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Azure Ethereum Tutorial

How To Build A Private Ethereum Blockchain

How To Build A Private Ethereum Blockchain

Step 5: Create an account to use as the coinbase for your blockchain node An Ethereum account is the public key that stores ether that will be used in your private blockchain to pay for gas fees. Before we start the blockchain, we need to create an account that the mining rewards will be deposited too. You will be prompted to set a password for the account, DONT FORGET YOUR PASSWORD, you will not be able to recover it later and wont be able to spend the ether you mine or unlock that account. After entering the password twice, you should expect to get a response back like this: Address: {941f1f0b08757457be0b52d83a1e3e566473ed61} This is the public key of the Ethereum account. Ethereum convention is to prefix accounts with 0x so the account is sometimes seen as 0x941f1fobo8757457be0b52d83a1e3e566473ed61. Step 6: Create JSON File for Genesis Block to Bootstrap Private Blockchain Using a text editor, create a file CustomGenesis.json with the following contents: Step 7: Initialize the blockchain from your CustomGenesis.json file go-ethereum/build/bin/geth init ./CustomGenesis.json You should expect to see output similar to this: INFO[0223|20:20:03] Allotted 128MB cache and 1024 file handles to /home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] closed db:/home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] Allotted 128MB cache and 1024 file handles to /home/ubuntu/.ethereum/geth/chaindata INFO[0223|20:20:04] successfully wrote genesis block and/or chain rule set: 5dd3be94dcbf5216aaa3e82700fb51a831257df5d45d984941a0a32ee0f960d8 Congratulations! You have initialized a private Ethereum blockchain!! Before we move on, lets take a break for some optional exploration of the files we have generated. In your home directory you will now see a hidden directory called.ether Continue reading >>

Why Microsoft Wants 'every Blockchain' On Its Azure Platform

Why Microsoft Wants 'every Blockchain' On Its Azure Platform

Why Microsoft Wants 'Every Blockchain' on its Azure Platform Feb 9, 2016 at 11:17 UTC|UpdatedFeb 10, 2016 at 17:40 UTC While Microsoft tested the waters with bitcoinat the tail end of 2014, the tech giant appears poised to be a far bigger player in the burgeoning market for solutions that harness its underlying blockchain technology. Since opening its Azure cloud computing platform to the ecosystem this October , Microsoft has added a steady stream of partners to its blockchain-as-a-service (BaaS) solution-a product styled as a kind of 'sandbox' where partners can interact with different technologies, from smart contracts to blockchain-based tax reporting services, in a low-risk environment. Far from starting with the biggest, venture capital-backed players, however, Microsoft has so far turned heads with its frequent, and oftenunpredictable, partnership announcements for the service. For example, in October, Microsoft chose to debut its BaaS service not with later partners like $32m bitcoin startup BitPay or recordkeeping service Factom (infamous for its now stalled but well-publicized " partnership "with Honduras), but with a then-relatively unknown distributed applications company called ConsenSys. Since then, Microsoft has backed efforts on all manner of blockchain services, from long-standing altcoin projects with novel blockchains (Emercoin) to 'build-your-own' blockchain solution providers ( MultiChain ). However, according to Microsoft's director of technology strategy, Marley Gray, there won't be any shortage of new blockchain players added to its Azure platform, given that it is designed for development and testing. "We want, and frankly our customers want, access to every blockchain. It could be two guys in a garage that forked bitcoin and had this genius id Continue reading >>

Ethereum Mining In Azure

Ethereum Mining In Azure

Update: posted a new blog about optimizing your miner here . Update 2: I have reports that this is being actively blocked by Azure. This was always intended for testing purposes not for actual production mining Lately my colleagues have gone wild over this 'better than Blockchain' crypto currency named Ethereum (Ether). So here are my findings on how you can mine it in Azure. Like Bitcoin Ethereum is a crypto currency. This means you can make secure payments to anyone in the world, without a centralized bank to process the payment. Because there is no single point of failure and the encrypted nature of the transactions this is a very secure form of payment. Ethereum is not only a public crypto currency, it is also offers you the possibility to create your own private chain. This makes it possible to easily make a secure and trustable system of transactions with your own group of people / entities. It is way more than a currency. Ethereum allows you to write Smart Contract. These contracts can describe anything from a voting system or auction system to a custom payment model. Because each transaction is stored in the public or private chain, these can not be altered later. A cool Azure feature since the beginning of late 2016 is GPU Virtual Machines, these offer both M60 and K80 NVIDIA GPU's. Since that moment I have always wanted to use it but never got to it until now. So, let's get started. As OS I am using Ubuntu 16.04, because this OS does not have the proper drivers for GPU mining. We need to install these - check the Microsoft docs here for the latest commands to setup the drivers. After installing let's install the mining software like this: #Add the ethereum repository and update apt-getsudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository ppa: Continue reading >>

Create A Private #ethereum #consortium #blockchain In#azure

Create A Private #ethereum #consortium #blockchain In#azure

Create a private #Ethereum #Consortium #Blockchain in#Azure Private Blockchain network template inAzure In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to create a private Ethereum Consortium Blockchain network in Azure using one of the Azure Marketplace templates. To begin the process, login to Azure portal and click on the + icon on top left corner. Then in the search box, type in blockchain and it will show you all the available templates with this name, and select the one called: Ethereum Consortium Blockchain by published Microsoft. Ethereum Blockchain template from Azure Marketplace Now, on the right side (following picture), you will see a description of the template and a nice picture of the components it is going to deploy for us. Ethereum Blockchain Template in Azure Marketplace description The following picture shows, what this template is going to deploy and how these component are connected to each other. Note that this is the current template definition and obviously it might change in the future by Microsoft. The Ethereum template will create this network inAzure First tab is Basic which you provide the Resource Group name, Location and the name and password for the VMs that are being provisioned. Resource Groups and VM user name password for the Ethereumnetwork The second tab, is about selecting the size and the plan of the VMs that are being created. For more details around the prices and configuration of each VM instance you can check the Azure portal . VM Size and Service plan selection for the EthereumNetwork The third tab, is about the Ehereum network settings. Each Ethereum network has its own Network ID, with 1 being the ID for the public network. While we have restricted network access for mining nodes, we still recommend using a large number to prevent col Continue reading >>

Deploying A Private Ethereum Blockchain On Azure And A Raspberry Pi

Deploying A Private Ethereum Blockchain On Azure And A Raspberry Pi

n. [from Greek nepho-, cloud] someone who goes above the clouds. Deploying a private Ethereum blockchain on Azure and a Raspberry Pi As part of exploring the blockchain technology, and specifically the Ethereum ecosystem, I have settled on an IoT-related use case around solar energy grids. You can read more background in the first article in this series . In this post, I am going to focus on building a small private blockchain that I will later use to deploy Smart Contracts and build my solar energy marketplace demo on. I am going to use an Azure virtual machine to start a reasonably powerful mining node, and a Raspberry Pi 3 to simulate an on-premises equipment running a lighter, non-mining node, but which can still be involved in blockchain transactions. We will be using geth , the Go Ethereum client, to set up our cluster. Since the blockchain is basically a peer-to-peer network, geth is used both as a client and a server connecting to the blockchain. The installation procedures are fairly straightforward, I will be going through all the steps in the next few paragraphs. You can start from one of the Azure DevTest Labs VM templates for Ethereum-Go, or you can install it from scratch on a base Ubuntu VM. In this documentation I will be starting from a blank VM, just because I want to understand how all the bits and pieces fit together. You can follow the official Ethereum installation instructions to install geth on your Ubuntu VM. I would recommend using the latest stable version, i.e. do not add the ethereum-dev repository. sudo apt-get install software-properties-commonsudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereumsudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install ethereum You can choose pretty much any size of Azure VM you would like, but since it is going to be mining (i Continue reading >>

Getting Started With Azure Ethereum Consortium Blockchain

Getting Started With Azure Ethereum Consortium Blockchain

Getting started With Azure Ethereum Consortium Blockchain Azure started supporting a number of distributed ledger technologies that fulfill business requirements in security domains and much more. Azure has started Blockchain as a Service (BaaS). It will emerge as a platform for rapidly creating applications on cloud technologies. Azure has come up with many blockchain solutions, like Ethereum Consortium, STRATO Blockchain LTS, Emercoin Blockchain etc. In this article, we are going to discuss Ethereum Consortium Blockchain template solution by Azure. The template will be used to deploy and configure a private Consortium Ethereum Network quickly. To create blockchain network, go to the Azure portal and log in with your Admin account. Click + New on the home page. Search for Ethereum Consortium Blockchain. Select the template, then click Create. It will open "Basics" bladewith input parameters as follows. After filling all the parameters, click OK. Resource Prefix: Prefix for naming the deployed resources.(1 to 6 characters long) VM user name: Administrator of all virtual machines created.It is also used while creating the Ethereum account.(1 to 64 characters long) Authentication type: The method to authenticate to the virtual machine username/password or username/ssh key.(Password or SSH public key) Password: The password for the administrator account.(12 to 72 characters long) After clicking on OK, it will open Network size and performance blade with input parameters as follows. After filling all the parameters, click OK. The number of mining members in the network. Subnet will be formed for each mining member. (2 to 12 members) The number of mining nodes deployed per member.Total mining nodes = Members * Nodes Per Member. (1 to 15 nodes/member) The storage replication Continue reading >>

Create A Hello World Contract In Ethereum

Create A Hello World Contract In Ethereum

Building a smart contract using the command line This page will help you build a Hello, World contract on the ethereum command line. If you don't know how to use the command line we recommend you skip this tutorial and instead build a Custom token using the graphical user interface . Smart contracts are account holding objects on the ethereum blockchain. They contain code functions and can interact with other contracts, make decisions, store data, and send ether to others. Contracts are defined by their creators, but their execution, and by extension the services they offer, is provided by the ethereum network itself. They will exist and be executable as long as the whole network exists, and will only disappear if they were programmed to self destruct. What can you do with contracts? Well, you can do almost anything really, but for our getting started guide let's do some simple things: To start you will create a classic "Hello World" contract, then you can build your own crypto token to send to whomever you like. Once you've mastered that then you will raise funds through a crowdfunding that, if successful, will supply a radically transparent and democratic organization that will only obey its own citizens, will never swerve away from its constitution and cannot be censored or shut down. And all that in less than 300 lines of code. Before you begin: Install the Ethereum CLI Learn more about contracts Please confirm that the GUI is closed before entering the geth console.Run geth to begin the sync process (this may take a while on the first run). Now that youve mastered the basics of Ethereum, lets move into your first serious contract. The Frontier is a big open territory and sometimes you might feel lonely, so our first order of business will be to create a little aut Continue reading >>

Deploying Smart Contracts To An Azure Blockchain Usingtruffle

Deploying Smart Contracts To An Azure Blockchain Usingtruffle

Deploying Smart Contracts To An Azure Blockchain UsingTruffle In this tutorial, Ill talk about how to migrate Solidity smart contracts to your own personal blockchain. Ill be using the standard MetaCoin contract that comes included when creating a new Truffle project. If you haven't already, make sure you complete the Deploying An Ethereum Consortium Blockchain on Azure tutorial first, as it goes over creating an Ethereum network and logging in with Geth. Well be using the Truffle Framework to migrate our smart contracts onto Azure. Make sure you have Node installed, and run: This initializes a Truffle project within the truffleProject folder. If we open our folder, well see folders for contracts, migrations, and test, along with a truffle.js file. The truffle.js file contains the information for deploying smart contracts onto a blockchain network. Currently, the configuration is set so that contracts are deployed to a local network, for use with testrpc. We need to add the endpoints for connecting to our Ethereum network on Azure. Default settings: deploys to testrpcnetwork In Azure, go to your deployment configuration screen and grab the ADMIN-SITE and ETHEREUMNETWORKID fields. (If you need help finding this screen, see the previous tutorial.) Now, in the truffle.js file, add a new network: You can name it whatever you want. In my case, I named it azureNetwork, and added the host from the ADMIN-SITE output and the network ID from the ETHEREUMNETWORKID field. Were almost ready to deploy. Theres just one more step: we need to unlock our Ethereum account. By default, accounts in Geth are locked, meaning that sending transactions is not allowed. Creating a smart contract on the blockchain is a transaction and requires gas, and so we need to unlock our default account. Lo Continue reading >>

Introduction To Nethereum Blockchain In Dotnetcore

Introduction To Nethereum Blockchain In Dotnetcore

This article describes the process of using a blockchain platform like Ethereum in dotNet core. The target audience are other dotNet developers who want to start with Ethereum. Understanding of blockchain is needed. In this article we construct a full example that allows you to interact with a custom written smart contract. The first era of blockchain can be viewed as Bitcoin only and no smart contracts. Nevertheless, the second era of blockchain is showing to be more promising. With more blockchain platforms besides Bitcoin, its showing more mature and blockchains have more possibilities. The Ethereum blockchain is more a distributed ledger with smart contracts which uses a crypto currency. The focus of Ethereum is more on the smart contract part, then on crypto currency. The purpose of Ether (Ethereums crypto currency) is to give pay for executing transactions which can be mining contracts or executing contracts. A smart contract is a piece of code written for the Ethereum Virtual Machine. This can be written in Solidity and compiled to byte code. This byte code is put in the ledger and becomes immutable but still can be interacted with, and can have changing states. As Ethereum documentation puts it From a practical standpoint, the EVM can be thought of as a large decentralized computer containing millions of objects, called "accounts", which have the ability to maintain an internal database, execute code and talk to each other. From a developer standpoint, you can view Solidity as a Javascript like language, which is a bit limited. Since the Solidity code runs in a blockchain there are good reasons for it to be so limited. Something simple as random numbers are a bit of a challenge. Also getting data with a Http call isnt possible because the truth needs to lie in Continue reading >>

Blockchain As A Service: Microsoft Azure Runs Blockapps And Ether.camp

Blockchain As A Service: Microsoft Azure Runs Blockapps And Ether.camp

Blockchain As A Service: Microsoft Azure Runs BlockApps And Ether.camp Arguably one of the most eagerly awaited talks during the Ethereum'sDevCon conference in London was that of Marley Gray from Microsoft. Arguably one of the most eagerly awaited talks during the Ethereum's Devcon1 conference in London was that of Marley Gray from Microsoft. Shortly before Devcon1 the community was surprised with the announcement that IT giant Microsoft had entered into a partnership with Ethereum-focused company Consensys and would sponsor Devcon1. What would this mean for Ethereum as a technology, the thriving community and the possibilities to build on it? Aron van Ammers, Chief Technology Officer and Founder of BlockStars.io , a participant of Ethereum's DevCon1, gave Cointelegraph his exclusive insight into the news. We publish it as it is. The offering on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform, now publicly announced , allows for easily running Ethereum nodes with the BlockApps stack on any of the geographic areas of Azure. Victor Wong and Ryan Reich of BlockApps further explained how their application stack can be used to build Ethereum DApps. Also, Roman Mandeleil of Ether.Camp demonstrated their in-browser development environment for DApps which can deploy straight to Azure. This means that Blockchain-as-a-Service or Baas, a term coined by William Mougayar earlier this year , is now a thing. Important to realize is that Ethereum nodes running on cloud providers like Azure can be used for connecting to both the public Ethereum blockchain or creating a private, permissioned blockchain. Also important to note is that it was already possible to run Ethereum nodes on any cloud provider. The Microsoft partnership allows to do this with far less effort and lowers the barrier for new dev Continue reading >>

Getting Started With Ethereum Tutorials On Azure

Getting Started With Ethereum Tutorials On Azure

On Ethereum.org are some tutorials (e.g. ) to get started with Ethereum. If you want to try them using the Ethereum templates in Azure you may find some blockers going through the tutorials. This blog post should get you started so far with your private Ethereum Blockchain that you can proceed with the tutorials you find in the web. In Azure you are able to create several private Blockchains using ARM (Azure Resource Manager) templates . This way you save time to deploy and configure small or large Blockchain networks. Those private Blockchains come very handy for developing and testing smart contracts in Blockchains. I was not able to follow standard tutorials for creating Smart Contract like those available on ethereum.org. My issues belonged to three groups: using the GUI of Mist to create a new account using the GUI of Mist to deploy a contract using geth interactively to manage accounts Starting mist connecting to my private Ethereum Blockchain. mist --rpc If you want to create a new account via the GUI the new account does not get created. In the log of the console you get the following error: [2017-07-12 09:15:50.882] [ERROR] ipcProviderBackend - Send request failed { code: -32601,message: 'The method personal_newAccount does not exist/is not available' } If you want to deploy a contract to your private Ethereum Blockchain you get the following error. [2017-07-12 09:21:39.468] [INFO] (ui: popupWindow) - Choosen Gas: 0x1197e9 1153001[2017-07-12 09:21:39.477] [ERROR] ipcProviderBackend - Send request failed { code: -32601,message: 'The method personal_sendTransaction does not exist/is not available' }[2017-07-12 09:21:48.936] [ERROR] ipcProviderBackend - Send request failed { code: -32602,message: 'invalid argument 0: missing 0x prefix for hex data' } Using geth t Continue reading >>

Azure Ethereum Tutorial

Azure Ethereum Tutorial

Suchergebnisse fr azure ethereum tutorial 12.07.2017 On Ethereum.org are some tutorials (e.g. to get started with Ethereum. If you Aus:01.08.2016 Getting Started with Blockchain as a Service using Microsoft Azure ... hosted on Azure see the following tutorial which ... for Ethereum ... Aus:09.11.2015 Microsoft and ConsenSys are partnering to offer Ethereum Blockchain as a Service (EBaaS) on Microsoft Azure so Enterprise clients and developers ... Aus:In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to create a private Ethereum Consortium Blockchain network in Azure using one of the Azure Marketplace templates. Then ... Aus:Azure started supporting a number of distributed ledger technologies that fulfill business requirements in security domains and many more. Azure has ... Aus:23.09.2016 Deploying a private Ethereum blockchain to Microsoft Azure ... well as the configuration of Go Ethereum ... Blockchain Tutorials 9,649 ... Aus:This Microsoft Azure template deploys a single Ethereum client with a private chain for development and testing. Once your deployment is complete you will ... Aus: Continue reading >>

Go Ethereum - How To Connect Mist To The Private Blockchain On Remote Server (azure)? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

Go Ethereum - How To Connect Mist To The Private Blockchain On Remote Server (azure)? - Ethereum Stack Exchange

How to connect Mist to the private blockchain on remote server (Azure)? I've installed Mist on my local PC (Windows 10), but I don't want to sync Main/Test networks. So I've used this Ethereum + Azure tutorial and now I can work via SSH on my private network. More than that, I know that it's possible to run Mist on custom blockchain using special flag So, according to geth --help, I'm running geth --dev --rpc console on Azure's virtual machine, after that I'm running mist.exe --rpc and there is an error: [2016-09-24 18:01:21.928] [INFO] Sockets/node-ipc - Connect to {"hostPort":"18:01:24.968] [ERROR] Sockets/node-ipc - Connection failed (3000ms elapsed)[2016-09-24 18:01:24.971] [WARN] EthereumNode - Failed to connect to node. Maybe it's not running so let's start our own...[2016-09-24 18:01:24.979] [INFO] EthereumNode - Node type: geth[2016-09-24 18:01:24.982] [INFO] EthereumNode - Network: test[2016-09-24 18:01:24.983] [INFO] EthereumNode - Start node: geth test[2016-09-24 18:01:32.284] [INFO] EthereumNode - 3000ms elapsed, assuming node started up successfully[2016-09-24 18:01:32.286] [INFO] EthereumNode - Started node successfully: geth test[2016-09-24 18:01:32.327] [INFO] Sockets/node-ipc - Connect to {"hostPort":"18:02:02.332] [ERROR] Sockets/node-ipc - Connection failed (30000ms elapsed)[2016-09-24 18:02:02.333] [ERROR] EthereumNode - Failed to connect to node Error: Unable to connect to socket: timeout Continue reading >>

Introduction To Smart Contracts

Introduction To Smart Contracts

Let us begin with the most basic example. It is fine if you do not understand everythingright now, we will go into more detail later. pragma solidity ^0.4.0;contract SimpleStorage { uint storedData; function set(uint x) public { storedData = x; } function get() public constant returns (uint) { return storedData; }} The first line simply tells that the source code is written forSolidity version 0.4.0 or anything newer that does not break functionality(up to, but not including, version 0.5.0). This is to ensure that thecontract does not suddenly behave differently with a new compiler version. The keyword pragma is called that way because, in general,pragmas are instructions for the compiler about how to treat thesource code (e.g. pragma once ). A contract in the sense of Solidity is a collection of code (its functions) anddata (its state) that resides at a specific address on the Ethereumblockchain. The line uint storedData; declares a state variable called storedData oftype uint (unsigned integer of 256 bits). You can think of it as a single slotin a database that can be queried and altered by calling functions of thecode that manages the database. In the case of Ethereum, this is always the owningcontract. And in this case, the functions set and get can be used to modifyor retrieve the value of the variable. To access a state variable, you do not need the prefix this. as is common inother languages. This contract does not do much yet (due to the infrastructurebuilt by Ethereum) apart from allowing anyone to store a single number that is accessible byanyone in the world without a (feasible) way to prevent you from publishingthis number. Of course, anyone could just call set again with a different valueand overwrite your number, but the number will still be stored in the Continue reading >>

Ethereum Devops With Truffle, Testrpc & Visual Studio Team Services | Truffle Suite

Ethereum Devops With Truffle, Testrpc & Visual Studio Team Services | Truffle Suite

Ethereum DevOps with Truffle, TestRPC & Visual Studio Team Services Update: Since this tutorial was published, we have released Ganache a personal blockchain and a replacement to the TestRPC. We have left this tutorial unaltered, but we highly recommend checking out our Working with Ganache page. This post was originally published by David Burela on his blog Burela's House-o-blog . Big thanks to David for allowing us publish it here! I have been working on automating the compilation and testing of Ethereum solidity contracts, via the use of Truffle . Ive got the test results being published back into the portal, allowing me to see on each commit if my code still compiles and passes my tests. Im assuming you already have a Truffle project locally that you want to automate the continuous builds & testing on. Follow the tutorial on installing Truffle & TestRPC on Windows . My final system will allow you to run truffle test locally to see standard test output, but will modify the test runner on the server to output it as JUnit format. The system uses the Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) build engine to automate this. You can sign up for free, and get unlimited private Git repos. You can have the code hosted on any Git provider. So either within VSTS itself, or GitHub, BitBucket, etc. A pre-step is to define the test section in the truffle.js file mocha: { reporter: spec, reporterOptions: { mochaFile: junitresults.xml } } VSTS does provide hosted build agents, which are generic and can build standard .Net projects, Xamarin, etc. But because we are going to use npm packages installed globally on the box to handle the Truffle builds Create a new Windows VM (Can be your own hosted server, or Azure). $ choco install git -y$ choco install nodejs.install y Install npm packages Continue reading >>

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