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Bitcoin Wallets From 2010

Found In Dust 27 Bitcoins(2010)

Found In Dust 27 Bitcoins(2010)

Okay I need some help. In 2010 I traded something for 27 bitcoins on an old Mac Powerbook G4. I just found it in my parents garage and remembered it. Before anything I have to wait for the charger I just ordered but I don't remember the wallet keys or any programs I used to store them. Basically is there any reason to persue finding the bitcoins on the laptop? I had an offer for the laptop on another site but it sounds like Id be getting stiffed because he only offered 2 bitcoins and the laptop was used to trade for 27 but truth be told idk how to even find them let alone trade them for money Well, first off, don't let that 2btc offer fade away...it might be your best option. Second, for anyone here to begin to assist we need to know all the details. Do you remember what wallet application you used? When you say "keys" are you referring to the private key or a pass phrase. If it was an online wallet then it's possible you just need to crack your password, there are services (and people on the forum) that will brute force in for a fair fee. If it's private keys in a wallet file it may still be on the laptop somewhere. And, Yes, I think 27 btc is worth spending a bit of time, money, and effort to retrieve. Thanks yeah I have no idea what program I used, but I did have to download the program and use some sort of filter to download a file or maybe a proxy? Im not sure exactly pretty sure this was dial up Internet were talking. Probably best to wait for the charger and see if the program is still installed on the laptop I guess. I would have no idea what the program was called maybe I'll look up the names of programs available circa 2010. If you have an idea of them help would be appreciated Probably best to wait for the charger and see if the program is still installed on Continue reading >>

I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old Pc. Can You Recover Bitcoin?

I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old Pc. Can You Recover Bitcoin?

I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old PC. Can You Recover Bitcoin? Can you recover bitcoin mined in the relative infancy of the cryptocurrency?If you can, it would be the equivalent of winning the lottery. Back in 2010, a single block was 50 bitcoins. If you mined just one block and held onto it, it could be worth $200,000 today andcloser to a quarter million dollars a month-or-so ago before China banned bitcoin . What if yourcoins are locked inside an old computer? If theyre retrievable, chances are youre rich. However, the temptation for a helpful geek to rip you off or lie about how many coins you have and abscond with some is very high. So be really careful thats the consensus below. Quit your job and learn how to get the coins yourself. Even if it takes you a year. This question, I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old PC. How Can I Recover The Coins? originally appeared on Quora , the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answers byVivek Teega,Patrick Broadfoot,Alex J,Zaki Ahmed Siddiqui, Myles Black, Jay Milla, Manuel Mayorquin, Chris Pay, Owen Miller, Mohith Agadi, Kayla Marie and Bob Ojne. Vivek Teega, Developing stuff on Florincoin Wow, you are really rich even if you had mined one single block If you were using Bitcoin core wallet to store your coins, there will be wallet.dat file in the bitcoin directory. You need to recover that. Then install Bitcoin core on your new machine, let the blockchain sync and then replace the wallet.dat in the new machine. Youll get back all your Bitcoins. Linux go to home folder using cd. then type .bitcoin Windows Press windows key + run, type %appdata%. You should see a bitcoin folder there As Patrick said, beware of people trying to Continue reading >>

Why A 12 Word Mnemonic Is An Insecure Bitcoin Walletbackup

Why A 12 Word Mnemonic Is An Insecure Bitcoin Walletbackup

Tech entrepreneur, avid rock climber, all natural environmentalist, and bitcoin evangelist. CEO & Founder of Edge (formerly Airbitz) Why a 12 Word Mnemonic is an Insecure Bitcoin WalletBackup Rewind back to 2010 and the way Bitcoin wallets worked. Users had a wallet.dat file on their computer with their private keys on it. They could optionally add a password to encrypt it. They SHOULD back up the file in case they lost their computer, like this guy . Life at the time was tedious! Some mobile wallets worked the same way. Users were given full responsibility for keys but without good tools to take responsibility. Fast forward to today. Now the defacto standard is to backup your wallet by writing down a 12 to 24 word passphrase which IS your master private key. In some ways this is easier than saving a file to a thumb drive and putting it in a safe. Especially on mobile. But have we just opened up ourselves to possibly the biggest attack vector on our devices? I recently sat down with John McAfee, life long hacker and former founder of popular anti virus software, and we discussed securing Bitcoin. Being buried in the hacker community, he sees the biggest threat to our devices as two things, and I would agree: Both Android and iOS now allow custom keyboards and its entirely possible one of those is snooping your keys and sending them to a malicious party. With a 1224 word seed backup, weve guaranteed that weve given attackers our private key on a silver platter. Show the words on screen and boom, a screen capture virus has it. Have the user enter it to verify the backup (many wallets do this) and bam, a key logger has you pwned! Some wallets talk about being uber secure because they use the Secure Element to store keys in hardware on the phone. But show the keys on scree Continue reading >>

Strongcoin Wallet

Strongcoin Wallet

In 2010 Bitcointalkk user Laszlo paid 10,000 BTC to 1XPTgDRhN8RFnzniWCddobD9iKZatrvH4 for a couple of pizzas. At current prices that's $10,000,000 which I think you'll agree is money well spent. Carl Force, a DEA agent accused of stealing hundreds of thousands of dollarsfrom the Silk Road drug-trafficking website while he investigated it,pleaded guilty, according to court papers. The receiving bitcoin address for the alleged thefts. 14rE7Jqy4a6P27qWCCsngkUfBxtevZhPHB 6. Bloomberg anchor displays bitcoin on TV, immediately gets robbed by reddit user. On Friday, December 20, Matt Miller surprised his two fellow anchors Adam Johnson and Trish Regan with bitcoin gift certificates during his12 Days of Bitcoin segment. Johnson then flashed his certificate on thescreen for a few seconds - enough time for a Reddit user to scan thedigital QR codeof Bitcoin address 1GBwk2YJMDFqSVhTKygH8zUwV7jdoJhHHH with his phone and take the gift for himself. 7. WikiLeaks funding blocked after government blacklisting Digital currency has proven vital for WikiLeaks survival over the past few years.After the release of classified U.S. diplomatic cables in November 2010,all donations to WikiLeaks were blocked by major payment providers,including VISA, MasterCard, PayPal and Western Union.This embargo is said to have drstically cut the incoming revenue. By opening up to bitcoin address, 1HB5XMLmzFVj8ALj6mfBsbifRoD4miY36v over the years the mediaorganization now receives a majority of its funds in digital currencies. 1EBHA1ckUWzNKN7BMfDwGTx6GKEbADUozX one of 9 accounts, all containing approximately 66,000 BTC and linked by asingle transaction that is most likely one owner with over 550,000 BTC in their control. 1M8s2S5bgAzSSzVTeL7zruvMPLvzSkEAuv is the recipient of a 500,000 BTC transfer, probably Continue reading >>

You May Have A Fortune On Your Hard Drive: Recovering Lost Bitcoin

You May Have A Fortune On Your Hard Drive: Recovering Lost Bitcoin

Tracking Bitcoin news and the incredible adoption of Bitcoins! You May Have a Fortune on Your Hard Drive: Recovering Lost Bitcoin Theres Gold In Them Hills, and Bitcoin On Your Hard Drive, Maybe A story published by The Guardian is sweeping the Internet today. Its about a Norwegian man who found 5,000 Bitcoin in 2009 for $27, and forgot about them until this year only to discover that they are now worth over $800,000. Kristoffer Koch invested 150 kroner ($26.60) in 5,000 bitcoins in 2009, after discovering them during the course of writing a thesis on encryption, explained the Guardian. He promptly forgot about them until widespread media coverage of the anonymous, decentralised, peer-to-peer digital currency in April 2013 jogged his memory. Koch bought an apartment in Toyen with his newfound money. It turns out that losing Bitcoins is not an uncommon circumstance. Many of the early adopters started mining or trading for Bitcoin back in 2009 and 2010 when the currency had little value. They did not look at Bitcoin as an investment, but rather a social experiment. One man, in May 2010, offered to pay 10,000 BTC to someone to deliver a pizza to him. That sum is now worth over $2,000,000. In the early days of Bitcoin, there were no cloud wallets . Bitcoiners used client software that would generate or accept bitcoins and save them into a file on the computer. Imagine the scenarios in which these bitcoins can be lost: file corruption, hard drive crashing, or just disposing an old computer. One user on a Reddit forum compared his experience to the Norwegian man, This happened to me but I only walked away with $25k. Still felt like winning the showcase on the Price is Right.I was cleaning up my important folder on one of my hard drives and came across the wallet.dat file. Th Continue reading >>

The 625m Lost Forever - The Phenomenon Of Disappearing Bitcoins

The 625m Lost Forever - The Phenomenon Of Disappearing Bitcoins

The 625m lost forever - the phenomenon of disappearing Bitcoins Immensely strong security means there's no hope of recovering Bitcoins if you lose the password - and it happens a lot more often than you'd imagine Millions of Bitcoins are already lost foreverPhoto: Bloomberg News By Matthew Sparkes , Deputy Head of Technology Unlike banks, Bitcoins are unregulated. If an owner dies without passing on their password (called a private key), their Bitcoins expire with them. Theyll remain in the ether, visible but unspendable. Nobody to help. You could imagine them eventually falling prey to brute force attacks someone guessing key after key until they stumble upon the correct one. But thats where Bitcoins formidable security becomes a problem. Security expert Bruce Schneier once ruled out an attempt to crack a 256-bit key, of the type used by Bitcoin, by referring to the laws of physics: such is the magnitude of the problem. Even an impracticably large computer consuming all the energy outputted by the sun couldn't count the number of possible combinations in several decades. His mind-bending conclusion was that such an attack "will be infeasible until computers are built from something other than matter and occupy something other than space." We know that only 21m Bitcoins will ever exist, that they will be gradually mined over many years and that 13.7m have been unlocked so far. We also know that they can be lost through death, simple carelessness or a hardware failure. But how many have actually been destroyed? Scour the archives of the Bitcoin forums and youll find references in the early days of the digital currency to sums worth pennies at the time, but which would now be small fortunes. Florida programmer Laszlo Hanyecz famously bought two pizzas in 2010 for 10,000 Continue reading >>

What Happens To Lost Bitcoins?

What Happens To Lost Bitcoins?

James Howells of Wales is one of the Bitcoin communitys most tragic figures. Last June, Howells inadvertently tossed a hard drive containing 7,500 bitcoins , which he had mined back when they were worth very little. Now that a bitcoin is worth somewhere around $1000, that drive has an estimated worth of $7.5 million. But unfortunately for Howells, an IT worker, city workers say its too late for him to recover the drive from the dump. The sum at stake in Howells case brought him lots of attention, but hes certainly not the only person to lose track of his bitcoins. Outside of anecdotal evidence, however, theres really no way of knowing how many people have similar talesor how much theyve lost. See also: Bitcoin Black Friday Aims To Get People To Actually Spend Their Bitcoins According to the founder of Bitcoin Black Friday , only 78% of bitcoins in existence were being circulatedin 2012. Since its impossible to tell whether dormant coins are lost or simply being saved, the holiday aimed to get hoarded bitcoins back in circulation. Researchers found that a full 64% of bitcoins have never been spent ; the question is whether they stillcan be. According to Greg Schvey , a Bitcoin researcher, its hard to distinguish lost bitcoins from those people are just saving for a rainy day. There is, however, one big clue. It starts with theblock chain, a public ledger that includes every transaction ever made within the currency. When miners verify new transactions, what theyre really doing is appending new blocks onto the block chain. Each address has ownership of a certain number of coins, Schvey said. As long as we see any amount of coin come out of that address, we know that since the same person has access to all the bitcoins at that address, theyre not lost. Schvey cofounded Th Continue reading >>

A Platform That Solves The Problem Of Lost Wallets Exists

A Platform That Solves The Problem Of Lost Wallets Exists

Global Africa Arabic Canada China Czech Republic France Greece India - English India - Hindi Italy Japan Latin America Pakistan Philippines Russia South Korea Turkey UK Ukraine US A Platform That Solves the Problem of Lost Wallets Exists The cryptocurrencies lost due to the forgetfulness of the user, broken technology or intentional destruction, cannot be restored ever.The total number of dead bitcoins can be about 4.3 million and their cost is about $14 billion at todays rate. As it is known, the total number of bitcoins in the world is limited: they have a limit of 21 million. About 17 million have already been mined as a result of mining. However, almost 30% of them are a dead weight. This currency will never be used in the future.Since a 256-bit private key is almost impossible to crack, so the lost bitcoins will be lost. Traces of a significant part of the missing bitcoins date back to the early stage of the existence of the digital currency. Many early users who adopted to cryptocurrencies were little concerned about the reliable storage of their bitcoins, which at that time were worth a penny.In 2013, James Holes from GB lost 7.5 thousand bitcoins by throwing an old hard disc drive away.James was one of the first miners in the world but due to underestimation of the prospects of the cryptocurrency, he abandoned his hobby. For three years he kept a hard disk drive with a wallet up to the spring-clean in 2013.His attempts to dig a disk in a dump did not succeed. Adam Leonard, who is the CEO of BlockEx stock exchange, lost 6000 bitcoins forever.Adam Leonard bought 6000 bitcoins with a business partner in 2010.The number and password from the wallet were stored on Hushmail, the popular secure email service.Nevertheless, the password from the mail was irretrievably l Continue reading >>

Meet The Man Who Will Hack Your Long-lost Bitcoin Wallet For Money - Coindesk

Meet The Man Who Will Hack Your Long-lost Bitcoin Wallet For Money - Coindesk

Meet the Man Who Will Hack Your Long-Lost Bitcoin Wallet for Money For Dave Bitcoin, the alias of the software architect that hacks peoples cryptocurrrency passwords, the price surge of Ethereums blockchain token ether has generated a significant amount of work; work that wouldnt have been steered his way without his focus on developing trust. And just to be clear, Dave Bitcoin hacks peoples passwords with their permission. He runs the website Wallet Recovery Services , which recovers peoples lost or forgotten passwords by brute force decryption that is, using a computer program to try millions of passwords in a short amount of time. He provides the service for bitcoin, litecoin and most other alternative cryptocurrency wallets, and in December, he began decrypting Ethereum pre-sale wallets. "I love a challenge," said Dave Bitcoin, whos pseudonym remains from the days when it was unclear if cryptocurrency was legal. "Initially, back in mid-2013, I just wanted to understand the cryptography used by bitcoin and the formats of encryption in the wallets. I realized that I was able to potentially help people who have forgotten their wallet passwords, and it grew from there." Dave Bitcoin has worked with more than 1,000 people since he launched the service, most in need of password recovery but a few that wanted deleted wallet files recovered. His success rate is about 30%, but its a rate that varies drastically based on how much information a client gives. Since January, Dave Bitcoin's Ethereum business has exploded, coinciding with the 1000% price increase. Today, about 50% of his business is decrypting Ethereum wallets, 40% is bitcoin related and the remaining 10% is recovering altcoin wallets, like litecoin or dogecoin. Dave Bitcoin charges 20% of the amount in the walle Continue reading >>

List Of Bitcoin Companies

List Of Bitcoin Companies

This is a list of Wikipedia articles on for-profit companies with notable commercial activities related to bitcoins and Cryptocurrency . Common services are wallet providers , bitcoin exchanges , payment service providers [1] and venture capital . Other services include mining pools , cloud mining , peer-to-peer lending , exchange-traded funds , over-the-counter trading , gambling , micropayments , affiliates and prediction markets . A sign advertising bitcoin payments in a cafe in The Netherlands in April 2013 A bitcoin ATM in the Czech Republic in September 2014 A FPGA based bitcoin mining board from 2013 Detail of TREZOR hardware wallet showing transaction details on its display 2014 A bitcoin point of sale terminal showing transaction has been paid, 2016 Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Hardware Wallets

Bitcoin Hardware Wallets

Since Bitcoins can be stored offline , a BTC hardware wallet is one more form of storage bin just as the same with a paper wallet. Being prone only to physical theft, Bitcoin hardware wallet has the same security as the paper wallets unless the step of having to generate the private key by wallet import format in some software is removed makes it very open to vulnerabilities online. There are two parts in hardware wallets - one is the connected device and another one is the disconnected one. The public keys are being held by the connected wallet and does all jobs of a regular wallet by selecting the transactions to sign. But signing in wouldnt be possible since the offline device keeps the private key. Next procedure would be to attached the device typically done through the USB port- but not secure - or through a QR-code. Using the USB method, the transaction is transmitted to the newly connected offline device enlisted - transported back to wallet which then proceeds to the Bitcoin network that includes the myriad of noted to verify and include in the blockchain. Using the method of QR code, the bitcoin transactions will be assembled through the software online and the QR code is made which then the offline device scans that generates in turn a transaction code which is signed and then scanned again to the software online and sent again to the network of bitcoin to verify. There are also devices like Trezor that needs a pin. Considered a better brand known out there in a small group of hardware wallets that are offline, Trezor wallets private keys are made on the device and stays there forever - the keys are made deterministically and upon the initialization of the device, the seed key is made which means that if stolen or lost, a brand new device is possible to be r Continue reading >>

Recovering Bitcoins From Old Wallets

Recovering Bitcoins From Old Wallets

Bitcoin, and the blockchain specifically, is a pretty cool technology. The price of a bitcoin, as shown in the above image, is still in flux. Thats euphemism for a bloody roller-coaster. Anyway, this post is about something connected, but not entirely the same. This post is about recovering some bitcoins which I had in an old wallet, and where I thought they would stay. When I was involved with coinduit I used to have some bitcoins (some part of bitcoins, of course) on Mycelium wallet on my android mobile phone. Unfortunately my phon encountered a kind of strange problem: even if connected to the charger, the phone was unable to charge. This meant I had small amount of time to transfer all my bitcoins, and take a backup of my existing wallet. I tried to do the 12 words backup with Mycelium, but didnt manage. However Ive managed to export the private keys of my three accounts that I had created at that time Who has the private keys of a bitcoin address, owns the address, therefore keeping the private key secure is paramount. The private key is necessary to sign a transaction, which is the way the bitcoins do get transfer from one address to another one. Basically without the private key, you cant move the bitcoinsfrom a bitcoin address. So before my mobile ran out of juice, Ive managed to transfer some coins on a new wallet Ive just opened on blockchain.info. For some reason that I do not remember, I didnt send them all of them, but some millibitcoins stayed behind. I think just after the transaction, my phone poweroff. That was basically the swans song for my phone. Ive sent the phone to be repaired, but as usual, they did a factory reset and everything that was stored on the phone, was gone. Quick fast forward to today. Ive got a new phone, a bit of time ago, and Ive Continue reading >>

Found Old Bitcoin Wallet

Found Old Bitcoin Wallet

So I found an old Bitcoin wallet on an old computer (from December 2010, back when BTC were about $0.50). I cannot recall how many BTC are on this wallet (might range between 1 - 50+). I have the "wallet.dat" file, tho not sure how to best view it. Can it be imported into Bitcoin-QT on my new system? Or would it be better to use something like this: I don't want to screw anything up. What's the best way? i dont think you can import a wallet.dat file on blockchain.info. navigate to your bitcoin-qt app data directory and then delete the wallet in there copy the old wallet into your bitcoin app data directory open your client and send the funds to your normal wallet delete the old wallet and past back in your normal one from where ever you backed it up Rep Thread: If one can not confer upon another a right which he does not himself first possess, by what means does the state derive the right to engage in behaviors from which the public is prohibited? Continue reading >>

19 Answers - I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old Pc. How Can I Recover The Coins?

19 Answers - I Mined Bitcoin As A Lark In 2010. I Still Have The Old Pc. How Can I Recover The Coins?

I mined bitcoin as a lark in 2010. I still have the old PC. How can I recover the coins? Wow, you are really rich even if you had mined one single block :) If you were using Bitcoin core wallet to store your coins, there will be wallet.dat file in the bitcoin directory. You need to recover that. Then install Bitcoin core on your new machine, let the blockchain sync and then replace the wallet.dat in the new machine. Youll get back all your Bitcoins. Linux - go to home folder using cd. then type .bitcoin Windows - Press windows key + run, type %appdata%. You should see a bitcoin folder there As Patrick said, beware of people trying to steal your Bitcoins, they are worth a lot. I doubt youll really need anybodys help on this. The task is pretty simple IMO. and also claim your Bitcoin cash :) Depending on the format*, you can either import it directly into many different wallets**. If a certain wallet doesn't support importing private keys, it usually allows you to sweep them. ** Bitcoin core, electrum, bitcoin wallet for android (sweeping only),... For example, using electrum, you would just download and install electrum, run electrum, when presented with the wizard that is run the first time chose "Standard Wallet" => "use public or private keys" => paste your private key => you're done... In bitcoin core it would be something like Installing core => syncing core (waiting) => go to help => debug window => importprivkey yourPrivateKeyInWalletImportFormat "TheLabelThatIWant" bitcoin wallet for android (sweeping only): IIRC, there was a button that allowed you to sweep a paper wallet, you need to convert your private key into a QR code tough. If this is true and you can recover the coins you are now filthy rich. A single block back then was 50 bitcoins. If you mined just o Continue reading >>

The 9 Biggest Screwups In Bitcoin History

The 9 Biggest Screwups In Bitcoin History

The 9 Biggest Screwups in Bitcoin History Do you know where your bitcoins are right now? Hopefully theyre still in your wallet where you left them, but the history of bitcoin is littered with human error, poorly implemented software and heists that would make even the most hardened of Wild West outlaws tip their hat in respect. Bitcoin is a man-made, open-source technology not a gift handed down from the heavens.Just to drive that point home, here arethe nine biggestscrewups in bitcoin history. 9. That time someone hacked 92 billion BTCinto existence On 8th August 2010 bitcoin developer Jeff Garzik wrote what could be mildly described as the biggest understatement since Apollo 13 told Houston: "We've had a problem here." The value out in this block is quite strange, he wrote on bitcointalk.org , referring to a block that had somehow contained 92 billion BTC, which is precisely 91,979,000,000 more bitcoin than is ever supposed to exist. CVE-2010-5139 (CVE meaning common vulnerability and exposures) was frighteningly simple and exploited to the point of farce by an unknown attacker.In technical language, the bug is known as a number overflow error. So instead of the system counting up 98, 99, 100, 101, for example, it broke at 99 and went to zero (or -100) instead of 100.In laymans terms, someone found a way to flood the code and create a ridiculously large amount of bitcoin in the process. The fix was the bitcoin equivalent of dying in a video game and restarting from the last save point. The community simply hit 'undo', jumping back to the point in the blockchain before the hack occurred and starting anew from there; all of the transactions made after the bug was exploited but before the fix was implemented were effectively cancelled. How serious was it? Bitcoins lead Continue reading >>

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