and minors are sold to sex brothels, caught in modern slavery rings, and even used for the illegal human organ trade. According to the Global Challenge organizers, with new technologies and solutions, such as digital identity on the blockchain, there is now a significantly higher chance of catching traffickers and securing data on an immutable ledger, further making any such trafficking attempts more traceable and preventable. Speaking of the opportunity to use the b Continue reading >>

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