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Blockchain Food Supply Chain

How Blockchain Technology Could Transform The Foodindustry

How Blockchain Technology Could Transform The Foodindustry

How blockchain technology could transform the foodindustry Blockchain technology could solve food safety and fraud by enabling immediate traceability to the point of origin. (Shutterstock) How blockchain technology could transform the foodindustry Professor in Food Distribution and Policy, Dalhousie University Sylvain Charlebois does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. There has been a lot of noise on cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin of late. While some suggest cryptocurrencies are a fraud , others believe them to be the next biggest economic revolution the world has seen since the internet. Bitcoin has brought to light blockchain technology, which offers great potential for food safety and verification in the agrifood sector. Yet it is far from being the panacea for a range of issues affecting the industry at least for now. Simply put, blockchain technology is a way of storing and sharing information across a network of users in an open virtual space. Blockchain technology allows for users to look at all transactions simultaneously and in real-time. In food, for example, a retailer would know with whom his supplier has had dealings. Additionally, since transactions are not stored in any single location, it is almost impossible to hack the information. For consumers, blockchain technology can make a difference. By reading a simple QR code with a smartphone, data such as an animals date of birth, use of antibiotics, vaccinations, and location where the livestock was harvested can easily be conveyed to the consumer. Yaxi Hu, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, developed a test to identify fore Continue reading >>

Cibus Blockchain Will Transform The Global Food Supplychain

Cibus Blockchain Will Transform The Global Food Supplychain

Cibus Blockchain will transform the global food supplychain Cibus Blockchain will transform the global food supply chain Blockchain technology has become the talk of the town because the technology is found extremely potential for strengthening global supply chain. Similarly, Cibus blockchain integration is anticipated to transform the global food supply chain in a positive way. Lets close view the point. What is the present problem of food supply chain? Unpredictability and unorganized food journey is one of the recurring problems of food supply chain and the problem is persisting all over the world. As a food product travels thousands of miles, journey details or tracking the product till it reaches to the consumers plate is not always possible, the risk of quality compromise always looms large. On the other hand, the interference of middlemen makes the whole food supply chain corrupted to a large extent. As the result, global food supply chain is lacking reliability and transparency to consumers. According to statistics shared by The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) 2,265 cases of food contamination were found during 201617, which was a 30% increase on the preceding year. The World Health Organization (WHO) has calculated that 420,000 people die every year from unhygienic food, with approximately one out of 10 is becoming sick due to consumption of tainted or adulterated foods. According to Cibus white Paper, Cibus blockchain is a shared, distributed ledger that has the ability to record transactions and track food products without the support of a central repository. It empowers all members of the network to share and authenticate transactions every time they come into view, reducing the need for intermediaries, opposing internal system or a 3rd party audit. Accordin Continue reading >>

Blockchain Next On Food Supply Chain Menu

Blockchain Next On Food Supply Chain Menu

Home Software & Technology Blockchain Next on Food Supply Chain Menu Blockchain Next on Food Supply Chain Menu The food supply chain has a new ally in blockchain to help grapple with safety and regulatory issues. Few can argue that the global food supply chain is rife with complexities. It is an image of a supply network with myriad actors operating with disparate systems all with the goal of delivering food to the customer. Within such a complex ecosystem, numerous questions abound. Regardless of whether its a question of origin, regulatory compliance or the like, most are centered around the same issuetransparency. While elusive for many supply partners in the food chain, transparency now has an ally in blockchain technology. In the food world, blockchain could not have arrived at a better time with several high-profile cases of food contamination and fraud making headlines. While still undergoing pilot testing within companies and among their supply chain partners, blockchain is poised to transform the food industry. But what is blockchain? Within a supply chain context, its an encrypted digital ledger shared by multiple supply chain partners that provides permanent transparency and validation of transactions. C. John Langley Jr., Ph.D., clinical professor of supply chain management at Penn State University and coauthor of the 2018 Third-Party Logistics Study, says the increased desire for visibility within the supply chain is driving increased interest in blockchain technology, which breaks each movement down into a block and documents transactions every time a shipment changes hands. Linking the blocks together creates a record for parties involved in the process and provides specific details associated with each movement, which all parties can access. This create Continue reading >>

Blockchain To Revolutionise The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain To Revolutionise The Food Supply Chain

Home > Technology > Blockchain to Revolutionise the Food Supply Chain Blockchain to Revolutionise the Food Supply Chain Bureau Veritas has recently announced that consumers expectations of greater transparency from food manufacturers and suppliers will finally be met. Complete food traceability will be possible for the first time ever through blockchain technology, which will revolutionise the industry. The UK Food Standards Agency investigated in 2016/17 2,265 cases of food contamination, up 30% than the previous year. Furthermore, the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that approximately 1 in 10 people become ill every year because of contaminated food, which results in 420,000 deaths. Bureau Veritas, the leading certification provider, is offering greater clarity to the issue with the launch of Food traceability: The blockchain revolution, which provides details about the current obstacles in food traceability, together with recommendations on how to overcome them by using disruptive technology. Joy Franks, UK certification managing director at Bureau Veritas, said that the issue is complexity. A single product may go through six to eight stages of a supply chain before it ends up on shelves, making end-to- end traceability using current methods such as sampling nigh on impossible to achieve. The paper explains that blockchain is a ledger where transactions are recorded and confirmed, acting as a record of events that is shared between many parties. For example, in a food supply chain if a product fails a test and an inspection the information will be automatically traced to the origin of the failure. This way, blockchain technology will be improving efficiency, eliminating duplication of reconciliation efforts and reducing the need for intermediaries. As a r Continue reading >>

Blockchain: The Next Revolution In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain: The Next Revolution In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain: The next revolution in the food supply chain Judy Fainor, IT expert and chief architect of Sparta Systems, explores how this technology could solve the transparency and traceability challenges the industry faces. Judy Fainor, IT expert and Chief Architect of Sparta Systems , explores how this technology could solve the transparency and traceability challenges the industry faces. For decades, the food industry has been reliant on inefficient, paper-based recording systems, causing transparency and traceability issues. Counterfeit foods, contaminated products and pressure from the FDA are prompting organizations across the supply chain to re-evaluate current tracking and registration models. Some are already turning to blockchain as a solution. While still in its infancy in the food industry, blockchain has shown promise among manufacturing and financial industries, which have already widely adopted the technology. From end-to-end visibility to tamper-proof data, a number of industries are realizing the technology's advantages. By implementing blockchain, the food industry will be able to more readily solve the problems its currently facing especially issues related to transparency. Not only are consumers demanding to know where their food comes from, the FDA is demanding supply chain transparency via the Food Safety Modernization Act. Blockchain makes data easily shareable and permanent increasing the credibility of the data on any food product and reassuring customers and regulators that the food has a detailed account of its path through various organizations. This goes hand-in-hand with the issue of traceability, or tracing the passage of products through the supply chain. Blockchain provides everyone in the system with a view of a products records, so th Continue reading >>

How The Blockchain Can Save Our Food

How The Blockchain Can Save Our Food

Posted: 23 April 2017 | Sean Crossey (Arc-Net) | 1 comment What benefits might blockchain bring to the food and beverage industry? Sean Crossey investigates Its hard to escape blockchain in 2017 not that wed like to. Each industry seems to consider the technology as potentially revolutionary and so we asked Sean Crossey of arc-net for an insight into how blockchain might significantly change the food industry. When it comes to our food supply, what we dont know most certainly can hurt us. The World Health Organisation estimates that almost 1 in 10 people become ill every year from eating contaminated food, with 420,000 dying as a result. Our global food supply has grown so complex that it has become almost impossible for food producers and retailers to guarantee the provenance of their products. As with any industry, where there is opportunity there will inevitably be those who take advantage. Individuals tampering with our food is nothing new, in the 17th Century fraudsters would water down milk and add chalk to bread in order to squeeze out as much profit as possible. While technology may have improved in the 21st Century, similar methods used in our food today give the phrase you are what you eat an unsettling connotation. Many are aware of high profile incidents of food fraud, from the 2013 UK Horsemeat scandal to the 2009 Salmonella peanut butter outbreak and now the recent scandal surrounding two of Brazils largest meat production firms. Of course the size of such events naturally bring huge national attention to the security of our food supply, but what must be remembered is that these are not outliers. Our food supply is under constant threat from adulteration, with food fraud estimated to cost UK families up to 1.17 billion a year. The phrase you are what you Continue reading >>

The Role Of Blockchain In The Food Supply Chain

The Role Of Blockchain In The Food Supply Chain

The number of use cases for blockchain technology is a lot greater than most people imagine. Outside of the financial sector, there are dozens of opportunities waiting to be explored. OriginTrail, for example, is currently working on integrating data from forensic laboratories on the blockchain.Its an interesting venture, although it remains to be seen how successful this project can be. Another use Case for Blockchain Technology On paper, blockchain technology can facilitate many different business models. Although most of the current focus lies on improving the financial industry as a whole, some companies are exploring other opportunities as well. Recording data in a safe and immutable manner, for example, is something a lot of companies would love to do. It may even have major repercussions for the rest of the world in the long run. The work being done by OriginTrail should not be overlooked in this regard. Although few people know this company even exists, the teamtook a rather impressive step forward not long ago. They inked a deal with two scientific laboratories from Australia and Vietnam to record data on the blockchain. Efforts like these are direly needed for companies which focus on data integrity and addressing issues with the food supply chain. More specifically, the OriginTrail blockchain solution is an infrastructure meant to integrate and distribute data. It will also create reportsfor clients of any company or project making use of this blockchain. As such, a whole new layer of transparency and trust can be created in a frictionless manner. It opens the door for a lot of different use cases,although it remains to be seen how successful this venture can be in the long run. When it comes to ensuring the integrity of food and non-food products, there is Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Could Transform Food Safety

How Blockchain Could Transform Food Safety

Blockchain tech has primarily been associated with financial services but increasingly its making an impact across industries, and the food supply chain is no exception. InAugust 2017, tenof the worlds biggest CPG and food companies partnered with IBM to integrate blockchain into their supply chains. This cohort Walmart, Nestle, Unilever, McCormick, Tyson, Kroger, McLane, Driscolls, Dole, and Golden State Foods representsmore than half a trillion dollarsin aggregate annual global sales. Through the partnership, IBMs blockchain platform will help food companiesincrease supply chainvisibility and traceability. Blockchain. Bitcoin. ICOs. Everyones talking about them, but can you explain what they are and how they work? Download this report for a full explainer. The global food chain is complex, bringing together farmers, warehousing, shipping companies, distributors, and grocers. Involving so many different parties also means involving many different types of record keeping methods, from Excel sheets to emails to paper printouts. Not only is this system inefficient, its also imprecise. When you buy a vegetable at your local grocery store, the brand listed on the sticker mayhave no idea which farm the vegetable came from. Therefore, brands may not be sure how to react when something goes wrong. And with food, things can go seriously wrong. According to the CDC,foodborne contamination causes 48M Americans to fall ill, 128,000hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths every year. Produce causes nearly half of the illnesses (due to norovirus) while poultry causes the most deaths (mainly due to listeria and salmonella). When contamination breaks out in the face of unclear record-keeping, companies can take days or even weeks to trace the source of an infection and recall appropriate p Continue reading >>

Ibm And Walmart Are Using Blockchain In The Food Supply Chain - Business Insider

Ibm And Walmart Are Using Blockchain In The Food Supply Chain - Business Insider

A vertical stack of three evenly spaced horizontal lines. * Copyright 2018 Business Insider Inc. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our IBM has teamed up with companies like Walmart to use blockchain technology in the global food supply chain. IBM is working with large food suppliers like Walmart, Dole, and Nestl to incorporate blockchain technology, which underlies bitcoin, into the global food supply chain. Blockchain technology can quickly track a product's progress from farm to store shelf. The technology offers a more efficient way to figure out when and where food items are contaminated, which can help producers an public health officials limit contagions. Some of the world's largest food companies are making a bet that blockchain technology, the digital ledger system that underlies bitcoin, can help improve food safety. Dole, Driscoll's, Tyson, and Nestl are collaborating with IBM to develop a blockchain for the food supply system. The companies believe that the technology will allow companies and policy makers to better track items within the global food supply chain. Walmart, Unilever, and Kroger are also participating. "Blockchain technology enables a new era of end-to-end transparency in the global food system," Frank Yiannas, vice president of food safety at Walmart, said in a statement. He added: "It also allows all participants to share information rapidly and with confidence across a strong trusted network." Among the issues the companies are looking to address is food contamination. It can often take months to identify when and where a product was contaminated. In the meantime, food can be either unnecessarily thrown out as a precautionary measure, or people can get sick from eating contaminated food that Continue reading >>

Blockchain Improves Visibility In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain Improves Visibility In The Food Supply Chain

Blockchain Improves Visibility In the Food Supply Chain Cryptocurrency is a favorite topic in the business world currently, but its not the coins or currency that are the star of the show. Bitcoin in and of itself is exciting and promising from several perspectives. However, the foundation of what these technologies run on is much more important. You likely already know what were going to talk about next: Blockchain. To understand why blockchain is considered so crucial, you first need to delve into the core components of the technology. Its basically a digital ledger, except it has some incredibly useful properties that make it uniquely lucrative. For starters, its public and transparent, so anyone with access to the network can see whats happening in the moment, or what has been happening while they were away. However, the parties involved in a transaction or entry remain private, as do the materials or items exchanging hands. Finally, because of the nature of blockchain, its secured and valid. The ledger itself is thoroughly protected, and no one can alter data save the parties involved. Even then, the relevant parties only weigh in with pertinent information such as time and date of the transaction and the amount transferred. Most of what were talking about here is in reference to currencies and more traditional transactions. But its important to remember that were merely scratching the surface. As we speak, various organizations are working to adapt this technology for alternate industries and applications. Still, what does any of this have to do with your average food supply chain? Blockchain May Evolve the Food Supply Chain As We Know It Believe it or not, blockchain can help improve the transparency and management of the food supply chain. Its definitely needed Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology Set To Revolutionize Food Safety In Supply Chains

Blockchain Technology Set To Revolutionize Food Safety In Supply Chains

Blockchain Technology Set to Revolutionize Food Safety in Supply Chains By Toma Levak, iga Drev, and Branimir Raki Weve all heard the term Blockchain by now but what exactly is it, and has it advanced to the stage where food businesses can leverage its advantages for food safety purposes? This is an innovation that was first used as an underlying technology for the digital cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. But its potential to enable more trustworthy transactions was quickly recognized by several other industries, particularly those where a safe supply chain is key. Blockchains main innovation is that it keeps all data in a sequence of blocks (or ledger copies), which are equally dispersed over a network of computer nodes. Because it has no central authority, and because copies of the ledger are stored on every node, it is virtually impossible for anyone to change the data or remove it from the blockchain system. Whatever is put on the blockchain, is set in stone. Hence, we are talking about decentralization of power over the data. If a food safety scandal emerges, current IT systems have a hard time tracing the problem. Enterprise Resource Planning Systems Are Limited This contrasts with Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems in modern companies, which are centralized and set-up mainly for internal use. This makes them far less useful for cooperation and data exchange. Data in ERP systems is stored in silos, and data exchange between partners mostly works one-step-forward, one-step-back. It is hard to check the quality of historical data, which ultimately leaves the door open for fraud. Furthermore, food supply chains in particular are getting increasingly complex and globalized, which means the existing supply chain process setup is obsolete in the interconnected world of Continue reading >>

A Supply Chain Traceability System For Food Safety Based On Haccp, Blockchain & Internet Of Things

A Supply Chain Traceability System For Food Safety Based On Haccp, Blockchain & Internet Of Things

A supply chain traceability system for food safety based on HACCP, blockchain & Internet of things Abstract: In recent times food safety has drawn upsurge of academic and commercial concerns. In supply chain area, with the rapid growth of internet technologies, a lot of emerging technologies have been applied in traceability systems. However, to date, nearly all of these systems are centralized which are monopolistic, asymmetric and opaque that could result in the trust problem, such as fraud, corruption, tampering and falsifying information. Besides, centralized system is vulnerable to collapse, since a single point of breakdown will lead the whole system to be crashed. Today, a new technology called the blockchain which is a ground-breaking innovation in decentralized information technology presents a whole new approach. However, since this technology is still in its early stages, it has some inherent defects, in which scalability become a primary and urgent one when we face the mass data in the real world. In this paper we will build a food supply chain traceability system for real-time food tracing based on HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), blockchain and Internet of things, which could provide an information platform for all the supply chain members with openness, transparency, neutrality, reliability and security. Furthermore, we introduce a new concept BigchainDB to fill the gap in the decentralized systems at scale. The paper concludes with a description of a use case and the challenges to adopt blockchain technology in the future food supply chain traceability systems are discussed. Continue reading >>

Hyped Up? Blockchain, The Fresh Food Supply Chain And Why A Hybrid Model Is Best

Hyped Up? Blockchain, The Fresh Food Supply Chain And Why A Hybrid Model Is Best

Addressing the Freshness, Waste and Safety of Perishable Food Hyped Up? Blockchain, the Fresh Food Supply Chain and Why a Hybrid Model is Best by Kevin Payne | Jan 30, 2018 | Blockchain Its hard to match the hype of an upcoming Super Bowl but blockchain is giving it a shot. You cant go a day without a story about blockchain in the trade and business press. Some companies have even changed their name to include the word blockchain, without even having the technology to back it up. Despite all the hype, blockchain merits a discussion and serious consideration as the upside benefits for its use and application in the fresh food supply chain is significant. But, at this point, is blockchain a technology looking for a problem to solve, or a way of solving or improving the solution of a known problem? And, how does implementing blockchain relate to your existing business processes? Can or should blockchain replace your current systems or is a hybrid model the best? Its prudent to find ways to apply blockchain to address known business issues, as this will significantly improve its chances of being successful. And there are many solid use cases that exist in the food fresh supply chain today. Food safety and traceability are often cited as a place to start but ensuring food freshness can also benefit from the intelligent use of blockchain technology. A new article published by ChainLink Research discusses how food traceability and freshness can also be managed by networked SaaS solution without the need for blockchain. However, the author, Bill McBeath , states that recording the various transactions, HACCP steps, and temperature readings onto a blockchain can add trust and additional capabilities to the system. In addition to discussing applications of blockchain solutions, Continue reading >>

Blockchain Technology : The Future Of Food Industry ?

Blockchain Technology : The Future Of Food Industry ?

Emerging automation trends in the supply chain A method proven and tested by food industry giants As of now, it is difficult to access the information contained in a food industry blockchain. For example, it is impossible to identify a precise point at which a product was contaminated, and assessing the losses in merchandise can take weeks. Although this technology is still in the embryonic stage of its development, food industry giants have carried out tests to verify its viability. Ten major food companies, including Nestl, Unilever, Walmart, Dole, Driscolls, Golden State Foods, Kroger, McCormick and Company, McLane Company and Tyson Foods, have thus integrated a blockchain to work on the traceability of perishable food products and prioritize the areas where technology could be useful. And the results live up to expectations. Walmart, which carried out a feasibility study for the development of a blockchain for pork in China in 2016, can corroborate: the multinational company announced last June that it took them only a few minutes to retrace the origin of their products instead of several days. The tracked data included information on the products origin, their batch number, the factory which they came from, the processing methods as well as the expiration date, temperature during storage and even distribution details. This process was also taken up by Carrefour, which announced in February 2017 that the company planned to use a blockchain for its logistics procedures, in order to ensure the transparency of its animal-based products. In the supply chain sector, the development of blockchains is an authentic godsend. In addition to ensuring product traceability and secure data, this technology encourages collaboration between the links of the supply chain. It provid Continue reading >>

Blockchain Could Revolutionize The Food Industry

Blockchain Could Revolutionize The Food Industry

Bloomberg the Company & Its Products Bloomberg Anywhere Remote LoginBloomberg Anywhere Login Bloomberg Terminal Demo Request Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Blockchain Could Revolutionize the Food Industry Technology set to improve efficiency, Rabobank analyst says Food-fraud costs industry $40 billion a year, university says The technology that tracks bitcoin transactions is set to revolutionize the food chain. Blockchain, the distributed ledger technology, will lower transaction costs for food companies, improve efficiency and create new business opportunities, said Harry Smit, a senior analyst at RabobankInternational. Firms should explore options to adapt to the new technology or risk losing their competitive edge as innovation takes hold, he said in a report released Thursday. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and International Business Machines Corp. have already jumped on the bandwagon and more are joining in , including Nestle SA and Dole Food Co. Companies are seeking to improve transparency in industry targeted by food-fraud thats been estimated by Michigan State University to cost as much as $40 billion a year. In order for goods to be traceable from farm to fork, all parties that handle the goods should be linked to the blockchain, Smit said. Once the hurdle of broad participation is taken and the benefits of a more transparent supply chain manifest themselves, laggards will be forced to join fast, or otherwise remain Continue reading >>

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