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Can Blockchain Boost Air Travel Security | Blockchain Council

Can Blockchain Boost Air Travel Security | Blockchain Council

The Blockchain is one of the most significant technological revolutions of the present time. Despite having a recent origin and being at a stage of infancy, this technology has shown prospects to be the next big thing. From managing inventory to supply chain management to a financial transaction, Blockchain finds application in all niches. Well, our agenda of discussion in this blog is its use to boost air travel security. We all know that the air travel industry has a lot of information and database. Thus, it becomes crucial for the industry to adopt measures which can ensure safety and security of this information. From travel booking, immigration at hotels, airports, etc. and many other databases lies with the air travel industry which makes data sharing an integral part of this industry. Thus, they need to run through complicated data reconciliation process between various systems to ensure operations, security and facilitate the successful departure of the traveler. Each airline system has a mixed data which facilitate travel. The successful functioning of airlines is a result of coming together of a multitude of systems and sharing the information. Thus, to ensure a seamless flow of information, it is important that every information related to the traveler is easily accessible. Hence, we need a system in place which can ensure this. Blockchain, as we all know is a distributed ledger which has all the information can work wonders when it comes to air travel industry. Lets have a quick look at how some of the companies have proposed the idea of using Blockchain Technology in the airline industry. Since all the data in the Blockchain is immutable and unalterable, it remains safe and secure. Key features of Blockchain which make it a perfect solution for boosting se Continue reading >>

Travel Industry Eyes Blockchain Potential For Fees, Delays, Lost Bags

Travel Industry Eyes Blockchain Potential For Fees, Delays, Lost Bags

Travel industry eyes blockchain potential for fees, delays, lost bags BERLIN (Reuters) - Blockchain technology has the potential to shake up the travel industry by giving airlines and hotels a way to bypass controlling intermediaries like Expedia ( EXPE.O ) or Amadeus ( AMA.MC ) and gain better access to customer data. FILE PHOTO: An Air New Zealand aircraft takes off from Auckland Airport alongside a Singapore Airlines cargo plane during fuel shortages in New Zealand, September 20, 2017. REUTERS/Nigel Marple/File Photo Major players including Lufthansa ( LHAG.DE ) and citizenM hotels are partnering with startups and talking to large corporate clients about whether they can do group bookings via blockchain instead of using middlemen, who charge up to 25 percent of ticket or room prices in fees. Blockchain, which functions as an online record-keeping system maintained by a group of peers rather than a central agency or authority, also offers new business opportunities in tracking bags and flight delays. Because transaction data is openly available and not controlled by any one party, blockchain offers an opportunity to build new platforms that can connect travel providers and customers more directly and replace decades-old technology. We see a lot of business potential from the very nature of blockchain being decentralized by construction, removing the middleman by design. That looks very fruitful potentially, Xavier Lagardere, head of distribution at Lufthansa Group Hub Airlines told Reuters. The travel industry joins financial, mining, energy trading firms and others in looking at the potential for blockchain technology when it comes to simplifying processes, cutting out middlemen or tracking goods. One travel blockchain company that has partnered with major players i Continue reading >>

Canada And The Netherlands To Trial Biometrics And Blockchain For Air Travel

Canada And The Netherlands To Trial Biometrics And Blockchain For Air Travel

Canada and the Netherlands to Trial Biometrics and Blockchain for Air Travel Canada and the Netherlands are about to test drive biometrics and blockchain for air travel as part of a larger initiative called Known Traveller. The announcement comes amid the World Economic Forum, and upon the launch of the Known Traveller Digital Identity prototype. The product of a wide-ranging collaboration between governments, international hotel chains and airlines, INTERPOL, and others and led by Accenture the idea is to store citizens identity information in a cryptographically secured distributed ledger system. Among that identity information is travelers biometric data, which can be used to confirm their identities as needed throughout the travel process, from border screening at the airport to check-in at a hotel. In a statement announcing the trial program, Canadian Minister of Transport Marc Garneau explained, Leveraging new technological advancements can support risk-based approaches to public safety and security, making air travel more efficient while improving the travel experience. Its an ambitious aim, but some of these ideas are already being put into practice, as can be seen in efforts to establish biometric passenger screening programs at airports in the US and elsewhere. Nevertheless, the nuts and bolts of the Canada-Netherlands trial are still unclear, with no clear start date or timeline having yet been announced. Continue reading >>

Wef Tests Blockchain To Improve Air Travel Security

Wef Tests Blockchain To Improve Air Travel Security

WEF Tests Blockchain to Improve Air Travel Security The World Economic Forum (WEF) is collaborating with the Government of Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands to initiate a digital identity project that partly focuses on blockchain. The Known Traveller Digital Identity initiative is designed to utilize technologies like blockchain and biometrics to enhance the security around international air travel. A prototype created in collaboration with Accenture, a professional services firm, was revealed at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland last week. The idea behind the initiative is to give travelers control over, and the ability to share their information with authorities in advance of travel for expedited clearance. At the same time, it will develop trust between public authorities to improve risk and threat detection. The WEF claims that if fully realized, the ledger would enable pre-screening and facilitation of compliant known travelers across borders. Furthermore, it could potentially ease up resources for other purposes. According to the group, an ever-growing volume of travelers highlights the need for more efficient processes. Based on figures cited by WEF, international air arrivals are expected to reach 1.8 billion passengers by 2030. This is a 50% increase from the 1.2 billion arrivals recorded in 2016. John Moavenzadeh , Head of Mobility System Initiative at the WEF, said in a statement: With travellers providing access to verified personal biometric, biographic and historical travel data at their discretion, they can assist authorities to undertake risk assessments and pre-screening in advance: essentially verifying their identities and providing secure and seamless movement throughout their journey using biometric recognition technology. For Continue reading >>

How Can Blockchain Be Used With Airline Tickets And Ancillary Booking?

How Can Blockchain Be Used With Airline Tickets And Ancillary Booking?

Ticketing in general is a huge opportunity for blockchain technology. A big problem you have with tickets is the following: Who holds the valid Ticket? Airlines verify this by link your ticket with your Identity. The upside there is, it is very hard for someone to steal your ticket. The downside on the other hand, you really cant sell your ticket to someone else once you bought it. This is where the Blockchain can jump in: Imagine the Wallet where you hold the ticket is linked to your Identity. When you buy the ticket, it is automatically linked with your identity as well. If the blockchain is public, everybody can see that you are currently the owner of the ticket. Now, if you want to sell it, this is what happens: The ticket leaves your wallet & is associated with the new owners wallet/identity. The link between the ticket and your identity is no longer valid. This transaction, since its stored in the blockchain is once again visible for everyone. TLDR: The blockchain makes it possible to know at any given moment who the rightful owner of a ticket is. Blockchain takes on many forms in its application to being used in airline related transactions. Bitcoin and crypto currencies can be used to purchase tickets across borders when other payment methods may fail. Future.Travel accepts blockchain payments using Bitcoin as a payment method, regardless of where you live. Shop in your favourite fiat currency and then checkout using a blockchain enabled transaction. Imagine your bag that is checked for a trip. It is forever tagged one time with a blockchain id. Change airlines, change cities, your bag will always appear even when lost. Every scan showing its last location on a blockchain record that is never lost. Time to check-in. Is it you or your identity thief? Blockchain Continue reading >>

Decoding Blockchain, Part 3: Flight Data Management

Decoding Blockchain, Part 3: Flight Data Management

Decoding blockchain, part 3: Flight data management Depending on whoyou listen to, cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Litecoin willeither change fundamental aspects of peoples daily lives - financial services,healthcare, retail and, yes, travel - or theyre a sham, a prime example ofmuch ado about nothing. There is lessdebate, though, about the underlying system that powers those cryptocurrencies:blockchain. While models are still being developed and hypotheses tested, werestarting to see consensus that blockchain may provide a viable - and valuable - architecture to improve nearly any system that relies on a transaction, whetherthat exchange is information, or money or something else. As part of thismonths focus on blockchain, were aiming to unpack this abstract concept bysharing real industry examples of how this new decentralized ledger system couldbe put into action. For our thirdreport, we examine a test of blockchain to manage flight data. Data sharing is acomplicated - and sometimes disjointed - process in the air transport industry.The creation and storage of information for each flight is handled by multiple entities,at minimum the arrival and departure airports and the airline. And even when theparties involved are sharing data, problems can arise because the information isstored on separate databases. Inevitably, they drift out of sync, and the end result is the passengerturns up at the airport and their phone says one thing about the flight status,the screen says another, and you can have airline staff seeing a different dataset, says Kevin OSullivan, lead engineer for SITA Lab, the technologyresearch arm at SITA . Theres no single version of the truth when it comes to what thestatus of any individual flight is. In the airline industry, this typ Continue reading >>

Blockchain In Air Travel

Blockchain In Air Travel

Published on 22 February by Kevin O'Sullivan , Lead Engineer, SITA Lab No one doubts that blockchain distributed ledger technology will disrupt business models across all sectors and countries. The fact it provides something thats all too often in short supply trust and transparency for information exchanged between businesses makes it a compelling future proposition for any business, the full range of air transport organizations notwithstanding. Blockchain is a new way for business to trade in products, services and information but without the friction that inevitably arises when establishing trust between parties. As a ledger of digital events that can be replicated, shared and trusted without the need for central authority, Blockchain offers resiliency, disintermediation, proof against tampering and traceability. This is a new world a world in which businesses can quickly contract, exchange services, record transactions, manage payment and disengage in near-absolute security. Combined with automation, the Internet of Things, artificial intelligence and robotics, Blockchains power to disrupt will be immense, promising a world where business can quickly contract, exchange services, record transactions, manage payment and disengage. But, as weve heard before, Blockchain is not the thing. Its simply the thing which enables the thing. The general perception is that its three to five years from maturity. Yet blockchain is already being heralded as a way to reduce operational, governance and regulatory overheads for existing business practices, and to create new business models where the complexity of sharing data in a trusted environment is prohibitive. While our industry is already identifying use cases for airlines and airports, whats really needed is research. We need Continue reading >>

Can Blockchain Technology Liberate Travel Inventory?

Can Blockchain Technology Liberate Travel Inventory?

Can Blockchain technology liberate travel inventory? This is a viewpoint by Trond Vidar Bjory, head of product development and implementation, Nordics for ATPI . The views expressed are the views and opinions of the author and do not reflect or represent the views of his employer. One of the many problems faced by travel startups is, and has been for years , access to inventory. As a new player you will either struggle because you dont have the volumes required for anyone to be willing to open their API and you cant get the volumes unless you have the inventory or, they see you as a potential threat down the road and deny you access altogether. As a result of this, the innovation happening in travel today is purely front end, lipstick on a pig. Very little is being done to the core of travel, inventory distribution. The power is centralized and the few big companies sitting on the inventory have little economic incentive to innovate themselves. But isnt NDC is going to revolutionize how airlines sell their products, you say? Sure, it is giving some of the major airlines better control over their distribution channels, and it is a welcome alternative to the existing model. But an XML standard that has been in development for five years and only allows a limited number of airlines better inventory control, is hardly a revolution. What about the rest of the industry? Had IATA gone with a schema that at least tried to embrace the whole industry and not just the airlines, we could be having another discussion entirely. Some of us believe that Blockchain technology could be the disruptive force that the industry needs. We have seen many articles about potential use cases for the industry (anyone else tired of reading about how lockchain could create the next, decentralized A Continue reading >>

The Potential Of Blockchain For Airlines - Accenture

The Potential Of Blockchain For Airlines - Accenture

Beyond the buzz: The potential of blockchain technology for airlines Blockchain technology can create new efficiencies and services models for airlines. Blockchain technology has captured the imagination of companies across industries, including airlines. Using robust cryptographic techniques and a distributed messaging protocol, it creates shared ledgers that decentralize reconciliation-based processes. Unlike traditional data technology, blockchain technologies are consistent and durable, shared and mutualized, and protected at the data element level. So how can airlines cut through the buzz and use this technology to change the way they do business? They can start by moving past common misperceptions. Not surprisingly, the uninitiated confuse blockchain with Bitcoin. The reality, however, is that the blockchain is the technology of Bitcoin, without the coin. It is capability, not currency. Blockchain technology elegantly transfers and tokenizes value. Expanding the definition of value shows how many ways the blockchain can be applied. There is the exchange of direct financial value. However, there is also the exchange of indirect financial valuethe business, operational and customer experience value that comes from moving data across an enterprise or ecosystem. The characteristics of the airline industryand also the broader travel industryalign very well with the capabilities of the blockchain. Data sharing among multiple actors and touchpoints powers the travel journey. From booking to arrival, players can include airlines, online travel platforms, card providers, airports, immigration, government, hotels, car rental agencies and more. Each actor requires, collects, stores and often shares traveler and operational information. In fact, a web of complex and seemingl Continue reading >>

Blockchain: The Future Of Flight Data Management?

Blockchain: The Future Of Flight Data Management?

Blockchain: the future of flight data management? IT technology firm SITA has built a private-permissioned blockchain system called FlightChain, which stores flight information and uses smart contracts to judge potentially conflicting information. SITA Lab lead engineer Kevin OSullivan outlines the key outcomes of the project and explains how blockchain could create a single source of truth for flight data. Blockchains role as a shared, decentralised digital ledger could enable more accurate exchange of flight information between airlines and airports. Leading digital currency Bitcoin is enduring a rocky start to 2018, with a sizeable drop in its exchange rate casting doubt on its sustainability. Nevertheless, the buzz behind blockchain platforms, which power crypto-currencies, remains persistent across the aviation sector. For the uninitiated, a blockchain is essentially a digital database that records data shared between parties, with each set of data forming a block along the chain. Every block is encrypted and can be accessed and verified by users across a network of computers. Changes to the blockchain cannot be made without the agreement of the majority of users, making it a significantly more secure way of storing information. The entire chain is visible to all users across the network, preventing data from being lost or manipulated by cybercriminals, and removing the need for a third party such as a bank to verify transactions. Blockchains role as a shared, decentralised digital ledger could enable more accurate exchange of flight information between airlines and airports. Last year, IT firm SITA announced the results of its FlightChain project, which investigated the potential use of blockchain for flight information storage and management. The company created Continue reading >>

Canadian Government To Test Blockchain And Biometrics In Air Travel

Canadian Government To Test Blockchain And Biometrics In Air Travel

Canadian government to test blockchain and biometrics in air travel The government of Canada has teamed up with Accenture to roll out a prototype which aims to test the application of biometrics and blockchain technology in the area of air travel. The prototype is called Known Traveller Digital Identity and was launched at the World Economic Forums (WEF) 48th Annual Meeting. The government is collaborating with the WEF and partners for the project. The system strives to enhance the security and the seamless flow of people across borders. Leveraging digital technologies such as biometrics, cryptography and distributed ledger technology, it will give travellers control over, and the ability to share their information with authorities in advance of travel for expedited clearance building trust between public authorities to improve risk and threat detection. The Government of Canada will be working with the Netherlands to explore opportunities for demonstrating the potential of digital identity systems to engender trust and cooperation between international partners. Moreover, the prototype and pilot result from two years of thorough cooperation between public and private sector partners in the WEFs Security in Travel Project. Continue reading >>

Urban Flying Taxi To Get Lift Off On A Blockchain

Urban Flying Taxi To Get Lift Off On A Blockchain

Urban flying taxi to get lift off on a blockchain Pamela Whitby has been looking at applications for blockchain technology and hears that success is most likely in entirely new markets With the hype around blockchain in travel reaching fever pitch, why not toss something else into an already complicated equation an initial coin offering (ICO) for an electrically charged flying urban taxi. At EyeforTravels recent digital and data summit in Amsterdam , there was plenty of buzz about the disruptive possibilities for blockchain technology in travel. But is a crypto-backed token to fund the take off of a flying car, which, the evangelists say, would change the way cities work and open new avenues for travel and tourism, a step too far? Not according to Nikolay Bezhko, the lead community manager of Blockchain.aero , a consortium of twelve firms which operate in the mass urban aviation market. He says: One of the interesting things is that this potentially trillion-dollar industry is in its infancy, and the whole concept of blockchain could be easily integrated in the early stages. this potentially trillion-dollar industry is in its infancy, and the whole concept of blockchain could be easily integrated in the early stages Until very recently, the notion of the urban flying taxi was little more than pie in the sky. But in April last year, at the Uber Elevate Summit , vertical take off and landing aircraft were showcased as a way to bring far-reaching changes to our cities and our lives. Present estimates are that a 1.5 hour city journey could be cut to around 10 minutes, and cost the equivalent of an Uber cab; around $8 per minute, but this could vary by market. With Uber Elevate estimating the need for around a thousand cars per hundred cities, the flying urban taxi, is no l Continue reading >>

The What, Why And How Of Blockchain In Travel

The What, Why And How Of Blockchain In Travel

The what, why and how of blockchain in travel Blockchain technology is in its infancy, but its clear that it will change many industries in radical ways. The most brilliant minds of our time are trying to understand all the implications, but it will take some time. NB: This is a viewpoint by Maksim Izmaylov, founder and CEO of Roomstorm . Hehas also helped to start Travel Tech Con and Winding Tree (mentioned below). As with many other technologies, startups will play the key role in this process by testing these ideas in the wild and trying different approaches. Well surely see some big wins and weve already seen disasters, such as The DAO . Ive already seen multiple X + blockchain ideas, where the blockchain part is not relevant to the idea, so lets discuss some of the aspects of the blockchain that you can use in your business today. Hopefully after reading this article you will be able to better understand what blockchain is, how it works and why its important. Blockchain is simply a type of database which has several interesting features. First of all, its immutable, meaning that records can only be added to that database and never removed or changed. Secondly, blockchain databases are distributed among multiple computers that store full or partial copies of that database. For example the Bitcoin blockchain (yes, there are multiple blockchains out there!) is hosted by millions of machines. Its important to distinguish private blockchains, where all the computers in the network are controlled by one organization and which you cant freely access, and public blockchains, such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and Hyperledger . Last, but not least, one can deploy a piece of computer code onto a blockchain and, because that database is immutable, that code will be stored and execute Continue reading >>

How Blockchain Development Will Dominate Air Travel?

How Blockchain Development Will Dominate Air Travel?

Since the exponential growth of Bitcoin, whose price has recently hit more than $15,000, the technology behind it, blockchain, is attracting more attention. More than simply enabling currencies, blockchain is expected to superpower the capability of countless industries, including Air Travel. German Airline Lufthansa Group has recently adopted Bitcoins blockchain technology to make travel cheaper (1)R. Air France KLM, one of the worlds largest airline wants to be at the forefront of the disruption by relying on blockchain development to track its maintenance and repair systems (2). Airline companies are beginning to see the value of this revolutionary digital, distributed ledger system. Blockchain Development For Accelerating the Air Travel Process The facets of the airline industry and also the broader travel industry align very well with the capabilities of the blockchain. To be more specific, blockchain could be employed in almost all stages in the complicated and security-filled steps of air travel. Blockchain proves fantastic for the management of aircraft and flights. First, Maintenance/Repair/Overhaul (MRO) can be tracked on the blockchain , helping the provenance of every part of the aircraft be instantly available and speeding up due diligence around future lifecycle events. Second, it facilitates Airport Collaborative Decision Making (ACDM) . To address the need of many separate parties coming together to safely get the aircraft landed, turned around and airborne again within the constraints of strict time expectations and weather events, blockchain allows each party to update information on the blockchain. Thus everyone gets a true picture of what is happening in near real time at an airport. This would mean that decision making would not happen in isolation Continue reading >>

Blockchains New Pilotdisrupting The Airlineindustry

Blockchains New Pilotdisrupting The Airlineindustry

Engineering student at the University of Michigan Blockchains New Pilot Disrupting the AirlineIndustry While bitcoin has received all of the hype surrounding blockchain, the use of blockchain in the airline industry is about to take off. Lets think about how much data is continuously being transmitted when just one flight takes off. As a passenger, you walk into an airport with your boarding pass. Your boarding pass alone has two key pieces of information: a frequent flier number and an itinerary number. Of course, your name is on it too. You use your unique frequent flier number or itinerary number to then check a bag or print your boarding pass if you still havent caught on to the digital plane ticket. From the airlines data perspective, each passenger is assigned to a flight which has a specific flight number and departure time and to a plane which has a finite amount of seats and several boarding groups. The amount of data that is shared in real time is enormous. Even simply tracking passengers on a single flight (not thinking about coordinating pilots/flight attendants or network operations center coordinating which planes to use, when they should take off or where they should go), each airline has to at the bare minimum keep track of when a passenger has checked in for their flight, when their ticket is scanned as they board and where their bags are in reference to their final destination. Airlines are a hub of data collection amongst multiple parties and many different touchpoints. After interning for an airline last summer, I am extremely intrigued to see how blockchain will innovate the airline industry and how real time data will improve the operational performance of airlines. But, how exactly does blockchain come into play? The current stressful process of Continue reading >>

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