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Bitcoin Brute Force Private Key

Bitcoin Wallets Under Siege From 'large Collider' Attack

Bitcoin Wallets Under Siege From 'large Collider' Attack

Bitcoin Wallets Under Siege From 'Large Collider' Attack A group called the Large Bitcoin Collider claims it can smash open bitcoin wallets by using a so-called brute force attack, which directs mass amounts of computer power at individual wallets in order to guess their private keys. The project, which has been underway for months, relies on a distributed network of computers (similar to bitcoin itself), and invites anyone to participatethose who do could potentially share in the proceeds of the wallets cracked open. A trophy list on the home page of Collider (an apparent reference to the Hadron Collider ) suggests the group has successfully opened over a dozen wallets, though only three had any bitcoin in them. Its unclear if the group is motivated by financial gain or the cryptographic challenge of smashing walletsthe answer is probably both based on the sites webpage and outside observers. A Q&A list on the Colliders website says robbing even a tiny amount from non-profit group like the Internet archive would make you an unconditional jerk. But it also suggests other wallets are fair game, and that proceeds would be divvied up among the Collider participants. Meanwhile, others think the wallet-smashing endeavor is a fools errand, according to Motherboard , which first reported on the Large Bitcoin Collider. In this view, the project is too hard and the rewards too low and infrequent (as this Reddit commenter explains ) to pay off. But some speculate the goal of the project is not to rob a whole lot of wallets, but instead to strike a mother lode from a long-lost wallet from bitcoins early days: About 10% of Bitcoins were created early, before 2012, and have never been traded. If somebody ever finds the key of the early lost Bitcoins, theyll have a huge payoff, over Continue reading >>

Cracker Tools

Cracker Tools

A tool for bruteforcing encoded strings within a boundary defined by a regular expression. It will bruteforce the key value range of 0x1 through 0x255. HTTP authentication cracker. It's a tool that launchs an online dictionary attack to test for weak or simple passwords against protected areas on an IIS Web server. An IKE/IPSec crack tool designed to perform Pre-Shared-Key analysis of RFC compliant aggressive mode authentication A free penetration testing and vulnerability discovery toolkit entirely written in python. Framework includes modules to discover hosts, gather information about, fuzz targets, brute force usernames and passwords, exploits, and a disassembler. Open Source Security tool to audit hashed passwords. A tool to perform differential fault analysis attacks (DFA). Tool to verify the usefulness of credentials across a network over SMB. A small tool designed to recover hashed known_hosts fiels back to their plain-text equivalents. A semi fast tool to bruteforce values of LDAP injections over HTTP. A brute force tool which is support sshkey, vnckey, rdp, openvpn. Lodowep is a tool for analyzing password strength of accounts on a Lotus Domino webserver system. A silly & effective MD5 cracker in Python. Password cracker based on the faster time-memory trade-off. With MySQL and Cisco PIX Algorithm patches. This program uses bruteforce algorithm to find correct password (rar, 7z, zip). A tool to perform rainbow table attacks on password hashes. It is intended for indexed/perfected rainbow tables, mainly generated by the distributed project www.freerainbowtables.com It connects to windows terminal servers - Bruteforce patch included. A null session RID cycle attack for brute forcing domain controllers. Multithreaded rlogin scanner. Tested on Linux, OpenBSD and Continue reading >>

Large Bitcoin Collider Is Generating Trillions Of Keys And Breaking Into Wallets | Hacker News

Large Bitcoin Collider Is Generating Trillions Of Keys And Breaking Into Wallets | Hacker News

About 10% of Bitcoins were created early, before 2012, and have never been traded. If somebody ever finds the key of the early lost Bitcoins, they'll have a huge payoff, over a billion dollars. Speculation is that either "Satoshi Nakamoto", whoever he is, is holding onto them for a big payoff, or somebody lost the private key for all those early Bitcoins. As the years go on, the second explanation seems more likely. Gaining access to the early wallets and bringing those Bitcoins into circulation will lead to a crash in Bitcoin value due to both increasing the supply (as in ) and decreasing confidence of other Bitcoin holders in the security of their wallets. You could extract some portion of the value if you do it slowly and pretend that Nakamoto is using his wallets, but you will not be able to extract their current market value. Not sure their what their heuristics are for narrowing the search space, but there certainly are some good ones. For instance, early versions of blockchain.info's wallet generated private keys by reading an ARC4 stream that had been seeded with Math.random() calls xor'd with timestamps. Quite the circus! I believe there was a time when blockchain.info's Android wallet generated keys from Apache's 301 redirect HTML fetched over HTTP[1]. I think there's also a lesson about idiot-proofing APIs. With the benefit of this in hindsight, I might instead return an invalid, non-HTTP response that blows up every major HTTP client internally, so that it's impossible for the API consumer code to happily truck along interpreting a non-200 response body as if it's valid random data. If this kind of attack is feasible, then maybe one should have several wallets and spread one's Bitcoin funds among these wallets, to dilute the risk. Maybe one wallet could be Continue reading >>

Private Key Hacked By Brute Force, Entire Wallet Drained

Private Key Hacked By Brute Force, Entire Wallet Drained

Private Key Hacked by brute force, Entire Wallet Drained If there becomes 100 trillion wallets in use, do you think finding a wallet with a balance will become common? Is the current private key secure enough to last 10,000+ years? Is there a way to scale up the security of the generated private keys somehow if needed someday? Sick of mining? Start minting! 5% per year! Mintcoin "MINT" Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here. Quote from: blackstone on February 09, 2017, 07:28:36 PM Private keys cant get common at all .it has a specific algorithm and it has probability to zero .it is not a bug of bitcoins wallet .it generates at a high pace with accuracy because it is a machine .and the wallet can get hacked and i dont think u can get it back because its untraceable . I don't think you understand my questions. And looking for a non-newbie to answer them. (No offense) Sick of mining? Start minting! 5% per year! Mintcoin "MINT" I just hacked this Adress in a second: 12AKRNHpFhDSBDD9rSn74VAzZSL3774PxQ Bitcoin is not a bubble, it's the pin! Use PGP! If there becomes 100 trillion wallets in use, do you think finding a wallet with a balance will become common? Is the current private key secure enough to last 10,000+ years? Is there a way to scale up the security of the generated private keys somehow if needed someday? I don't have my English to Nerd translator handy, butt is your query about the probability of bitcoin address collisions? "What are the chances of an address collision? and what happens when it does?" Did this actually happen to you? All your coins stored in one address? Or was the wallets password compromised? They have done the calculations and always shows it is Continue reading >>

Bitcoin Sha-256 Brute Force Attack : Bitcoin

Bitcoin Sha-256 Brute Force Attack : Bitcoin

Do not use URL shortening services: always submit the real link. Begging/asking for bitcoins is absolutely not allowed, no matter how badly you need the bitcoins. Only requests for donations to large, recognized charities are allowed, and only if there is good reason to believe that the person accepting bitcoins on behalf of the charity is trustworthy. News articles that do not contain the word "Bitcoin" are usually off-topic. This subreddit is not about general financial news. Submissions that are mostly about some other cryptocurrency belong elsewhere. For example, /r/CryptoCurrency is a good place to discuss all cryptocurrencies. Promotion of client software which attempts to alter the Bitcoin protocol without overwhelming consensus is not permitted. Trades should usually not be advertised here. For example, submissions like "Buying 100 BTC" or "Selling my computer for bitcoins" do not belong here. /r/Bitcoin is primarily for news and discussion. Please avoid repetition /r/bitcoin is a subreddit devoted to new information and discussion about Bitcoin and its ecosystem. New merchants are welcome to announce their services for Bitcoin, but after those have been announced they are no longer news and should not be re-posted. Aside from new merchant announcements, those interested in advertising to our audience should consider Reddit's self-serve advertising system . Do not post your Bitcoin address unless someone explicitly asks you to. Be aware that Twitter, etc. is full of impersonation. Continue reading >>

What Happens If Someone With 100,000 Bitcoinsdies?

What Happens If Someone With 100,000 Bitcoinsdies?

What Happens if Someone with 100,000 BitcoinsDies? Lets take note of the variables and constants in this scenario. Amount of Bitcoins in the network (supply) is constant since the cap is placed at 21 Million Bitcoins. Death of the person having been foretold is a constant. A person owning a set number of Bitcoin dies without revealing his private key to anyone. No one would be able to access the funds in his wallet, hence all the Bitcoins present in the deceased persons wallet cannot be used by anyone else. The value of the Bitcoin would certainly be a lot more than it was whenever the person died since the demand is the only variable in this situation and as the demand increases, the value shall definitely increase. The wallet can be accessed with a private key and a public key together which can be obtained through brute force but this process of obtaining the key would take years altogether. Rest assured, if a person dies without revealing his private key to anyone, itd take one longer than the persons lifetime to actually get the private key of the deceased person through brute force. If A intends to spend the Bitcoin from B s wallet, he needs Bs private key to sign the transaction without which he wouldnt be able to spend any Bitcoin from Bs wallet. Brute force is the only possible method by which one can actually spend the Bitcoins in the wallet by obtaining the private key and it is an extremely long process to be carried out in reality. Wallets are encrypted with AES 256 CBC encryption which havent been cracked to this date. Every person on the planet owns 10 computers. There are 7 billion people on the planet. Each of these computers can test 1 billion key combinations per second. On average, you can crack the key after testing 50% of the possibilities. Then t Continue reading >>

The Large Bitcoin Collider Is Generating Trillions Of Keys And Breaking Into Wallets

The Large Bitcoin Collider Is Generating Trillions Of Keys And Breaking Into Wallets

The Large Bitcoin Collider Is Generating Trillions of Keys and Breaking Into Wallets Update: Since we first published this article, major security flaws in the Large Bitcoin Collider client have come to light. Check out our follow-up reporting on these issues here . For nearly a year, a group of cryptography enthusiasts has been pooling their resources on a quixotic quest to brute-force crack one of bitcoin's cryptographic algorithms for creating wallet addresses. This is thought to be impossible today, but if they succeed, at least one element of bitcoin's cryptography will be instantly obsolete. It's probably due to the scope of the challenge that the project is called the Large Bitcoin Collider , after the Large Hadron Collider , the world's largest particle accelerator. But instead of new physics , the Large Bitcoin Collider is hunting cryptographic collisionsessentially proving that a supposedly unique and random string of numbers can be duplicated. More on collisions and their ramifications for bitcoin later, but along the way the LBC is using its computing power to try and bust open bitcoin wallets owned by other people, and potentially taking the coins inside. Read More: The Great Physical Bitcoin Robbery The basics are this: bitcoin addresses containing funds can be accessed by private keys, which are generated at the same time as the address. Technically, a number of private keys could work with any given address, but you'd need a huge amount of computing power to brute force your way through enough possibilities to find any of them. The LBC attempts to accomplish this by recruiting the computing power of anyone who's willing to download and run their software. Finding a private key that works with an existing wallet is a fast-and-loose version of "cracking," Continue reading >>

Mini Private Key Format

Mini Private Key Format

Comparison of QR codes of the same private key, encoded in mini private key format (left) and wallet import format (right). Both codes have the same dot density and error correction level, but the mini key is 57% of the full code's size. A minikey in a small space on a physical bitcoin This page contains sample addresses and/or private keys. Do not send bitcoins to or import any sample keys; you will lose your money. The mini private key format is a method of encoding a Bitcoin private key in as few as 30 characters for the purpose of being embedded in a small space. A private key encoded in this format is called a minikey. This private key format was designed for and first used in Casascius physical bitcoins , and is also favorable for use in QR codes. The fewer characters encoded in a QR code, the lower dot density can be used, as well as more dots allocated to error correction in the same space, significantly improving readability and resistance to damage. The mini private key format offers its own built-in check code as a small margin of protection against typos. Casascius Series 1 holograms use a 22-character variant of the minikey format, instead of 30 characters. Everything is the same other than the length. To properly implement minikey redemption, services and clients must support the 30-character format, but may optionally support the 22-character format as well to allow redemption of old Casascius coins. Use of the 22-character format for future applications is discouraged due to security considerations; the standard 30-character format should be used instead. An example key using this encoding is S6c56bnXQiBjk9m_SAMPLE_PRIVATE_KEY_DO_NOT_IMPORT_qSYE7ykVQ7NzrRy. Paper disc inserts for Casascius coins with minikeys on the obverse (top) and corresponding addre Continue reading >>

How To Steal Bitcoins

How To Steal Bitcoins

This article is also available in French here . Every Bitcoin address is based on a secret key, from which the public key (associated to a Bitcoin address) is calculated. Once you have the private key for an address,you have the control of that address and can use it to transfer funds. This secret key is a 32-bytes unsigned integer. You can generate a lot of secret keys, calculate the public keys associated to them and see if they contain bitcoins.If its the case, you can transfer the money to an address you control, because you have the secret key. Such an attack is completely infeasible, because the private key space is really, really huge. There are 115792089237316195423570985008687907853269984665640564039457584007913129639936 secret keys available (1077). Oh, and they are all listed on directory.io ! Of course, this website is kind of a joke , and all is calculated on the fly when you request a specific page.It also shows the danger of entering your secret key on an unknown website, for example to see if it was compromised... However, we can bruteforce only a tiny fraction of this space, concentrating on secret keys with some distinctive features. This is what I will explain. I have made a script that tries every secret key, counting from 1. After some seconds, I found dozens of already used addresses, with private key smaller than 100 000 ! In particular, the 1EHNa6Q4Jz2uvNExL497mE43ikXhwF6kZm address (corresponding to the private key 1) was already used quite a lot, as 4 bitcoins already flowed through it. Brainwallet is a website that allow people to create private keys from a passphrase. It calculates the private key from the sha256 of the passphrase. By using a password dictionary, we can search for private keys corresponding to classic password that were alre Continue reading >>

Security - Is It Possible To Brute Force Bitcoin Address Creation In Order To Steal Money? - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

Security - Is It Possible To Brute Force Bitcoin Address Creation In Order To Steal Money? - Bitcoin Stack Exchange

Is it possible to brute force bitcoin address creation in order to steal money? Bitcoin users frequently generate new addresses for each transaction they make, which greatly increases the number of bitcoin addresses being used to receive money. Would it be possible (and profitable) for someone to find collisions in the bitcoin address space in order to steal money? To give you an idea of the numbers involved: There are 1,921,075 different addresses in the block chain. That's less than 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000001 % of all the addresses that can be generated. Artefact2 Aug 30 '11 at 21:42 @Artefact2 Yes, there is currently 2m different addresses. If we want BitCoin to scale to 7b, 8b, 9b, or 10b people, each generating 10k different addresses a day, that's 100 trillion addresses created daily. Pacerier Jun 18 '12 at 3:44 @Pacerier Why would every user need 10k different addresses per day? Murch Mar 28 '14 at 1:37 @Murch, 10k may be a severe underestimation. In any case, now is not the best time to answer that question, for the same reason 4 decades ago wasn't the best time to answer "Why will we run out of IP addresses?" Pacerier Mar 29 '14 at 1:03 @Pacerier: That is an interesting statement, but I am more interested in why you expect that to happen than what the exact figure might be in the end. ;) I've opened a new question for it here: Why would we ever need 10k new addresses in average per day? Murch Mar 29 '14 at 19:32 It may be "theoretically" possible, but in reality it's unlikely to be achieved - As in counting the number of atoms in an office building unlikely. Bitcoin addresses are actually the 256-bit SHA hash of an ECDSA public key, so any vulnerabilities in those algorithms would constitute a vulnerability in bitcoin itself. Realistically, howe Continue reading >>

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know About Private Keys

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know About Private Keys

Six Things Bitcoin Users Should Know about Private Keys Private keys have been an integral component of Bitcoin since its first description in 2008. Wallet software often attempts to shield users from the need to understand what private keys are and how they work. Even so, most users eventually come face to face with private keys, too often with unpleasant results. A basic understanding of private keys can help prevent loss of funds and other mishaps, but it can also offer useful insights into how Bitcoin works. This guide outlines the most important private key concepts for using Bitcoin effectively. Although Bitcoin is best known as an electronic cash system , underneath it all runs a secure messaging system built on the Internet. Instead of relaying emails, texts, or web pages, the Bitcoin network processes value-transfer messages called transactions. Private keys play a central role in authenticating these messages and allowing users to identify each other. An example helps illustrate the problems that private keys solve. Imagine Alice wants to pay Bob using a coin with a face value of 1. Her plan is to create a transaction identifying Bob as the payee. After doing so, Alice plans to publish the transaction to the Bitcoin network. In using this system, Alice faces two fundamental problems: Alice needs a way to identify both herself and Bob in the transaction. She cant employ a trusted authority such as a government registry or email provider because that would create a central point of control and failure the very thing Bitcoin was created to eliminate. Alice needs a way to prevent others from changing her transaction and forging transactions in her name. Bitcoin solves both problems through a system called public key cryptography . This system uses two pieces of i Continue reading >>

Meet The Man Who Will Hack Your Long-lost Bitcoin Wallet For Money - Coindesk

Meet The Man Who Will Hack Your Long-lost Bitcoin Wallet For Money - Coindesk

Meet the Man Who Will Hack Your Long-Lost Bitcoin Wallet for Money For Dave Bitcoin, the alias of the software architect that hacks peoples cryptocurrrency passwords, the price surge of Ethereums blockchain token ether has generated a significant amount of work; work that wouldnt have been steered his way without his focus on developing trust. And just to be clear, Dave Bitcoin hacks peoples passwords with their permission. He runs the website Wallet Recovery Services , which recovers peoples lost or forgotten passwords by brute force decryption that is, using a computer program to try millions of passwords in a short amount of time. He provides the service for bitcoin, litecoin and most other alternative cryptocurrency wallets, and in December, he began decrypting Ethereum pre-sale wallets. "I love a challenge," said Dave Bitcoin, whos pseudonym remains from the days when it was unclear if cryptocurrency was legal. "Initially, back in mid-2013, I just wanted to understand the cryptography used by bitcoin and the formats of encryption in the wallets. I realized that I was able to potentially help people who have forgotten their wallet passwords, and it grew from there." Dave Bitcoin has worked with more than 1,000 people since he launched the service, most in need of password recovery but a few that wanted deleted wallet files recovered. His success rate is about 30%, but its a rate that varies drastically based on how much information a client gives. Since January, Dave Bitcoin's Ethereum business has exploded, coinciding with the 1000% price increase. Today, about 50% of his business is decrypting Ethereum wallets, 40% is bitcoin related and the remaining 10% is recovering altcoin wallets, like litecoin or dogecoin. Dave Bitcoin charges 20% of the amount in the walle Continue reading >>

Nullcon Hackim Crypto 1 Writeup

Nullcon Hackim Crypto 1 Writeup

This weekend was nullcon HackIM CTF and I wanted to post my writeup for the Crypto 1 challenge, because I found it particularly interesting. Although crypto challenges aren't usually my favorite category, I often find them to be quite interesting and a good way to learn something new. This particular challenge caught my attention, because it was about bitcoins: From looking at the picture we learn that: We have a public bitcoin address in the QRcode It has a hint which does not make sense yet The first step I did was to extract the QRcode from the screenshot and use an online QRcode reader to the get public key: But then I was confused how the partial password should reveal the private key or if we're supposed to brute-force the private key for the given public key. The latter, however, wouldn't make sense, because otherwise bitcoin would be broken. After a bit of googling we learn that a brainwallet's private key is the sha256 of the password : That means we only have to find the correct password (the letters behind the red bar) to restore the private key and solve the challenge! I've found a repo on GitHub which automatically brute-forces brainwallets and looks if there are unspent bitcoins on them. Make sure to have a long long long unique brainwallet password otherwise your bitcoins might get stolen! For my solution I've adapted their Wallet-class because it takes care of the password-to-publickey computation and the final idea was to generate possible password combinations until the resulting public key matches our bitcoin address. This is the point where the hint became helpful. I first started the brute-force with combinations of length 1-7 with a charset made of all characters of scrambled egg and nullcon8itsgr8. After a while my teammate Alex suggested to only Continue reading >>

I Forgot My Pin: An Epic Tale Of Losing $30,000 In Bitcoin

I Forgot My Pin: An Epic Tale Of Losing $30,000 In Bitcoin

I Forgot My PIN: An Epic Tale of Losing $30,000 in Bitcoin I Forgot My PIN: An Epic Tale of Losing $30,000 in Bitcoin The Trezor: January 4, 2016: 7.4 BTC = $3,000 In January 2016, I spent $3,000 to buy 7.4 bitcoins. At the time, it seemed an entirely worthwhile thing to do. I had recently started working as a research director at the Institute for the Futures Blockchain Futures Lab, and I wanted firsthand experience with bitcoin, a cryptocurrency that uses a blockchain to record transactions on its network. I had no way of knowing that this transaction would lead to a white-knuckle scramble to avoid losing a small fortune. My experiments with bitcoin were fascinating. It was surprisingly easy to buy stuff with the cryptocurrency. I used the airBitz app to buy Starbucks credit. I used Purse.io to buy a wireless security camera doorbell from Amazon. I used bitcoin at Meltdown Comics in Los Angeles to buy graphic novels. By November, bitcoins value had nearly doubled since January and was continuing to increase almost daily. My cryptocurrency stash was starting to turn into some real money. Id been keeping my bitcoin keys on a web-based wallet, but I wanted to move them to a more secure place. Many online bitcoin services retain their customers private bitcoin keys, which means the accounts are vulnerable to hackers and fraudsters (remember the time Mt. Gox lost 850,000 bitcoins from its customers accounts in 2014?) or governments (like the time BTC-e, a Russian bitcoin exchange, had its domain seized by US District Court for New Jersey in August, freezing the assets of its users). I interviewed a handful of bitcoin experts, and they all told me that that safest way to protect your cache was to use something called a hardware wallet. This little device is basically a glo Continue reading >>

Lets Enhance! How We Found @rogerkvers $1,000 Wallet Obfuscated Privatekey

Lets Enhance! How We Found @rogerkvers $1,000 Wallet Obfuscated Privatekey

Lets Enhance! How we found @rogerkvers $1,000 wallet obfuscated privatekey Part of the documentary where Roger Ver gives the details of the Bitcoin wallet. Before we even start: We do not know the journalists who recorded the interview and we do not know Roger Ver. Anyone who had access to this video could have retrieved the private key. We could have simply named this post How great QR code are and how we recovered one from almost nothing. But its much more interesting when the QR code is the key to a $1000 Bitcoin Cash wallet. Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Dash, Neo Cryptocurrencies are all over and are moving fast. I have been following Bitcoin since 2013 (following doesnt mean buying), had to read Mastering Bitcoin 3 times to understand how each part of it really works and be able to explain it to someone else. Still, I cant keep up with the market, new cryptocurrencies, new forks, new ICOs everywhere, every day. Its easy to start using cryptocurrencies by following a tutorial online. Download a random wallet app, generate a random pair of keys and buy some crypto on a random exchange but the cryptocurrencies learning curve is difficult. If you dont fully understand how all parts of this work you should avoid cryptocurrencies. If you dont, you risk losing your money by falling in one of the many pitfalls. One of them, keeping your private key secure, is the subject of this post. The first rule of Crypto Club is: You do not share your privatekey. The most precious thing you have when you own cryptocurrencies is your private key. If you lose your private key, you lose your money. If someone gets access to your private key, you lose your money. Simple. With this real-world example will show you step by step how we recovered the private key of the $1000 Bitcoin wallet c Continue reading >>

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