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Blockchain Food Traceability

A Supply Chain Traceability System For Food Safety Based On Haccp, Blockchain & Internet Of Things

A Supply Chain Traceability System For Food Safety Based On Haccp, Blockchain & Internet Of Things

A supply chain traceability system for food safety based on HACCP, blockchain & Internet of things Abstract: In recent times food safety has drawn upsurge of academic and commercial concerns. In supply chain area, with the rapid growth of internet technologies, a lot of emerging technologies have been applied in traceability systems. However, to date, nearly all of these systems are centralized which are monopolistic, asymmetric and opaque that could result in the trust problem, such as fraud, corruption, tampering and falsifying information. Besides, centralized system is vulnerable to collapse, since a single point of breakdown will lead the whole system to be crashed. Today, a new technology called the blockchain which is a ground-breaking innovation in decentralized information technology presents a whole new approach. However, since this technology is still in its early stages, it has some inherent defects, in which scalability become a primary and urgent one when we face the mass data in the real world. In this paper we will build a food supply chain traceability system for real-time food tracing based on HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), blockchain and Internet of things, which could provide an information platform for all the supply chain members with openness, transparency, neutrality, reliability and security. Furthermore, we introduce a new concept BigchainDB to fill the gap in the decentralized systems at scale. The paper concludes with a description of a use case and the challenges to adopt blockchain technology in the future food supply chain traceability systems are discussed. Continue reading >>

How The Blockchain Can Save Our Food

How The Blockchain Can Save Our Food

Posted: 23 April 2017 | Sean Crossey (Arc-Net) | 1 comment What benefits might blockchain bring to the food and beverage industry? Sean Crossey investigates Its hard to escape blockchain in 2017 not that wed like to. Each industry seems to consider the technology as potentially revolutionary and so we asked Sean Crossey of arc-net for an insight into how blockchain might significantly change the food industry. When it comes to our food supply, what we dont know most certainly can hurt us. The World Health Organisation estimates that almost 1 in 10 people become ill every year from eating contaminated food, with 420,000 dying as a result. Our global food supply has grown so complex that it has become almost impossible for food producers and retailers to guarantee the provenance of their products. As with any industry, where there is opportunity there will inevitably be those who take advantage. Individuals tampering with our food is nothing new, in the 17th Century fraudsters would water down milk and add chalk to bread in order to squeeze out as much profit as possible. While technology may have improved in the 21st Century, similar methods used in our food today give the phrase you are what you eat an unsettling connotation. Many are aware of high profile incidents of food fraud, from the 2013 UK Horsemeat scandal to the 2009 Salmonella peanut butter outbreak and now the recent scandal surrounding two of Brazils largest meat production firms. Of course the size of such events naturally bring huge national attention to the security of our food supply, but what must be remembered is that these are not outliers. Our food supply is under constant threat from adulteration, with food fraud estimated to cost UK families up to 1.17 billion a year. The phrase you are what you Continue reading >>

Ibm Forges Blockchain Collaboration With Nestl & Walmart In Global Food Safety

Ibm Forges Blockchain Collaboration With Nestl & Walmart In Global Food Safety

IBM Forges Blockchain Collaboration With Nestl & Walmart In Global Food Safety Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. A group of leading retailers and food companies including Nestl and Walmart have signalled their commitment to strengthen consumer confidence in the foods they purchase by announcing a major blockchain collaboration with IBM. The consortium will work with Big Blue to identify the most urgent areas across the global food supply chain that could benefit from the blockchain. Highlighting matters, every year one-in-10 people fall ill (c.600 million) globally and around 420,000 die as a result of contaminated food, according to global estimates of foodborne diseases from the World Health Organization (WHO). These diseases were cited as being caused by diseases caused by 31 agents - bacteria, chemicals, viruses, parasites and toxins. The findings contained in a WHO report titled Estimates of the global burden of foodborne diseases (December 2015), were the most comprehensive published at the time and found that almost 30% of all deaths from foodborne diseases are in children under the age of five years (c.125,000). Many of the critical issues impacting food safety such as contamination, food-borne illness, waste and the economic burden of recalls rest though on a lack of access to information and traceability. Given that today nobody currently oversees the entire supply chain and traceability is undertaken only in a linear fashion, this is where the blockchain is being pitched as playing a pivotal role. By using blockchain, when a problem arises, the potential is to quickly identify what the source of contamination is since one can see across the whole ecosystem and where all the potential points of contamination could be - using the data to Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Technology Could Transform The Foodindustry

How Blockchain Technology Could Transform The Foodindustry

How blockchain technology could transform the foodindustry Blockchain technology could solve food safety and fraud by enabling immediate traceability to the point of origin. (Shutterstock) How blockchain technology could transform the foodindustry Professor in Food Distribution and Policy, Dalhousie University Sylvain Charlebois does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. There has been a lot of noise on cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin of late. While some suggest cryptocurrencies are a fraud , others believe them to be the next biggest economic revolution the world has seen since the internet. Bitcoin has brought to light blockchain technology, which offers great potential for food safety and verification in the agrifood sector. Yet it is far from being the panacea for a range of issues affecting the industry at least for now. Simply put, blockchain technology is a way of storing and sharing information across a network of users in an open virtual space. Blockchain technology allows for users to look at all transactions simultaneously and in real-time. In food, for example, a retailer would know with whom his supplier has had dealings. Additionally, since transactions are not stored in any single location, it is almost impossible to hack the information. For consumers, blockchain technology can make a difference. By reading a simple QR code with a smartphone, data such as an animals date of birth, use of antibiotics, vaccinations, and location where the livestock was harvested can easily be conveyed to the consumer. Yaxi Hu, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, developed a test to identify fore Continue reading >>

Blockchain: The Next Revolution In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain: The Next Revolution In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain: The next revolution in the food supply chain Judy Fainor, IT expert and chief architect of Sparta Systems, explores how this technology could solve the transparency and traceability challenges the industry faces. Judy Fainor, IT expert and Chief Architect of Sparta Systems , explores how this technology could solve the transparency and traceability challenges the industry faces. For decades, the food industry has been reliant on inefficient, paper-based recording systems, causing transparency and traceability issues. Counterfeit foods, contaminated products and pressure from the FDA are prompting organizations across the supply chain to re-evaluate current tracking and registration models. Some are already turning to blockchain as a solution. While still in its infancy in the food industry, blockchain has shown promise among manufacturing and financial industries, which have already widely adopted the technology. From end-to-end visibility to tamper-proof data, a number of industries are realizing the technology's advantages. By implementing blockchain, the food industry will be able to more readily solve the problems its currently facing especially issues related to transparency. Not only are consumers demanding to know where their food comes from, the FDA is demanding supply chain transparency via the Food Safety Modernization Act. Blockchain makes data easily shareable and permanent increasing the credibility of the data on any food product and reassuring customers and regulators that the food has a detailed account of its path through various organizations. This goes hand-in-hand with the issue of traceability, or tracing the passage of products through the supply chain. Blockchain provides everyone in the system with a view of a products records, so th Continue reading >>

Food Traceability And Blockchain By Cibusworld

Food Traceability And Blockchain By Cibusworld

FOOD TRACEABILITY AND BLOCKCHAIN by CIBUSWorld Food is a multi-trillion-dollar industry, so using block chain based food safety system across the industry cannot take place overnight. But with the introduction of blockchain empowered trade and retail system the standard of food industry can be more filtered and improved in terms of food safety. Blockchain has already been started to perk up collaboration, trust, and transparency across the food industry and surely it is going to increase the traceability and safety of food products. That is why it rightly said that the relation between block chain and food safety is made in heaven and they are complementing each other in the most unadulterated approach. Trust on food and dietary supplements is the most demanding aspect of customers that has increased in recent years. Quality and labeling information of food and dietary supplements currently available, is just not enough to improve the customers trust. So it has become customary and necessary to comply with the mandatory declaration imposed by safety regulators and providing customer proper information about a foods life cycle in order to achieve the complete food safety and thereby the consumers trust. But unfortunately the manufacturers and sellers are unwilling to go the extra miles and cagey about declaring all origin, quality and supply chain data with their consumers. Know more about CIBUS world or if you have any questions, look them up in our website: or feel free to email us at: [email protected] Continue reading >>

Carrefour To Expand Its Blockchain-based Food Traceability Programme

Carrefour To Expand Its Blockchain-based Food Traceability Programme

Carrefour to Expand its Blockchain-based Food Traceability Programme French supermarket group Carrefour announced on Tuesday that it would enlarge its food traceability system based on Blockchain technology to add eight more products by the end of this year. At the present moment, the fintech programme includes only some chickens. According to the reports, the supermarket group said in a statement: "For consumers, it responds to the need for greater and greater transparency, for producers, it allows them to obtain more value from their production and know-how" Blockchain is the financial technology that underpins virtual coins such as bitcoin, the most famous digital currency on the cryptocurrency market. However, innovative and modernized applications that make possible the secure and transparent sharing of information are entering the financial market today due to the efforts of large companies and influential authorities. Frances largest grocery chain started to implement blockchain tech trying to trace the number of chickens in France's Auvergne region. Recently, Carrefour reported on its plan of expanding the blockchain program to eggs, cheese, milk, oranges, tomatoes, salmon and hamburgers by the end of 2018. If a consumer wants to know detailed information about the chickens, including where and how they were raised and what they ate, he should scan a code on the package with the help of his phone. Farmers carefully report to a digital ledger at each stage of growing and processing the chickens. In January, Carrefour brought to the public its intention to reconstruct the whole business, taking into account constantly increasing rivalry from major competitors and e-retailers. One such initiative aims at raising the number of organic foods, as consumers started to Continue reading >>

Startup Introduces Blockchain Traceability To The Food We Eat

Startup Introduces Blockchain Traceability To The Food We Eat

Startup introduces blockchain traceability to the food we eat Inspired by the events of 2013, when UK foods were found to contain horse meat , a local entrepreneur named Kieran Kelly founded a new innovation in food security and product protection. Arc-net was born in Northern Ireland to ensure our food products are 100% authentic and traceable. Food crime is a rising trend, and Arc-net points to national reports claiming 30 40% of the food we eat is either adulterated or mislabelled. Arc-net uniquely applies blockchain technology to food accountability. Its about making sure youre eating what you think youre eating. The blockchain provides openness, transparency, and an irrefutable data history from creation through to consumption. Arc-nets chief development officer, Brendan Smyth said: We take a DNA sample from an animal to positively identify its breed, country of origin, exposure to toxins and unregulated medication, among other key markers. These samples can be cross-checked with the blockchain record to ensure the animals authenticity and lifecycle. A report released by PwC in 2016 sets the cost of food fraud and adulteration in excess of $40 billion per annum. Regular consumers are affected, but so are national retailers, who unwittingly sell or purchase effected products. Its not just meat. In this Guardian article , QUB Professor Chris Elliott flagged six items at risk of fraud: including guacamole (when avocado, an expensive fruit, is switched with inexpensive fruit), or baby formula (where brand names make a big difference to price). Prof Elliott warned that theres A huge incentive for the criminal to pursue food crime. Food is particularly at risk. A national retailer like Tesco might need to monitor 40,000 different products. Traceability is a huge task re Continue reading >>

The Potential Of Blockchain Technology Application In The Food System

The Potential Of Blockchain Technology Application In The Food System

A blockchain uses hash-based cryptology to assure security and trust4,5. A hash is an encrypted version of a string, or sequence of characters, wherein it is computationally impossible to derive the original without a key5. The blockchain has three essential pieces of data: the transaction timestamp, transaction details, and a new hash combining the hash and details of the previous transaction5. Each transaction is then distributed throughout the network4,5. Through this process, a continuous encrypted record of the transaction is kept and becomes immutable once added to the blockchain4,5. To verify changes to the blockchain, a resolving algorithm audits the pending transaction after which it is then distributed throughout the network to the shared ledger3. Once a transaction has become finalized through this validation process, it becomes a permanent part of the chain. The nodes at which transactions are verified known as miners4,5. Blockchain architectures primarily differ in their choice in resolving algorithms3. Some algorithms prioritize decentralization and anonymity while other prioritize throughput and rapidity3. Users of the blockchain have two keys: private and public. The public key is the means for sending material to a specific individual on the blockchain. The private key authenticates transactions from the individual holder. Blockchain in Supply Chains and Food Traceability Systems Although most blockchain applications have been devoted to cryptocurrency exchange, the framework can theoretically be applied to any scenario requiring assured/verified information1. The technology has heavy interest among financial and supply chain technology companies, for its ability to rely on peer-to-peer networks rather than centralized institutions1. By having a more t Continue reading >>

Q&a: Blockchain Traceability Startup Ceo On Selling Blockchain To The Food System

Q&a: Blockchain Traceability Startup Ceo On Selling Blockchain To The Food System

Q&A: Blockchain Traceability Startup CEO On Selling Blockchain to the Food System For those paying close attention to the conversation about how blockchain could change the global food system, progress may appear to be crawling. For those just wrapping their minds around what blockchain technologies are and what they can do, the pace may seem breakneck. Somewhere in between, are the entrepreneurs looking to make the potential of blockchain-backed technologies a reality. Emma Westonis co-founder and CEO of Full Profile , where she leads blockchain strategy and development under the AgriDigital brand, and a grain grower. (Read Westons explanation of how farmers can benefit from blockchain here. ) AgriDigital is a blockchain-backed supply chain management and traceability technology from Australia.AgriDigital applies blockchain tosupply chain finance, automating the link between payment and physical delivery of goods at multiple points in the supply chain. The startup claims to have 1300 users and has verified A$360 million ($276m) in grower payments since 2016. In February, the company raised A$5.5 million ($4.2m) in a Series A round of funding that will finance her companys expansion to Canada and the US. When it comes to blockchain and food, startups are not alone. In the last year, some major initiatives have been announced from corporates, claiming to move the blockchain of food closer to reality. Walmart, Nestle, Driscolls, Tyson Foods Unilever, IBM, Dole and several other major food companies have teamed up to explore using blockchain technology (also known as a distributed ledger system) to manage the global food supply chain. Walmart and IBM have already run two successful blockchain trials tracking Chinese pork and Mexican mangoes. Coca-Cola has attempted to use Continue reading >>

Romana Food Brands Develops Blockchain Food Traceability Application

Romana Food Brands Develops Blockchain Food Traceability Application

Romana Food Brands develops blockchain food traceability application Romana's blockchain will include information on conditions at the production facilities, tracking of food items and volumes in the supply chain, to name a few features. Romana Food Brands Corp., Canada, announced plans to develop the next-generation blockchain food traceability and control application. Romana's blockchain will include information on conditions at the production facilities, tracking of food items and volumes in the supply chain, to name a few features. "Romana's development of the next-generation blockchain for food traceability and control is a true catalyst to sustainable shareholder value," says Morrie Fogelbaum, chairman. "Romana's blockchain solution will not only provide our food operation a competitive advantage, but [also] the licensing of our blockchain technology to some of the leading brands of the world will enable Romana to become a leader in the $16 billion application market. Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to Refrigerated & Frozen Foods magazine. Continue reading >>

The Blockchain Of Food

The Blockchain Of Food

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. The author is a Forbes contributor. The opinions expressed are those of the writer. This story appears in the {{article.article.magazine.pretty_date}} issue of {{article.article.magazine.pubName}}. {{article.article.magazine.subscription_text}} ripe.io , a start-up at the forefront of creating a blockchain solution for our food system was a recent participant at The Mixing Bowls FOOD IT: Fork to Farm and recognized as one of Forbes' Top 25 Most Innovative Ag-Tech Start-ups of 2017 . Raja, their CEO, has compiled and written with his team, the following perspective and analysis on how to initiate, gain adoption and run a Blockchain of Food in the food supply chain. We would like to share it with you. Theme 1 - Blockchain Participants Friction The actors interested to participate in the Blockchain of Food are driven by a need to demonstrate the superior quality of their methods and products.Most of the participants in the supply chain complain about the lack of transparency and trust by other participants. The participants are asking for a better supply-chain collaboration method.The blockchain can provide this... if they are willing to collaborate. The lynchpin of the food supply have little visibility to the end-consumer; little to no ability to differentiate product; and have little to no incentive to adopt better but more costly farming methods if the added value cannot be communicated up the chain and monetized. The Blockchain of Food could give a voice and new distribution opportunities to these farmers. Produce farmers generally sit on 20% unused land capacity, and they routinely compost about 10% of their output at peak season. The business case for farmers to embrace blockchain is to find a market for thei Continue reading >>

Origintrail Story: From Food Traceability To The Blockchain

Origintrail Story: From Food Traceability To The Blockchain

We are building the first purpose-built protocol for supply chains based on blockchain. OriginTrail Story: From Food Traceability to the Blockchain Our story started with food traceability projects. But the OriginTrail Decentralized Network will benefit any product supply chain. Blockchain is a kind of technology that challenges previous thinking and the way business is done. The tokenization of business models calls for a new approach and is bound to disrupt whole industries. At the same time, blockchain and tokenization will only work if we can apply them to solve real-world, genuine business problems and to address broader public issues. Food safety is often at the heart of consumers concern, especially in the view of recent large-scale food safety scandals. And its not just the food most of the products we use every day come to us via long and complex supply chains which can adversely affect the quality of the product delivered to consumers. The quality of the product is closely related to the reputation of the brands problems in the supply chain can cause enormous damage. If anything goes wrong, brand damage can be enormous. In the era of connected society and viral spreading of the news via social media, one simple mistake or uncovered wrongdoing can sink the brand image and also the company value. A fault can even be buried deep down the supply chain and unknown to the company in the forefront. It is much easier to lose the consumers trust than to gain it. Fashion, Medicine, Elecrtronics OriginTrail is now applicable to any product supplychain The development of OriginTrail began with food traceability projects we implemented for our partners in recent years, which helped them with communicating the origin of products for their premium food brands. Supply chains Continue reading >>

Wal-mart And Ibm Want To Harness Blockchain To Improve Food Safety

Wal-mart And Ibm Want To Harness Blockchain To Improve Food Safety

These days its hard to read about the future of industrynearly any industry, reallywithout hearing how the blockchain is going to completely disrupt it. Blockchain is best known for being the digital accounting backbone of the volatile digital currency Bitcoin, but in many other contexts it is being promoted as a catch-all solution for transparency, efficiency, and trust. And the food industry is no exception. Some companies, including giants like Walmart, Nestl, and Dole, are hopeful that the high-tech tool can be used to address longstanding problems around food safety and traceability. One can understand why the technology might seem a natural fit for supply chains. For the uninitiated: Blockchain is basically a digital ledgera permanent record of transactionseach entry, or block, is linked to the one before it (the chain), and secured with cryptography, making the ledger highly-resistant to modification. For this reason, it is said to create trust, because entries cannot be removed or changed. In 2015, The Economist anointed it the trust machine. And then theres blockchains potential use for the seemingly intractable problem of food safety. In November and December of 2017, more than 60 people in the United States and Canada fell ill as a result of an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E.colithe deadliest strain of the bacterium. Two people died. And although Canadian officials laid the blame specifically on romaine lettuce, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was unable to definitively identify the source of the contaminationsaying only that leafy greens were likely the source. But thats just one incident. Nearly 28 million people fall ill in the United States every year as a result of foodborne illnesses, according to CDC estimates. Approximately Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology: Increasing Trust, Traceability & Security In The Food Industry

Blockchain Technology: Increasing Trust, Traceability & Security In The Food Industry

Blockchain technology: Increasing trust, traceability & security in the food industry 20 Feb 2018 --- How the food industry can harness the power of blockchain technology is a key question for many as we learn more about cryptocurrency concepts and how blockchain applications can be beneficial for companies and consumers.Hyped as a potentially game-changing pioneering innovation, blockchain technology is inspiring change and innovation in the global food and beverage industry and although its still in the extremely early stages, blockchain technology offers the promise of disruption on a huge scale across multiple sectors including agri-food, retail and the ingredients business at large. Cutting-edge companies looking to get ahead of the curve are forming partnerships in this burgeoning technology invented a decade ago by Satoshi Nakamoto the name used by the unknown person or people who designed bitcoin and created its original reference implementation for use in the cryptocurrency bitcoin. In this report, FoodIngredientsFirst examines how it is being used and the potential scope for the future. A blockchain, or distributed ledger, is a continuously growing list (digital file) of encrypted transactions called blocks that are distributed (copied) to a peer-to-peer (P2P) network of computers. Blockchain is a digital ledger in which transactions made in bitcoin or another cryptocurrency are recorded chronologically and publicly. The structure of blockchain means that it is a decentralized, distributed and a public digital ledger that is used to record transactions across many computers so that the record cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks and the collusion of the network. In turn, this allows the participants to verify and aud Continue reading >>

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